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News Releases
Oregon Psilocybin Fall Business Forum scheduled for October 19 - 10/04/22

October 4, 2022

Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, 

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Fall Business Forum scheduled for October 19

What: The Oregon Psilocybin Services Section at Oregon Health Authority in partnership with the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office of Small Business Assistance is holding a Psilocybin Fall Business Forum event on Oct.19, 2022 (9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time).

The Psilocybin Fall Business Forum is a free one-day virtual event open to the public. The event will include a series of Zoom presentations offered by various state agency partners. Session topics throughout the day will cover important business considerations for those interested in licensure under M109, the Oregon Psilocybin Services Act. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and learn about challenges and resources for new businesses in this emerging sector.

More details can be found in the Event Program, now available on the Psilocybin Fall Business Forum webpage.

Real-time captioning (CART), and simultaneous interpretation in Spanish and American Sign Language (ASL) will be provided in all sessions, except for the special session with the Office of Small Business Assistance at the end of the day which will be in a different format. If you would like to request interpretation services or other accommodations during the special session, please e-mail: business.sos@sos.oregon.gov by Oct. 16.

If you need any assistance with language or accessibility formats, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at: 971-341-1713, 711 TTY or OHA.Psilocybin@odhsoha.oregon.gov and every effort will be made to respond to requests received in advance. Submitting your request as early as possible is greatly appreciated.

When: Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022 (9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time)

Where: Virtual - Zoom Links can be found on the Psilocybin Fall Business Forum webpage.

Background:  Ballot Measure 109 (M109), also known as the Oregon Psilocybin Services Act, was voted into law by Oregonians in Nov. 2020. M109 directs OHA to license and regulate psilocybin products and the provision of psilocybin services. OHA is in a two-year development period extending from Jan. 1, 2021, to Dec. 31, 2022. During this time, OHA is building a new Oregon Psilocybin Services (OPS) Section and working with the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Rules Advisory Committees (RACs), and the public to establish rules for the production of psilocybin and provision of psilocybin services in the state of Oregon.

For the latest updates, Sign Up Here.

Conference of Local Health Officials meets October 20 in Corvallis and via Zoom. - 10/04/22

October 4, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist 503-871-8843

PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets October 20 in Corvallis and via Zoom.

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Officer elections; Annual committee reports; Health Space environmental health inspection platform updates; Maternal and child health home-visiting program updates; Alcohol and drug prevention program element (PE 36) changes; Fiscal year 2021 local investment data report; Public health accountability metrics update; Public health advisory board updates.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022, 9:00-11:30 a.m. 

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at  

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItde2trDIuHi77O3JM8PRXSEpfLh2L6YY

In person option.  Oregon State University Memorial Student Union Room 104 (Journey Room), 2501 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis OR, 97331

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869,  danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869 711 TTY or danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Recreational use advisory issued for Willow Creek Reservoir Oct. 3 - 10/03/22

October 3, 2022

 

Media contacts:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued for Willow Creek Reservoir Oct. 3

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Willow Creek Reservoir due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom and indication of concerning levels of cyanotoxins. The reservoir is in Morrow County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the reservoir where blooms are, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, if you have skin sensitivities you may get a puffy red rash.

You are encouraged to visit Willow Creek Reservoir and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing, and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. If you do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area you are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur, or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Be aware that dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention. Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If your dog exhibits symptoms veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends you do not eat fish. If you do decide to eat the fish, you should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Oct. 12 - 10/03/22

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Oct. 12

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee.

Agenda:  Program updates; legislative bill review; exemptions/rules update; emergency preparedness/response/incident overviews.

When: Wednesday, Oct. 12, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Teams Meeting: Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 971-277-2343; Passcode: 401 511 857#

Background: Per Oregon Revised Statute, the Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) is comprised of eight members representative of Radiation Protection Services (RPS) registrants and licensees who use radiation devices/sources. RAC members advise RPS staff on radiation use and safety, including budgetary and administrative rule matters.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Patty Thompson at 503-509-2622, or lee.lind@dhsoha.state.or.us  at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Rules Advisory Committee on transfers of local public health authority responsibilities meets remotely Oct. 11 - 10/03/22

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Rules Advisory Committee on transfers of local public health authority responsibilities meets remotely Oct. 11

What: A rules advisory committee will hold its third meeting to consider proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR) 333-014-0590.  The proposed changes are the result of passage of Senate Bill (SB) 253 during 2019 legislative session.

Agenda:  Review of revised proposed draft rules; review of draft fiscal impact statement and draft statement of need. The agenda will include time for public comment.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m.

Where: Microsoft Teams meeting. Click here to join the meeting

Meeting ID: 225 754 782 881 Passcode: khARqT

Download Teams | Join on the web

Or call in (audio only)

+1 971-277-2343,,584941053#   United States, Portland

Phone Conference ID: 584 941 053#

Background: SB 253 revised ORS 431.382 to include provisions for a local public health authority that has previously transferred its responsibilities to Oregon Health Authority to request the responsibilities be transferred back to the local public health authority.

Program contact: Andrew Epstein, 503-969-5816, andrew.d.epstein@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-969-5816, 711 TTY or andrew.d.epstein@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Oct. 11 - 10/03/22

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Oct. 11

What: A Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 11, 1-4p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 976 4473 Passcode: 742926

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom Oct. 10 - 10/03/22

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,  PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom Oct. 10

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, Oct. 10, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 696 9297 Passcode: 538725

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers. Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to offer Measure 110 grant extensions through June 2025 - 09/30/22

September 30, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhs.oregon.gov

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to offer Measure 110 grant extensions through June 2025

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) on Wednesday approved several proposals intended to protect continuity of services for individuals seeking treatment under Measure 110 and to ensure operational and financial stability for Measure 110 service networks ramping up across Oregon.

The OAC approved a proposal to offer current Measure 110 Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) grantees an option to receive an 18-month grant extension through June 2025. The current grants are due to expire in December 2023. The OAC also approved a process for how to handle Measure 110 service providers that may drop out of service networks.

Offering the potential extensions ensures individuals seeking treatment and services under Measure 110 won’t face a disruption in care in December 2023.

“It also allows providers the predictability and certainty they need to become fully operational,” said Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Behavioral Health Director Steve Allen. “Approving these extensions and the process for replacing service providers further demonstrates our commitment to serving individuals seeking treatment and to working with the OAC and our community partners to provide a stable source of funding needed to fully implement Measure 110,” he said.

Starting in November OHA will ask BHRN service providers whether they are interested in continuing to provide services through June of 2025, with a deadline of expressing an interest in an extension of December 15, 2022.  

Beginning in January, OHA will work on grant extension documents and work with service providers to adjust budgets. The deadline for finalizing grant extensions is June 2023.

The OAC has established and funded 44 Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) under Measure 110. These networks now exist in every Oregon county.

Each one offers a comprehensive array of community-based and culturally specific services for people seeking treatment for drug use and substance use disorders, without regard to their ability to pay.

Replacing service providers

The OAC also approved a process for replacing network providers who wish to stop providing services, if the loss of the provider would leave a service gap. Grantees opting to leave a network must get approval from the OAC and before agreeing to the termination of a grant agreement OAC wants to ensure all required BHRN services are covered. If there is another network partner providing the same service or services as the provider that is dropping out, the OAC has authorized OHA to agree to terminate the grant, but no replacement provider will be sought.

If a BHRN partner’s departure would leave a gap in services for the BHRN, OHA will look to other BHRN partners in the county to provide the additional, service.  If a network partner in the county cannot provide the service, OHA will look to any BHRN provider, and only if no current Measure 110 grantee can provide the service, will OHA look to a new provider to fill the gap. OHA will not agree to the termination of a grant until all required services in a BHRN are provided.

More detailed information on the grant extensions and the process for replacing providers, along with implementation progress updates can be found on the Measure 110 web page. Notices for future OAC meetings can be found here.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNs that have been established, along with a robust dashboard showing the funded services within each service network. OHA has also developed a Measure 110 resources page, which includes contact information for each of the BHRNs.

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the OAC to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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OHA lifts health advisories for Short Sand, Rockaway beaches Sept. 29 - 09/29/22

September 29, 2022

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA lifts health advisories for Short Sand, Rockaway beaches Sept. 29

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted public health advisories for contact with ocean water at Short Sand and Rockaway beaches, both located in Tillamook County.

The health authority issued the advisories on Sept. 27 for Short Sand Beach and Sept. 28 for Rockaway Beach, after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from follow-up tests taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels at these beaches. Contact with the ocean water in these areas no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. Officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Oregon Health Policy Board Behavioral Health Committee to hold public meetings in October - 09/29/22

September 29, 2022

Media contact: Tim Heider 971-599-0459 timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon Health Policy Board Behavioral Health Committee to hold public meetings in October

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board’s Behavioral Health Committee

When: October 10, and 24, 2022 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Virtual:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1615920136?pwd=UnVjMGxIZzRucGtxN0U2ekl6UWhhQT09

Join by phone: 669-254-5252

Zoom Meeting ID: 161 592 0136

Zoom Passcode: 734636

Agenda: Committee members continue to develop metric concepts.

The meeting will include time for public comment. Comments may also be sent ahead of time to BHC@dhsoha.state.or.us

Purpose: In 2021, the Oregon State Legislature passed House Bill (HB) 2086, which included multiple provisions and called for the establishment of the Behavioral Health Committee of the Oregon Health Policy Board. The committee’s purpose is to increase the quality of behavioral health services and transform Oregon’s behavioral health system through improved outcomes, metrics, and incentives. The committee will direct this work for the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and will be supported by staff from OHA’s Office of Behavioral Health Services

The Behavioral Health Committee will use a health equity lens. It will center the voices of those with lived experience, community members impacted by health inequities, and members of the community with behavioral healthcare knowledge.

Read more about the Behavioral Health Committee.

Questions? Email questions to:  BHC@odhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please call 503-784-3737, 711 TTY, or BHC@odhsoha.state.or.us or at least two business days before the meeting.

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Opioid overdoses increased in 2021, OHA report shows - 09/29/22

September 29, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Opioid overdoses increased in 2021, OHA report shows

Fentanyl and methamphetamine help fuel rise in deaths and hospitalizations

PORTLAND, Ore.—Methamphetamines and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl helped drive an increase in opioid overdoses and related deaths in 2021, according to a new Oregon Health Authority (OHA) report.

The report, Opioids and the Ongoing Drug Overdose Crisis in Oregon, shows that overdoses involving multiple drugs – known as polysubstance overdoses – also rose during 2021 and now account for more than half of all fatal overdoses. In addition, hospitalizations increased in 2021 following decreases between 2018 and 2020. Charges for drug overdose-related hospitalizations reached $170 million and overdose-related emergency room charges reached $50 million.

“What this report tells us is that, even as prescription opioids were on the decline in Oregon over the last decade, misuse of synthetic and prescription opioids and other drugs continues to take a heavy toll on everyone in our state,” said Tom Jeanne, M.D., M.P.H., deputy health officer and deputy state epidemiologist at OHA’s Public Health Division, who served as an advisor on the report. “We need to continue our efforts focused on enhanced prevention across the continuum of drug use.”

The report also describes those at highest risk for unintentional drug overdose death in 2021, which were non-Hispanic American Indians and Alaska Natives, non-Hispanic Blacks, and males. At lowest risk were people of Hispanic ethnicity and non-Hispanic Asians and Pacific Islanders.

