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News Releases
Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 90 new COVID-19 cases - 04/02/20

April 2, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 503-373-7872, media.COVID-19@state.or.us

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 90 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 19 to 21, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 90 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the statewide total to 826. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Deschutes (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lane (3), Lincoln (1), Marion (13), Union (2), Multnomah (26), Washington (22), and Yamhill (1). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s twentieth COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 21, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020 at Tuality Healthcare. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s twenty-first COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 31, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Douglas County case was later determined to be a Lane County case. The total number of new cases in Lane County is 3 to reflect this change. However, the case moved from Douglas County to Lane County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 47 new COVID-19 cases; Latest COVID-19 projections show social distancing can cut coronavirus infections if Oregonians keep current measures in place into May - 04/01/20

April 1, 2020

Media Contact: Oregon COVID-19 Joint Information Center (JIC) staff, 503-373-7872, media.COVID-19@state.or.us

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 47 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 19, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (1), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (18), Washington (3), and Yamhill (1). One case previously reported in Hood River County was identified as a resident of another state; thus, today’s statewide case count is 736. Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s nineteenth COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27, 2020, and died on March 29, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Hood River County case was later determined to be a Washington State case. The total number of new cases reported as of yesterday has changed from 690 to 689.

Latest COVID-19 projections show social distancing can cut coronavirus infections if Oregonians keep current measures in place into May

Updated projections from health researchers show that there is “strong evidence that measures currently in place in Oregon are reducing transmission,” according to the latest models.  The most recent data suggest that current social distancing measures could cut transmission rates between 50%-70% if Oregonians maintain these limitations on virus-spreading interactions into early May.

If Oregonians can maintain current social distancing efforts and the current projections hold true, the state could meet the likely demand for hospital beds under current strategies. 

According to the latest report, researchers estimate that Oregon has slightly higher numbers of current infections than previously assessed, based on an increase in reported cases from earlier time points.

  • COVID-19 infections: Under current social distancing conditions with the cooperation of most Oregonians to Stay Home, Save Lives, it is estimated that in early May Oregon would have over 4,000 cumulative infections and 200-1,200 active infections. However, if the state were to reopen non-essential businesses (while keeping schools closed), the number of new infections would spike to as many as 3,500 active infections by early May
  • Hospital beds needed: Researchers found “expected demand for hospital beds is predicted to remain relatively constant before decreasing, assuming current or strengthened interventions and continued high compliance
  • Uncertainty: Researchers highlighted that the projections remain uncertain. In coming weeks, state public health officials and researchers will get a better picture of current actual infections and how they affect the projections, as well as more data on the public’s continued adherence to social distancing measures.

The models state health officials released today were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling, based in Washington.

Oregon’s emergency response continues to focus on strengthening the health care system’s ability to meet the coming surge. State health officials are working with hospitals and other health care partners to mobilize the health care workforce and keep workers safe, expand bed capacity and secure more ventilators. However, the public’s ability to maintain social distancing will be the most important factor in determining whether Oregon prevents local hospitals from becoming overwhelmed by COVID-19 admissions.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “We know coronavirus has brought painful disruption and distress for Oregonians. However, these numbers tell us that what we’re doing can work. We know social distancing is tough and comes with incredible sacrifices. But steps we’re all taking to maintain social distancing could save the lives of people we know and people who are important to us. As Oregonians, we all must continue to put Stay Home, Save Lives into practice.”


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 84 new COVID-19 cases; OHA gains flexibility in its Medicaid program to better serve low-income Oregonians during COVID-19 pandemic - 03/31/20

March 31, 2020

Oregon COVID-19 Joint Information Center (JIC) staff, 503-373-7872, media.COVID-19@state.or.us

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 84 new COVID-19 cases; OHA gains flexibility in its Medicaid program to better serve low-income Oregonians during COVID-19 pandemic

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 16 to 18, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 84 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 690, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (4), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Umatilla (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (18), and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s seventeenth COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25, 2020, and died on March 29, 2020 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s eighteenth COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26, 2020, and died March 30, 2020 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Deschutes County case has been updated today to Washington County.

Oregon Health Authority gains flexibility in its Medicaid program to better serve low-income Oregonians during COVID-19 pandemic

The Oregon Health Authority has received flexibility from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to remove barriers for Oregonians to qualify for, enroll in, and stay enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Oregon has also received flexibility for providers to provide care to members as the state responds to the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly one in four Oregonians currently receives health coverage through OHP.

“The COVID-19 pandemic requires us to act quickly to support the needs of our communities,” said Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Health Authority. “This added flexibility in our Medicaid program is going to allow us to more quickly get people access to health care and expand our health system to meet the challenges of this public health emergency.”

The key areas of flexibility that Oregon will gain from this waiver include:

  • All members who are currently enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan will not lose coverage during this crisis. This includes coverage that is only state-funded (i.e. Cover all Kids).
  • Individuals can sign up for OHP without having to verify their income (submit a pay stub) with their application. They will be able to self-attest, which will help Oregonians get access to OHP coverage more quickly.
  • Federal stimulus payments and increased unemployment payments will not affect OHP eligibility. They will not be counted during the application process or when members report a change in their household.
  • Oregon will have additional flexibility to add to its healthcare workforce, provide treatment in temporary sites, and for paying providers during this public health emergency.

Additional information and guidance related to COVID-19 for coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and providers serving OHP members is available on the OHA website. A fact sheet for OHP members about their coverage and COVID-19 can be downloaded on the OHP website in English and in Spanish.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 58 new COVID-19 cases - 03/30/20

March 30, 2020

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 58 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 16, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 58 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 606, as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (2), Douglas (4), Jackson (1), Josephine (4), Lane (2), Marion (14), Multnomah (9), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (2), Washington (14), Yamhill (1).

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 14th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old male in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 20, and died March 29 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 15th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old male in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 22, and died March 29 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 16th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old male in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 29 at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon. He had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

 

OHA News Release: Oregon reports 69 new COVID-19 cases - 03/29/20

PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority reported 69 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 548, as of 8 a.m. today. No new deaths were reported. The number of COVID-19 deaths in Oregon remains at 13, as of 8 a.m. today.

 The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (11), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lane (1), Linn (4), Marion (15), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), Washington (14). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

 Update: The 93-year-old man whose death was reported yesterday had an underlying condition. The data posted once a day on Oregon Health Authority’s website and shared once a day with the media are provisional and may be updated as more information becomes available after the daily reporting.

OHA News Release: Oregon reports 13 COVID-19 death, 65 new COVID-19 cases - 03/28/20

Oregon reports 13 COVID-19 death, 65 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 12 to 13, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:00 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 65 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 479, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (2), Jackson (2), Josephine (1), Linn (4), Marion (11), Multnomah (14), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (2).

