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PeaceHealth chaplains offer Services of Remembrance - 09/25/20

PeaceHealth chaplains will offer two “Services of Remembrance” in October to provide comfort for all families in southwest Washington who are grieving the loss of a child. “This is a time to remember the little ones, to support their families and any families who have experienced the death of a child,” said Susan Lanford, M.Div, Director of Mission and Volunteer Services for PeaceHealth's Columbia Network.

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center chaplains will hold a Service of Remembrance for Clark County area families on Saturday Oct. 10th at 10 a.m. at Evergreen Memorial Gardens, located at 1101 NE 112th Avenue in Vancouver, in the Little Angels Memorial Garden. The Vancouver service is provided by PeaceHealth Southwest Spiritual Care Services, the PeaceHealth Southwest Family Birth Center, PeaceHealth Hope Bereavement Services, and Evergreen Memorial Gardens. For more information, contact PeaceHealth Southwest Spiritual Care at (360) 514-2257.

PeaceHealth St. John Medican Center chaplains will hold a second Service of Remembrance for Cowlitz County area families on Wednesday, Oct. 14 at 11 a.m. at Longview Memorial Park, located at 5050 Mt. Solo Road in Longview, WA. The Longview service is provided by PeaceHealth St. John Spiritual Care Services, PeaceHealth St. John’s Birth Center, and Longview Memorial Park. For more information please contact PeaceHealth Spiritual Care at (360) 414-7575.

PeaceHealth offers classes to prevent Type 2 diabetes - 09/16/20

One out of three American adults has prediabetes and most of them don’t know it. Prediabetes can lead to Type 2 diabetes. Without making lifestyle changes, many people with prediabetes can develop type 2 diabetes within five years.

PeaceHealth's  "Prevent T2 Diabetes" lifestyle change program can help participants make lasting changes to prevent type 2 diabetes. With just modest lifestyle changes, participants can cut the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than half.

The "Prevent T2 Diabetes" program is offered at PeaceHealth's Specialty Clinic in Salmon Creek, located at 2312 NE 129th Street in Vancouver, WA 98686. "Prevent T2 Diabetes" is part of the National Diabetes Prevention Program, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Classes start Sept. 30, 2020, with meetings on Wednesdays from 1 – 2 p.m. Participants will learn to:

  • Eat healthy
  • Add physical activity to lifestyle
  • Manage stress
  • Stay on track when eating out
  • Stay motivated
  • Solve problems that get in the way of healthy habits

Important: Due to COVID-19 safety guidelines, all interested participants must pre-enroll; we are unable to accept walk-ins. There are also some eligibility requirements and a fee for the class, which varies based on individual insurance coverage.

For more information or to register, call Kate at 360-546-8049. For more information about diabetes prevention visit  www.peacehealth.org/southwest/services/diabetes-endocrine

 

 

Free Breast Health Screenings at PeaceHealth Kearney Breast Center - 09/16/20

The Kearney Breast Center at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, WA will host two free breast health screening events for uninsured women on Saturday, Oct. 17 and Saturday, Oct. 24 from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Kearney Breast Center is located on the PeaceHealth Southwest campus at 200 NE Mother Joseph Place, Suite 420. Annual mammograms are key to the early detection of breast cancer.

To protect attendees and staff, COVID-19 safety guidelines are in place. All interested participants must pre-enroll and have a scheduled appointment. This year no unscheduled walk-in appointments can be accommodated. To register or learn about eligibility requirements, call 360-514-1663 (choose option 1 or 2). Interpreters will be available. For language assistance, call 1-888-202-3301.

The Kearney Breast Center team is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the free screening event, in collaboration with the Breast, Cervical and Colon Health Program, which serves the uninsured and underinsured population across southwest Washington. For additional information visit www.peacehealth.org/southwest/kearney-breast-center.

About Kearney Breast Center
The Kearney Breast Center team takes a personal approach to caring for each patient, by providing advanced imaging technology, exceptional diagnostic capabilities, compassionate services, prompt results reporting, and the convenience of a comprehensive breast center all under one roof.

About BCCHP
The Breast and Cervical Health Program (BCCHP) provides breast and cervical cancer screenings. The best protection is early detection. Don’t let a lack of insurance or money stand in your way of valuable cancer screenings that can save your life. This program provides free breast exams, cervical exams, HPV and pap smear tests to eligible women.