“These are populations that have been unfairly affected by systemic racism, socioeconomic and political injustices and bias, which through multiple pathways can worsen health outcomes and increase the risk of experiencing a drug overdose,” Jeanne said.

The report noted some trends that presented opportunities for intervention with those at risk of overdoses.

For one, emergency medical services (EMS) personnel administered naloxone, a drug that rapidly reverses an opioid overdose, during 5,556 encounters in 2021, which is up from 3,758 encounters in 2019. In most of these cases the patient was transferred to a medical care facility for treatment.

In addition, there were almost 73,000 emergency department visits and more than 17,000 hospitalizations related to substance use disorder or intoxication issues other than an overdose in 2021. Such health care interactions represent opportunities to connect patients to treatment, prescribe naloxone – a medicine that rapidly reverses an opioid overdose – and provide other supports to reduce their risk for experiencing future overdoses, the report explains.

Providing comprehensive, non-stigmatizing harm-reduction services for people who use drugs is among a number of response strategies the report points to. Others include education for people who have never used drugs; resilience building and support to strengthen protective factors among those at higher risk for drug use and for developing substance use disorder; ensuring universal access to culturally sensitive treatment; and maintaining strong support for people in recovery, including peer support workers.

“Each non-fatal overdose and medical or behavioral health care visit has the potential to be a touch point with prevention, treatment and recovery services to support recovery and reduce the risk of a future fatal overdose,” according to the report.

An overdose is always a medical emergency. Individuals should call 911 before administering naloxone. Oregon’s Good Samaritan Law protects the caller and the person who has overdosed against possession and paraphernalia charges.

OHA’s Naloxone Rescue for Opioid Overdose webpage contains naloxone frequently asked questions and a map showing Oregon pharmacies that distribute the medicine. In Oregon, naloxone is available without a prescription. Anyone actively using opioids, or other illicit substances, can get naloxone and other harm-reduction materials at no cost through syringe service programs. Syringe service programs are available to anyone who uses drugs, regardless of whether they inject them. Here is OHA’s list of syringe and needle exchange services available in Oregon.

OHA has developed the following guidance for people who use drugs:

  • Unless a pharmacist directly hands you a prescription pill, assume it is counterfeit and contains fentanyl.
  • Assume any pills obtained from social media, the internet or a friend are counterfeit and contain fentanyl.
  • If you are using pills, don’t use alone and always have naloxone on hand and visible.
  • Test your drugs with fentanyl test strips before you use them. Fentanyl test strips can often be accessed at local harm-reduction sites.

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OHA seeking applicants for peer run respite programs in Oregon. Deadline is Oct.6 - 09/29/22

September 28, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

OHA seeking applicants for peer run respite programs in Oregon. Deadline is Oct.6

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has issued a Request for Grant Applications (RFGA) seeking state-based organizations to operate peer-run respite programs for people who experience a mental health crisis or emotional distress that may lead to a higher-level of care.

The program, established under House Bill 2980, will distribute $6 million in grants to operate up to four peer-run centers in four geographic regions: The Portland-Metro area, central or eastern Oregon, southern Oregon and the Oregon coast. At least one of the centers must offer culturally specific services.

Peer-run respites are voluntary, non-clinical, short-term residential programs operated in home-like settings for people experiencing emotional distress. The respites are staffed by people with lived experience and run independently of other behavioral health support providers.

The program is being operated through OHA’s Office of Recovery and Resilience. More about the grants and the program can be found here.

Eligibility is limited to peer-run organizations currently operating in Oregon. Information on how to apply for the programs, including the RFGA can be found here. The deadline for RFGA applications is Thursday, Oct. 6.

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Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30, via Zoom - 09/29/22

Sept. 30, 2022

Contacts: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, Elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Lisa Bui, oha.resourceallocation@dhsoha.state.or.us or contact by phone at 503-576-9321 (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee (ORAAC).

When: Sept. 30, 2022 noon to 2:00 p.m

Join meeting by computer or video link:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604980686?pwd=RmVTVk5aTU0rNkpyWkhQM3JjYUZIdz09

Join meeting by phone:

Phone # 669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 498 0686

Passcode: 828115

Agenda: Welcome; Health Justice vs Health Equity, Community Systems and Health Justice, Healthcare Systems and Health Justice.

Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee (ORAAC) meeting. Meeting materials are posted to the ORAAC website. https://www.oregon.gov/oha/Pages/Resource-Allocation-Advisory-Committee.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

Everyone is welcome to the meetings. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please call 971-304-6236 or write oha.resourceallocation@dhsoha.state.or.us

Rockaway Beach health advisory issued Sept. 28 - 09/28/22

September 28, 2022

 

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Rockaway Beach health advisory issued Sept. 28

High bacteria levels prompt OHA warning to avoid water contact

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing a public health advisory today for unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters at Rockaway Beach in Tillamook County. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Children, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should use extra caution as they are more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Levels of fecal bacteria tend to be higher in these types of water sources.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources including:

  • Stormwater runoff.
  • Sewer overflows.
  • Failing septic systems.
  • Animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

Even if there is no advisory in effect, avoid swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Ocean waters are re-tested after an advisory is issued. Once bacteria levels are at a safe level, OHA will notify the public that the advisory is lifted.

While this advisory is in effect at Rockaway Beach, state officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Federal Government Approves Oregon Medicaid Waiver, Including First-in-Nation Medicaid Funding for Food and Housing - 09/28/22

September 28, 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

Note to reporters: Oregon health officials will hold a media briefing at 11AM. Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link.

To watch today’s media availability, click here.

Federal Government Approves Oregon Medicaid Waiver, Including First-in-Nation Medicaid Funding for Food and Housing

Agreement also expands health coverage for children and provides $1.1 billion in new federal funding

SALEM, Ore. -  Today, Oregon received federal approval to pilot first-in-the-nation changes to the state’s Medicaid program over the next five years. Under the agreement, Oregon would receive $1.1 billion in new federal funds to address inadequate food, housing and other root-cause issues that lead to poor health for people and families struggling to make ends meet. As part of the agreement, the federal government also approved expanded Oregon Health Plan (OHP) coverage for young children, as well as extended eligibility for youth and adults.

The Oregon Health Plan, which is Oregon’s Medicaid program, provides comprehensive health coverage to approximately 1.4 million Oregonians, more than one in three state residents. States may request federal approval to test innovations in their Medicaid programs. Today’s agreement between Oregon and the federal agency Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) renews Oregon’s current section 1115 Medicaid Demonstration Waiver for the next five years (covering 2022 – 2027) and provides federal sign-off and funding to implement the new changes.

A state must apply for a Medicaid waiver when it wants to make changes from normal federal guidelines. States can request flexibilities in who is eligible for Medicaid, what benefits they receive and how health care is delivered.

 “I’m proud to work alongside Oregon to advance policies to expand access to high-quality health care, particularly for those most in need,” said Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure. “Thanks to this demonstration, for example, eligible children in Oregon will be able to keep their Medicaid coverage continuously until age 6, eliminating potential gaps in coverage and care. The demonstration also invests in the services that people need to address their health-related social needs, such as medically tailored meals and housing supports. That is transformational change – as are many of the other components included in Oregon’s 1115 demonstration. We encourage all states to follow Oregon’s lead supporting a whole-person approach to care.”

Extended health coverage for children, special needs youth and adults

Oregon’s renewed waiver will allow the state to keep children enrolled in Medicaid up to age 6 — preventing gaps in coverage that can cause children to lose access to needed care in their formative early years. Oregon is the first state in the nation to receive federal approval for continuous health coverage for children under 6 years old.

Also, all OHP members age 6 and older will have two years of continuous OHP enrollment. Establishing longer continuous coverage periods will keep more Oregonians enrolled in OHP with consistent access to health, dental, and behavioral health care.

Medicaid coverage to address hunger, homelessness and climate change

In another first-in-the nation innovation, Oregon will expand health-related social needs coverage for certain food assistance, housing supports and other interventions that are medically appropriate for individuals experiencing certain life transitions, including individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

This package of services, called health-related social needs, includes food and housing supports (including rental assistance) for up to six months for groups who have been marginalized such as youth in foster care, people who are homeless and low-income older adults. State health officials sought federal approval to cover housing and nutritional support services to reduce health inequity and stabilize the circumstances of OHP members who are at-risk of worsening health during major life disruptions. In addition, Oregon will provide devices – air conditioners, air filters, generators - to people with a high-risk clinical need who reside in regions experiencing extreme weather events that place the health and safety of residents in jeopardy as declared by the federal government or the governor of Oregon.

“Oregon is committed to eliminating health inequity and ensuring that our health care system provides optimal health and well-being for everyone in Oregon,” said OHA Director Pat Allen. “This agreement gives us more tools and resources to tackle the problems in people’s lives that undermine their health such as lack of housing, food or consistent health coverage. We’re excited to work with partners in every corner of the state to help more people in Oregon live healthier lives, hold down the growth of health care costs and strengthen communities across our state.”

Expanding health services for children and youth with special needs

Under the new five-year Medicaid waiver, Oregon will cover early periodic screening, diagnosis and treatment (EPSDT) services for to all children and youth up to age 21 and for youth with special health care needs up to age 26, effective Jan. 1, 2023. Under the new waiver, the federal government will allow Oregon to expand Medicaid eligibility and benefits for youth with special health care needs up to the age of 26 if their income levels are at or below 300% of the federal poverty level (FPL). This will ease their transition to adulthood, with fewer disruptions in health care and services.

Federal government commits $1.1 billion to address health-related services, expand coverage and improve care

Oregon also received significant federal support through Designated State Health Programs (DSHP) totaling $1.1 billion in federal funds over the waiver period. Under the waiver, Oregon will use these funds to address health-related special needs (such as housing, food and climate related supports), increase health coverage, achieve better health outcomes and improve the efficiency and quality of care.

In addition, the new waiver sets a timeline to move Oregon’s prioritized list of services from a demonstration to the State Plan as part of standard benefits and services.

Pending decisions

Along with today’s waiver approval, Oregon and CMS will continue to discuss Oregon’s proposals to have new Community Investment Collaboratives (CIC) throughout the state manage community-led health equity interventions. State and federal health officials also will continue to discuss OHP coverage for youth in detention and adults in jails, as well as 90-day transitional pre-release coverage for adults in prison or psychiatric facilities.

Oregon health officials also requested authority to remove prior authorization requirements for American Indians/Alaska Natives on OHP, convert the Special Diabetes Program for Indians to a Medicaid benefit, reimburse tribal-based practices and extend coverage of new health-related social need services to tribal members not enrolled in a Coordinated Care Organization. Federal officials are continuing to evaluate Oregon’s request.

To learn more about all the changes being implemented in the Medicaid waiver and other related efforts in Oregon to transform our health system, visit here.

2022 – 2027 Medicaid Demonstration Waiver Policy Summary

Oregon Health Plan Section 1115 Demonstration Approval


 

Media briefing on Medicaid tomorrow at 11 a.m. - 09/27/22

September 27, 2022

Media contact: Elizabeth Gharst, 971-666-2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us

Media briefing on Medicaid tomorrow at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority officials will host a Zoom media briefing at 11 a.m. tomorrow – Wednesday, September 28 – to discuss updates to the state’s Medicaid program.