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 13th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old male in Yamhill County, who tested positive on 3/18/20, and died 03/27/2020 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had no known underlying medical conditions.

Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death, 98 new COVID-19 cases - 03/27/20

March 27, 2020

Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death, 98 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 12, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 98 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 414, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Columbia (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (2), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (22), Polk (4), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (4). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 12th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County. She tested positive on March 20, and died March 25 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Video link: Dawn Mautner, senior health advisor at Oregon Health Authority, explains the increase in case numbers during an internal agency briefing today.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

 # # #

Oregon releases health care system action plan to fight COVID-19 - 03/26/20

March 26, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon releases health care system action plan to fight COVID-19

New projections show social distancing must be maintained to protect health care system

(Portland – March 26, 2020) The fight against the coronavirus depends on Oregon hospitals having enough beds to treat the coming surge in patients who will become seriously ill with the virus. Today, Oregon health officials and hospitals announced a joint statewide action plan to dramatically bolster the state’s ability to treat people with COVID-19 illness who need hospital care.

The plan was developed by the “Governor’s Joint Task Force for Health Care Systems Response to COVID-19,” convened by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). It includes a broad range of health systems, health care providers, human services organizations, public health and public safety agencies, insurers and other organizations needed in the battle.

The plan addresses 4 urgent actions necessary to expand the health care system’s capacity and maintain its capability as Oregon braces for a projected spike in new coronavirus cases:

  1. Procure and distribute critical medical supplies, including personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers and ventilators.
  2. Optimize hospital capacity to be able to treat COVID-19 cases.
  3. Mobilize the health care workforce to respond to COVID-19.
  4. Maintain a unified, coordinated and transparent emergency response to COVID-19.

New projections of COVID-19 cases in Oregon show the state is at a critical moment in the fight against the disease. Social distancing measures could alter the trajectory of new infections, which gives Oregon’s health care system the chance to ramp up to meet the coming surge. But the state has little margin for error. A return to “business as usual” or slight differences in actual infection rates (compared to projected ones) could swamp hospitals with more coronavirus cases than they could treat.

Governor Brown said, “Hospital leaders and health officials are doing their part to find beds, secure supplies and protect health care workers. Oregonians can make a difference too: stay home and save lives. We all have a role to play in an unprecedented, unified effort across Oregon to stop the coronavirus from taking the tragic toll we’ve seen it claim elsewhere.”

State agencies, hospitals and health care providers have already begun to implement the plan.

  • The state is collecting PPE for re-distribution to facilities in need.
  • Regional hospitals have signed mutual aid agreements to shift equipment, workforce and patients from overburdened facilities to others with adequate capacity.
  • The state is working with providers to stand-up alternate care locations (such as the Oregon Medical Station), identify and develop new alternate care sites, enable ambulatory care centers to house patients and re-purpose long-term care facilities.
  • The state and hospitals are sharing hospital bed utilization data so hospitals can manage the use of beds and equipment across their region.
  • The state is developing childcare options for health care workers, so their work isn’t interrupted by school closings and family responsibilities.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “Oregon’s health care system began preparing for a pandemic years ago, which gave us a head start on this plan. From expanding testing to securing more ventilators for Oregon hospitals, we are united by a set of common strategies to save lives in every corner of the state.”

The latest models state health officials released today forecast the following outcomes for 3 different scenarios:

  • Return to business as usual: If Oregon lifted all the social distancing measures state leaders have instituted in recent weeks, there will be an estimated 15,000 cumulative infections by May 8th (within a range of 5,900-26,000). Approximately 1,100 people would need inpatient beds (850 AAC/250 ICU) across Oregon.
  • Maintain bans on large gatherings and indefinite school closures: There would be an estimated 6,100 cumulative infections by May 8th (within a range of 2,000-12,000) and 340 people will need inpatient beds (260 AAC/80 ICU).
  • Maintain aggressive interventions put into place on Monday, March 23rd (i.e.., Stay Home, Save Lives) with high public adherence: There will be an estimated 1,000 (within a possible range of 700-3,800) cumulative infections by May 8th. Under this scenario, hospitals would have to boost capacity by a smaller number of beds.

The models show that only aggressive interventions, like the Stay Home, Save Lives executive order Governor Brown issued on March 23rd, are predicted to decrease the number of active infections.

The models state health officials released today were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling. While similar to projections completed earlier by researchers at Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU), these newer models from IDM take into account the impact of community-level social distancing interventions, which were not incorporated into the OHSU study. Researchers from OHSU and other hospitals are collaborating with OHA to forecast the COVID-19 burden for their specific hospitals based on this information.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “These projections tell us the sacrifices Oregonians are making right now can save lives. At the same time, they paint a dark picture of what could happen. We can’t afford to drop our guard.”

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 50 new COVID-19 cases - 03/26/20

March 26, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 50 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 1 more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 10 to 11, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:00 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 316, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Josephine (2), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (12), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), and Washington (8). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website and today new demographic information was added: : www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s eleventh COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on 3/15/2020, and died 3/25/2020 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

The Oregon Health Authority is now releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak and the response across government agencies. Read more here: https://govsite-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/SLdyToaAQ2i1P0EsaL7t_Oregon-COVID-19-SitStat-03-26-2020-FINAL.pdf

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Media briefing: Health care leaders to release health care systems' plan to fight COVID-19 in Oregon and latest projections on infection and hospitalization rates - 03/26/20

March 26, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Media briefing: Health care leaders to release health care systems’ plan to fight COVID-19 in Oregon and latest projections on infection and hospitalization rates

(Portland, OR – March 26, 2020) State health officials and hospital leaders will release the “Governor’s Joint Task Force for Health Care Systems Response to COVID-19” today in a media briefing. They also will present the latest projections on coronavirus infection and hospitalization rates in the state.

The Governor’s Joint Task Force for Health Care Systems Response to COVID-19 report outlines coordinated steps state agencies and Oregon’s health care system are taking to fight the coronavirus pandemic in Oregon.

The media briefing will be held at 1:00 p.m. Speakers will include:

  • Overview of latest COVID-19 projections in Oregon: Dr. Dean Sidelinger, Oregon Health Authority
  • Summary of Governor’s Joint Task Force action plan: Dr. Dana Hargunani, Oregon Health Authority
  • Collaborative efforts across the health care system to fight COVID-19: Becky Hultberg, CEO, Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems.

When: 1 p.m. TODAY, March 26, 2020.

Webinar login information: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1397125641980035851

Dial-in: (415) 655-0052
Access Code: 902-062-156

System of Care Advisory Council meets by teleconference April 15 - 03/25/20

March 25, 2020

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council.

