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News Releases
Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom June 27 - 06/24/22

June 24, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom June 27

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, June 27, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 867 6690 Passcode: 981896

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Abortion remains legal, accessible in Oregon in wake of Supreme Court ruling - 06/24/22

June 24, 2022

Media Contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@odhsoha.oregon.gov 

Abortion remains legal, accessible in Oregon in wake of Supreme Court ruling

Decision has no effect on Oregon’s Reproductive Health Equity Act that guarantees right to receive abortion, health care providers’ right to provide it

PORTLAND, Ore. — Following a U.S. Supreme Court decision today that overturns Roe vs. Wade, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is reminding people that abortion remains legal in the state.

The Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA) was established in 2017 after the Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3391. The landmark legislation contained multiple provisions to both protect and expand access to the full scope of reproductive health services, including abortion, for all people in Oregon. RHEA enshrined into state law an individual’s right to receive an abortion, as well as a health care provider’s right to provide an abortion.

“The decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Roe vs. Wade does not change the fact that people in Oregon are guaranteed the right to receive abortion services, which remain legal in this state,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “OHA will continue to implement and promote RHEA to ensure that people in Oregon have access to essential reproductive health services, including abortion, sterilization and contraceptives, without any barriers.”

This includes a legal right for anyone who comes to Oregon for an abortion, not just Oregon residents.

While the abortion rate has declined across the country in the last 30 years, the need for abortion care has recently been on the rise, according to Guttmacher Institute, which found the abortion rate increased by 7% from 2017 to 2020. In Oregon, the abortion rate declined by 21% during this time.

Oregon is one of 16 states and the District of Columbia that has laws that protect the right to abortion, and is just one of four states and the District of Columbia that has ensured the right to abortion without any restrictions or state interference. Oregon also is one of only seven states that funds abortions, using state general funds under the Oregon Health Plan (OHP), the state’s Medicaid program, without any restrictions.

In 2017, RHEA further expands access to abortion by requiring health benefit plans regulated by the state of Oregon to cover abortion services without any cost sharing to its members. It also provides coverage for abortion services for people not eligible for the Oregon Health Plan because of their immigration status, including those with DACA status, those with no documentation, and people with legal permanent resident status who have not met the five-year waiting period for OHP eligibility.

And abortion access will continue to expand with the Oregon Legislature’s passage earlier this year of House Bill 5202, which allocates $15 million in state general funds to advancing reproductive health equity. The funds will be distributed by OHA to Seeding Justice, a grant-making organization, to establish the Reproductive Health Equity Fund, which will invest in culturally specific health outreach and education programs around the state that benefit patients, health care providers and community advocates.

Individuals can access free or low-cost reproductive health services at local health departments, Planned Parenthood clinics, federally qualified health centers and rural health clinics across the state. To find a clinic, visit: healthoregon.org/rhclinics, dial 211, or text HEALTH to 898211.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has approved BHRNs in more than half of all county regions for drug treatment and recovery services - 06/23/22

June 23, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has approved BHRNs in more than half of all county regions for drug treatment and recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) approved one additional Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) on Wednesday, June 22, for Wallowa County with an investment of $750,000. The OAC has now approved 19 out of 36 counties.

The funds for the 19 approved BHRNs now total nearly $72 million. To date, nearly $114 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNS that have been approved for funding; (in orange) along with those that have been selected by the OAC (in blue) and are in negotiations for funding approval.

See OHA’s robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress being made to date. OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension was offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022.

Twenty-eight of the original 66 recipients received first-round extensions for a total of $5,725,054.93. Fifty-four of the original 66 recipients requested second-round extensions, and of those, 41 were found eligible for additional funds, totaling $4,356,343.

The additional funds are in the process of being disbursed, bringing the total ATC funds to be disbursed to approximately $41.6million. 

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications. 

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services. 

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

####

OHA provides update on COVID-19 and expansion of vaccines for youngest children - 06/17/22

June 17, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA provides update on COVID-19 and expansion of vaccines for youngest children

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) held its monthly media availability today, providing an update on COVID-19 in Oregon and the status of state and federal reviews taking place through this weekend for vaccines for children under 5 years of age.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, highlighted the latest data trends, showing that hospitalizations for COVID-19-positive patients in Oregon have hit the peak projected by current modeling and that Oregon still continues to have a high level of community spread.

Sidelinger also provided an update on the next steps in federal and state reviews for authorizing Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for children 6 months through 4 years of age and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for children 6 months through 5 years of age.

Sidelinger was joined by Dawn Nolt, M.D., professor of pediatrics (infectious diseases) in the OHSU School of Medicine, who explained vaccine safety and what Emergency Use Authorization means for this age group, including reduced risk of severe disease.  

Nolt emphasized that — as a pediatrician, an infectious disease doctor and parent — her key advice is that children get vaccinated as soon as they can.

Here are the talking points from today’s media availability. You can also watch it here.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has approved BHRNs in half of all county regions for drug treatment and recovery services - 06/17/22

June 17, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has approved BHRNs in half of all county regions for drug treatment and recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in five additional Oregon counties today, including one tri-county region. The OAC has now approved 18 out of 36 counties. Today’s approved counties and their funding amounts are:

Washington:        $20,529,702

Marion:               $20,090,774

Hood River:         $1,301,167

Benton:               $3,525,487

Columbia:           $3,609,285

The funds for the 18 approved BHRNs total more than $71 million. To date, approximately $113 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

The OAC also approved a motion when a county region is under allocation, to:

  • Reach out to approved housing providers within the county region to determine whether one or more can expand offerings to meet additional housing needs and allocate the additional funds to providers that can expand low-barrier housing; or
  • If the county region is still under budget after additional housing options are funded to the fullest extent possible, pro-rate remaining funds based on each provider’s proportion of the current budget.

See OHA’s robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress being made to date. OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension was offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022.

Twenty-eight of the original 66 recipients received first-round extensions for a total of $5,725,054.93. Fifty-four of the original 66 recipients requested second-round extensions, and of those, 41 were found eligible for additional funds, totaling $4,356,343.

The additional funds are in the process of being disbursed, bringing the total ATC funds to be disbursed to approximately $41.6million. 

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications. 

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services. 

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

####

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Tuesday, June 21st via Zoom - 06/16/22

June 16, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Tuesday, June 21st via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss what we learned from our previous work and discuss and develop a new framework for the PHAB Strategic Data Plan.

When: Tuesday, June 21, 2022, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: ZoomGov Meeting

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605421162?pwd=Y24rL0hJUmFGV1hzdjNjSVJFZzNmZz09 , Meeting ID: 160 542 1162, Passcode: 022079, One tap mobile:

+16692545252,,1605421162# US (San Jose)

+16468287666,,1605421162# US (New York)

Meeting ID: 160 542 1162

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-255-6370

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-255-6370 711 TTY, or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves new grant agreements for drug treatment, recovery services - 06/16/22

June 16, 2022

Media contact:

Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459, timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves new grant agreements for drug treatment, recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in three additional Oregon counties on Wednesday, June 15.

The OAC approved BHRNs in Crook, Polk and Umatilla counties. The OAC will review five additional counties for approval at a special meeting scheduled for Friday, June 17 at 8 a.m. The public may view the meeting here.  

The OAC has now approved 13 BHRNs along with their funding, totaling nearly $22 million. To date, approximately $64million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization showing the BHRNs that have been approved for funding; (in orange) along with those that have been selected by the OAC (in blue) and are in negotiations for funding approval.

OHA has also established a robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress being made to date.

OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed 

A three-month extension was offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022.

Twenty-eight of the original 66 recipients received first-round extensions for a total of $5,725,054.93. Fifty-four of the original 66 recipients requested second-round extensions, and of those, 41 were found eligible for additional funds, totaling $4,356,343.

The additional funds are in the process of being disbursed, bringing the total ATC funds to be disbursed to approximately $41.6million. 

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications. 

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services. 

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

Oregon reports first case of potential hMPXV - 06/16/22

June 16, 2022

Media contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, ORCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports first case of potential hMPXV

Potential monkeypox in adult who traveled to affected area

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is reporting the first case of probable hMPXV (denoting the human version of the monkeypox virus) in Oregon.