Pat Allen, OHA Director, will join Danielle Sobel, Policy and Governmental Affairs Senior Director at the Oregon Primary Care Association, Mercedes Elizalde, Public Policy Director at Central City Concern, Sarah Sullivan, Executive Director at Gorge Grown Food Network representing Oregon Community Food Systems Network, and Erin Fair-Taylor, Vice President of Medicaid Programs at PacificSource to give an update on the state’s Medicaid program, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.

Oregon Health Policy Board meets October 3, via Zoom - 09/27/22

September 27, 2022

Contacts: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, Elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets October 3, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: October 3rd – 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604737337?pwd=WEJFeWJick9oVCsrT0RwcjEwaWdWZz09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,, 1604737337#,,,,,,0#,, 136235#

Proposed topics for the meeting agenda are listed below. The final meeting agenda and supporting materials will be posted on the OHPB website prior to the meeting. 

Agenda:

Agenda and meeting materials will be uploaded to the website prior to the October 3rd meeting, to find materials please follow the link below

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-meetings.aspx

*To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

$913,000 in grants for nonprofits and insurance agents to help Oregonians with health coverage enrollment - 09/27/22

September 27, 2022  

Media contact: Amy Coven, 503-943-0164, amy.coven2@dhsoha.state.or.us

$913,000 in grants for nonprofits and insurance agents to help Oregonians with health coverage enrollment

(Salem) – Figuring out health insurance was complicated, even before facing a global pandemic. To help Oregonians sort through health insurance plans and programs, the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace has awarded grants to nonprofit community groups and insurance agents.

“Choosing the best health plan can be a daunting process,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Applying for health coverage and financial help and then sorting through plan options can be stressful. Insurance agents and community partners throughout the state are available to take the stress out of the process and help Oregonians enroll in the best coverage for their situation.”

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace runs OregonHealthCare.gov and helps people get insurance when they do not have coverage available through work and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan, Medicare or another program.

“Everyone in Oregon should have access to the high-quality coverage that works for their health needs,” said Flowers. “Insurance agents and community partners can help you figure out the programs, plans, and financial help available to make insurance more affordable for you.”

Grants totaling $913,000 will be awarded to 14 community groups and 29 insurance agents. Awardees use these grants to spread awareness of the upcoming Marketplace health insurance open enrollment period, and to help Oregonians enroll in coverage through the Marketplace.

For many people, open enrollment is the only time of the year to sign up for a private health plan or switch plans. Open enrollment will run from Nov. 1 through Jan. 15 for health coverage for 2023.

Grantees were judged on multiple criteria, including their demonstrated ties to community networks, ability to reach underserved populations, and capacity to serve consumers whether they are eligible for HealthCare.gov plans or other programs, such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare. Grantees represent and serve Oregon’s diverse populations and offer services in multiple languages, including Arabic, Asian languages, Russian, and Spanish.

Community partner groups who will receive grants are:

  • ADAPT Integrated Health Care, Roseburg
  • Asian Health & Service Center, Portland
  • Cascade AIDS Project, Portland
  • Centro Latino Americano, Eugene
  • Grand Ronde Tribal Health Clinic, Grand Ronde
  • Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization, Portland
  • Interface Network, Salem
  • Mosaic Medical, Bend
  • Northeast Oregon Network, La Grande
  • One Community Health, The Dalles
  • Project Access Now (PANOW), Portland
  • Unete Center for Farmworker Advocacy, Medford
  • Urban League of Portland, Portland
  • Waterfall Community Health Center, North Bend

Insurance agents – also called partner agents – who will receive grants are:

  • Aaron Michael Burns Insurance Services, Eugene
  • Abel Insurance, Coos Bay, Florence, Gold Beach, and Newport
  • Bancorp Insurance, La Pine
  • Boone Insurance Associates, Eugene
  • Country Financial, Sisters
  • FG Insurance, Forest Grove and Portland
  • Gordon Wood Insurance, Roseburg
  • Grace Insurance Services, Portland
  • HE Cross Company, Portland
  • Health Plans in Oregon, Portland
  • HealthMarkets Insurance, Canby
  • Healthwise Insurance Planning, Portland
  • Healthy, Wealthy & Wise, Tigard
  • High Desert Insurance, Bend
  • Hillock Insurance Agency, Enterprise
  • iCover Oregon, Albany
  • Insurance By Design, Wilsonville
  • Insurance Marketplace, Medford
  • K Insurance Group, Independence
  • Klamath Insurance Center, Klamath Falls
  • Linda Dugan Insurance, Astoria
  • Matthew Woodbridge Insurance, Salem and Woodburn
  • Premier NW Insurance, Oregon City, Salem, and Sandy
  • RJS & Associates, Philomath
  • Shanon Saldivar Insurance, Hood River and The Dalles
  • Thippayaphorn Om Sukheenai, Newberg
  • Tomlin Health Insurance, Eugene
  • Valley Insurance, La Grande

To make an appointment with a partner or agent, go to OregonHealthCare.gov/GetHelp or call 855-268-3767 (toll-free).

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov. For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in October - 09/27/22

September 27, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in October

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will discuss next steps following the establishment of BHRNs. Agendas will be posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Virtual meetings are Wednesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Oct. 5 – https://youtu.be/lw3MWMQsH6Y

Oct. 12 – https://youtu.be/P3uwwrNHRNA

Oct. 19 – https://youtu.be/Fd0c1k_Desk

Oct. 26 - https://youtu.be/PoZV5ulnkHw

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

###

Public Health Advisory Board meets Oct. 13 - 09/27/22

September 27, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets Oct. 13

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve September meeting minutes; discuss PHAB subcommittees; review Strategic Data Plan subcommittee charter; review PHAB charter and bylaws; discuss prioritization for public health modernization funding in the 2023-25 biennium.

When: Thursday, Oct. 13, 3-5:30 pm. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602414019?pwd=MWtPYm5YWmxyRnVzZW0vZkpUV0lEdz09 or conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1602414019#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday, October 4 - 09/26/22

September 26, 2022 

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,  

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov 

Program contact: Anna Williams, 971-720-9654, anna.k.williams@dhsoha.state.or.us 

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday, October 4

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council 

When: Tuesday October 4, 12:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Where: By webinar at ZoomGov 

Meeting ID: 160 347 3675, Passcode: 123456 

Dial by your location +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose) 

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment. 

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults.  

Primarily the Council will be reviewing the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion statement for the System of Care Advisory Council and the Council’s report to the Legislature due September 15, 2022. 

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide: 

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christy Hudson at 971-678-4347, 711 TTY, or christy.j.hudson@state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting. 

###

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30 - 09/23/22

September 23, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Licensing, Facilities, and Operations RAC (Session 3).

When: Friday, Sept. 30, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601443759?pwd=M2JFaXVkT0hzcjVPOUVFTUJWd3FyZz09  

Meeting ID: 160 144 3759

Passcode: 172831

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 29 - 09/23/22

September 23, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 29

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Packaging, Labeling, and Product Transportation RAC (Session 3).

When: Thursday, Sept. 29, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604155121?pwd=OVREZU1vTUpjL2FYRjZ2Uk1qUUlZZz09  

Meeting ID: 160 415 5121

Passcode: 111516

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 28 - 09/23/22

September 23, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 28

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Facilitator Conduct, Preparation, Administration, and Integration Sessions RAC (Session 3).

When: Wednesday, Sept. 28, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605370281?pwd=Y1VlWGNFVHZINkNkWVF6RWpSY1JYUT09  

Meeting ID: 160 537 0281

Passcode: 619313

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup to meet September 30 - 09/23/22

September 23, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971.666.2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503.931.3053, kiari.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup to meet September 30

What: The regular public meeting of the Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup

When: September 30, 9:00am to 12:00pm

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome (9:00-9:10); Legislative Recommendations Next Steps (9:10-9:30); State HIE Infrastructure: HIT Commons (9:30-10:20); BREAK (10:20-10:30); State HIE Infrastructure: Reliance eHealth Collaborative (10:30-11:50); Public Comment (11:50-11:55); Next Steps and Adjourn (11:55-12:00)

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/OHIT-HITOC/Pages/HIEworkgroup.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Oct. 4 via Zoom - 09/22/22

September 22, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Oct. 4 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve August meeting minutes; discuss public health indicators for communicable disease control and environmental health.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 4, 9-11 a.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 841 5649; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1608415649?pwd=NUZQNloxYjVyR2VlVml0RHArdnBGUT09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Healthy Homes Task Force meets Oct. 13 via Zoom - 09/22/22

September 22, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Healthy Homes Task Force meets Oct. 13 via Zoom

What: The Healthy Homes Task Force is holding its third (of about eight) meetings.

Agenda: Welcome, agenda, introductions; task force actions; identifying barriers; initial results from Healthy Homes Landscape Survey; public comment period; closing.

When: Thursday, Oct. 13, 2-4 p.m. Public comments will be collected during a 10-minute public comment period at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom, https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607162369?pwd=VTUzZzVUUWcvejJiZGpDUk1vWnRqQT09

Meeting ID: 160 716 2369

Passcode: 414009

One tap mobile

+16692545252,,1607162369# US (San Jose)

+16468287666,,1607162369# US (New York)

Background: The Healthy Homes Grant Program was established by House Bill 2842 of the 2021 Oregon Legislative session. The legislation dedicated funding for home repair, lead or mold abatement, structural or safety improvements, and electrical upgrades that support energy efficiency for low income and environmental justice communities. This legislation also established a Healthy Homes Task Force to help shape the development of the Healthy Homes Grant Program.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jordana Leeb at 971-393-8487, 711 TTY, or jordana.a.leeb@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

CORRECTION: Oregon, Washington joined by Nevada in offering new prescription discount card - 09/22/22

September 22, 2022

Media Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon, Washington joined by Nevada in offering new prescription discount card

PORTLAND, Ore.—Nevada has just joined Oregon and Washington in offering the ArrayRx card, a state-backed program that can save individuals up to 80% for generic drugs and 20% for brand-name drugs.

The ArrayRx Card, formerly known as Oregon/Washington Prescription Discount Card, has helped more than 550,000 participants in both states save money on needed prescription drugs for nearly two decades.

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak received his prescription discount card Sept. 22 to celebrate the state’s participation in the ArrayRx pharmacy discount program.

“Since 2003, Oregonians have been able to access our state sponsored pharmacy discount card, and today we welcome Nevadans to the ArrayRx family,” said Trevor Douglass, DC, MPH, pharmacy purchasing director at Oregon Health Authority (OHA). “Oregon and Washington have a rich history of collaborating on the pharmacy purchasing front.”

By implementing the ArrayRx Card program, Nevada will be able to offer the same savings that people in Oregon and Washington have enjoyed, thanks to the expansion of the ArrayRx pooled purchasing potential.

How the ArrayRx card works

For people interested in using ArrayRx, the enrollment process is simple and free, and there no age or income restrictions. For those who have insurance, they can choose to use the ArrayRx Card or their pharmacy benefit at the point of sale, whichever provides a better price. All U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs prescribed by a licensed provider are eligible for a discount. Mail-order and specialty drugs are also available.

“The ArrayRx card was supportive to many Oregonians during the historic wildfires that broke out during Labor Day weekend 2020,” said Heidi Murphy, pharmacy purchasing program and ArrayRx operations manager at OHA. “Evacuees were able to contact ArrayRx and quickly get discounted medications to replace those they had to leave behind when fleeing the fires. Receiving their needed medications helped provide some stability in an otherwise stressful and difficult situation.”