When: April 15, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: By teleconference at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/706039269. The public can also dial in by telephone at 872-240-3212, access code 706-039-269. The meeting will be listen-only until the public comment time.

Agenda: The council will be discussing bylaws, reviewing the first report on agency successes, data for the data dashboard, and public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 in 2019 established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults. The council's immediate work is to develop and maintain a state System of Care and a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system.

Learn more: System of Care Advisory Council website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.

https://bit.ly/2Uz7dtj

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 57 new COVID-19 cases - 03/25/20

March 25, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 57 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 8 to 10, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:00 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 266, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (8), Washington (20), Yamhill (1). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s ninth COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on 3/23/20, and died 3/24/2020 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s tenth COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on 3/22/20, and died 3/23/20 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 18 new COVID-19 cases - 03/24/20

March 24, 2020

Media contact: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 18 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to eight, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 18 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 209, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Clatsop (1), Jackson (1), Marion (2), Multnomah (4), and Washington (7). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s sixth COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 22 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s seventh COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Multnomah County, who had underlying medical conditions and was not hospitalized at the time of death. He tested positive on March 16, and died March 23.

Oregon’s eighth COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 19, and died March 23 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

 # # #

Oregon reports 30 new COVID-19 cases - 03/23/20

March 23, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 30 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority reported 30 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 191, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Hood River (1), Linn (1), Marion (8), Multnomah (2), Polk (2), Washington (14). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 24 new COVID-19 cases; announces funding for Local Public Health and Tribes - 03/22/20

March 22, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 24 new COVID-19 cases; announces funding for Local Public Health and Tribes

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from to four to five. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 24 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 161, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (1), Lane (1), Marion (3), Multnomah (1), Washington (13) and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s one COVID-19 death in Linn County is a veteran in his 90’s, who tested positive on March 11, and died this morning at the Oregon Veterans Home. He had underlying medical conditions.

“Our hearts are heavy,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “This resident was a veteran who served our nation with honor and dignity in its hour of need. He was also a beloved member of our Lebanon community, and he will be deeply and truly missed. On behalf of everyone at the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and the Oregon Veterans’ Home, we offer our sincere condolences to his family and loved ones. We grieve with them.”

OHA Announces Local Public Health and Tribal Funding for COVID-19 Response

Oregon Health Authority and other officials also announced details about $4 million in state funding that is going out to Local Public Health Authorities (LPHA), Tribes and Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA – the Urban Indian Health Program in Oregon) to support their COVID-19 response. See this table for the allocation amounts per LPHA, Tribe and NARA, which combined total $4 million.

Basic facts about the funding: 

  • All LPHAs, the nine-federally recognized Tribes in Oregon, and NARA receiving the funds.
  • Total amount to these recipients is $4 million, representing a substantial portion of the funds approved by the Oregon Legislature’s Emergency Board on March 9. 
  • Funding amounts are based on a funding formula as well as COVID-19 cases and investigative work as of March 10, 2020.
  • Funds can be used to support local and tribal COVID-19 response, including: 
    • Reporting, monitoring and controlling of COVID-19 in communities 
    • Identification and screening of contacts of COVID-19 positive individuals 
    • Education, prevention and related communications activities to share information with the public and community partners

“We believe that those funds will have a significant positive impact on our state’s capacity to perform COVID-19 response functions at the local level,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “Their staff are truly on the front lines of the essential epidemiological work that can help slow the spread of COVID-19 and other communicable diseases in communities. But we know that more resources will be needed across all aspects of the response.”

“Honoring our government to government relationship is important in our coordinated response to COVID-19,” said Julie Johnson, OHA Director of Tribal Affairs. “We are appreciative of this funding to provide support at the local level. We know everyone is working extremely hard to protect all of our communities across the state.”

“Local health authorities are on the frontlines of this epidemic and leading the response,” said Jocelyn Warren, PhD, MPH, Public Health Division Manager Lane County and current Conference of Local Health Officials chair. "This vitally important funding will ensure that their ability to respond increases in line with the severity of the crisis.”

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death, 23 new COVID-19 cases - 03/21/20

March 21, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death, 23 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from three to four, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:00 a.m. today. Oregon Health Authority also reported 23 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 137, as of 8:00 a.m. today.

The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Deschutes (1), Josephine (1), Lane (1), Marion (2), Multnomah (6), Washington (11). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s fourth COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 15, and died March 20 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 26 new COVID-19 cases - 03/20/20

March 20, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 26 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority reported 26 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 114, as of 8:30 a.m. today, March 20. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (2), Grant (1), Linn (1), Marion (4), Multnomah (5), Union (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon reports 13 new COVID-19 cases; state prepares Oregon Medical Station - 03/19/20

March 19, 2020

Media contacts: OHA Joint Information Center (JIC) Staff, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 13 new COVID-19 cases; state prepares Oregon Medical Station

PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority reported 13 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 88, as of 8:30 a.m. today, March 19. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Linn (2), Marion (5), Multnomah (4) and Washington (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

State prepares Oregon Medical Station

The Oregon Health Authority, together with the Oregon Military Department, is assembling the Oregon Medical Station (OMS) beginning Friday, March 20, at the Salem Fairgrounds. The OMS is a temporary mobile facility dedicated for emergency use in situations like the COVID-19 pandemic. The mobile facility will provide an alternate site for 250 patients currently in nursing home care.

The OMS is one component of Oregon’s larger emergency preparedness plan. Here is a snapshot of the facility:

  • It will include beds, pharmaceuticals, medical supplies and equipment to support 250 patients.
  • It which will be staffed by members of the State Emergency Registry of Volunteers in Oregon (SERV-OR) and the Oregon Disaster Medical Team (ODMT).
  • It will have staffing for 24/7 operations.
  • It will be housed in the Jackson Long building at the Salem Fairgrounds in a state-owned building.
  • It will use dedicated supplies that have been stored in Salem at the State and Federal Surplus Property.

Military members from the Oregon Military Department, SERV-OR and ODMT have previous joint training experience for disaster-type events. All three groups have participated in an annual exercise known as Pathfinder-Minuteman, which presents multiple scenarios where first responders have causalities in need of immediate medical treatment.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Update: HERC Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets by webinar April 2 - 03/19/20

March 19, 2020

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee. This is an update of a meeting notice posted March 6.

When: April 2, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Online only. The public may attend by webinar or via a listen-only conference line by calling 888-204-5984, access code 801373. Public comment will be taken by phone, arranged at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us. Written comments will be accepted until noon on Tuesday, March 31.