The individual identifies as an adult male and has traveled to a community with confirmed cases. He remains isolated and is following recommendations from public health officials and medical providers. Confirmatory testing is being done at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

OHA is working closely with the CDC, local public health and the patient’s health care providers to ensure appropriate actions are taken to identify individuals at potential risk for exposure.

“hMPXV does not spread easily between people, so the risk to other people is generally very low,” said Dr. Richard Leman, Public Health Physician with OHA. “Unlike COVID-19, which can be spread easily from person to person through the air over several feet of space, hMPXV spreads between people primarily through direct contact with infectious sores, scabs, or body fluids. Less commonly, it can be spread by respiratory secretions during prolonged face-to-face contact.”

Though hMPXV is in the same group of viruses as smallpox, it is not smallpox. hMPXV is much harder to catch, and it is not as severe. There are two strains of this virus, and the one that’s circulating now causes milder disease. Most people are recovering at home without any special treatment. Additionally, there have been no deaths reported nationwide.

Historically, people have become infected by handling wild animals, but hMPXV can also be transmitted person-to-person. This can happen through prolonged, close contact, either skin-to-skin, contact with fluid from hMPXV lesions, or less commonly from large respiratory droplets.

An ill person who coughs or sneezes on someone else could possibly spread the infection. However, most transmission in the current outbreak appears to be from prolonged, skin-to-skin contact,” Dr. Leman said.

What are the symptoms?

Initial symptoms of hMPXV often include fever, headache and muscle aches. These symptoms are followed in one to three days by a rash, often on the face, spreading to the limbs. The rash starts with flat patches that then form large, firm bumps, which then fill with fluid or pus. These then scab and fall off, usually over two to four weeks. Symptoms usually start within seven to 14 days after exposure, with a range of five to 21 days.

When can a person ill with hMPXV spread it to others?

Ill people can potentially transmit the infection from when symptoms start until the rash has resolved. However, this is not an easy infection to catch. hMPXV typically requires prolonged, close contact. People at increased risk include sexual partners of an ill person, or family members and healthcare workers caring for someone ill with hMPXV.

Are there vaccines for hMPXV?

There is a vaccine specifically for hMPXV and smallpox called Jynneos. It could be used to protect people with high-risk exposure to someone ill with hMPXV. There is another vaccine, ACAM2000, that is approved to prevent smallpox. It could be used under special arrangements with CDC, but it is more likely to cause adverse effects.

Vaccines would be used to protect people who have known exposure to someone ill with hMPXV infection. It works to prevent or decrease disease even after someone was exposed. Members of the public who haven’t been exposed don’t need this vaccine.

How is OHA responding to the outbreak?

Currently, there are 84 cases across 18 states, no deaths and one case in Oregon.

OHA is working with community partners to share information about hMPXV, the outbreak and infection prevention strategies with people who might be at increased risk of infection. OHA is sharing information with clinicians about the outbreak, how to recognize and test for hMPXV illness and how to prevent spread.

For more information on hMPXV, visit this FAQ page.

Click here for CDC information on hMPXV, social gatherings and safer sex.

Here are images of hMPXV.

Click here to see why the World Health Organization (WHO) wants to give monkeypox a new name.

OHA holds media briefing on COVID-19 tomorrow at 11 a.m. - 06/16/22

June 16, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA holds media briefing on COVID-19 tomorrow at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is hosting its monthly media availability to give an update on the COVID-19 pandemic on Friday, June 17.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will discuss the state of the pandemic, planning for the expected expansion of COVID-19 vaccines for younger children and answer reporters’ questions at 11 a.m. via Zoom. He will be joined by Dawn Nolt, M.D., professor of pediatrics (infectious diseases) in the OHSU School of Medicine, who will provide remarks regarding vaccines for young children.

Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream will be available for the public on YouTube.

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds special meeting Friday, June 17, 2022 - 06/16/22

June 16, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds special meeting Friday, June 17, 2022

What: A special meeting of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: Council will vote to approve BHRN recommendations.

When: Friday, June 17, 2022, from 8-10 a.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions

(English and Spanish):  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F80MR-zqles

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 7 - 06/15/22

June 15, 2022

Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, erica.j.heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 7

What: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. Members of the public may attend.

Agenda: HERO Kids Registry; EMSC Program; PEDS-03 Project; Suicide Prevention Project; State EMS and Trauma Systems Program.

When: Thursday, July 7, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Join the meeting from your computer, tablet, or smartphone: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1606839152?pwd=Q1dPaWsvNnNoY1JUc3JOcVhSNlFXQT09

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1606839152#

Dial: 1-669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 683 9152

Passcode: 397714

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at www.oregonemsc.org.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

OHA welcomes all participants. If you have any questions about accommodations or need any assistance to participate, please contact Rachel Ford at rachel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us, 971-673-0564 (voice), or 503-490-4971 (text) at least 48 hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted.

Health care providers reimbursed with state funds required to work with certified or qualified health care interpreters starting July 1 - 06/15/22

June 15, 2022

Media Contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health care providers reimbursed with state funds required to work with certified or qualified health care interpreters starting July 1

New rules reflect bill passed by Oregon Legislature during 2021 session

PORTLAND, Ore. — New rules that go into effect July 1 will require health care providers reimbursed with public funds to work with credentialed health care interpreters qualified or certified by Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

The rules drafted by OHA reflect changes in the requirement for health care interpreting services in Oregon that were made by the state Legislature’s passage of House Bill 2359 during the 2021 session. These new rules will ensure that people for whom English is a second language (those with limited English proficiency) or who use sign language can access high-quality interpreting services so they can receive health care like anyone else in Oregon. This access is critical to achieving the state’s mission of eliminating health inequities by 2030.

In addition to requiring publicly reimbursed health care providers to work with a qualified or certified health care interpreter listed on OHA’s 900-plus-member central registry, the law outlines recordkeeping requirements for health care providers and interpreting service companies when they work with a health care interpreter. Among the requirements are that they document the interpreter’s name, central registry number and language interpreted.

The law also requires health care providers to supply appropriate personal protective equipment, or PPE, at no cost to a health care interpreter for onsite interpreting services. And it directs OHA to develop policies and processes to improve the quality, consistency, availability and affordability of training, and qualification and certification standards, for health care interpreters, as well as accuracy and usability of the OHA central registry.

In addition, OHA – and state boards that license and certify health care professionals – must develop rules to enforce the new requirements for health care interpreting services.

“We are pleased we received participation and input from community partners and pleased that this legislation strengthens and supports language interpretation services in Oregon,” said Leann Johnson, director of the Equity and Inclusion Division at OHA.

Johnson added that the new rules ensure health care providers and interpretation service companies work with best practices in providing health care interpretation services. The rules also will improve access to health care interpreters in rural communities in Oregon, particularly to interpreters capable of interpreting languages of limited diffusion – or spoken by a small population – in those areas.

One of the organizations OHA is partnering with to eliminate barriers that prevent access to health care interpreter services is Pueblo Unido PDX. The Portland-based nonprofit connects individuals with a vulnerable immigration status in the Pacific Northwest with legal, social and Indigenous language interpretation services.

“Pueblo Unido PDX and the Collective of Indigenous Interpreters of Oregon (CIIO) are grateful for the opportunity to collaborate with OHA to identify and address barriers to healthcare interpreter credentialing for Indigenous language interpreters,” said Cam Coval, executive director of Pueblo Unido PDX.

He said OHA’s Equity and Inclusion Division staff actively listened to feedback from Pueblo Unido and CIIO and “did not hesitate to implement our suggested changes, including eliminating the background check requirement and creating an exception to the GED or educational equivalency requirement for health care interpreters.”

Pueblo Unido and CIIO, he said, look forward to continued collaboration with OHA to ensure that required interpreter trainings are offered in Spanish; verify that patients are paired with an interpreter that speaks the correct variation of their Indigenous language; and develop more robust language proficiency evaluation mechanisms to determine that Indigenous language interpreters are indeed proficient in the target language.