Donna Sullivan, chief pharmacy officer for the Washington Health Care Authority, ArrayRx offers pharmacy benefit management services for local government, private sector businesses, labor organizations and individuals.

“Between 2003 and 2022, 1.2 million participants in Oregon and Washington benefitted from the ArrayRx services,” Sullivan said. “We welcome the residents of Nevada to receive the same prescription drug discounts through the ArrayRx Card.”

To learn more about the ArrayRX Discount Card, visit www.arrayrxcard.com. The website is available in Spanish at: https://www.arrayrxcard.com/es.

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OHA confirms state's second pediatric monkeypox (hMPXV) case - 09/21/22

September 21, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA confirms state’s second pediatric monkeypox (hMPXV) case

Officials say illness not associated with school, child care settings

PORTLAND, Ore. – A second pediatric case of monkeypox virus (hMPXV) has been identified in the state, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) confirmed.

Local public health officials have investigated the case and confirm that the case is not linked to a school, child care or other community setting.

“Pediatric monkeypox cases have happened around the country during the nationwide outbreak, and unfortunately Oregon is no exception,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA. “As we have stated previously, this virus can affect anyone.”

Monkeypox spreads primarily through close skin-to-skin contact. Most commonly during the current outbreak, this has been through intimate or sexual contact. Infection has also occurred during close, skin-to-skin contact with the lesions of an individual with monkeypox through a caregiving relationship, such as a parent caring for a child or an adult caretaker of another person. Much less often, monkeypox could spread through contact with towels, clothing or other objects that have been in contact with monkeypox lesions. Large respiratory droplets or oral fluids that might come from prolonged face-to-face contact could also transmit the virus, but it is uncommon.

To protect patient confidentiality, OHA is not disclosing the child’s sex, age, county of residence or how the child is believed to have acquired the illness. A pediatric case is defined as someone with the virus in the 0-17 age range.

The new pediatric case is among a total, as of today, of 204 presumptive and confirmed cases of monkeypox in Oregon, with illness onset ranging from June 7 to Sept. 13. The cases are in nine counties: 141 in Multnomah; 24 in Washington; 22 in Lane; six each in Clackamas and Marion; two in Columbia; and one each in Coos, Hood River and Union. About 9.5% of cases identify as Mexican and 8.9% of cases identify as Other Hispanic or Latino a/x/e. Case counts for South American and Central American were too low to calculate a percent.

The Oregon child was tested for monkeypox Sept. 14 and the test results were reported to public health Sept. 19. The local public health authority, with OHA support, has been conducting case investigation and contact tracing to determine whether there are other exposures. During these investigations, public health provides guidance on how to avoid spreading the virus to others and offers vaccines to close contacts.

Sidelinger emphasized that risk of monkeypox spreading in school settings is low, since the most common means of person-to-person transmission is direct contact with the rash, scabs or body fluids of a person with the virus. It is not easily spread unless there is prolonged, skin-to-skin contact with an infected person.

OHA continues to encourage vaccination against monkeypox for anyone who anticipates having, or has had, recent, direct, skin-to-skin contact with at least one other person, and who knows other people in their social circles or communities who have had monkeypox.  

Oregon has distributed, or is in the process of distributing, more than 8,870 vials – about 44,350 doses – of the Jynneos vaccine and 340 courses of the investigational antiviral drug known as tecovirimat – or TPOXX – since June 20. According to OHA’s ALERT Immunization Information System database, 8,800 Jynneos doses have been administered so far. More than that have been administrated, but those 8,800 doses are what’s been entered into ALERT thus far. OHA continues to work with its local partners to redistribute any leftover doses they may have to ensure a continued, steady flow of vaccines to communities where they’re most needed.

On Sept. 20, Oregon received its next federal allocation of 1,220 vials, giving the state a total of 1,428 vials or up to 7,140 doses to continue to meet initial and second dose recommendations. 

People who suspect they have monkeypox should contact their health care provider to let them know before going in to be seen. The provider may recommend testing for monkeypox.

Those who don’t have a health care provider can call 2-1-1 or their local public health authority to get help finding a clinic or health care provider.

For more information about monkeypox and Oregon’s response to the outbreak, visit OHA’s monkeypox (hMPXV) website.

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Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet September 27 - 09/21/22

September 21, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet September 27

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: September 27, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1614785914?pwd=V1VJTGV6N0ZaOHRiajEyNm4wTDF0QT09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 478 5914, Password: 948427.

Agenda: Welcome and Roll Call/Introductions (1:00-1:05); Review agenda and approve minutes (1:05-1:10); Public comment (1:10-1:20); HPQMC Letter about Behavioral Health Measures (1:20-1:50); Lessons Learned Report Workshop (2:00-2:55); Wrap up and next steps (2:55-3:00); adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, or

brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

OHA report highlights progress on behavioral health investments in Oregon - 09/20/22

September 20, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA report highlights progress on behavioral health investments in Oregon

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today released an updated report on the progress of behavioral health investments in Oregon. The report documents the progress OHA has made on funding several vital priorities as part of the legislature’s historic investment.

According to the Behavioral Health Investment Report, as of mid-September, OHA has spent or obligated $845 million of the $1.35 billion the Oregon Legislature appropriated during the 2021-2023 biennium, to transform the state’s behavioral health system.

OHA expects to spend or obligate an additional $291 million by the end of 2022, which would raise the total to more than $1.1 billion, comprising 84 percent of the Legislature’s allocated funding.

The spending over the remaining three months of this year will focus on:

  • Distributing an estimated additional $67 million for construction and renovation projects to increase the number of behavioral health beds in Oregon
  • Distributing approximately $30 million in workforce grants to provide scholarships, tuition assistance, and other support to diversify the behavioral health workforce
  • Getting federal approval for $155 million in behavioral health provider rate increases, to sustain and to support behavioral health services.
  • Distributing more than $41 million for a variety of other behavioral health programs including Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics, substance use disorder funds, and other system and accountability programs.

In early 2023, state health officials will release additional funds to support mobile crisis services, expand supportive housing for people in substance use treatment and increase rates for behavioral health programs. New rates require federal approval, which is pending.

State behavioral health director Steve Allen said, “We’re grateful for the legislature’s historic increase in behavioral health funding, which is helping to correct years of underinvestment. We have more work to do, but we’re building a system that can address the full range of services people need to get in treatment, sustain their recovery and lead full and productive lives.”

The funding update was released earlier today at a news conference which highlighted the establishment of new behavioral health resource networks  in every Oregon county, under Measure 110.

Behavioral health networks have been approved in every county. These locally led networks will provide a comprehensive array of services, from harm reduction, to treatment, to housing for people in recovery, instead of the more fragmented services people who need substance use services often need to navigate.

The Measure 110 news conference featured:

  • Tera Hurst, Executive Director of the Health Justice Recovery Alliance.
  • Steve Allen, Behavioral Health Director at the Oregon Health Authority.
  • Sabrina Garcia, a Tri-Chair on the Measure 110 Oversight Accountability Council.
  • Basilio Sandoval of Centro Latino Americano, a Lane County culturally specific, community-based organization that works to empower Latino families.

Here are talking points from today’s speakers.  

###

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 23 - 09/20/22

September 20, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 23

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Licensing, Facilities, and Operations RAC (Session 2).

When: Friday, Sept. 23, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604589022?pwd=aUgxQUQzVGlxSEZreWJ4TnhpdThLZz09  

Meeting ID: 160 458 9022

Passcode: 985483

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 21 - 09/20/22

September 20, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee meets Sept. 21

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RAC).

Agenda: TBD for Packaging, Labeling, and Product Transportation RAC (Session 2).

When: Wednesday, Sept. 21, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601727000?pwd=NG51MW4wdlVLOW1KdWU4UXNRYTkrUT09  

Meeting ID: 160 172 7000

Passcode: 536010

Call-in 669 254 5252 (US)

Background: Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) are an important process that allow members of the public an opportunity to provide input on proposed administrative rules before they become effective. RACs are comprised of individuals who have subject matter expertise and members of the public who are likely to be affected by the proposed rules. The RAC process is designed to include a diversity of opinions and viewpoints. Although RACs evaluate fiscal and racial impact of the proposed rules and make recommendations, Oregon Health Authority retains decision making authority.

All community members will be invited to provide comments on the proposed rules during the public comment period scheduled from November 1 to November 21, 2022. Information about the public comment period will be sent out to the OPS mailing list later this year.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA holds media briefing on Measure 110 Sept. 20 at 11 a.m. - 09/19/22

September 19, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA holds media briefing on Measure 110 Sept. 20 at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will host a Measure 110 media availability on Tuesday, Sept. 20 from 11 a.m. to noon, via Zoom.

Tera Hurst, Executive Director of the Oregon Health Justice Recovery Alliance, Steve Allen, Behavioral Health Director at OHA; Sabrina Garcia, a Tri-Chair on the Measure 110 Oversight Accountability Council, and Basilio Sandoval of Centro Latino Americano in Lane County will discuss the funding of new service networks across Oregon established under Measure 110, and will highlight a new report on the progress of behavioral health investments in Oregon.

Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream will be available for the public on You Tube.

####

 

Public Health Advisory Board workgroup meets Sept. 23 - 09/16/22

September 16, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board workgroup meets Sept. 23

What: A workgroup of the Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Make recommendations to update the PHAB charter and bylaws.

When: Friday, Sept. 23, noon to 1 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 160 952 2375# or Zoom video: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1609522375?pwd=YmUyTUk1dnloMnFjblNQMU1rUnZqZz09

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet September 21 - 09/16/22

September 16, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet September 21

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 21, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Attendance for those attending by phone only; Meeting opening; Public comment; General updates: APAC data use, Upcoming data release; Annual validation reports training by HSRI; Update on 2023 legislative concept – early stages; Outreach to compliance officers; Future topics; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

For people who speak a language other than English or people with disabilities we can provide free help.

Some examples are:

  • spoken language interpreters,
  • sign language interpreters,
  • CART captioning,
  • braille,
  • large print,
  • transcripts,
  • virtual platform change.

If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Brian Toups, 503-385-6542 (voice/text), brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov at least 48 business hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 22 - 09/15/22

September 15, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet September 22

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 22, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome and logistics (1:00-1:05); Updates (1:05-1:20); ODHS measure specification changes (1:20-1:30); CCO SDOH TA needs (1:30-2:00); OHA metrics reporting updates (2:10-2:20); Year 10 HER data submission manual and validation checks (2:20-2:45); Health Care Interpreter Registry file (2:45-3:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, or

brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board Subcommittee on Long-Term Program Funding meets Sept. 21 - 09/15/22

September 15, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board Subcommittee on Long-Term Program Funding meets Sept. 21

What: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Advisory Board is holding a public subcommittee meeting. The meeting is accessible by a webinar link or conference line.

Agenda: Welcome; Oregon Public Health Program Funding Models; overview of Newborn Screening Funding Models; subcommittee discussion; public comment; wrap-up and next steps.

When: Wednesday, Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-11 a.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at about 10:30 a.m.; comments are limited from one to three minutes depending on the number of people providing comments.