Webinar registration link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/9149500647798347021

Agenda: Review of public comments on the draft coverage guidance on Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth (topic blog); review of a new evidence-based report: Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer (sources); new topics for 2020-2021.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.

http://bit.ly/2Uh35hk

Media Advisory: NEW: COVID-19 Media Queries Process - 03/18/20

Media Advisory

NEW: COVID-19 Media Queries Process

March 18, 2020 – In an effort to streamline communications and ensure responsiveness, today the Joint Information Center (JIC) at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced new procedures for media requests for information and interviews regarding the COVID-19 Coronavirus epidemic in Oregon.

All members of the media are asked to email questions/requests to Covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us. For deadline requests, call 971-673-2097.

Please include your name, organization, contact information and deadline in the email with your inquiries.

Joint Information Center media staff will triage requests and connect reporters with appropriate information sources. Inquiries outside this channel will be funneled back through this channel.

Members of the public should call 211 with questions.

In addition, you may notice changes to OHA’s coronavirus website.

Due to a high volume of web traffic related to COVID-19 in Oregon, OHA also will be relocating most of its COVID-19 information to a different web platform. We are working hard to make this change as quickly as possible in order to reduce the impact this high traffic is having on other Oregon.gov websites. We hope to have the new site up by March 19. Your browser will automatically redirect you to the new location. Thank you for your patience.

Oregon reports two more deaths in COVID-19 outbreak - 03/18/20

March 18, 2020

Media contacts:

Oregon reports two more deaths in COVID-19 outbreak

10 new cases also confirmed statewide, bringing total to 75

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from this virus to three, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:30 a.m. today.

The cases are a 60-year-old woman in Lane County, who died at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend on March 14, and a 71-year-old man in Washington County who died March 17 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. The Lane County resident tested positive for the virus March 17, while the Washington County resident received a positive result on March 16. Both had underlying medical conditions.

They are among a total of 75 people in Oregon who have been confirmed to have COVID-19, the novel coronavirus. That includes 10 new cases that were confirmed statewide today in the following counties: Benton (1), Lane (2), Marion (4), Washington, (2) and Yamhill (1).

“We are saddened at the news of these additional lives lost in Oregon due to COVID-19,” said Patrick Allen, OHA director. “These deaths only strengthen our resolve to slow the spread of this disease in our communities. We are in this together.”

Washington County Health Officer Christina Baumann, M.D., M.P.H., said, “We are sad to learn of the first death in our county due to COVID-19. Our hearts go out to his family during this time. We are committed to slowing down the spread of this disease and to protecting those most vulnerable among us.”

Patrick Luedtke, M.D., M.P.H., Lane County senior public health officer, said “First and foremost, we are deeply saddened by the loss of our community member. We ask that our community members, and the greater Oregon community, show kindness and compassion for the family of the deceased at this time. We are absolutely committed to preventing future death through slowing the spread of COVID-19.”

Stay informed

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Public Health Advisory Board teleconference March 19 - 03/17/20

March 17, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss PHAB chair and co-chair positions and solicit volunteers to serve as PHAB chair for 2020-2022; hear an update on Oregon’s COVID-19 response.

When: Thursday, March 19, 2-3 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: By teleconference only. Telephone 669-900-6833, meeting ID 730 818 593.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

State announces 18 new COVID-19 cases - 03/17/20

March 17, 2020

Media contacts:

State announces 18 new COVID-19 cases

Oregon now has a total of 65 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced 18 new cases of the novel coronavirus as of 10:30 a.m. today.

OHA is reporting 18 total new cases in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Linn (5), Marion (1), Multnomah (1) and Washington (7). Of the Linn County cases at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, four were previously reported by Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs in a media released last evening. These results came in after OHA updated its daily count. OHA updates it daily count on the website once a day.

Stay informed

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

State announces 8 new COVID-19 cases - 03/16/20

March 16, 2020

Media contacts:

State announces 8 new COVID-19 cases

Oregon now has a total of 47 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced eight new cases of the novel coronavirus as of 10:30 a.m. today.

OHA is reporting 2 new cases each in Benton and Deschutes Counties; and 1 new case in each of the following counties: Clackamas, Marion, Multnomah and Washington.

“I know it’s difficult to learn that we are seeing more active community spread of COVID-19, but this is something we’ve been expecting,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed, State Health Officer and Epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division. “It’s a good reminder to take steps to protect yourself, and vulnerable friends and family members, by washing your hands, covering your coughs and sneezes, and staying home and away from others if you’re sick.”

Officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect themselves, their families, and those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect themselves and those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces like bathrooms, desks, countertops, doorknobs, computer keyboards, faucet handles, toys and cell phones.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home and away from others if you are ill.

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness.

Stay informed

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

OHA News Release: State announces 3 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases - 03/15/20

March 15, 2020

Oregon now has a total of 39 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced three new cases of the novel coronavirus as of 11 a.m. today.

OHA is reporting 1 new case in Yamhill County, 1 new case in Deschutes County, and 1 new case in Linn County. The Yamhill County and Deschutes County cases are believed to be community acquired.

The case in Linn County is a staff member at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, which currently has nine residents who have tested positive. The employee was sent home when symptoms appeared and has remained in isolation ever since, in accordance with established infection prevention protocols and public health guidelines. Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is working closely with OHA to coordinate and prioritize testing for residents and staff at the Oregon Veterans' Home in Lebanon.

“Protecting our dedicated staff, along with our residents, has always been the highest priority. All infectious disease control precautions were, and continue to be, taken to mitigate the spread,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “I cannot speak highly enough of the herculean efforts these staff members have taken to continue to provide exceptional care to our honored residents even before this outbreak. They are truly going above and beyond, and all efforts are being made by ODVA, our state agency partners, and our Linn County partners to support them in their critical work.”

Health officials also reminded the public that viruses don’t discriminate – and neither should we. The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu, when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means within about 6 feet). No group of people is more likely to get COVID-19 or spread it to others.

“I know it’s difficult to learn that we are seeing more active community spread of COVID-19, but this is something we’ve been expecting,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed, State Health Officer and Epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division. “It’s a good reminder to take steps to protect yourself, and vulnerable friends and family members, by washing your hands, covering your coughs and sneezes, and staying home and away from others if you’re sick.”

Officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect themselves, their families, and those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect themselves and those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces like bathrooms, desks, countertops, doorknobs, computer keyboards, faucet handles, toys and cell phones.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home and away from others if you are ill.

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness.

Stay informed

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response. 

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response. 

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response. 

###

State and Local Officials Announce First Fatality from COVID-19 in Oregon - 03/14/20

Portland, OR – A 70-year-old man in Multnomah County is the first person to die from COVID-19 in Oregon. The Multnomah County resident was hospitalized at the Portland Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center and succumbed to his symptoms on Saturday, March 14.

The individual is not connected to the cases at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon.