 

How to breathe easier in wildfire smoke - 09/14/20

With wildfires creating smoky conditions, it’s important to take extra steps to protect your health. Wildfire smoke can irritate your eyes, nose, throat and lungs. It can make it hard to breathe and cause you to cough or wheeze. Children, pregnant women and people with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart disease especially need to reduce their exposure to wildfire smoke.

PeaceHealth offers the following steps you to protect your health for the duration of our hazardous air quality event.

  • Pay attention to air quality. As air quality worsens, the possibility of negative health effects increases. You can track air quality in your area through websites such Oregon Smoke Blog and AirNow.
  • Stay indoors and keep doors and windows closed. You can use wet cloths to plug up any cracks where smoke may seep through. If the smoke is especially bad or if you have a large home, choose one room in your home to set up as a clean room.
  • Keep the indoor air clean. Use a portable air cleaner to clean the air inside. Run an air conditioner, if you have one, but keep the fresh air intake closed. Use HEPA or MERV-13 filters to trap pollutants.
  • Do not add to indoor pollution. Don’t use anything that creates additional smoke such as candles, fireplaces or cigarettes. Refrain from activities such as vacuuming that can stir up particles in your home.
  • Stay hydrated and take measures to soothe any symptoms.  Drinking water can help your body trap or fend off the particles and other irritants you’re breathing in. Artificial tears or saline can also be used to moisten your eyes, if you need it.
  • If you must go out, wear the right mask. Cloth masks and face coverings recommended for protection against COVID-19 do not protect against wildfire smoke. Look for masks (respirators) marked NIOSH with N95 or P100. The Environmental Protection Agency has additional information on how to use them correctly.  
  • Protect yourself when driving. When the air is thick with smoke, it may be best to avoid driving due to low visibility. If you do need to travel, keep your vehicle windows closed, turn on the air conditioner and use the recirculate function to lower particle levels in the vehicle. Be sure to vent the air occasionally, however, as these actions can cause carbon dioxide levels to build and make you sleepy.
  • Watch out for your pets. Dogs, cats and other animals can also be affected by wildfire smoke. Learn how to protect them.

Wildfire smoke and COVID-19
Wildfire smoke can irritate your lungs and affect your immune system making you more prone to lung infections, including the virus that causes COVID-19. People who currently have or have had the coronavirus may be at increased risk of health effects due to their lung and/or heart function being compromised by the virus.

Some symptoms, such as dry cough, sore throat and difficulty breathing can be caused by both wildfire smoke and COVID-19. If you have concerns, you can use an online symptom checker or contact your doctor for an assessment.

If you develop severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or chest pain, call 911 immediately.

Have a plan in case you need to evacuate
Wildfire smoke in the air can mean a wildfire is close by. Be sure to pay attention to local updates from officials and new outlets so you know what’s happening around you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a list of steps you can take to prepare your home and your family.

PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a nonprofit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a multi-specialty medical group practice with more than 1,200 physicians and providers, and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of its founding Sisters and remains dedicated to ensuring that every person receives safe, compassionate care; every time, every touch. For more information, visit peacehealth.org

How to breathe easy in wildfire smoke - 09/14/20

With wildfires creating smoky conditions, it’s important to take extra steps to protect your health. Wildfire smoke can irritate your eyes, nose, throat and lungs. It can make it hard to breathe and cause you to cough or wheeze. Children, pregnant women and people with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart disease especially need to reduce their exposure to wildfire smoke.

PeaceHealth offers the following steps you to protect your health for the duration of our hazardous air quality event.

  • Pay attention to air quality. As air quality worsens, the possibility of negative health effects increases. You can track air quality in your area through websites such Oregon Smoke Blog, Washington Smoke Blog and AirNow.
  • Stay indoors and keep doors and windows closed. You can use wet cloths to plug up any cracks where smoke may seep through. If the smoke is especially bad or if you have a large home, choose one room in your home to set up as a clean room.
  • Keep the indoor air clean. Use a portable air cleaner to clean the air inside. Run an air conditioner, if you have one, but keep the fresh air intake closed. Use HEPA or MERV-13 filters to trap pollutants. You can also make your own DIY box fan air cleaner by following these steps from the Washington Department of Ecology.  
  • Do not add to indoor pollution. Don’t use anything that creates additional smoke such as candles, fireplaces or cigarettes. Refrain from activities such as vacuuming that can stir up particles in your home.
  • Stay hydrated and take measures to soothe any symptoms.  Drinking water can help your body trap or fend off the particles and other irritants you’re breathing in. Artificial tears or saline can also be used to moisten your eyes, if you need it.
  • If you must go out, wear the right mask. Cloth masks and face coverings recommended for protection against COVID-19 do not protect against wildfire smoke. Look for masks (respirators) marked NIOSH with N95 or P100. The Environmental Protection Agency has additional information on how to use them correctly.  
  • Protect yourself when driving. When the air is thick with smoke, it may be best to avoid driving due to low visibility. If you do need to travel, keep your vehicle windows closed, turn on the air conditioner and use the recirculate function to lower particle levels in the vehicle. Be sure to vent the air occasionally, however, as these actions can cause carbon dioxide levels to build and make you sleepy.
  • Watch out for your pets. Dogs, cats and other animals can also be affected by wildfire smoke. Learn how to protect them.