House Bill 2359 allows some exceptions for health care providers in working with a health care interpreter, including that:

  • The health care provider is proficient in the preferred language of the person with limited English proficiency.
  • The person with limited English proficiency has an interpreter they prefer to work with who is not on the central registry.
  • The health care provider tried to find an interpreter using the central registry, but no interpreters were available.

OHA has been working closely with Oregon Council on Health Care Interpreters, the Oregon Department of Justice, health systems and other community partners to identify additional changes that reduce costs for health care interpreters associated with inclusion in the OHA central registry and administrative burdens. For example, all OHA central registry application and renewal fees for interpreters have been removed; training is offered for free or at low cost; training and experience requirements have been updated to maintain and improve interpreter quality standards; and an interpreter’s transition from qualified to certified status is now optional rather than required.

Health care providers and interpreting service companies will be given time – one year – to transition to the new requirements for working with OHA central registry interpreters who work remotely. Also, interpreters will no longer need to pass a background check to be included as a qualified or certified interpreter on the OHA central registry.

For more information about HB 2359, OHA’s central registry or health care interpreter services, visit the Health Care Interpreter Program website.

Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup to meet June 21 - 06/15/22

June 15, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503-931-3053, Kiari.Chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup to meet June 21

What: The regular public meeting of the Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup.

When: June 21, 12:30pm to 3:00pm

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome (12:30-12:35); Potential opportunity for statewide data program (12:35-12:50); Legislative Concept Area 4: Statewide data program—Jamboard Exercise (12:50-2:00); 10-Minute Break (2:00-2:10); Public Comment Period 1 (2:10-2:15); Finalize Concept Paper 1: Support for community-based organizations (CBOs) to participate in CIE (2:15-2:30); Review Concept Paper 2: Recommend OHA and ODHS roles in CIE (2:30-2:50); Public Comment Period 2 (2:50-2:55); Closing Remarks and Meeting Adjourn (2:55-3:00)

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup to meet June 24 - 06/15/22

June 15, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503-931-3053, Kiari.Chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup to meet June 24

What: The regular public meeting of the Health Information Exchange (HIE) Workgroup.

When: June 24, 1:30pm to 4:30pm

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome (1:30-1:40); HIE in Oregon—Big Picture (1:40-2:05); Legislative Recommendations (2:05-2:40); BREAK (2:40-2:50); Value-Based Payment (2:50-4:20); Public Comment (4:20-4:25); Next Steps and Adjourn (4:25-4:30)

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Advisory Committee meets June 22, 2022 - 06/15/22

June 15, 2022

Contact:

Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, Philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Sarah Bartelmann, 971-283-8107, sarah.e.bartelmann@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Advisory Committee meets June 22, 2022

What: A public meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Advisory Committee

When:  Wednesday, June 22, 2022 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

Where: This is a virtual meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or conference line.

Join by Zoom

To join by phone:

+16692545252,,1605418363#

Passcode: 493485

Agenda:

  • Welcome
  • How the Cost Growth Target supports the Oregon Health Authority’s and Oregon Health Policy Board priorities
  • National Landscape
  • Cost Growth Target Program Overview
  • Committee Introductions
  • Committee Charge and Working Together
  • Public Comment

Public comment will be heard at 4:45 PM.

Please submit any public comment in writing prior to the meeting at  HealthCare.CostTarget@dhsoha.state.or.us

For more information, please visit the committee’s website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact JerRonde Weatherspoon at 503-385-5948, 711 TTY, jerronde.a.weatherspoon@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Climate change disasters affecting youth mental health, report shows - 06/14/22

EDITORS: OHA is hosting a Zoom media briefing at 11 a.m. today to discuss findings from a new report. Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream of the media briefing will also be available on YouTube.

June 14, 2022

Media Contacts:

Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, jonathan.n.modie@dohsoha.state.or.us

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, erica.j.heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Climate change disasters affecting youth mental health, report shows

Extreme weather, wildfires, drought among climate-related stressors

PORTLAND, Ore. — Increasing extreme weather events and climate-related disasters, climate stressors such as water and food insecurity, slow progress from leaders and increased awareness of the negative impacts of climate change are leading to feelings of hopelessness, despair, anxiety and frustration among young people, an Oregon Health Authority (OHA) report has found.

The report, Climate Change and Youth Mental Health in Oregon, also found that youth feel dismissed by adults and older generations in society, and are angry that not enough is being done to protect their future. They recognize that vulnerability to climate change is closely linked with systemic racism and structural oppression, and that both need to be simultaneously addressed.

OHA’s Environmental Health Assessment Unit prepared the report in response to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown’s Executive Order 20-04, which directs state agencies to take actions to reduce and regulate greenhouse gas emissions. The report shares research on how climate change affects mental health. It includes results from a literature review, youth focus groups, key informant interviews, and learnings from youth story circles.

The report is packed with quotes from young people about the effects of climate change on their mental health, such as:

  • “It is a huge weight…just really overwhelming and I already have generalized anxiety. So now I have to also deal with the climate crisis. It’s just really scary and frustrating. I just wish I could be ignorant and not care.”
  • “(Adults have) already lived their futures, if that makes sense. But I still don't know what mine's gonna look like because of this existential threat. And so it’s like yelling at the wall about like, this really scary thing, but not really hearing anything back.”
  • “It's like a constant thing. And it's like it affects all things and includes the wildfires on top of the settlers on top of their violence. And then thinking more broadly and globally, because I'm also indigenous to the islands of Tonga, a lot of our people are climate refugees and are no longer able to return home to the islands because it's sinking and cemeteries are underwater. And that's also settler induced climate change… I feel like climate change cannot be talked about without talking about settler colonialism, white supremacy and, like, genocide…”

For others, like Eliza Garcia, a 21-year-old University of Oregon student, the pressure of wanting to do more but knowing it may not be enough can be overwhelming.

“I feel this constant pressure to save the world from climate change,” Garcia said. “It’s the fear for our future and the guilt that I’m not doing enough if I’m not constantly working to fight climate change. It’s not fair, and I wish more was being done so that I don’t have to feel like this all the time and so people much younger than me don’t have to grow up with these feelings as well.”

Saraya Lumberas, 16, a Crater High School student in Medford, agrees. “I want people in power to know that this is our future. Our world. We don’t want to live with the consequences of their actions because they ignore the climate crisis and they ignore youth,” she said.

Ukiah Halloran-Steiner, 17, who lives in Yamhill County, said OHA’s report “proves something that young people have long known. The psychological weight of climate change is constantly upon us and the hopelessness of the crisis is inescapable if the adults in power continue with ignorance and inaction."

Julie Early Sifuentes, M.S., with OHA’s Climate and Health Program and the report’s lead author, said the report demonstrates the link between worsening climate events and growing climate-related distress.

“As climate effects get worse, youth are becoming very worried about their future and the future of their younger siblings,” Sifuentes said. “I hope this report gets more conversations going in communities across the state, about how we can join with youth in confronting these crises.”

Meg Cary, M.D., M.P.H., child and adolescent psychiatrist and senior health advisor at OHA, who served as an adviser to the study, said the report and the conversations and actions that follow represent the “first step to promoting youth emotional health during this time of uncertainty, fear and dismay.”

“Youth have spoken to what they need to move forward, including stronger connections with community, culture and nature, better access to mental health services and participation in policy making,” she said. “Protecting youth mental health is a state and national urgency. Collective and coordinated investments in these priorities is the next step in fostering youth well-being.”

The report concludes with a call to “decision-makers, educators, mental health professionals and environmental professionals” who have “opportunities to support youth mental health and resilience in the face of climate change …” These opportunities include:

  • Sharing power with youth in decision-making about climate and mental health policy and solutions to increase youth’s sense of hope, belonging and agency.
  • Educating themselves about the connection between climate change and youth mental health including healing centered approaches to engage with youth.
  • Increasing investments in school and community mental health services. These investments are needed to meet increasing demands to support youth, family, and community well-being.

“Youth need to feel a sense of control and empowerment when it comes to climate change,” Sifuentes explained. “Addressing these needs will build their confidence and resilience as they help society develop meaningful solutions to take on these environmental effects into the future.”