Where: Remote access only. Zoom access:

https://pdx.zoom.us/j/89241011995

Dial by your location +1 971 247 1195 US (Portland) +1 720 928 9299 US (Denver) +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma) +1 602 753 0140 US (Phoenix)

Meeting ID: 892 4101 1995

Background: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Program screens newborns for endocrine, hemoglobin, cystic fibrosis, immunodeficiency and metabolic disorders that may not be clinically evident in the first few days or weeks of life. Detecting these conditions early allows the infant to be referred for diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent death or disability. The Advisory Board has formed a subcommittee to investigate options for long-term program funding. For more information, visit www.healthoregon.org/nbs.

###

For people who speak a language other than English or people with disabilities we can provide free help.  Some examples are:

  • Spoken language interpreters
  • Sign language interpreters
  • CART captioning
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Transcripts, or
  • Virtual platform change.

If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Sheri Hearn, sarah.m.humphrey@dhsoha.state.or.us, 503-693-4104 (voice), at least two business days before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.


 

OHA expands eligibility criteria for monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccine - 09/15/22

September 15, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA expands eligibility criteria for monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccine

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded its eligibility criteria for the monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccine. It now includes “anyone who anticipates having or has had recent direct skin-to-skin contact with at least one other person AND who knows other people in their social circles or communities who have had monkeypox.”

The new interim monkeypox vaccination guidance for use of the JYNNEOS vaccine was developed with extensive input from community partners, local public health authorities, health care providers and Tribal health organizations, said Tim Menza, M.D., Ph.D., senior health adviser for OHA’s monkeypox response.

“It was a community-based process,” Menza said. “We heard loud and clear that if we wanted to get people in the door to get vaccinated against monkeypox, we needed to rethink how we talked about who is at greatest risk of infection.”

In its vaccine eligibility criteria, the vaccination guidance no longer refers to sexual orientation or gender identity – cisgender men, transgender men, transgender women, and non-binary people who have sex with men – which may have been a barrier for people seeking vaccinations, Menza said. The guidance also clearly states what is known as the most common route of transmission: direct, skin-to-skin contact.

The guidance “no longer calls out specific populations defined by sexual orientation or gender identity. Instead, it calls out the most common route of transmission,” Menza explained. “In doing so, we hope to reduce the stigma associated with eligibility for monkeypox vaccination.”

In addition to encouraging JYNNEOS vaccination for anyone who anticipates having or has had recent skin-to-skin contact with others and shares a social circle or community with someone who had the virus, the guidance continues to recommend the vaccine for other high-risk persons: anyone who had close contact with someone with monkeypox or who local public health staff identified as being a contact of someone with the virus; laboratory workers who routinely perform monkeypox virus testing; and clinicians who had a high-risk occupational exposure, such as from examining monkeypox lesions or collecting monkeypox specimens without using recommended personal protective equipment.

The guidance also encourages vaccine providers to “think creatively” in planning vaccine events, Menza said. For example, it recommends providers work in partnership with community-based organizations or local businesses to offer “venue-based vaccine events” that prioritize communities most affected by monkeypox, which will make vaccines more accessible and acceptable. Venue-based vaccine clinics are those that occur in spaces or at events frequented by people from communities most affected by monkeypox. For example, OHA and partners have been offering vaccines at large community events, nightclubs and bathhouses.

Anyone who requests the vaccine at community-based vaccine events, should receive it, the guidance states.

When possible, vaccine providers should integrate monkeypox vaccine administration with the influenza vaccine, COVID-19 vaccines and boosters, COVID-19 testing, HIV/STI testing, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) information and referrals, and harm-reduction education and outreach. Combining services will reduce stigma related to receiving a monkeypox vaccine “in that people could come to a vaccine event for one of several services,” according to the guidance.

“We want these events to feel more like a health fair,” Menza explained.

Menza believes the expanded monkeypox vaccination guidance represents a new phase in the state’s response to the outbreak.

“Initially, folks were stepping forward, and we had a lot of demand for the vaccine up front,” he said. “In the last four weeks, since mid-August, we’ve seen a steep drop-off in demand. Wait lists have dropped to zero, and available slots are not being filled. We need to reinvigorate our vaccination campaign and find new ways to get the vaccine to people who most need it.”

###

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets Oct. 13 - 09/14/22

September 14, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets Oct. 13

What: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. Members of the public may attend.

Agenda: HERO Kids Registry; EMSC Program; PEDS-03 Project; Suicide Prevention Project; State EMS and Trauma Systems Program.

When: Thursday, Oct. 13, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Join the meeting from your computer, tablet, or smartphone: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610861287?pwd=QXY2aks3SUlOS0NQZXhyZWpBMElvUT09

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1610861287#

Dial: 1-669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 161 086 1287

Passcode: 111317

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at www.oregonemsc.org.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

OHA welcomes all participants. If you have any questions about accommodations or need any assistance to participate, please contact Rachel Ford at rachel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us, 971-673-0564 (voice), or 503-490-4971 (text) at least 48 hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted.

###

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Sept. 20 via Zoom - 09/14/22

September 14, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Sept. 20 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review the recommended charter and discuss what was learned from previous work to develop a new framework for the PHAB Strategic Data Plan.

When: Tuesday, Sept. 20, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call: (669) 254-5252, participant code: 1605421162#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-673-2284.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership subcommittee meets via Zoom Sept. 19 - 09/14/22

September 14, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership subcommittee meets via Zoom Sept. 19

What: A public zoom meeting for the Research and Leadership subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, Sept 19, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 048 7057 Passcode: 020773

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 

COVID-19 data update shows more than four in five Latino/a/x adults now vaccinated - 09/14/22

September 14, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

COVID-19 data update shows more than four in five Latino/a/x adults now vaccinated

Vaccination rates for some racial and ethnic groups will show increases this week after Oregon Health Authority (OHA) updates the population estimates used to calculate COVID-19 data.

Starting today, OHA’s COVID-19 Vaccination Metrics dashboard will include the updated Oregon population estimates for race and ethnicity data at the state and county level. Some of the biggest increases for adults will be recorded among residents who identify as Hispanic and Latino/a/x, whose adult vaccination rates now exceed 80%.

"I want to extend my heartfelt congratulations and thanks to everyone in Oregon's Latino, Latina and Latinx community for achieving this goal," said Governor Kate Brown. "It took hard work by community organizations, health care workers and volunteers partnering together to reach this milestone. I thank you all for your dedication and the work you do each and every day to keep community healthy and safe."

“When life-saving COVID-19 vaccines became widely available in Oregon, we saw early on that groups marginalized because of historic and ongoing systemic racism had worse health outcomes, including higher hospitalization and death rates,” said OHA’s Public Health Director Rachael Banks. “Historical oppression and existing barriers to health care contributed to lower vaccination rates among communities of color in Oregon, with large inequities for people who identify and Black or African American and Hispanic/Latino/a/x. Community stepped in to say OHA needed to more, and today we are seeing positive results from public health and community partners who helped vaccinate their communities using culturally specific approaches.”

"We were successful because we worked together — community, community-based organizations (CBOs), Latinx business and the state," said Olivia Quiroz, executive director for the Oregon Latino Health Coalition. "Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, CBOs have been serving on the front lines to address the needs of our community. Thank you to the CBOs who called for action, the state for being responsive and most importantly to all those individuals who overcame many barriers and got their vaccines to protect their families and our community."

Before today’s change, the statewide percentage of adults who received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and who identify as Black or African American was 82.4%. Today, the rate will show as 94.7%. The vaccination rate for Hispanic/Latino/a/x adults will increase from 68.6% to 80.7%.

The vaccination rate will decrease slightly for White adults, from 85.6% to 81.7%. The vaccination rates for adults who identify as Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, and American Indian and Alaska Native will not change significantly.

The new population data refines the last update from December 2021, done in collaboration with demographers at Portland State University’s Population Research Center.

The center produces the official data used for Oregon population estimates. The updated data reflect the most recent five-year period, 2016-2020. They provide a more accurate estimate of the number of people by race and ethnicity in different age groups. The new estimates also have more precise age-related data to better represent populations in Oregon.

Inaccurate representation of populations in Oregon perpetuates systemic racism and health inequities. This update in population estimates also provides more accurate race and ethnicity data at the state and county level.

Data used for OHA’s population estimates come from the American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS), a representative sample of the population of Oregon.

Respondent data on race and ethnicity, place of birth and language were used to assign a primary race or ethnicity to every person in the sample, using the Oregon Race, Ethnicity, Language and Disability (REALD) standard. The population size of each age group in the ACS PUMS was adjusted to match the published totals by age for each county.

The previous data series included totals for the adult population, age 18 or older, based on the assumption that the share of the population for each REALD race and ethnicity group was the same for the adult population as for the population overall. That assumption was inaccurate for some groups.

The Hispanic and Latino/a/x population of Oregon is 12% of the state total, but only 10% of the adult population, indicating there are more Hispanic and Latino/a/x young people among all of Oregon’s youth. The update for 2016-2020 data now incorporated in OHA’s COVID-19 data use age data adopted directly from the ACS PUMS, leading to greater accuracy when comparing age groups.

County vaccination rates also will show changes with the update.

The greatest differences will be seen for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander persons in Douglas county, for Asian persons in Baker county, for White persons in Jefferson county, for both Black and African American and American Indian and Alaska Native persons in Crook county and for Hispanic and Latino/a/x persons in Lincoln county.

Statewide Youth Advisory Council Supports Schools During Pandemic Recovery - 09/14/22

Sept. 14, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Statewide Youth Advisory Council Supports Schools During Pandemic Recovery

PORTLAND, OREGON – The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is pleased to announce the formation of a Statewide Youth Advisory Council charged with supporting schools and communities with COVID-19 school-based recovery.  This summer, OHA appointed 20 youth aged 15-19 to serve on the council and lead decision making for $1 million in recovery investment.  OHA has partnered with REAP Inc. to facilitate and provide leadership development to the group. 

“Our goal is for students to want to access our services. The way to do that is to build our youth-adult partnerships and listen to what youth around Oregon are saying they need right now” says Lev Schneidman, the program coordinator for the COVID-19 School Based Recovery Funds. “We are beyond excited to be partnering with REAP, an organization with over 20 years of experience providing multicultural youth empowerment and leadership”.

OHA recruited high-school aged youth from across the state and received hundreds of applicants. OHA and REAP selected 20 youth representing 12 counties and 19 schools.  Fifty percent of the youth represent a rural or frontier zip-code.  All members of the council identify with a community disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 including communities of color, Tribal communities, people with disabilities, LGBTQ2SIA+ communities and youth involved with the child welfare system.

Since their formation in June, the group has met four times and has already established values related to advancing health equity in the wake of the pandemic. 

They began identifying several needs created/exacerbated by COVID-19, including:

  • Difficulties with the transition back to in-person education – including issues with student behavior and challenges with socialization.
  • Increased need for mental health and other healthcare services.
  • Lack of engagement opportunities in schools and communities – fewer clubs, classes, and events.
  • Food insecurity.
  • Housing affordability and instability.
  • Financial instability due to job loss or issues finding and maintaining work.
  • Racism and other forms of oppression.

The advisory council is also supported by 13 community-based organizations from across the state including the Center for African Immigrants and Refugees in Multnomah County, Citizens for Safe Schools in Klamath County and Rogue Climate and Rogue Action Center in Jackson County.

By late fall 2022, the group hopes to have recommendations on how to invest funds to support school and community recovery.  “I am humbled by the students and the experiences they bring to the table as we shape out a path for the future of councils and for Covid relief. There is so much care and passion infused into every conversation about how to better the entirety of our state, not just the larger cities,” says Anderson DuBoise, Strategic Initiatives Manager at REAP Inc. 

