Pacific Power
Emergency Messages as of 6:45 am, Fri. May. 29
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Pacific Power.
Primary email address for a new account:

  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Columbia River Maritime Museum and Pacific Power Host "Mighty Miniboat Float" Live Events   - 05/22/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                

Media Contact:
Lisa Scholin, 503-320-9379
lisa@noble-communications.com

 

Columbia River Maritime Museum and Pacific Power Host "Mighty Miniboat Float" Live Events  

Public invited to join this mini stay-at-home adventure

as part of Museum’s STEAM education program

 

ASTORIA, Ore., May 22, 2020 — We might not be traveling far these days, but a 5-foot long GPS-tracked miniboat, designed and launched by local students, sure is – as part of the Columbia River Maritime Museum’s Miniboat Program. On Friday, May 29, the public can join the adventure via livestream as the pint-sized vessel is launched into the mighty Columbia River. It’s the first in a series of three online distance learning events supported by Pacific Power that will follow the boat on its voyage between the Port of Vancouver to Astoria.

The Miniboat Program provides a one-of-a-kind educational opportunity that introduces students to ocean science, international exchange, and the STEAM fields of science, technology, engineering, the arts and math, helping to inspire future careers. Earlier this year, a fleet of seaworthy vessels cooperatively designed and built by participating elementary and middle school students was launched from the west coast. An identical fleet was launched by sister schools in Japan, ideally headed this way.

While those boats navigate to distant shores (you can track their progress here), the Museum, together with Pacific Power, is hosting a mini adventure closer to home. On Friday, May 29, 2020, they will launch the "Mighty Miniboat Float” events, open to all students and the public.

 

Participants can view the livestreamed series on the Museum’s Miniboat Facebook page and YouTube channel, and are encouraged to tune in starting at 11:45 a.m. More details are available on the Museum’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, May 29, 12-1 p.m.: A Miniboat’s Big Adventure

The first livestream will cover the local miniboat launch near the Port of Vancouver, Washington, from a Shaver tugboat. The segment will continue with captivating, educational programming that introduces the miniboat phenomenon, weaving in STEAM concepts in an accessible way.

Friday, June 5, 12-1 p.m.: Thar She Blows!

The second livestream will introduce the role of wind and currents, as participants check in on the fleet and discuss the vessels’ progress.

Friday, June 12, 12-1 p.m.: The Mighty Columbia

The third livestream will explore how a working river…works, in a celebration of the industry and communities that depend on our region's biggest river. We’ll hear from bar pilots, ship captains, tugboat operators, and more about their real-river jobs.

 

The sessions will be hosted by Nate Sandel, education director, Columbia River Maritime Museum and Pacific Power’s Alisa Dunlap, community manager for the North Coast of Oregon. Student shipbuilders, representatives from the Columbia River Bar Pilots, Shaver Transportation, and other surprise guests will join in the engaging experience as they bring science to life.
 

“Miniboats have the power to create substantial and lasting impact, and we are delighted to bring their might into local homes to help inspire even more students and families,” said Sandel of the program and livestream. “We’ve seen these boats capture the imagination of our students, but also many people from around the world, who encounter the boats, help with a rescue, or simply follow the boats’ progress online. These livestream events will allow us to bring their magic to even more households.”

 

This is the third year of the museum’s Miniboat Program, with more than 59,000 nautical miles traveled to date. Pacific Power has supported the program this school year, providing mentorship in the classroom with company engineers helping to install solar onto a miniboat deck.  

One of this year’s boats, created by students at Wy’East Middle School in Vancouver, Washington washed ashore after its ocean launch earlier this year. The students will now give their boat a “second chance voyage” on the Columbia River, before it is eventually relaunched at sea.

 

“Witnessing these young students navigate their miniboat journey underscores the importance of trying, failing, and then trying again. It’s an essential part of the STEAM process,” says Pacific Power President and CEO Stefan Bird. “These students will become our future engineers, problem solvers, and leaders, and it’s why programs like this matter to Pacific Power and businesses across Oregon.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through the Miniboat Program, students take on roles as quartermasters, sail designers, keel engineers, cargo trackers, and documentarians. Along the way, they learn real-world skills and make friends overseas while they track their boats online, which are packed with mementos curated by the students. 