Cary added that an important takeaway for parents, other family members, educators, and mental health therapists is that they need to listen to, and not dismiss, youth who are experiencing climate anxiety.

“Listening means creating a space where the young people in your lives can express their full range of emotions, and it also means to join youth in engaging in actions and solutions,” Cary said. “For youth, I hope that they when they read this report, they feel heard and that they are not alone.”

For more information, including a link to the report and additional background, visit the Climate Change and Mental Health Effects page.

UPDATED: OHA media briefing on 'Climate Change and Youth Mental Health' report today at 11 a.m. - 06/14/22

Updated: A YouTube link for a livestream of this media briefing has been added.

June 14, 2022

OHA media briefing on ‘Climate Change and Youth Mental Health’ report today at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority will host a Zoom media briefing at 11 a.m. today – Tuesday, June 14 – to discuss findings from a new report about the effects of climate change on youth mental health. 

Speakers will include:

• Julie Early Sifuentes, M.S., with OHA’s Climate and Health Program and the report’s lead author.
• Meg Cary, M.D., M.P.H., child and adolescent psychiatrist and senior health advisor at OHA, who served as an adviser to the study.
• Several Oregon youth who will share their thoughts about climate change and how climate events have affected them: Mira Saturen, 16, a high school student in Ashland; Mecca Donovan, 23, of Eugene; Te Maia Wiki, 16, a high school student in Ashland.

Interested reporters can join via this link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610132468?pwd=MXB5NVNaUjBxcVg1c0RoZVJ1VC9EZz09

A livestream of the media briefing will also be available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ivkjS6UGMKo

A recording of the briefing will be available on YouTube after the event.

###

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds short Executive Session on June 15 - 06/13/22

June 13, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds short Executive Session on June 15

What: An executive session of the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has been scheduled for the first 45 minutes of the regular council meeting on Wednesday, June 15, 2022.

Agenda: Executive Session is to be held under ORS 192.660(2)(f) and (h) to discuss attorney-client privileged legal advice and discuss documents that are confidential with the Oregon Department of Justice.

The agenda for the public portion of the meeting will be posted on the OAC website prior to the meeting.

When/Where: Wednesday, June 15, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Public meeting will open with roll call then go into a short Executive Session from 1:45-2:15 p.m. Public meeting will resume at 2:15 p.m. https://youtu.be/bjJn20q9NBo​

Executive Session for media only:

Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610808672?pwd=VEVxcUxoRmc5NjdwangrU1pPQkZVZz09 Meeting ID: 161 080 8672 Passcode: 459711 +16692545252,,1610808672# US (Pacific Time)

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet June 24 - 06/13/22

June 13, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet June 24

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: June 24, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome & consent agenda (9:00-9:15); Public testimony (9:15-9:25); Select Draft 2023 Challenge Pool (9:25-10:15); Select Draft 2023 Challenge Pool (10:30-11:00); Groundwork for New Measurement Structure Centered on Equity (11:00-12:00); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, or brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

Public hearing on Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant June 14 via Zoom - 06/09/22

June 9, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public hearing on Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant June 14 via Zoom

What: Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division is holding a hearing to take public comments on the division’s proposal for the use of funds from the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant

Agenda: Review of Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant proposal for October 2022 through September 2023. Public comment will be taken. Draft proposal will be posted at www.healthoregon.org/lhd prior to the meeting.

When: Tuesday, June 14, 2-2:30 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1600921387?pwd=cGVqa3J6MXNhQ0VSaTY3aldaWVc2UT09

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, danna.k.drum@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the hearing.

OHA releases COVID-19 vaccine Breakthrough Report - 06/09/22

June 9, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases COVID-19 vaccine Breakthrough Report

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, reported 44,363 cases of infection during the month of May.  

Of those cases, 21,100, or 47.6%, were unvaccinated people, and 23,246, or 52.4%, were vaccine breakthrough cases. Among the breakthrough cases, 14,506, or 62.4%, were fully vaccinated and boosted. 

To date, there have been 233,873 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. Of those cases, 69,105, or 29.5%, were fully vaccinated and boosted at the time of infection.  

To date, 2.6% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized, and 0.6% have died. The median age of vaccinated people who died is 80. 

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective at protecting people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized and dying. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone age 5 years and older stay up to date with their vaccines, including getting boosters when they are eligible.  

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.

Note: The next Breakthrough Report will be published Thursday, July 7.  

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet June 15 - 06/09/22

June 9, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet June 15

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: June 15, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1616731389?pwd=bFNTV245cmhtT3NBWWE4SGtUaEU5Zz09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 161 673 1389, Password: 579284.

Agenda: Attendance for those attending by phone only; Meeting opening; Public comment; General Updates: APAC data use; Rule change process and TAG feedback; Summary of 2022-23 proposed rule changes; Feedback on 2022-23 proposed changes; Next steps for 2022-23 proposed rule changes; Future topics; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

For people who speak a language other than English or people with disabilities we can provide free help.

Some examples are:

  • spoken language interpreters,
  • sign language interpreters,
  • CART captioning,
  • braille,
  • large print,
  • transcripts,
  • virtual platform change.

If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Brian Toups, 503-428-3442 (voice/text), brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 business hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.

CORRECTION: Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 16 via Zoom - 06/09/22

CORRECTION: A previous version of this meeting notice included an incorrect date for the event.

June 9, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 16 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Review of Public Health Advisory Board accountability metrics and funding formula proposals; rural community-based organization capacity building; health care interpreter statutory changes; tobacco prevention and education program element changes; Public Health Advisory Board history and updates.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, June 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. 

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at  

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItde2trDIuHi77O3JM8PRXSEpfLh2L6YY

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869,  danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869 711 TTY or danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets June 14 via Zoom - 06/09/22

June 9, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139

PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets June 14 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve April and May meeting minutes; finalize metrics selection criteria; hear from local public health committee on communicable disease metrics; develop responses to PHAB health equity review questions.

When: Tuesday, June 14, 3-4:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 116 1415; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601161415?pwd=Tmd1dHhXcGppd0VHOStZY3lOKy80dz09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA recognizes Pride Month with resources to support LGBTQ2SIA+ youth - 06/09/22

June 9, 2022

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, OHA, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA recognizes Pride Month with resources to support LGBTQ2SIA+ youth

Agency reaffirms commitment to youth, families as school wraps up

PORTLAND, Ore. — June is Pride Month, and Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is reaffirming its commitment to supporting lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, two-spirit, intersex and asexual+ (LGBTQ2SIA+) youth and families.

OHA is encouraging family members and communities to join in supporting LGBTQ2SIA+ young people by celebrating gender and sexual orientation diversity and affirming the unique and diverse identities of young people in Oregon. OHA is also highlighting resources that help promote well-being, safety and inclusion as summer gets under way.

“Summer can be a challenging time for our LGBTQ2SIA+ youth, particularly transgender and LGBTQ2SIA+ youth of color, who lose many of the supports they had access to the rest of the year,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “For any youth, and LGBTQ2SIA+ youth in particular, having positive, affirming supports from their families and community organizations over the summer can make the difference between surviving and thriving.”

In June 2020, the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) published the LGBTQ2SIA+ Student Success Plan to address “barriers to educational success for Oregonian students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, non-binary, transgender, gender queer, two-spirit, intersex, asexual (+).” The plan establishes a framework for creating safe, inclusive and welcoming schools for LGBTQ2SIA+ students. One of the primary strategies within the plan is to align State of Oregon agencies to support LGBTQ2SIA+ youth to thrive.

ODE Director Colt Gill said the Success Plan “recognizes the tremendous inherent strengths in each of our LGBTQ2SIA+ students. It also acknowledges the statistically inhospitable educational settings they experience in school and in their communities. It sets forth strategies to increase inclusivity, increase student belonging, reduce bullying, address bias-based harassment and campus assaults, and improve attendance.”  

Communities, families and trusted adults play a critical role in contributing to and supporting their LGBTQ2SIA+ children’s well-being. Family behaviors that promote self-esteem, overall health, and strong, affirming relationships protect LGBTQ2SIA+ young people against potential suicidal behavior, depression and substance use.