The council is set to expire in a year.  However, the YAC opportunity will create a foundation for an equity-focused approach to youth engagement and advisory within the agency.  “We believe the experience will create structures that help embed youth voice in larger and longer-term statewide health policy and program decision,” says Schneidman.  

youth advisory members

Youth Advisory Council Members:

A'ishah Mokrani

Araceli Granados

Brenda Ramirez Gonzalez

Connor Allen

Gabriel Jurado

Ivette Alonso Garcia 

Jack Sparks

Jenny Duan

Kate Hawley

Kenney Phillips

Kenzi Haugen

Ndeye Sall

Norah Markham

Sage Waters

Saraya Kathrine Lumbreras

Sasha Shan'te

Sophia Richards

HB 4003 Nursing Study Group to meet September 14th via Zoom meeting - 09/13/22

September 13th, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476 elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Marc Overbeck, 503-689-5321, marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

HB 4003 Nursing Study Group to meet September 14th via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the HB 4003 Nursing Study Advisory Group of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, September 14, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. Public comment will be taken at 2:05 – 2:15 p.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom:

https://ucsf.zoom.us/j/94763933699?pwd=aHlSbEgybGg3Yi8wMTMvb2l5WUUzZz09

One tap mobile (iPhone) +16692192599,,94763933699#,,,,1#,,631709# US (San Jose)

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Equity Subcommittee meets Sept. 22, 2022 - 09/13/22

Sept.13, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@odhsoha.oregon.gov

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Equity Subcommittee meets Sept. 22, 2022

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Equity Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022, 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (PDT)

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16054780370

Call in: 1-669-254-5252 (US)

Meeting ID: 160 5478 0370

Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@odhsoha.oregon.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Protect yourself and your family from health effects of wildfires and related power shutoffs - 09/13/22

Sept. 13, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Protect yourself and your family from health effects of wildfires and related power shutoffs


Help is available for those struggling with trauma caused by wildfires

For many people in Oregon, dealing with the wildfires has been especially difficult.

For those directly affected by the fires and evacuations, these traumatic events can bring feelings of stress, anxiety, grief, worry and anger. Even those who were not directly affected by fires and evacuations this year but have experienced them in the past may feel these emotions again. Seeing news reports or images of current fires or hearing about fires affecting loved ones can drive feelings like anxiety and stress.

If you'd like to talk with someone or find mental health resources, remember, the Safe + Strong Helpline is only a call away: 1-800-923-HELP (4357).

Protect yourself and your family when smoke levels are high

Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions on the Oregon Smoke Information Blog (http://ow.ly/hZmC50KFZn9), Oregon DEQ Air Quality Index (http://ow.ly/IWyx50KFZnf) or by downloading the free OregonAIR app (http://ow.ly/aqgW50KFZnc) on your smartphone.

Remember that cloth, dust and surgical masks do NOT protect from the harmful particles in smoke.

N95 or P100 respirators approved by NIOSH may offer protection, but they must be properly fitted and worn. They won’t work for everyone, especially children.

Here's how you can protect yourself and your family when smoke levels are high:

  • Stay inside if possible.
  • Follow your breathing plan if you have one. Wildfires and pollution contain small particles that can make asthma and other chronic diseases worse.
  • Make sure you have enough medication and monitor your health. Call your health care provider if your asthma gets worse or you’re exposed to smoke.
  • If you can, create a cleaner air space.
    • Keep windows and doors closed.
    • Avoid strenuous outdoor activity.
    • If available, use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in indoor ventilation systems or portable air purifiers.
    • You can also create a DIY Box fan filter: http://ow.ly/NYMB50KFZne
  • If you are unable to create a cleaner air space, many communities open cleaner air spaces during severe smoke events. In partnership with local officials and organizations, 211Info maintains a list of public cleaner air spaces. You can learn more about cleaner air spaces:
  • Dial 2-1-1 or 1-866-698-6155- available 24 hours a day.
  • Text your zip code to 898211 (TXT211) – available M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
  • Check https://www.211info.org/
  • For more information on protecting your health during wildfires, visit http://ow.ly/CQIy50KFZnb.

If your power goes out during the fires, there are ways to keep your family safe

  • Refrigerated or frozen foods may not be safe to eat after the loss of power.
  • During power outages, keep your fridge and freezer doors closed as much as possible to keep the cold in.
  • Throw out perishable food in your refrigerator (meat, fish, cut fruits and vegetables, eggs, milk and any leftovers) after 4 hours without power. A freezer can stay cold for up to 48 hours, but any frozen perishable foods should be thrown away if they thawed. Never taste food to determine if it is safe to eat. When in doubt, throw it out.
  • Turn off and unplug all unnecessary electrical equipment. Unplugging your medical devices, appliances, computers and other sensitive electronics can protect them from damage when the power returns.
  • If you use a generator during the public safety power shutoff, never use it inside your home, basement or garage.
  • Run your generator more than 20 feet from any window, door or vent. Generators can produce carbon monoxide. When carbon monoxide builds up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces, it can be lethal to people and animals.
  • When using a generator, use a battery-powered or battery backup CO detector in your home, especially in sleeping areas.

For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/poweroutage/needtoknow.html.

Get your prescriptions filled even in an emergency, preferably at a pharmacy  

Any pharmacy in Oregon can make an emergency prescription refill for a person who had to leave an area affected by a declared disaster.

  • It is preferred, and in some cases perhaps easier, to use the same company that filled the original prescription.
  • If the pharmacist believes the medicine is needed to maintain the patient’s health or to continue established treatment, the pharmacist can make a refill.
  • The emergency refill may be for no more than a 30-day supply.
  • Go to any pharmacy in Oregon, preferably one from the same company as the original fill and request an emergency 30-day refill.
  • A pharmacy will bill insurance as normal if you have insurance. There still may be an associated co-pay.
  • Reach out to their insurance company and work with your pharmacy to get the medications refilled and the costs covered. Call the state’s consumer advocates at 888-877-4894 if there are any issues.
  • If you don’t have insurance or have other questions about accessing emergency refills, Oregon Health Authority might be able to help. E-mail the Oregon Health Authority’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program at: pharmacy@state.or.us

Drinking water may be affected by wildfires

After a wildfire, those who have water supplied by a public water system should know:

  • Customers should stay tuned for messaging from their public water system regarding a potential boil or do not drink advisory. If there is no advisory, it is okay to drink the water.
  • If wildfire was directly over or very near water pipes and water pressure was lost, avoid drinking the water until it is tested for contamination or verified that no plastic pipes were affected.
  • Keep an emergency supply of water in case a power outage causes a disruption in service.

After a wildfire, domestic well users should Assess, Protect, and Test the well with the following guidance:

Begin by completing a well assessment to identify damage level and next steps.

English: https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le3558a.pdf

Spanish: https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/ls3558a.pdf

If you own a well and a wildfire didn’t affect your area, but you had a power outage:

  • Turn on a faucet in the home to see if water comes out.
  • Observe whether water intermittently spurts out because of air escaping from the open faucet. Spurting water indicates a loss of pressure in the well and the household plumbing.

What should be done if the well lost pressure?

  • Warn users not to drink the water until the well water tests negative for bacterial contamination.
  • Test water for bacterial contamination at a minimum. Water may need to be tested for nitrates and other local contaminants of concern using a certified laboratory.
  • Prime the well pump.
  • Disinfect* and flush the well. Consult with a well contractor if needed.

NOTE: Turn off power to the pump before inspecting to avoid electrical shock.

For additional tips visit:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Private Wells after a Wildfire: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/water/private-wells/after-a-wildfire.html

Oregon Health Authority’s Domestic Well Water Program: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HEALTHYENVIRONMENTS/DRINKINGWATER/SOURCEWATER/DOMESTICWELLSAFETY/Pages/Wildfire-Impacted-Domestic-Well-Testing.aspx

OHA Ombuds Releases 2021 Report - 09/13/22

September 13, 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

OHA Ombuds Releases 2021 Report

Needed improvements identified in four key areas

Oregon Health Authority’s (OHA) Ombuds Program, which serves as the advocate for Oregon Health Plan (OHP - Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program) members, released a new report detailing top concerns from members of OHP during 2021. Established by legislation, the Ombuds Program provides recommendations and additional oversight internally to OHA Medicaid programs and externally to Medicaid contractors and is independent of Medicaid program implementation, operations or compliance.

The Ombuds Program advocates for access to care, quality of care and channeling member experience into recommendations for systems improvement. OHP members come to the Ombuds Program when they cannot get the support they need elsewhere and other avenues have not led to resolution. These issues often represent systemic concerns impacting other members. Margie Stanton, Director of OHA Health System’s Division, says “Elevating OHP member voice and perspective are essential for our agency to strengthen every part of our Oregon Health Plan for those we serve.”

The new Ombud’s Program 2021 report summarizes four areas of significant member concern:

  • OHP member enrollment and member-centered transitions across services and benefits
  • Care coordination improvements
  • Language access and equity-centered approaches
  • Mental health and substance use disorder (SUD) priorities and existing gaps

Adequate access to mental health and SUD providers, and all supporting behavioral health services, is a significant challenge for OHP members. This is an area that requires both Medicaid and behavioral health programs within OHA to coordinate and identify shared solutions for OHP members and for all Oregonians. Specific Ombuds concerns outlined in the report include:

  • The need for timely and accessible mental health and SUD services at all levels of care;
  • Inadequate mental health residential treatment and system capacity, for both children and adults;
  • Underutilization of traditional health workers, particularly Peer Support Specialists and Peer Wellness Specialists; and
  • Insufficient statewide capacity for inpatient and residential services, with member access further limited by CCO provider networks that may either be lacking availability by specialty, or that may not work with all inpatient facilities willing to accept OHP members.

The Ombuds Program continues to support efforts to address the challenges members experience in behavioral health and other areas. Critically, to turn member-centered Ombuds recommendations into actions that change operations and practice, OHA is treating the 2021 Ombuds report and all future annual Ombuds reports as formal audits which require a response and workplan. “The work of the Ombuds Program help bring issues to light that are critical to achieving our 2030 goal of eliminating health inequities,” says Stanton.

Read the full report here. To refer a concern to the Ombuds program, contact OHA.OmbudsOffice@dhsoha.state.or.us, leave a message at 877-642-0450 or visit here.

A workgroup of the Public Health Advisory Board meets on Sept. 16 for a meeting - 09/12/22

Sept. 12, 2022

Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

A workgroup of the Public Health Advisory Board meets on Sept. 16 for a meeting

What: A workgroup of the Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Make recommendations to update the PHAB charter and bylaws.

When: Friday, Sept. 16, 2022 from noon-1:30 pm. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 161 3439 1980# or Zoom video: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16134391980

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet September 16 - 09/12/22

September 12, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet September 16

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: September 16, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome & consent agenda (9:00-9:10); Public testimony (9:10-9:20); Chair and vice-chair election (9:20-9:30); 2023 benchmark selection (9:30-10:20); 2023 benchmark selection continued (10:35-12:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, or

brian.m.toups@oha.oregon.gov at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership subcommittee meets via Zoom Sept. 19 - 09/09/22

September 9, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership subcommittee meets via Zoom Sept. 19

What: A public zoom meeting for the Research and Leadership subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, Sept 19, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 048 7057 Passcode: 020773

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RACs) meetings scheduled for Sept.12-30 - 09/09/22

Sept. 9, 2022

Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, erica.j.heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Services Rules Advisory Committee (RACs) meetings scheduled for Sept.12-30

What: The Oregon Psilocybin Services Section at Oregon Health Authority is holding a series of nine Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) meetings in September.