“While we knew we would arrive at this day at some point, it doesn’t lessen the impact,” said OHA director Patrick Allen. “Our thoughts and deepest sympathy are with the family of this individual who honorably served his country.”

The individual, who had underlying heath conditions, tested positive for COVID-19 on March 10. The individual had no known contact to a confirmed case and had not traveled to a country where the virus is circulating.

“This is a sobering reminder that this virus is in our community and can be serious for older people and those with underlying conditions,” said Dr. Jennifer Vines Multnomah County Health Officer. “This loss has motivated us to continue our efforts to minimize the impact of this virus on our community.”

State announces 6 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases - 03/14/20

State announces 6 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases

 

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon now has a total of 36 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19, after the Oregon Health Authority announced six new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus as of 10:30 a.m. today.

 

OHA is reporting 3 new cases in Washington County, 2 new cases in Deschutes County, and 1 new case in Linn County. The Linn County case is at the Veterans’ Home in Lebanon. One of the Deschutes County cases traveled to a country where the virus is actively spreading. The remaining cases are believed to be community acquired. 

“With these latest test results, our concerns and efforts remain laser focused on our 9 honored veteran residents who are presumptive positive for COVID-19,” said Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “We are vigilantly working with Oregon Health Authority, Linn County Public Health and other partners to ensure all possible steps are being taken to help mitigate additional impact to our residents and staff. Our thoughts are with the affected veterans and all residents, as well as their families.”

“I know it’s difficult to learn that we are seeing more active community spread of COVID-19, but this is something we’ve been expecting,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed, health officer and state epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division. “It’s a good reminder to take steps to protect yourself, and vulnerable friends and family members, by washing your hands, covering your coughs and sneezes, and staying home if you’re sick.”

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu, when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about 6 feet). 

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

 

Stay informed

Oregon Health Policy Board retreat, meeting rescheduled as conference call - 03/13/20

March 13, 2020

Oregon Health Policy Board retreat, meeting rescheduled as conference call

What: The annual retreat and monthly meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board is rescheduled to be a shortened conference call meeting.

When: March 18, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, access code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; minutes approval; OHA report: COVID-19; health care cost growth target implementation committee update.

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, ey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/3cWo01A

Six more residents of Veterans' Home in Lebanon positive for COVID-19 - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

Six more residents of Veterans' Home in Lebanon positive for COVID-19

PORTLAND, Ore.—Six additional residents of Oregon Veterans' Home in Lebanon, where two people were diagnosed yesterday with COVID-19, have tested positive for COVID-19 and are presumptive positive cases, Oregon Heath Authority has announced.

The affected individuals include one man between ages 55 and 74 and five men aged 75 years or older. While their illnesses are considered linked to the two earlier cases, the exact sources of their exposures are not known. All have been placed in isolation at the facility.

“Tonight our thoughts are with these veterans and their loved ones,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “We are working closely with Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, the facility’s staff and Linn County Public Health to ensure they get the best care and support possible.”

The new cases bring Linn County’s total number of presumptive positive cases to eight. There now are 30 cases of the virus statewide, as of 8:13 p.m. today.

“Our deepest concerns are with our now eight veteran residents who have tested positive for COVID-19,” said Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “Our thoughts are with their families and loved ones, and with our staff at the Oregon Veterans’ Home who are working tirelessly to provide exceptional care to all residents. Our hearts go out to everyone who has been affected by this rapidly evolving pandemic, but we can’t help but feel special concern for what is happening at our Veterans’ Home. These residents are our nation’s heroes. They protected our freedoms and way of life that we now enjoy. It is nothing less than our sacred duty to now fight for them. We will continue to do everything in our power to protect our residents and staff, and mitigate the spread of this virus within our facility.”

Last night, an Infection Control and Specimen Collection Strike Team from OHA deployed to the Veterans' Home to help support existing and additional infection control practices and help collect specimens. Samples from the suspected cases were brought to the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory early this morning, and test results were released late this afternoon.

On Wednesday, Oregon Department of Human Services, in consultation with OHA, issued a policy to limit exposure to COVID-19 at long-term care facilities. The guidance directs nursing, assisted living and residential care facilities, including those providing memory care, to:

  • Restrict visitation to only essential individuals.
  • Limit essential visitors to two per resident at a given time.
  • Screen all permitted visitors for respiratory or other symptoms potentially indicating COVID-19, and for recent travel to an affected geographic area or high-risk setting prior to entering the facilities.
  • Document the screenings for all visitors.
  • Limit community outings.
  • Support residents’ access to socialization when visitors are not able to enter the facility through virtual visits.

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

Stay informed

 

3 new presumptive positive cases bring state’s COVID-19 count to 24 - 03/12/20

3 new presumptive positive cases bring state’s COVID-19 count to 24

PORTLAND, Ore.--Oregon is adding three new presumptive positive cases to its count of people diagnosed with novel coronavirus, COVID-19, bringing the state’s total to 24.

Clackamas County now has its first case, a man between the ages of 35 and 54 who was a close contact with a previous case. The new Washington County cases are both women older than 55 who had no known close contacts with confirmed cases and are considered community-spread cases.

Washington County now has a total of 10 cases.

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.
  • Call your provider before seeking health care.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu, when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about 6 feet).

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

As testing capacity increases--with LabCorp and Quest Diagnostics online, and clinical laboratories at some Oregon hospitals expected to begin testing by next week--officials expect the number of people who test positive with COVID-19 to rise.

Stay informed

PartnerSHIP meets March 16 by video and teleconference only - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

PartnerSHIP meets March 16 by video and teleconference only

UPDATE: The March 16 PartnerSHIP meeting will take place by video and teleconference only. In order to do our part to move to remote options for non-essential in-person meetings, in-person attendance for this meeting has been canceled.

What: The PartnerSHIP, tasked with developing the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP), will hold a teleconference to review draft strategies set forth by five subcommittees.

Agenda: Review draft of 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan and community engagement process.

When: March 16, 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting. Comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: In-person attendance to this meeting has been canceled. The public may view the meeting remotely using Zoom via computer, tablet, or smartphone, or listen in via phone.

Background: Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities across the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath in Oregon. The SHIP will be based on findings from the State Health Assessment.

  • Health departments develop and implement a health improvement plan at least once every five years.
  • The Public Health Division is using the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) framework, widely used by CCOs and local health departments. The MAPP framework has six phases. The SHA is developed over the first three phases, while the SHIP is developed and implemented over the second three phases.
  • Information about the PartnerSHIP can be found on the OHA website at http://healthoregon.org/2020ship.
  • The current State Health Improvement Plan, completed in December 2019, identifies seven priorities related to tobacco use, obesity, oral health, immunizations, suicide, communicable disease, and substance use.