A number of local, state and national resources are available for LGBTQ2SIA+ youth and families to thrive as summer kicks off:

  • TransActive Gender Project at Lewis & Clark Graduate School Works to empower transgender and gender-expansive children, youth and their families in living healthy lives that are free of discrimination through a range of services and expertise.
  • PFLAG offers quick tips to parents for supporting their LGBTQ2SIA+ children during the coming-out process. PFLAG also has nine chapters in Oregon, including in eastern, southern and central Oregon and the Portland metro area.
  • The Family Acceptance Project works to increase family and community support for LGBTQ2SIA+ children and youth, decrease health and mental health risks, and promote well-being. An Oregon page also is available.
  • The Trevor Project promotes suicide prevention and crisis intervention for LGBTQ2SIA+ young people. Public education materials are available on its website, and it recently published the results of its 2022 National Survey on LGBTQ Youth Mental Health.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a number of resources for LGBTQ2SIA+ youth, their friends and supporters on its website. The CDC also provides professional development resources for teachers and school staff.
  • The Center of Excellence on LGBTQ+ Behavioral Health Equity at the University of Maryland aims to address disparities in mental health and substance use disorder treatment systems that affect the LGBTQ2SIA+ community. The center published a short video last year on basic terminology that is important for people to know when working with those of diverse sexual orientations or gender identities.
  • New Avenues for Youth’s Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Center provides culturally specific support for LGBTQ2SIA+ youth.

The Student Health Survey (SHS) is a comprehensive, school-based, anonymous and voluntary health survey of sixth-, eighth- and 11th-graders that OHA and ODE jointly conduct in the fall of even-numbered years. SHS data is used to improve the health and well-being of all Oregon students to help them succeed; the survey is a key part of statewide efforts to help local schools and communities support all Oregon youth to be healthy and successful learners. According to Oregon’s 2020 Student Health Survey, youth identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender are much more likely to report mental health concerns compared with their peers.

  • Among eighth-graders, 38% of lesbian, gay and bisexual youths contemplated suicide in the past year, compared with 7% of heterosexual youth.
  • Among 11-graders, 44% of transgender or gender diverse youth contemplated suicide compared with 18% of females and 10% of males.
  • Also among eighth-graders, 40% of lesbian/gay youth experienced anxiety almost every day, compared with 8% of straight peers.

Tribal two spirit, black LGBTQ2SIA+ and youth of color often experience racial discrimination as well as the weight of discrimination related to their sexual and gender identities. The survey found:

  • Thirty-nine percent of LGBTQ2SIA+ youth of color strongly agree/agree that there is conflict at school based on race/ethnicity/culture, compared with 38% of all LGBTQ2SIA+ youth and 27% of all youth.
  • Fifteen percent of LGBTQ2SIA+ youth of color strongly disagree/disagree that adults at their school respect people from different backgrounds, compared with 13% of all LGBTQ2SIA+ youth and 7% of all youth.
  • Twenty percent of LGBTQ2SIA+ youth of color experienced recent school bullying, compared with 21% of all LGBTQ2SIA+ youth and 12% of all youth.
  • Forty percent of LGBTQ2SIA+ youth of color said they had no one at school to go to if they had a problem with their physical or mental health during the school day, compared with 39% of all LGBTQ2SIA+ youth and 27% of all youth.

The survey also found that queer and transgender youth experienced school bullying at much higher rates than their peers:

  • Among 11-graders, 26% who are transgender, 19% who are lesbian/gay and 17% who are bisexual report experiencing bullying over the last 30 days, compared with 8% of straight peers.
  • Among eighth-graders, bullying rates were 30% for transgender, 23% lesbian/gay, 24% bisexualand 10% straight.

OHA works with other state agencies, counties, Tribal Nations, communities and advocacy groups across the state to prevent suicide in Oregon, including offering links and contact information to help lines and other resources:

  • Find a training program near you to learn about how you can help prevent suicide and connect to help.
  • Oregon launched the Safe + Strong Helpline and website at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic to provide support for those struggling with the loss of loved ones and lifestyle changes. The Safe + Strong Helpline, 1-800-923- HELP (4357), is available 24/7. More help and resources are available in multiple languages on the Safe + Strong website.
  • 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Line by Lines for Life: 1-800-273-8255
  • 24/7 Crisis Text Line: Text “OREGON” to 741741
  • YouthLine for teen-to-teen support. A phone line and text support line are available where trained youth respond from 4 to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday, PDT.
    • Call 1-877-968-8491
    • Text teen2teen to 839863

# # #

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves new grant agreements for drug treatment, recovery services - 06/09/22

June 9, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves new grant agreements for drug treatment, recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) this week approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in three additional Oregon counties: Baker, Curry and Sherman.

The OAC has now approved 10 BHRNs along with their funding, which totals more than $11.5 million. To date, approximately $50 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

Baker County Region

New Directions Northwest will serve as the single service provider for the Baker County region. The approved budget is $860,830.

Curry County Region

Adapt Integrated Health Care and Brookings Community Resource Response will serve as collaborative providers in the Curry County BHRN. The approved budget is approximately $1.5 million.

Sherman County Region

Boulder Care and Mid-Columbia Center for Living will serve as collaborative service providers in the BHRN for Sherman County. The approved budget is $750,000.

OHA has established a robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress being made to date.

OHA has also developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNS that have been approved for funding; (in orange) along with those that have been selected by the OAC (in blue) and are in negotiations for funding approval.

Progress

OAC subcommittees have now approved BHRN applications for negotiations in all 36 Oregon counties and have adjourned their meetings.

Over the course of their work, the subcommittees reviewed applications for 327 service providers -- some are serving more than one county. 

The approved providers then coordinate to form BHRN’s which are then in a later stage, approved for funding.

Funding will be released no later than 20 days after a BHRN is approved and all funding agreements are executed. Thus far, funding has been released well within the projected time frame.

Last month, the OAC voted to adopt a new 18-month grant spending timeline that will extend from July 2022 through December 2023.

OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension will be offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022. The grantees will receive a pro-rated amount based on their prior award, bringing the total funds disbursed to approximately $39.9 million.

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications.

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services.

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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Court-ordered expert submits second report for improving Oregon State Hospital capacity challenges - 06/07/22

June 7, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Court-ordered expert submits second report for improving Oregon State Hospital capacity challenges

Dr. Debra Pinals, the mutually agreed upon expert who was chosen to provide recommendations for alleviating Oregon State Hospital’s (OSH) capacity challenges as part of a settlement agreement among Oregon Health Authority (OHA), the Metropolitan Public Defender and Disability Rights Oregon, submitted her second report to the court on June 5, 2022.

The first report was submitted on Jan. 30, 2022. It outlined a short-term compliance plan for the hospital to meet the Mink Order, which requires the hospital to admit patients needing competency restoration (also called Aid and Assist) within seven days of court orders and to also timely admit those under Guilty Except for Insanity (GEI) commitments. The second report, submitted to the court on June 5, 2022, outlines a long-term plan for improving admission wait times for the Aid and Assist and GEI commitments.

“The parties worked diligently with me to discuss various strategies to achieve compliance with the 7-day admission requirement of Mink as soon as possible, and the need of the GEI patients to be similarly released from jail and timely admitted,” Dr. Pinals wrote in her second report.

Dr. Pinals conducted interviews with a variety of stakeholders, including OSH and other OHA staff, advocates and partners and held weekly meetings with the parties in the settlement agreement to receive timely updates. While she points out in the report that “there is no simple single solution that will fix the issues that are contributing to the increased referrals to OSH and difficulties with discharges that create ongoing barriers to opening space at OSH for those waiting in jails and other places,” Dr. Pinals was still able to provide recommendations that would lead to shorter wait times for OSH admissions and discharges.

Those system changes include improving forensic evaluations when assessing people while they are in jail to see if they become fit for trial before they are admitted to the hospital, as well as working with counties to expand the number of treatment beds in the community for people who no longer need hospital level of care, which will improve discharge wait times.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “I am encouraged by the thoroughness of Dr. Pinals’ work and her careful assessment of the capacity challenges the state faces. I believe her recommendations are reasonable and achievable and I look forward to seeing them applied.”