Oregon Psilocybin Services (OPS) is convening three Rules Advisory Committees (RACs) to discuss proposed rules on (1) packaging, labeling and product transportation, (2) licensing, facilities, and operations, and (3) facilitator conduct, preparation, administration and integration sessions. 

RAC members provide input on draft administrative rules, which are now available on the Oregon Psilocybin Services Administrative Rules webpage. The RAC meetings are open to the public and will be recorded and posted to the Administrative Rules webpage

After the RAC meetings, the draft rules will be updated, and the next version of proposed rules will be available for public comment beginning Nov. 1, 2022.

When: For the full list of meeting dates and agendas, please go to the Oregon Psilocybin Services Administrative Rules webpage.

Where: Virtual - Zoom Links can be found on the Administrative Rules webpage.

Background:  Ballot Measure 109 (M109), also known as the Oregon Psilocybin Services Act, was voted into law by Oregonians in November 2020. M109 directs OHA to license and regulate psilocybin products and the provision of psilocybin services. OHA is in a two-year development period extending from Jan. 1, 2021, to Dec. 31, 2022. During this time, OHA is building a new Oregon Psilocybin Services (OPS) Section and working with the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Rules Advisory Committees (RACs), and the public to establish rules for the production of psilocybin and provision of psilocybin services in the state of Oregon.

Sign Up for Updates Here.

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 15, 2022 - 09/08/22

September 8, 2022

Media contact: Amber Shoebridge, 503-931-9586 amber.shoebridge@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852 jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 15, 2022

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: September 15, 2022, 1-4:15 p.m.

Where: The meeting will be held via free conference line at 971-277-2343, access code 280 492 858#.

Agenda: After introductions, updates will be given on the rules advisory committee, a recent ruling from federal court, changes to patient property and access, and diversity work. See the full agenda here.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of OSH patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the OSHAB website.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

COVID-19 Year-In-Review Data Report highlights continued disproportionate impact on communities of color - 09/08/22

September 8, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

COVID-19 Year-In-Review Data Report highlights continued disproportionate impact on communities of color

The 2021 COVID-19 Year-in-Review Data Report released today highlights the pandemic’s continued disproportionate impacts on communities of color. The annual report also serves as a summary of trends and key statistics from the second calendar year of the COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon.

The report includes case counts and rates, along with hospitalization and death data from 2021, with comparisons across geography, race, ethnicity, sex and age. Breaking down COVID-19 data by race, ethnicity, sex, age and geography helps Oregon’s public health system and Oregon Health Authority (OHA) better respond to health inequities in Oregon.

For the calendar year 2021, there were 321,620 cases of COVID-19 reported to OHA. Of these cases, 15,795 (4.9%) were hospitalized and 4,164 (1.3%) died.

Throughout 2021, COVID-19 disproportionately affected communities of color. Data reported for 2021 confirmed similar findings compared to 2020, that COVID-19 intensified many of the inequities that already existed in Oregon, affecting communities of color the most. American Indian and Alaska Native people, Black, Hispanic and Latino/a/x people and Pacific Islander people had higher age-adjusted hospitalization and death rates when compared to White people.

Lack of access to health care, language barriers, crowded working conditions, lower-income jobs and distrust in government due to historical racism all exacerbated the impact of COVID-19 in communities of color.

Among those with COVID-19 in 2021, people 80 and older were most likely to be hospitalized (27.8% of all hospitalizations) and most likely to die (16.9% of all hospitalizations) in association with COVID-19, compared to all other age groups. This represents a decrease in adverse outcomes compared with 2020, when people 80 and older were most likely to be hospitalized (30% of all hospitalizations) and most likely to die (23% of all hospitalizations) in association with COVID-19. Overall annual case rates varied significantly by county of residence. Overall, case fatality decreased from 1.7% of reported cases in 2020 to 1.3% in 2021.

The report highlights the impact of vaccination on fighting COVID-19 and its impacts helping to prevent severe disease, hospitalizations and deaths. Additional information on the impact of COVID-19 vaccines in Oregon can be found on the Oregon COVID-19 Case and Vaccination Stories dashboard.

Biweekly COVID-19 reports released

The COVID-19 Biweekly Data Report, released today, shows a decrease in COVID-19-related hospitalizations and deaths. 

OHA reported 8,592 new cases of COVID-19 from Aug. 21 to Sept. 3, a 25.9% decline from the previous biweekly total of 11,597. 

During the two-week period of Aug. 21 to Sept. 3, test positivity was 10.6%, down from 10.8% in the previous two-week period. 

Today’s COVID-19 Biweekly Congregate Care Setting Outbreak Report shows 167 active outbreaks in care facilities, senior living communities and congregate care living settings, a decrease from the prior two weeks.

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Oregon State Hospital to receive Oregon OSHA violations - 09/08/22

September 8, 2022

Contact: Amber Shoebridge, 503-931-9586

Amber.shoebridge@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital to receive Oregon OSHA violations

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) has notified Oregon State Hospital Hospital (OSH) that the hospital will be cited with three violations related to workplace violence and injuries in the areas of documentation, thorough investigation and response. Oregon-OSHA also warned the hospital of three additional issues on the same topics that could become a problem in the future if not addressed.

“One of our guiding principles at the hospital is to ensure the safety of both our patients and our staff,” stated OSH Superintendent Dolly Matteucci. “Our staff deserve to come to work each day without the fear of being hurt. We know we have more work to do, and we know more thorough investigation of incidents will help us learn from what happened and prevent future occurrences.”

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen echoed Superintendent Matteucci’s statement about the importance of staff and patient safety. “Members of our hospital staff are getting injured while caring for patients, and that is not acceptable. Period. We must do better, and we will do better. We appreciate what the Oregon-OSHA violations bring to light, we will continue to partner with our hospital staff to find additional ways to prevent workplace violence.”

Prior to the Oregon-OSHA investigation, OSH had started making proactive and operational changes to reduce workplace violence. Here is some of the work that is underway:

  • Workplace Violence Prevention Program
    • SAIF Corporation has hired a workplace violence prevention consultant to work with OSH. That consultation began last month. The work is expected to lead to more recommendations to reduce workplace violence and improve staff safety.
  • Broset Violence Checklist (BVC) Implementation
    • The BVC is an evidence-based risk assessment tool that assists in identifying patients at high risk for aggressive behavior within the next 24 hours.
  • Trainings
    • The Safe Together team is improving access for staff to attend drills, training opportunities and consultation.

One factor contributing to changes at OSH is a recent shift in the patient population. There has been an increase in “Aid and Assist” patients who are more likely to pose behavioral challenges until medication and other treatment has a chance to work. In addition, staff and patients have coped with inconsistent staffing, Covid-19 restrictions and other external demands.

OSH is expected to receive the official Oregon-OSHA report in the next 2-3 weeks.

Oregon raises awareness of hope during National Suicide Prevention Month - 09/08/22

Sept. 8, 2022

Media contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon raises awareness of hope during National Suicide Prevention Month

In recognition of National Suicide Prevention Month and National Suicide Prevention Week (Sept. 4-10, 2022), Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and local partners are continuing efforts to increase awareness of ways everyone can help prevent suicide.

In 2020, Oregon had the 13th highest rate of suicide in the United States, with a total of 833 deaths. Oregon’s suicide rate has stayed well above national rates since 2000. Suicide is also the second leading cause of death among youth aged 5-24.

“Suicide remains a persistent and yet largely preventable cause of death in Oregon,” said Debra Darmata, adult suicide prevention coordinator at OHA. “Every death by suicide in Oregon carries a substantial and long-lasting ripple effect into our communities. We know that suicide prevention is everyone’s business.” 

Oregon is brimming with advocates and champions for suicide prevention, including the Oregon Alliance to Prevent Suicide. Many organizations also have ongoing social media and awareness campaigns to join.

What can you do to help?

Research shows people who are having thoughts of suicide feel relief when someone asks after them in a caring way. Acknowledging and talking about suicide may reduce rather than increase thoughts of suicide. We all have a part to play in reducing stigma and ensuring people have hope, feel safe asking for help, and can get access to community-based support. You can also:

dial988

Photo courtesy: Bella Organic Farm

Some businesses are also using September to raise awareness. Bella Organic Farm on Sauvie Island in Portland, Ore., is using their seven-acre corn maze to promote 988, the number for the new national Suicide & Crisis Lifeline.

“We wanted to be able to spark conversation and to try to destigmatize the idea that you can’t talk about your mental health and how you are feeling,” said Sofia Kondilis-Hashem, marketing director at Bella Organic Farm, who helps design each year’s maze. “We really wanted to do something that inspires hope in people. No matter who it is, you can always reach out to somebody.”

If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental or behavioral health crisis, free help is immediately available.

988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, via phone, text and online chat, offering people compassionate care and support from trained crisis counselors for individuals, families or their loved ones. One does not have to be suicidal to call 988 but can reach out when experiencing any behavioral health crisis. 988 call services are available in English and Spanish, along with interpretation services in more than 150 languages. Texting 988 and online chat are currently available only in English. Veterans and military service members can call 988 and press “1” to connect with the Veterans Crisis Line.

Oregon Health Evidence Review Commission meets October 6 Online - 09/08/22

September 8, 2022

Contacts: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Daphne Peck, 503-580-9792, HERC.Info@OHA.Oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Evidence Review Commission meets October 6 Online

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission

When: Thursday, October 6, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1613004950?pwd=S05QOVc2YWFwS1A3RmVkdFBVY1Rodz09

1 669 254 5252  Meeting ID: 161 300 4950 | Passcode: 340410

Written public comment (up to 1,000 words per sender for each topic) will be accepted until noon on 10/4/2022; submit to HERC.Info@OHA.Oregon.gov.

Agenda: HERC will consider the following topics:

  • Value-based Benefits Subcommittee report (see below)*
  • QALYs review (Review potential policy options to guide Commission’s use of quality-adjusted life years in meeting materials and decision-making)
  • Continuous Glucose Monitoring scope statement (tentative) (Real-time blood sugar monitoring)

*Topics which remain unresolved at the conclusion of the morning's VbBS meeting will not be heard by HERC until a later date. Public notice of tabled topics will be announced 28-days prior their next scheduled discussion.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 


HERC’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee meets October 6 Online

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee

When: Thursday, October 6, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Where: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1613004950?pwd=S05QOVc2YWFwS1A3RmVkdFBVY1Rodz09

1 669 254 5252  Meeting ID: 161 300 4950 | Passcode: 340410

Written public comment (up to 1,000 words per sender for each topic) will be accepted until noon on 10/4/2022; submit to HERC.Info@OHA.Oregon.gov.