 

“We have been honored to have a front-row seat in supporting this engaging curriculum, which offers an extraordinary way for students to learn crucial STEAM skills during the critical late-elementary and early middle school years,” said Dunlap. “We are proud of our role in helping them discover future career options, while building international connections that will last a lifetime.”

 

The Miniboat Program was developed by the Columbia River Maritime Museum in partnership with the Consular Office of Japan in Portland, Educational Passages, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and is supported by Pacific Power, the U.S. Coast Guard, and many others. The public can follow the miniboat adventures on Facebook at CRMM Miniboat Program or through the museum’s website at www.crmm.org.

 

###
 

About the Miniboat Program from The Columbia River Maritime Museum
Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, debris from the country washed up on Oregon and Washington shores. One of those items, a fishing vessel, is now on display at the Columbia River Maritime Museum. That boat and its journey across the Pacific Ocean became the inspiration for building the Miniboat Program. Since the program’s start in 2017, 1,213 students on both sides of the Pacific Ocean have been involved in the launch of 24 miniboats, traveling a total of 55,236 nautical miles (and climbing daily). These boats are tracked daily and students are still building on the skills they honed to launch them.

This year’s participants include 7th graders from Warrenton Grade School in Warrenton, Ore. and 5th graders at Columbia City Elementary School in Columbia City, Ore, along with the 7th graders from Wy’East Middle School in Vancouver, Wash. These three schools are partnered with three schools in Japan, including Tanesashi Primary School, Okuki Elementary, and Kanehama Elementary in Hachinohe City, in the Aomori Prefecture.  

About Pacific Power’s Support for STEAM Education
At Pacific Power, we know the importance of building a solid foundation of STEAM skills early to help open more doors for students and strengthen our communities. We are committed to building opportunities for STEAM education by supporting organizations like the Columbia River Maritime Museum and building opportunities that enrich the education of students of all ages – whether we are supporting the Miniboat Program in Astoria, INVENT in Grants Pass, visiting classrooms to provide mentorship, or providing distance learning opportunities.

Pacific Power continues to reduce wildfire risk - 05/22/20

The company has increased inspections, weather monitoring and invested in new technologies to protect communities

PORTLAND, Ore. (May 22, 2020) – With wildfire season already underway in parts of the West, Pacific Power is adding new safety measures and system enhancements to continue to help protect the communities it serves while providing safe, reliable power.

“While it is impossible to eliminate all wildfire risks, we continue to invest in our system in high-risk areas to reduce the chance of utility-caused, catastrophic wildfires during extreme weather” said David Lucas, vice president of transmission and distribution operations. “We continue to upgrade our system to mitigate wildfire risk, protect people and property and increase equipment resiliency. This essential work and investment underscores our continued commitment to doing our part in the evolving preventative fight against wildfires.”

Last year, in addition to regular inspection schedules, crews performed 20,000 extra facility inspections system-wide. Other mitigation measures include:

  • Investing in new technologies, such as covered overhead wire to prevent sparks from occurring when debris or branches fall into the line
  • Installing dozens of weather monitoring stations throughout high risk wildfire areas for deeper insight into weather-related threats
  • Enhanced plant and tree clearings around power lines and poles in high risk areas
  • Coordinating with state and local government officials and forestry management groups and other stakeholders to help ensure public safety

Pacific Power recently released an easy-to-use interactive map to view areas where a Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS) may occur – rare instances when power could be proactively shut off in specific, high-risk areas to prevent wildfire ignitions. Customers can see if a home or business is in a potential PSPS area and view the seven-day status forecasts in these designated zones. These tools help customers stay informed and provide actionable information so they can be prepared and stay safe during wildfire season. Additional resources, along with the web tools are available at pacificpower.net/wildfiresafety.

For more information on the company’s wildfire prevention practices, customers can attend Pacific Power’s Wildfire Mitigation and Safety webinar on May 27, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

###

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 773,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet customers’ growing electricity needs while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity providers in the United States. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

 

Pacific Power to open additional day use areas, Swift Forest Camp - 05/18/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 800-570-5838

 

May 18, 2020

 

Pacific Power to open additional day use areas, Swift Forest Camp

Following Washington State COVID-19 guidelines, the sites will allow outdoor recreation while observing social distancing rules

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — Beginning May 22, Swift Forest Camp will be available for both camping and day use and the Cougar and Cresap Bay Parks will open for day use only, aligning with the state of Washington’s COVID-19 phased reopening approach.