Among the many recommendations listed in her report, Dr. Pinals outlined ways the state can improve its system of sharing data and information so that current numbers of patients waiting for admission and waiting for discharge, as well as current capacity levels, are easily found. She also recommended streamlining and improving a variety of hospital processes and outlined in the report several steps to achieve the improvements.

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Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom June 21 - 06/07/22

June 7, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom June 21

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Tuesday, June 21, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 313 1798 Passcode: 246240

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 16 via Zoom - 06/07/22

June 7, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 16 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Review of Public Health Advisory Board accountability metrics and funding formula proposals; rural community-based organization capacity building; health care interpreter statutory changes; tobacco prevention and education program element changes; Public Health Advisory Board history and updates.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, June 14, 9:30-11:30 a.m. 

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at  

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItde2trDIuHi77O3JM8PRXSEpfLh2L6YY

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869,  danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869 711 TTY or danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds short Executive Session on June 8 - 06/06/22

June 6, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds short Executive Session on June 8

What: An executive session of the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has been scheduled for the first 45 minutes of the regular council meeting on Wednesday, June 8, 2022.

Agenda: Executive Session is to be held under ORS 192.660(2)(f) and (h) to discuss attorney-client privileged legal advice and discuss documents that are confidential with the Oregon Department of Justice.

The agenda for the public portion of the meeting will be posted on the OAC website prior to the meeting.

When/Where: Wednesday, June 8, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Public meeting will open with roll call then go into a short Executive Session. Public meeting will resume at 2:15 p.m. https://youtu.be/rJaDpdE_Mkw

Executive Session: For media only:

Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610808672?pwd=VEVxcUxoRmc5NjdwangrU1pPQkZVZz09

Meeting ID: 161 080 8672 Passcode: 459711 +16692545252,,1610808672# US (Pacific Time)

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets June 15 - 06/06/22

June 6, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets June 15

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee.

Agenda:  Program updates; legislative bill review; exemptions/rules update; emergency preparedness/response/incident overviews.

When: Wednesday, June 15, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Teams Meeting: Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 971-277-2343; Passcode: 919 883 08#

Background: Per Oregon Revised Statute, the Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) is comprised of eight members representative of Radiation Protection Services (RPS) registrants and licensees who use radiation devices/sources. RAC members advise RPS staff on radiation use and safety, including budgetary and administrative rule matters.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Patty Thompson at 503-509-2622, or patricia.a.thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us  at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom June 13 - 06/06/22

June 6, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom June 13

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, June 13, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 765 7543 Passcode: 739801

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA begins accepting applications from organizations interested in training individuals to become psilocybin services facilitators - 06/06/22

June 6, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA begins accepting applications from organizations interested in training individuals to become psilocybin services facilitators

PORTLAND, Ore. – This week the Oregon Psilocybin Services (OPS) section at Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will begin accepting applications from psilocybin training programs for curriculum approval.

Individuals interested in being licensed as psilocybin facilitators must complete a training program that has had OHA curriculum approval before applying for licensure. Once trained and licensed, facilitators will be able to meet with clients and supervise sessions where clients consume psilocybin in a licensed psilocybin service center facility. 

Psilocybin training programs are invited to submit an application for curriculum approval by going to the OPS website: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/Pages/Psilocybin-Training-Program-Approval.aspx

All organizations interested in training facilitators of psilocybin services in Oregon must apply for curriculum approval and submit a $500 application fee.

Once OPS begins approving applications, a list of training programs with approved curriculums will be posted on its webpage. OPS does not have the authority to control the costs of training programs. Training programs will determine the cost of their programs.

Individuals interested in facilitating psilocybin services in Oregon must complete an approved curriculum before applying for licensure.

Additional rules related to psilocybin services will be adopted by the end of the year, in time for OPS to begin accepting applications for facilitator licensure on Jan. 2, 2023.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or OHA.Psilocybin@dhsoha.state.gov.

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Civil Monetary Penalties Committee meets virtually June 8 - 06/06/22

June 6, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s Civil Monetary Penalties Committee meets virtually June 8

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s Civil Monetary Penalties Committee is holding its sixth meeting.

Agenda: Review meeting agenda; summarize past CMP Committee Discussion; discuss draft CMP Decision-making Tool; vote to recommend NSAB support implementation of CMP tool; discuss CMP report for NSAB; summarize action items and next steps. Full agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Wednesday, June 8, 3-4:30 p.m.

Where: Register for this meeting to receive meeting login information: https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIscu2opz8uEpqmGPHxOyTygPaCLyyyTkg

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, Mailbox.nursestaffing@state.or.us

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Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker, MPH at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets June 10 via Zoom - 06/03/22

June 3, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139

PHD.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets June 10 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Incentives and Funding Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve May minutes, discuss changes to public health modernization funding formula, discuss data and measures for migrant and seasonal farmworkers, develop responses to PHAB’s health equity review questions.

When: Friday, June 10, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 161 998 8519; or register in advance by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIsduCrrTkrHoOhnYZbR5cHLdJr_sJoU10.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops the public health modernization funding formula and makes recommendations about public health funding priorities.

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Health Information Technology Oversight Council to meet June 9 - 06/03/22

June 3, 2022

Contact: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503-931-3053, kiari.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Information Technology Oversight Council to meet June 9

What: The regular public meeting of Health Information Technology Oversight Council.

When: June 9, 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome, Introductions and HITOC Business (12:30-12:40); Health IT Data Report (12:40-1:00), Plan for HB 4150 (1:00-1:10); HIE Workgroup Updates (1:10-1:30); CIE Workgroup Updates and 1st Legislative Concept (1:30-2:10); 10-Minute Break (2:10-2:20); EHR Adoption and Additional Areas of Opportunity (2:20-3:00); Strategic Plan Update Work Ahead (3:00-3:10); HIT Policy & Program Updates (3:10-3:20); Public Comment (3:20-3:25); Closing Remarks and Meeting Adjourn (3:25-3:30)

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/OHIT-HITOC/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday June 7, 2022 - 06/03/22

June 3, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us  

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday June 7, 2022

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council

When: Tuesday June 7, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at ZoomGov

Meeting ID: 160 347 3675, Passcode: 123456

Dial by your location +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose)

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults.

Primarily the council will be reviewing possible legislative ideas for the 2023 session.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves new grant agreements for drug treatment, recovery services - 06/03/22

June 3, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves new grant agreements for drug treatment, recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) this week approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in five additional Oregon counties: Gilliam, Grant, Lake, Morrow and Wheeler.

Th OAC has now approved seven BHRNs along with their funding, which totals more than $7.3 million. To date, approximately $47 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

The M110 funding is part of a $1.35 billion investment toward transformational change in Oregon’s behavioral health system.

As of June 1, OHA has spent or obligated approximately $523 million in behavioral health investments. An additional $422 million is expected to be spent or obligated by the end of September 2022. A report detailing the progress of this historic investment can be found here.

Gilliam, Grant, Wheeler County Region

Community Counseling Services (CCS) and Boulder Care will serve as the collaborative service providers for the Gilliam, Grant and Wheeler county region. The approved budget is $2.25 million.

CCS provides a full range of in-person support services and Boulder Care will provide accessible telehealth substance use treatment, which will expand the range of services in rural Oregon.

Lake County Region

Lake Health District will serve as the BHRN for Lake County. The approved budget is approximately $1.2 million.

The funds will be used to consolidate and expand mental health services for outpatient treatment and development of a robust low-barrier drop-in service center.

Morrow County Region

Community Counseling Services will serve as the BHRN for Morrow County. The approved budget is $924,517. They will provide expanded and culturally specific treatment options. CCS will also offer low-barrier treatment options and shorter waits for appointments.

OHA has established a robust new dashboard showing the progress being made to date. BHRN Approval progress, service entity coverage and funding progress by county

Orientation meetings with service providers will continue over the next few weeks and more funding announcements are expected.