Wildfire smoke and COVID-19
Wildfire smoke can irritate your lungs and affect your immune system making you more prone to lung infections, including the virus that causes COVID-19. People who currently have or have had the coronavirus may be at increased risk of health effects due to their lung and/or heart function being compromised by the virus.

Some symptoms, such as dry cough, sore throat and difficulty breathing can be caused by both wildfire smoke and COVID-19. If you have concerns, you can use an online symptom checker or contact your doctor for an assessment.

If you develop severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing or chest pain, call 911 immediately.

Have a plan in case you need to evacuate
Wildfire smoke in the air can mean a wildfire is close by. Be sure to pay attention to local updates from officials and new outlets so you know what’s happening around you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a list of steps you can take to prepare your home and your family.

PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a nonprofit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a multi-specialty medical group practice with more than 1,200 physicians and providers, and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of its founding Sisters and remains dedicated to ensuring that every person receives safe, compassionate care; every time, every touch. For more information, visit peacehealth.org

PHMG clinics reopening in Eugene, Springfield and Cottage Grove - 09/14/20

We're happy to report that all of our Eugene,Springfield, Cottage Grove and Florence PeaceHealth Medical Group clinics and services are back to normal operations this morning. We've brought in air scrubbers to ensure safe indoor air quality. Thank you for your patience and understanding! You can find all clinic locations and hours here: http://ow.ly/OM6650Bqb4c

Several PeaceHealth Medical Group clinics open through the weekend - 09/12/20

The following PeaceHealth Medical Group clinics in the Eugene-Springfield area are open this weekend to provide medical care, as hazardous air conditions continue: 

*Urgent Care--Gateway (860 Beltline Rd., Springfield); West Eugene (3321 W. 11th Ave., Eugene)  and Valley River (1400 Valley River Dr. #110, Eugene)
*Pediatrics (University District only; 1255 Hilyard St, Eugene)
*Cottage Grove PeaceHealth Medical Group Walk-In (Saturday only; 1515 Village Drive, Cottage Grove)

For very serious or potentially life-threatening illness or injuries, please call 911. Those experiencing chest pain, difficulty breathing or severe abdominal pain should seek care at our Emergency Departments: PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend (3333 RiverBend Dr., Springfield) or PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center, University District (1255 Hilyard St., Eugene).

PeaceHealth Medical Group closing most clinics in Eugene, Springfield and Cottage Grove - 09/10/20

Due to the continuing hazardous air quality and wildfire activity, we will close most of our Eugene, Springfield and Cottage Grove PeaceHealth Medical Group clinics from noon today through the weekend. The only clinics that will remain open are:

*Urgent Care at Gateway in Springfield and West Eugene
*Pediatrics at RiverBend Pavilion in Springfield and University District in Eugene
*New Patient Coordinator at University District
*Pediatric Cardiology and Surgery at RiverBend Pavilion
*Cottage Grove Walk-In Clinic

Also: Women's Services and all Behavioral Health Services clinics at University District will close at 3 today. Behavioral Health will keep all appointments but conduct them via teleconference through Friday.

All affected patients will be notified. Thank you for understanding. The health and safety of our patients and caregivers is our top priority, and we want to minimize exposure to the unhealthy air.

PeaceHealth Medical Group announces fire-related clinic closures in Eugene, Dexter - 09/09/20

Due to the unhealthy air quality and evolving wildfire conditions, PeaceHealth Medical Group's South Eugene Clinic, Barger Clinic in West Eugene and Dexter Clinic in East Lane County are closed today, Sept. 9. Patients with appointments will be called to reschedule. Thank you for your patience.