 

Reservations are required for camping at Swift and can be made by visiting the Lewis River recreation website. Camping at other Lewis River Parks remains closed until further notice.

 

These new openings come three weeks after the May 5 reopening of most day use recreation areas along Pacific Power’s Lewis River reservoirs east of Woodland, Wash. Visitors are able to access boat ramps and day use areas, but COVID-19 social distances measures will remain in force. Restroom maintenance and personal hygiene supplies may be limited in both day use and camping areas. Some park features such as playground equipment will remain closed.

 

Camping at Cresap Bay, Cougar, and Beaver Bay Parks remains closed until further notice. A previously announced waiver of cancellation fees has been extended.

 

Pacific Power is a division of PacifiCorp, which owns and manages hydroelectric resources that offer clean, affordable energy for customers, as well as a variety of public recreation opportunities. The facilities provide boating, swimming, camping and picnicking opportunities.

 

During the COVID-19 emergency, outlets for appropriately distanced recreation are important, so long as it can be done within state and federal health directives. We appreciate patience from the public as we work to maintain these opportunities while observing guidelines pertaining to social distancing and safety.

 

Specifically, on the Lewis River, the following sites will be open as of May 22 with limited maintenance. Social distancing requirements will be in place:

 

  • Merwin Park
  • Saddle Dam Equestrian Parking
  • Merwin Hatchery Boat Ramp
  • Lewis River Hatchery
  • Cedar Creek Ramp Access
  • Johnson Creek Access
  • Speelyai Park
  • Yale Park
  • Eagle Cliff Park
  • Beaver Bay Park (Day Use Only)
  • Swift Forest Camp (Camping and Day Use)
  • Cresap Bay Park (Day use Only)
  • Cougar Park (Day use Only)

 

Pacific Power takes pride in operating recreation sites. During the COVID-19 health emergency, we want to allow some outlets for recreation so long as it can be done within recently issued state guidelines. We appreciate patience as we work to maintain these opportunities while observing guidelines pertaining to social distancing and safety.

 

For a complete list of recreation site closures and limited or reduced services, including PacifiCorp facilities in Oregon, Washington, and California, please visit https://www.pacificorp.com/community/recreation.html.

 

# # #

 

PGE and Pacific Power urge customers to be alert for utility scams - 05/14/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

May 14, 2020

CONTACT:                                        

Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power

1-800-570-5838

Tom.Gauntt@Pacificorp.com

 

PGE and Pacific Power urge customers to be alert for utility scams

COVID-19 is just the latest excuse for con artists to prey on the vulnerable

Portland, Ore. — Portland General Electric and Pacific Power are working together to spread awareness and tips to help utility customers avoid becoming a victim of scams.

Scammers are taking advantage of the coronavirus pandemic to target those who are most vulnerable and who may be particularly worried about potential disruption of their service. Anyone can be a target, although they often prey on senior citizens, low-income families, non-English speakers and small business owners. With the right information, customers can learn to detect fraudulent activity.

"We don't want anyone to fall victim to this kind of fraud," said John McFarland, PGE vice president for customer solutions. "If you receive one of these calls, texts or emails don't give them any information. If you're unsure, call your utility directly to check your account status and ask about payment arrangements if you need help with your bill."

Thieves impersonating electric company employees use phone calls, texts, social media messages, emails and sometimes even knock on doors to reach potential victims. The impostors threaten to disconnect service immediately unless a payment is made within a short timeframe, usually with a prepaid credit card or even Bitcoin. These payments are not traceable and give the scammer instant access to the victim’s money.

“These scammers exploit the trust of the community at a time of uncertainty,” said William Comeau, vice president of customer experience for Pacific Power. “We have been helping our customers during this difficult time by suspending disconnections, waiving late fees and providing more flexible payment arrangements.”