Program contact: Heather Owens, 971-291-2568, .r.owens@dhsoha.state.or.us">heather.r.owens@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board March 19 meeting canceled - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us

In accordance with Governor Brown’s directive to slow the transmission of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Oregon and in order to protect the most vulnerable Oregonians and our state’s health care system capacity, the March 19, Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meeting is canceled.

The next meeting is scheduled for May 21 in Junction City.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2viaq7Z

 

Oregon Cannabis Commission Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee meets by conference call March 16 - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

Oregon Cannabis Commission Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee meets by conference call March 16

What: A conference call for the Governance and Frame Working  Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: March 16, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board meets March 19 by teleconference - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

Public Health Advisory Board meets March 19 by teleconference

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB) by teleconference.

Agenda: Discuss PHAB chair and co-chair positions and solicit volunteers to serve as chair for 2020-2022; adopt public health funding principles; approve letter regarding the application of public health funding principles to local public health funds outside of public health modernization; review draft 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan and provide input on implementation; and discuss key issues for PHAB members, including individual member roles and perspectives.

When: Thursday, March 19, 2-4 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: By telephone only at 669-900-6833, meeting ID 730 818 593.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Medical Marijuana Program Rules Advisory Committee meeting postponed - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

Oregon Medical Marijuana Program Rules Advisory Committee meeting postponed

What: A Rules Advisory Committee meeting to discuss changes to the cannabis testing rules in Division 7 and 64 originally scheduled for March 17 is being postponed to April 13.

The changes to be discussed include the addition of heavy metals and mycotoxin testing along with adding new testing requirements for cannabinoid inhalable products. See the OMMP's Rules and Statutes page for more info.

When: April 13, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Background: The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is responsible for cannabis testing rules that apply to both the medical and retail market. All marijuana items intended to be sold at a dispensary or retail shop must have been sampled and tested according to the testing rules set by OHA.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Health Policy Board to hold annual retreat, monthly meeting March 18 - 03/12/20

March 12, 2020

What: The annual retreat and monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: March 18, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St. Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: Welcome; minutes approval; retreat purpose; OHA report: COVID-19, OHA strategic planning, OHA performance management; committees of the board: annual progress reports, liaison roles and responsibilities, liaison assignments, Medicaid Advisory Committee; children’s health update; health equity update; tribal health update; public testimony; Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee update; 2019/2020 OHPB policy priority area review, OHPB work plan calendar; 2021 retreat planning.

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, ey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Governor Kate Brown Announces Steps to stem spread of COVID-19 - 03/12/20

Media Contact: Charles Boyle, Press Secretary Office of Governor Kate Brown, (503) 931-7773, les.Boyle@oregon.gov">Charles.Boyle@oregon.gov

Governor Kate Brown Announces Steps to stem spread of COVID-19

9:00 a.m. news conference to be live-streamed

Governor Brown will hold a press conference this morning at 9:00 a.m. to discuss new steps to stem the spread of coronavirus in Oregon. She will be joined by Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen, Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, Tri-County health officials, and other state and local officials. Please note modified time:

The event will be live-streamed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PruG7QBbSUs

Thursday, March 12
9:00 a.m. Portland State Office Building
800 NE Oregon St, Rm 177 Portland, OR

State announces 2 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases - 03/11/20

State announces 2 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases

March 11, 2020

Media contacts:

MEDIA ADVISORY: Press Briefing on COVID-19 scheduled for 7:30 p.m., TODAY, Wednesday March 11, 2020. To participate please call: 844-767-5679, access code: 2995615

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today announced Linn County’s first two presumptive positive cases of COVID-19. The new cases, involving two males over the age of 80, brings Oregon’s total to 21 total cases in eight counties.

Like the cases in Polk, Marion and Deschutes, the Linn County cases had no known close contacts with confirmed cases, so they are considered community-spread.

An Infection Control and Specimen Collection Strike Team will deploy to Linn County. The team will assess and work with the facility to assess infection control. The team will collect specimen samples for COVID-19 testing from all residents and care providers.

Upon initial evaluation, residents with symptoms were initially tested for flu, and respiratory illness. As an extra precaution, that facility had previously switched its ventilation system to circulating 100% outside air to mitigate the potential spread of infectious disease. the residents continued to receive appropriate medical care and were placed in isolation. Infectious disease prevention protocols also continued to be followed to protect other residents and staff.

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick said “our highest priority has always been the health and safety of our most honored veteran residents that we serve in our two veterans’ homes. From the start of concerns about COVID-19, and especially upon learning that the very age group that resides in our veterans’ homes is also the most susceptible, we took immediate measures to protect our veterans, including adhering to state and federal guidelines. Even before COVID-19 emerged, the two veterans’ homes regularly followed strict infectious disease protocols. We believe that protecting the health and safety of the veterans in our homes helps ensure we live up to their motto, ‘the place where honor lives.’ We have a sacred trust to safeguard them now.”

OHA, in consultation with the Oregon Department of Human Services, issued a policy to limit exposure to COVID-19 at long-term care facilities yesterday.

The guidance directs nursing, assisted living and residential care facilities, including those providing memory care, to:

  • Restrict visitation to only essential individuals;
  • Limit essential visitors to two per resident at a given time;
  • Screen all permitted visitors for respiratory or other symptoms potentially indicating COVID-19 and for recent travel to an affected geographic area or high-risk setting prior to entering the facilities;
  • Document the screenings for all visitors;
  • Limit community outings; and
  • Support residents’ access to socialization when visitors are not able to enter the facility through virtual visits.

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

State announces 4 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases - 03/11/20

March 11, 2020

Producers, editors: Deschutes County Public Health officials will be holding a press conference today at 1 p.m. at the Deschutes County Administration Building, 1300 NW Wall Street. Livestream: https://bit.ly/2TQx7rS.

Media contacts:

State announces 4 new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon now has a total of 19 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since Feb. 28 after the Oregon Health Authority announced four new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus today.

OHA confirmed one new case each in Polk, Marion, Umatilla and Deschutes counties. None of the new cases involved travel to a country where the virus is actively spreading. The Polk, Marion and Deschutes cases had no known close contacts with confirmed cases, so they are considered community-spread. The Umatilla County case is a close contact with that county’s first case.

OHA and Polk, Marion, Umatilla and Deschutes counties are working to identify and isolate any individuals who may have been in close contacts with the cases in the last 14 days.

“I know it’s difficult to learn that we are seeing more active community spread of COVID-19, but this is something we’ve been expecting,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed, health officer and state epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division. “It’s a good reminder to take steps to protect yourself, and vulnerable friends and family members, by washing your hands, covering your coughs and sneezes, and staying home if you’re sick.”

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu, when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about 6 feet).