Agenda: Items scheduled for discussion could include, but may not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Straightforward consent agenda items (Routine changes that may be approved without discussion)
  • Behavioral Health Advisory Panel report
    • Residential therapy for anxiety (Should therapy given in a residential setting be covered on the anxiety line?)
    • Acupuncture guideline clarification for substance use disorder therapy (Clarify when acupuncture treatment may be provided for people with substance use disorder)
    • Prioritization of personality disorders (Should certain personality disordersa group of mental illnesses involving long-term, consistent thought and behavior patterns that cause distress or impairmentbe given a higher priority?)
    • Somatization disorders (Extreme anxiety about physical symptoms)
    • Clubhouse services for mental health disorders (Peer group of adults, and young adults, with serious mental illness and staff who are active in Clubhouse activities. Goals include helping members with employment, education, housing, wellness, health promotion, etc.)
  • QALYs review (Review proposed policy options to guide Commission’s use of quality-adjusted life years in meeting materials and decision-making)
  • Below the line review (Review of conditions currently below the funding level)
    • Line 528 DEFORMITIES OF UPPER BODY AND ALL LIMBS
    • Line 599 CONGENITAL DEFORMITIES OF KNEE
    • Line 602 CONGENITAL ANOMALIES OF THE EAR WITHOUT IMPAIRMENT OF HEARING; UNILATERAL ANOMALIES
    • Line 658 GENITOURINARY CONDITIONS WITH NO OR MINIMALLY EFFECTIVE TREATMENTS OR NO TREATMENT NECESSARY
  • Statement of intent for public health emergencies (Clarify the Commission’s intent for coverage of treatments and preventive services like vaccines when a public health emergency is declared)
  • Solid organ transplant lines review (General review of current coverage and guidelines in organs other than bone marrow)
  • Hydrocele repair in adults (Consideration for coverage for adults for swelling or fluid collection in the scrotum)
  • Atopic dermatitis (Guideline revision for conditions affecting skin)
  • CPAP titration (An overnight sleep study used to properly set continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for people with sleep apnea)
  • Congenital foot deformity code review (Foot conditions present since birth)
  • Human growth hormone for treatment of adults with Prader-Willi syndrome (Use of growth hormone for adults with a rare genetic disorder)
  • Corneal collagen cross linkage for keratoconus (Treatment for condition of the outer layer of the eye (cornea))
  • Autologous chondrocyte implantation (Healthy cartilage is taken from the knee and grown in a lab, then used to patch a damaged area)
  • Inflammatory skin disease guideline modification (Guideline revision for conditions affecting skin)

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 

# # #

For people who speak a language other than English or people with disabilities we can provide free help.  Some examples are: spoken language interpreters, sign language interpreters, CART captioning, braille, large print, transcripts, virtual platform change. If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Daphne Peck, 503-580-9792 (voice), HERC.Info@OHA.Oregon.Gov at least 48 business hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.

OHA shifts COVID-19 reporting; bivalent boosters arrive in Oregon - 09/07/22

September 7, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA shifts COVID-19 reporting; bivalent boosters arrive in Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today announced changes to its reporting of COVID-19 data and provided an update on the new bivalent COVID-19 boosters. State health officials also gave an update on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon, including new demographic data and recommendations for monkeypox vaccines.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said COVID-19 data reporting is changing next week, with the COVID-19 Data Update moving to a weekly schedule and other data moving to a monthly cycle. “Shifting our reporting to match where we are in the pandemic will also allow us to free up resources that can be used for responding to other public health events that are equally important,” Allen said.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, said the state has recorded fewer COVID-19-related cases and hospitalizations, but still has high levels of circulation based on wastewater and testing results.

Sidelinger encouraged all eligible Oregonians to get a newly approved COVID-19 booster as soon as they can. “As we head into fall, as more of us spend time indoors, the updated booster will be the best way to protect ourselves and those around us from severe illness and hospitalization caused by the predominant BA.5 and BA.4 COVID-19 subvariants,” he said.

Sidelinger also said OHA has counted 179 presumptive and confirmed cases of monkeypox as of today. He said Oregon has distributed, or is in the process of distributing, more than 40,080 doses of the Jynneos vaccine and 263 courses of the investigational antiviral drug known as tecovirimat — or TPOXX — since June 20. He encouraged people to talk to their providers about testing if they have symptoms of monkeypox (hMPXV). Providers should test their patients for the virus, even if it’s only suspected, based on a patient’s symptoms, he said.

A recording of today’s media availability can be found here. Allen’s and Sidelinger’s prepared remarks are published here.

New dashboard focuses on cases, hospitalizations and deaths by vaccination status

The new dashboard will display information previously available in the Breakthrough Case Report and will highlight trends in cases, hospitalizations and deaths by vaccination status over time. Data are available at state and county levels. The updated dashboard aligns with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) COVID-19 hospitalizations by vaccination status dashboard.

The new dashboard data demonstrate that COVID-19 vaccines are very effective at protecting people from developing severe illness, being hospitalized and dying. COVID-19 vaccines are widely available and free to everyone in Oregon.

The new dashboard will replace the monthly Breakthrough Case Report, which will no longer be updated. The dashboard will be published for the first time on Sept. 8 and published on the second Wednesday of the month.

OHA shifts COVID-19 reporting frequency

OHA will stop distributing daily data updates on COVID-19 cases, testing and deaths, effective Sept. 14. Information about COVID-19 cases, current hospitalizations of COVID-19-positive patients and COVID-19-associated deaths, along with other COVID-19 data, will be made available weekly.

The daily data updates grew out of the urgent need to communicate quickly evolving COVID-19 trends early in the pandemic. Now, as cases and hospitalizations have declined, and the public has the information and tools to protect themselves, OHA is aligning resources with other public health needs.

The changes do not mean the pandemic is over. OHA will continue to monitor and report cases, deaths, hospitalizations, variants, vaccination and booster rates and other developments. These monitoring efforts include analyzing wastewater samples across the state to track COVID-19 spread.

Starting Sept. 14, OHA will update the following information on the Oregon COVID-19 Update dashboard every Wednesday. Key points will continue to be shared on OHA’s COVID-19 website, and on Twitter, Facebook and OHA Facebook en Espanol:

  • Newly reported and total COVID-19 cases
  • Newly reported and total COVID-19-associated deaths
  • Total current COVID-19-positive patients hospitalized
  • Percentage of statewide emergency department visits for COVID-19-like illness
  • Total newly reported COVID-19 tests and percent test positivity
  • Total variants of concern sequenced and the percentage of sequences by variant.

A new summary table dashboard with downloadable data will accompany the Oregon COVID-19 Update, updated every Wednesday.

In addition, the following dashboards will continue to be updated weekly on Wednesdays:

The cadence of other COVID-19 dashboards and reports will change starting Sept. 14. The following reports will be updated monthly on the second Wednesday of the month:

The following reports will be updated monthly on the second Thursday of the month:

The Oregon Health Care Workforce COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake dashboard will be updated quarterly, the COVID-19 Age Adjustment report will be updated annually and the Oregon COVID-19 Case and Vaccination Stories dashboard will be updated as needed.

Other COVID-19 reports will be archived and no longer updated starting Sept. 14:

Update planned for immunization data

Due to a data system error, COVID-19 vaccination data updated today will only show administrations submitted to the ALERT Immunization Information System through Aug 31. OHA anticipates the error will be resolved by Sept. 14.

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OHA begins reporting new demographic data for monkeypox cases - 09/07/22

September 7, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA begins reporting new demographic data for monkeypox cases

Publication of REALD, SOGI data reflects effort to better understand diversity in Oregon, address health disparities

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today began publishing monthly reports of monkeypox (hMPXV) case data by sexual orientation or gender identity, and by expanded categories of race and ethnicity.

Publication of the data, in consultation with OHA’s Equity and Inclusion Division (OEI), will help the agency better understand the diversity of the people living in Oregon, which will help it identify and address health disparities and support data justice in communities most affected by health disparities.

The monkeypox outbreak is the first communicable disease outbreak for which OHA is publicly reporting sexual orientation or gender identity (SOGI) data, and data from expanded race and ethnicity categories found in REALD, or race and ethnicity, language or disability. The data will be reported each month on OHA’s monkeypox (hMPXV) website.

“OHA has established a strategic goal to achieve health equity by 2030,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA. “A critical component to meeting this goal is ensuring meaningful access to services for everyone in Oregon, regardless of their race, ethnicity, language, disability, or sexual orientation and gender identity. The REALD and SOGI data will help guide OHA and its partners in an equitable response to the monkeypox outbreak.”

In 2021, the Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3159, which charged OHA with drafting and adding SOGI questions to the current data collection standards in OHA Oregon Administrative Rules; building a data collection system for both REALD and SOGI; and developing and implementing reporting requirements.

In 2018, OHA’s Equity and Inclusion Division convened a Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection Committee. The group consists of internal and external stakeholders who interact with the LGBTQ+ community and health systems, many of whom identify as LGBTQ+ themselves.

The Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3159 in 2021, charging OHA with drafting and adding SOGI questions to the current data collection standards in OHA Oregon Administrative Rules, building a data collection system for both REALD and SOGI and developing and implementing reporting requirements. The SOGI Data Collection Committee draft data collection standards have been implemented in Oregon’s public health communicable disease data collection system known as Orpheus.

OHA and local public health partners have been collecting SOGI information from people diagnosed with monkeypox since the start of the outbreak in Oregon.

While the narrative of monkeypox in the United States has centered on cisgender gay men as the population most affected by the virus, this narrative does not reflect the full spectrum of people who have been affected by monkeypox. The SOGI will help illuminate the experiences of people with other gender identities and sexual orientations in the Oregon outbreak of monkeypox, Sidelinger said.

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OHA holds media briefing on COVID-19 and newly approved COVID-19 boosters tomorrow at 10 a.m. - 09/06/22

September 6, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA holds media briefing on COVID-19 and newly approved COVID-19 boosters tomorrow at 10 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will host a COVID-19 media availability on Wednesday, Sept. 7, from 10-11 a.m., via Zoom.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will provide an update on the state’s pandemic response, the new bivalent COVID-19 boosters and monkeypox. OHA Director Patrick Allen will provide an update on data reporting. Both will be available to answer reporters’ questions.

Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream will be available for the public on YouTube.

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988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee announces upcoming meeting schedule, meets Sept. 20, 2022 - 09/06/22

September 6, 2022

Media contact: Dean Carson, 503-348-9233, dean.carson2@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Gina Schulze, 503-551-6409, 988SC@odhsoha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee announces upcoming meeting schedule, meets Sept. 20, 2022

What: The 988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup (CSAW) Steering Committee will hold virtual meetings the third Tuesday of each month from 11 a.m. to noon. Composed of people and families with lived experience in the behavioral health system, the CSAW Steering Committee guides the design, implementation and policies of 988 and the behavioral health crisis response system.

Agenda: The agenda will be posted on the 988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee web page in advance of the meeting.

When: Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, 11 a.m. to noon (Public comment will be held during the last 10 minutes of the meeting.)

Where: Virtual. The public can join remotely via Zoom or conference line.

Join ZoomGov meeting

Meeting ID: 161 765 1259

Passcode: 733420

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1617651259# US

Purpose: House Bill 2417 (2021) directs the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to implement an improved behavioral health crisis system. OHA recognizes that many individuals and families with lived experience and from disproportionately affected communities have experienced adverse impacts of the crisis response system due to systemic and historical social injustice. The 988 CSAW Steering Committee ensures the crisis system is grounded in equity and centered on the needs of people in Oregon.

Read more about the 988 CSAW Steering Committee. Read more about the Behavioral Health Crisis Response System and 988.

Questions? Contact 988SC@odhsoha.oregon.gov.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Gina Schulze at 503-551-6409, 711 TTY or gina.b.schulze@dhsoha.state.or.us.