Funding will be released no later than 20 days after a BHRN is approved and all funding agreements are executed. Thus far, funding has been released well within the projected time frame.

Last month, the OAC voted to adopt a new 18-month grant spending timeline that will extend from July 2022 through December 2023.

OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension will be offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022. The grantees will receive a pro-rated amount based on their prior award, bringing the total funds disbursed to approximately $39.9 million.

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications.

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services.

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council subcommittee #2 meeting date change - 06/03/22

June 3, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council subcommittee #2 meeting date change

What: A meeting of the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council’s subcommittee #2 to discuss approval of a BHRN applicant has been moved from Friday, June 3 to Monday, June 6.

Agenda: Posted on the Oversight and Accountability web page.

When: Monday, June 6 from 12-1 p.m.

Where: Virtual: https://youtu.be/IhWGy7QF0ZY

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets virtually June 8 - 06/03/22

June 3, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets virtually June 8

What: The Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC) is holding its quarterly public meeting.

Agenda: Committee business (logistics update, approve March 2022 minutes); OHA updates; COVID response and recovery; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Overview and Oregon Perspective; topics for future meetings and reports; public comment.

When: Wednesday, June 8, 1-3 p.m.

Where:

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIsceupqDwjHUZZDo5jvI0P5wRPonvo0-o

All attendees must use the webinar for audio functions. Please register for the webinar by following the link above. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of healthcare-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI Program. The HAI Program convenes its advisory board on a quarterly basis; the purpose of the board is to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities: http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Pages/index.aspx

Program contact: Laura LaLonde, 971-673-1120, Laura.Lalonde2@dhsoha.state.or.us

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Laura LaLonde at 971-673-1120, 711 TTY or Laura.Lalonde2@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

More attending providers can recommend medical marijuana to patients starting Jan. 1 - 06/02/22

June 2, 2022

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

More attending providers can recommend medical marijuana to patients starting Jan. 1

PORTLAND, Ore. — A new law that went into effect in January allows more attending health care providers who have primary responsibility for the care and treatment of a person diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition to recommend medical marijuana to a patient.

In May 2021, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 3369, which expanded the definition of attending provider under the rules for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP). After the new year, attending providers allowed to recommend medical marijuana now include:

  • Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathy (DO), licensed under ORS chapter 677.
  • Physician Assistant licensed under ORS 677.505 to 677.525.
  • Nurse Practitioner licensed under ORS 678.375 to 678.390.
  • Clinical Nurse Specialist licensed under ORS 678.370 and 678.372.
  • Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist as defined in ORS 678.245.
  • Naturopathic Physician licensed under ORS chapter 685.

Having "primary responsibility” means the attending provider has one of the following roles:

  • Provides primary health care to the patient.
  • Provides medical specialty care and treatment to the patient.
  • Is a consultant who has been asked to examine and treat the patient by the patient's primary care physician licensed under ORS chapter 677, the patient's physician assistant licensed under ORS chapter 677, or the patient's nurse practitioner licensed under ORS chapter 678.

The provider must also have reviewed a patient's medical records at the patient's request and conducted a thorough physical examination of the patient; provided or planned follow-up care; and documented these activities in the patient's medical record.

To recommend medical marijuana in Oregon, an attending provider must evaluate the patient’s health history, perform a physical examination, and determine that the use of marijuana may mitigate the symptoms or effects of the patient’s debilitating medical condition. Qualifying conditions include:

  • Cancer, glaucoma, a degenerative or pervasive neurological condition, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or a side effect related to the treatment of those medical conditions.
  • A medical condition or treatment for a medical condition that produces, for a specific patient, one or more of the following:
    • Cachexia.
    • Severe pain.
    • Severe nausea.
    • Seizures, including but not limited to seizures caused by epilepsy.
    • Persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to spasms caused by multiple sclerosis.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder.

An Attending Provider Statement (APS) form must be signed by the attending provider attesting that the patient has been diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition and that the medical use of marijuana may mitigate the symptoms or effect of the individual’s debilitating medical condition. As an alternate, the attending provider may supply the patient with relevant portions of the patient’s medical records containing the same information on the APS.

The patient is responsible for submitting the APS, or relevant medical records, with other required application documents, to the OMMP. The APS or relevant medical documents must be submitted within 90 days of the attending provider’s signature when a patient applies for the first time. When a patient is renewing with OMMP, application material must be submitted within 90 days of their registration card expiration date and the APS must be signed within that 90-day period.

For the OMMP to accept the APS from any of the providers listed above, other than a MD and DO, the APS or relevant medical records must be dated on or after Jan. 1, 2022. An updated APS form for attending providers is available on OMMP’s form’s page.

For more information, visit the OMMP website at healthoregon.org/ommp. Information specific to attending providers is under the Attending Providers link.

Join the OMMP listserv to get program updates by clicking this link.

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OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports - 06/02/22

June 2, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports

The COVID-19 Biweekly Data Report, released today, shows an increase COVID-19-related cases, hospitalizations and deaths since the previous biweekly period.

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported 22,845 new cases of COVID-19 from May 16 to May 29, a 24% increase over the previous biweekly total of 18,447.

There were 549 new COVID-19-related hospitalizations during the biweekly period, more than double from the 208 reported during the previous two-week period.

“The increases we are seeing with COVID-19 cases statewide confirm that the virus is still widespread through Oregon, even though many of us are ready to move on,” said Dr. Paul Cieslak, medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at OHA. “With our healthcare partners, we continue to monitor hospitalization numbers that are rising gradually. We anticipate, based on the latest modeling, that hospitalizations will peak around the second week of June and then start to come down.”

There were 58 COVID-19-related deaths, up from the 50 reported during the previous two weeks.

During the two-week period of May 15 through May 28, 196,549 tests for COVID-19 were reported to OHA; of those, 12.1% were positive — up from the 10.5% positivity rate reported during the previous two-week period.

“Being up to date with your vaccinations and boosters is still your best way to prevent serious disease,” added Cieslak. “Persons who are at higher risk should make a plan for getting tested and treated quickly should they develop COVID-19 symptoms despite vaccination. Paxlovid and other treatments are now widely available in Oregon with a doctor’s prescription or through test-to-treat sites.”

Today’s COVID-19 Biweekly Outbreak Report shows 153 active outbreaks in care facilities, senior living communities and congregate care living settings with three or more confirmed COVID-19 cases or one or more COVID-19-related deaths.

OHA updates COVID-19 Data Reports

OHA has identified a discrepancy in its labeling of age groups in tables and charts published in the COVID-19 Data Reports. The age group labels in the Data Reports indicate ages 0-9 and 10-19, but the case counts are from people ages 0-10 and 11-19. Information on the COVID-19 dashboards was not affected.

The error started in late 2020, when OHA transitioned from manually creating the reports to an automated process. OHA identified the scripting error in late May this year.

OHA will update all affected archived Data Reports, in both English and Spanish, with statements noting that data labels for the age groups should be for ages 0-10 and 11-19, and include a link to the dashboards for up-to-date information. OHA also will update its 2020 Annual COVID-19 Data Report to incorporate these changes.

Age groups and case counts in this week’s and all future Data Reports will align with OHA’s Case Demographics, Hospitalizations and Deaths dashboards. OHA also has updated its quality control processes to provide additional levels of review for all reports.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective at protecting people from getting seriously ill, being hospitalized and dying. Because the protection provided by COVID-19 vaccines decreases over time, especially among certain groups, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone ages 5 years and older stay up to date with their vaccines, including getting boosters when they are eligible. For more information on where to get a vaccine or your booster dose in Oregon, click here

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

OHA notifies Trillium of completion of corrective action plan for issues in Tri-County service area - 06/02/22

June 2, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, OHA.ExternalRelations@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA notifies Trillium of completion of corrective action plan for issues in Tri-County service area

Salem – On May 31, 2022, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) notified Trillium Community Health Plan (Trillium) that it had satisfactorily met the requirements of its corrective action plan (CAP) for service deficiencies in the Tri-County service area.