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

As testing capacity increases — with Labcorp and Quest Diagnostics online, and clinical laboratories at some Oregon hospitals expected to begin testing by next week — officials expect the number of people who test positive with COVID-19 to rise.

Stay informed

New guidance directs long-term care facilities to limit exposure of residents to COVID-19 - 03/10/20

CORRECTED: AVAILABILITY IS TUESDAY, MARCH 10

MEDIA AVAILABILITY -- The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Department of Human Services will hold a conference call for media at 5:30 pm Pacific Time Tuesday, March 10th. The call-in number is 1-877-873-8017, code 9095232.

March 10, 2020

New guidance directs long-term care facilities to limit exposure of residents to COVID-19

In consultation with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) is using the authority of Governor Brown’s emergency order to issue a policy to limit exposure to COVID-19 at long-term care facilities. DHS is taking this action to protect older adults, Oregonians who are at greater risk of the most severe outcomes of this disease.

“Oregonians in our nursing homes are particularly vulnerable to this disease,” said OHA director Patrick Allen. “We are working in close partnership with long-term care facilities and asking families, friends, and others who work in and visit these facilities to help us protect the health and safety of our parents, grandparents and other loved ones.”

The guidance directs nursing, assisted living and residential care facilities, including those providing memory care, to:

  • Restrict visitation to only essential individuals;
  • Limit essential visitors to two per resident at a given time;
  • Screen all permitted visitors for respiratory or other symptoms potentially indicating COVID-19 and for recent travel to an affected geographic area or high-risk setting prior to entering the facilities;
  • Document the screenings for all visitors;
  • Limit community outings; and
  • Support residents’ access to socialization when visitors are not able to enter the facility through virtual visits.

"We are committed to working with long-term care providers on prevention and preparedness to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19," said DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht. “The new visitation restrictions are an additional preventative step we can take to protect older adults and Oregonians with underlying chronic medical conditions, and people who are immunocompromised, who are most at risk. We realize the hardship these restrictions may cause for residents and family members, and appreciate everyone’s partnership in protecting this vulnerable population.”

Oregon Health Care Association (OHCA) supports the guidance and recommendations for long-term care providers issued today by the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Health Authority, said Linda Kirschbaum, SVP of Quality Services at the OHCA. “Long-term care providers are doing everything they can to stop the virus from entering their communities. Limiting the number of people moving through communities is a critical part of those precautions. Since the first case was confirmed in the U.S., long-term care providers have been following their state-approved emergency preparedness and infection prevention plans and protocols to limit risk and exposure to residents in their communities. Screening visitors has been a part of these protocols from day one.”

OHA continues to recommend that older adults and people with underlying conditions take the following steps to stay safe and healthy:

  • Minimize contact with people who may be ill.
  • Avoid large public gatherings.
  • Order prescriptions by mail.
  • Take daily precautions:
    • wash your hands frequently,
    • don’t touch anywhere on your face, and
    • clean surfaces.

For more information:

OHA Coronavirus page

CDC COVID-19 page

CDC travel notices

World Health Organization (WHO) COVID-19 page

First Multnomah County resident tests positive for COVID-19 - 03/10/20

March 10, 2020

Producers and Editors: Dr. Jennifer Vines, lead health officer for the tri-county region, will be available for interviews today from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Multnomah County Health Department, 619 NW 6th Ave., in Portland. Call Kate Willson to schedule.

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us Kate Willson, 503-410-4524, kate.willson@multco.us

First Multnomah County resident tests positive for COVID-19

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority today announced Multnomah County’s first presumptive positive case of COVID-19. The new case brings Oregon’s total to 15 cases in seven counties.

OHA and Multnomah County are working to identify and isolate any individuals who may have been in close contact with the person in the last 14 days.

This case is being treated at Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The individual had no known contact with a confirmed case, and had not traveled from a country where the virus is circulating, so the case is being investigated as a community-acquired case.

“I can only imagine the concern among the family and friends of this person,” said Jennifer Vines, M.D., lead health officer for the tri-county region. “I’m asking you, as my neighbors and as my community, to keep this individual and their loved ones in your thoughts. And let us all do what we can to minimize the number of other people who must go through this.”

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu, when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about six feet).

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

As testing capacity increases — with Labcorp and Quest Diagnostics online, and clinical laboratories at some Oregon hospitals expected to begin testing by next week — officials expect the number of people who test positive with COVID-19 to rise. Also on Tuesday the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory received eight additional testing kits from the CDC, which allows for testing of up to 4,800 people.

“We are not going to isolate and quarantine our way out of this pandemic,” Dr. Vines said. “We are working with our partners on mass gathering guidance, at schools, places where people gather and mix, to spread people out.

“We are not talking anymore about stopping the spread of this virus,” she said. “Without a vaccine and without medicine, our best bet as a community is to slow the spread so those who do get seriously ill can get the care they need from our health system.”

Stay informed

 

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient and Social Equity Subcommittee meets March 23 - 03/10/20

March 10, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Patient and Social Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: Opening remarks, introductions; old business; subgroup discussions: OLCC store survey, OAR’s review, patient care, social equity; recap; set next meeting; and public comment.

When: March 23, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and eight members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information visit the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2wKHwh0

MEDIA ADVISORY: Press briefing on COVID-19 scheduled for 2 p.m., TODAY, Monday, March 9, 2020 - 03/09/20

March 8, 2020

Media contacts:

Jonathan Modie, OHA, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Kate Willson, Multnomah County, 503-410-4524, kate.willson@multco.us

MEDIA ADVISORY: Press briefing on COVID-19 scheduled for 2 p.m., TODAY, Monday, March 9, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore.—A news briefing on the COVID-19 situation in the Tri-County Portland Metro Region is scheduled for 2 p.m. Monday, March 9, at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St, Room 1D, Portland.

This is the second in a series of regular updates to members of the media on this rapidly changing landscape. 

Who

  • Dean Sidelinger, MD, MSEd, Health Officer and State Epidemiologist, Oregon Health Authority
  • Jennifer Vines, MD MPH,  Tri-County Health Officer
  • Sarah Present, MD, MPH, Clackamas County Health Officer

What: Local impacts of the changing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

Where:  Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St, Room 1D, Portland, OR 97232. 

When: 2 p.m. TODAY, March 9, 2020.

View online live: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRfmXj_Dmxw

Conference number: 877-336-4440, access code 522178

MEDIA ADVISORY: Gov. Brown, health officials to hold press conference today to give update on state's COVID-19 response - 03/08/20

March 8, 2020

What: Gov. Kate Brown will join Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen and other state and local officials for a press conference to give an update on the state’s response to the outbreak of novel coronavirus, COVID-19.