PGE and Pacific Power encourage customers to be aware of these tips to protect themselves against scams:

  • When in doubt, check it out! Contact the utility company to verify account information and status if someone threatens you with immediate disconnection. Use the phone number on your monthly bill or from the utility company’s website – not a number provided by the suspected scammer.
  • During the COVID-19 crisis, PGE and Pacific Power have temporarily stopped disconnecting service for non-payment and collecting late fees and are urging customers who may be having trouble paying their monthly bills to contact their customer service representatives directly for help.
  • Even during normal business conditions, customers will never receive just a single notification with one hour or less to respond. A legitimate utility company employee will allow customers to call the office to ask questions and discuss arrangements.
  • Legitimate utility companies will never ask for payment via prepaid or pre-loaded credit card. Utility companies offer a variety of ways to pay a bill, including online or by phone. Customers should never agree to purchase and pay with a prepaid card to prevent an immediate shutoff.
  • If someone comes to the door saying they’re from your utility, ask to see the employee’s badge. A legitimate utility employee will have an official badge with their name, photo, company logo and contact information. If customers feel threatened or uncomfortable, they should not open the door. They should call 911 if at any point they are concerned about their safety.
  • Scammers rely on their victim’s uncertainty and panic over the prospect of having their power cut off to make them act without thinking the situation through. Stop, think and verify.

For more information on tactics used by scammers and how customers can protect themselves, visit PortlandGeneral.com/Scams and PacificPower.net/Scam.

####

 

 

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves 899,000 customers with a service area population of 1.9 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE has 16 generation plants in five Oregon counties, and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. For over 130 years, PGE has delivered safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are working with customers to build a clean energy future. In 2019, PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donated $4.7 million and volunteered 32,900 hours with more than 700 nonprofits annually across Oregon. For more information visit portlandgeneral.com/cleanvision.

 

About Pacific Power: Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. Our goal is to provide our customers with value for their energy dollar, and safe, reliable electricity. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.9 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

Pacific Power to reopen most fishing, day use sites on Lewis River - 05/01/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 800-570-5838

 

May 1, 2020

 

Pacific Power to reopen most fishing, day use sites on Lewis River
Following Washington State COVID-19 guidelines, the sites will allow outdoor recreation while observing social distancing rules

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — Beginning May 5, Pacific Power will reopen most day use recreation areas along its Lewis River reservoirs east of Woodland, Wash., in alignment with Gov. Jay Inslee’s update to the stay-at-home order in Washington state. Visitors will be able to access boat ramps and day use areas, but COVID-19 social distances measures will remain in force. Restroom maintenance and personal hygiene supplies may be limited. Some park features such as playground equipment will be closed.

 

Campgrounds will remain closed until further notice. A previously announced waiver of cancellation fees has been extended.

 

Pacific Power is a division of PacifiCorp, which owns and manages hydroelectric resources that offer clean, affordable energy for customers, as well as a variety of public recreation opportunities. The facilities provide boating, swimming, camping and picnicking opportunities.

 

During the COVID-19 emergency, outlets for appropriately distanced recreation are important, so long as it can be done within state and federal health directives. We appreciate patience from the public as we work to maintain these opportunities while observing guidelines pertaining to social distancing and safety.

 

Specifically, on the Lewis River, the following sites will be open May 5 with limited maintenance. Social distancing requirements will be in place:

 

  • Merwin Park
  • Saddle Dam Equestrian Parking
  • Merwin Hatchery Boat Ramp
  • Lewis River Hatchery
  • Cedar Creek Ramp Access
  • Johnson Creek Access
  • Speelyai Park
  • Yale Park
  • Eagle Cliff Park
  • Beaver Bay Park (Day Use Only)
  • Swift Forest Camp (Day Use Only, weekends only)

 

Pacific Power takes pride in operating recreation sites. During the COVID-19 health emergency, we want to allow some outlets for recreation so long as it can be done within recently issued state guidelines. We appreciate patience as we work to maintain these opportunities while observing guidelines pertaining to social distancing and safety.

 

For a complete list of recreation site closures and limited or reduced services, including PacifiCorp facilities in Oregon, Washington, and California, please visit https://www.pacificorp.com/community/recreation.html.

 

# # #