When: 11 a.m. TODAY (Sunday, March 8, 2020)

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland, Room 177; Livestream link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I9Dx2Dvqi0

Who:

  • Gov. Kate Brown
  • OHA Director Patrick Allen
  • Paul Cieslak, MD, medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations, OHA Public Health Division

For more info: http://healthoregon.org/coronavirus

HERC Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets April 2 - 03/06/20

March 6, 2020

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

HERC Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets April 2

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee.

When: April 2, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Rooms 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. The public also may attend via a listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 801373; or by webinar at  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/9149500647798347021.

Agenda: Review of public comments on the draft coverage guidance on Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth (topic blog); review of a new evidence-based report: Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer (sources); new topics for 2020-2021.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.

 

 

NW Prescription Drug Consortium announces Moda and Navitus as contractors for their pharmacy benefit management services - 03/05/20

For immediate release

March 5, 2020

NW Prescription Drug Consortium announces Moda and Navitus as contractors for their pharmacy benefit management services

SALEM, Ore. – The NW Prescription Drug Consortium is pleased to retain Moda as their contracted program administrator and begin using Navitus as their pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) effective January 1, 2022.

The NW Prescription Drug Consortium was created in 2006 to allow Oregon and Washington state agencies, local governments, businesses, labor organizations, and uninsured consumers to pool their purchasing power to get better prices on prescription drugs. It is made up of the Oregon Prescription Drug Program (OPDP) and the Washington Prescription Drug Program (WPDP) which are managed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA) respectively.

This announcement comes after an extensive eight-month procurement and evaluation process. Customer satisfaction and service excellence were paramount considerations throughout this process to obtain the best value for NW Prescription Drug Consortium.

Moda has served as the consortium’s program administrator for 13 years. Navitus demonstrated through the evaluation process that it shares the aligned values and goals of the consortium and Moda, including openness and transparency. Navitus also has a demonstrated history of collaborative partnerships and extremely high customer satisfaction ratings serving as a PBM.

A PBM provides insurance companies with wide array of services that manage the delivery of the pharmacy benefit to the consumer and negotiate with manufacturers to secure rebates that reduce the net costs for payers.

Next steps include contract negotiations between the consortium and Moda. The Consortium could have a final contract finalized as early as June.

The NW Prescription Drug Consortium provides a transparent pharmacy services and benefit management solution that has a demonstrated track record of saving money for the people of Oregon and Washington. In 2019 the consortium’s discount card program saved consumers almost $2 million every month. Groups participating in the consortium have appreciated consistent over-performance against our guaranteed rates. This over-performance has generated in excess of $100 million in additional savings to our groups since 2016.

For more information: What is the NW Prescription Drug Consortium?

# # #

New CDC data shows suicide was leading cause of death among Oregon youth in 2018 - 03/04/20

EDITORS: Here is an audio clip of Dr. Dana Hargunani discussing the 2018 suicide data .

March 4, 2020

Media contact: Sarah Kelber, 503-975-6633, ah.kelber@state.or.us">sarah.kelber@state.or.us

New CDC data shows suicide was leading cause of death among Oregon youth in 2018

Rank change due to increase in suicide deaths as well as drop in unintentional injury deaths among ages 10 to 24

Salem, Ore. – In February the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data showing that suicide was the leading cause of death among Oregon youth ages 10 to 24 in 2018, up from the second leading cause of death in 2017. Oregon is now ranked 11th highest in the nation for youth suicide death rates (up from 17th in 2017).

The change in rank is due to multiple factors: There was a rise in the suicide rate as well as a drop in the rate of unintentional injury deaths, the former leading cause. The unintentional injury category includes overdose deaths and motor vehicle accidents. While the suicide rate has increased, the unintentional injury rate decreased from 2017 to 2018.

"Suicide continues to be a concerning problem in Oregon across all age groups, including youth, as this new data confirms," said Dana Hargunani, Oregon Health Authority’s chief medical officer. "We continue to prioritize work across Oregon to support young people in schools, at home and in our communities. Fortunately, we are able to apply best practices that work to prevent suicide, and there are many ways you can get involved."

The 2018 CDC data is included in the 2019 Youth Suicide Intervention and Prevention Plan annual report, which was released to the Legislature this week.

Advocates and state agency staff have been working to address this growing issue and together requested dedicated funding for suicide prevention in 2019.

Governor Kate Brown included more than $6 million for suicide prevention in her budget for the 2019-2021 biennium, marking the first time this work has been funded by the state. The funding is being used to:

  • Fully fund Oregon’s 24/7 Suicide Prevention Lifeline.
  • Create statewide access to proven suicide prevention programming.
  • Provide funding to Oregon tribes for suicide prevention.
  • Address higher risk groups (LGTBQ youth, veterans, people with lived experience).
  • Support school districts to create and implement suicide prevention plans.
  • Fund youth peer-to-peer crisis intervention, outreach and youth development through the Oregon YouthLine.
  • Add capacity to support suicide prevention programs at the Oregon Health Authority.
  • Additionally, the Oregon Department of Education and the Oregon Health Authority are collaborating to implement Senate Bill 52 – also known as Adi’s Act – which requires school districts to have a suicide prevention, intervention and postvention response plan by the start of the 2020-2021 school year. The two agencies are also working together to support school safety (including suicide prevention), which is outlined in the Student Success Act (Section 36, pages 21 and 22).

What can I do?

Join in the efforts. Creating a suicide-safe Oregon is everyone’s work. There are many projects underway in communities across Oregon.

For more information:

  • If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, please know that help is available. Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline run by Lines For Life at 800-273-8255 or text '273TALK' to 839863. En español: 888-628-9454. TTY: 800-799-4TTY (4889).Youthline is a teen-to-teen crisis and help line. Teens are available to help daily, 4 to 10 p.m. Pacific Time (off-hour calls answered by Lines for Life). Call 877-968-8491 or text teen2teen to 839863 or chat at http://www.oregonyouthline.org/.
  • See Crisis Services by Oregon County and a list of crisis lines on OHA’s website.

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ADVISORY: OHA posts link to COVID-19 Q&A on Facebook Live - 03/04/20

ADVISORY: OHA posts link to COVID-19 Q&A on Facebook Live
Recording includes Gov. Brown with OHA’s Patrick Allen, Dr. Dean Sidelinger

PORTLAND, Ore.Oregon Health Authority has posted a recording of today’s Facebook Live presentation on COVID-19 featuring Gov. Kate Brown, OHA Director Patrick Allen and Dean Sidelinger, MD, MSed, state health officer and epidemiologist.

The recording is available at https://youtu.be/bIkI9iiiV30.

OHA has also created B-roll footage of Tuesday’s media tour of the OHA agency operations center (AOC). The video clips are available at the Media Resources box at healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

For more info about OHA’s COVID-19 response, visit: http://healthoregon.org/coronavirus