Trillium was placed on a CAP in September 2020, concurrent with its entry into the Tri-County service area. The CAP was imposed after Trillium’s failure to adequately address OHA’s concerns around the plan’s expansion into the Tri-County service area. The CAP was comprised of four main finding areas: (i) network development, (ii) health equity & language access, (iii) community engagement, and (iv) intensive care coordination.

OHA has worked with Trillium continuously to monitor and ensure progress towards meeting the requirements of the CAP. With the May 31 notice, subject to a final review, the various notices associated with the CAP are considered resolved and no further action is required from Trillium. The letter to Trillium can be found here.  

In the four main finding areas, Trillium has demonstrated it has resolved the initial and subsequent issues. Below is a summary of the original findings and the demonstrated resolution of the issues.

Network adequacy:

Trillium was notified that it must ensure that its members have the same access to certain services as other patients in the service area. In addition, Trillium must have sufficient in-network hospitals, primary care providers, specialists, and pediatric oral health providers to meet the time and distance standards in the foregoing rules and regulations, and Trillium must ensure that it has a sufficient network to provide an array of services, including (i) urgent care within 72 hours, (ii) well-care visits within four weeks, (iii) emergency oral care within 24 hours, (iv) urgent oral care within one week or as indicated in the initial screening, (v)routine oral care within an average of eight weeks (vi) routine oral care for pregnant women within an average of four weeks (vii) and urgent behavioral health care immediately.

Trillium demonstrated resolution of the original findings based on the following:

  • A methodology to gather provider capacity attestations across provider types within its provider network; and
  • Infrastructure to monitor utilization across provider types to ensure its network has adequate capacity to meet its membership's needs and to identify and address gaps.

Health Equity and Language Access:

Trillium was notified that it was required to develop and implement a Health Equity Plan designed to address the cultural, socioeconomic, racial, and regional disparities in health care that exist among members and communities in the Tri-County service area. And with regard to language access, Trillium was required to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services and supports to members.

Trillium has demonstrated resolution of the original findings based on the following:

  • Expanded access to language services within its network, including training for providers on accessing language services and a methodology for the ongoing monitoring of language access services;
  • A utilization review methodology that includes data stratification by member demographic information and service type; and
  • Meaningful engagement of community partners and stakeholders to address the cultural, socioeconomic, racial, and regional disparities in health care among members and communities in the Tri-County service area.

Community Engagement

Trillium was notified that it was required to (i) establish a Community Advisory Council to ensure the health needs of Tri-County members are being addressed, (ii) draft a Community Health Assessment, and (iii) Community Health Improvement Plan with key partners.

Trillium has now demonstrated resolution of the original findings based on the following:

  • Establishing the North Service Area Community Advisory Council, including robust consumer-member representation and bi-directional feedback between the CAC and Trillium Community Health Plan North Board of Directors;
  • Meaningful engagement of community partners and stakeholders to address the cultural, socioeconomic, racial, and regional disparities in health care among members and communities in the Tri-County service area; and
  • Meaningful progress towards creating the draft Community Health Assessment and the Community Health Improvement Plan in partnership with the Healthy Columbia Willamette Collaborative.

Intensive Care Coordination

Trillium was notified that it is required to automatically screen all members of Prioritized Populations for ICC services and to make ICC services available to all members of Prioritized Populations who qualify for them.

Trillium has now demonstrated resolution of the original finding based on the following:

  • Tracking engagement of members identified as potentially eligible for Intensive Care Coordination to ensure that ICC screenings, assessment, and enrollment occur in a timely manner in accordance with OAR 410-141-3870.

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in June - 06/01/22

June 1, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in June

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agendas: Posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Meetings are Wednesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. All meetings are virtual.

June 8:           https://youtu.be/WbqGS7wjtWk

June 15:         https://youtu.be/bjJn20q9NBo

June 22:         https://youtu.be/WpE_WvVZPRQ

June 29:         https://youtu.be/IhWGy7QF0ZY

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC holds regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets June 21 via Zoom - 05/31/22

May 31, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets June 21 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Review May meeting minutes and discuss a new framework for the PHAB Strategic Data Plan.

When: Tuesday, June 21, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call: (669) 254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 542 1162.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-673-2284.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 711 TTY, or cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board meets June 16 - 05/31/22

May 31, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets June 16

What: The Public Health Advisory Board will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Approve accountability metrics, funding formula and recommend submission of the public health modernization biennial report to Legislative Fiscal Office; recommend Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant work plan for Fiscal Year 2023; discuss PHAB charter and bylaws.

When: Thursday, June 16, 2-4:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code 1602414019#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds Executive Session and subcommittee #2 meets week of May 30, 2022 - 05/31/22

May 31, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds Executive Session and subcommittee #2 meets week of May 30, 2022

What: An executive session of the Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has been scheduled for the first 45 minutes of the regular council meeting on Wednesday, June 1, 2022.

Agenda: Executive Session is to be held under ORS 192.660(2)(f) and (h) to discuss attorney-client privileged legal advice and discuss documents that are confidential with the Oregon Department of Justice.

The agenda for the public portion of the meeting will be posted on the OAC website prior to the meeting.

Executive session and regular OAC meeting:

Wednesday, June 1, 1:30-3:30 p.m. https://youtu.be/rJaDpdE_Mkw

Meeting will open with roll call then go into a short Executive Session. Public meeting will resume at 2:15 p.m.

The OAC subcommittee #2 will also hold meetings this week. Subcommittee #1 is no longer meeting.

Agendas: Posted on the Oversight and Accountability web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

All meetings are virtual.

Subcommittee #2:

June 2, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. https://youtu.be/THB_pcPx-Nw (one-hour meeting)

June 3, 12-4 p.m. https://youtu.be/LgI3Q-NdYJw

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Health Policy Board meets June 7 via Zoom - 05/31/22

May 31, 2022

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets June 7 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: June 7, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604737337?pwd=WEJFeWJick9oVCsrT0RwcjEwaWdWZz09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,, 1604737337#,,,,,,0#,, 136235#

Proposed topics for the meeting agenda are listed below. The final meeting agenda and supporting materials will be posted on the OHPB website prior to the meeting. 

Agenda:

  1. Roll Call, Welcome & Minutes Approval;
  2. Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Director Updates;
  3. Oregon Health Plan Redeterminations & Bridge Program Task Force Update;
  4. Public Comment*;
  5. Task Force on Universal Health Care (SB 770) Update;
  6. Committee Membership Workgroup Recommendations;
  7. OHA 1115 Waiver Update;
  8. Closing Comments & Meeting Adjourn;

*To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board 3 meets June 1 - 05/27/22

May 27, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139

PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board 3 meets June 1

What: The Oregon Area Trauma Advisory Board (ATAB) 3 is holding a public meeting.

Agenda items: Administrative tasks; Oregon Trauma Registry data; state and committee reports; county EMS protocol updates; Stop the Bleed training.

When: Wednesday, June 1, 3-5:30 p.m. Members of the public are welcome to attend the meeting.

Where: Virtual meeting only. Meeting link:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607944586?pwd=eDIwZEpFOW5qWEtieVYzWnBZOFg0QT09

  • Landline: 1 669 254 5252
  • Meeting ID: 160 794 4586
  • Passcode: 629657

Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, EMS & Trauma Systems Committee Coordinator, OHA Public Health Division, at 503-490-3717 or stella.m.rausch-scott@dhsoha.state.or.us

Background: Oregon Administrative Rules 333-200-0050 through 300-200-0080 define the ATAB's functions, rules and policy and guidelines for the Area Trauma Plan. Visit the Area Trauma Advisory Board website: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ProviderPartnerResources/EMSTraumaSystems/TraumaSystems/Pages/atab.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Stella Rausch-Scott, 503-490-3717 (voice/text), stella.m.rausch-scott@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 business hours before the meeting. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves BHRN grant agreement for drug treatment, recovery services in Jefferson County - 05/27/22

May 27, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council approves BHRN grant agreement for drug treatment, recovery services in Jefferson County

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) this week approved a Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) grant, funding drug treatment and recovery services in Jefferson County.  

Best Care Inc., which offers a wide range of support services, will coordinate the BHRN for the Jefferson County region. The approved budget is slightly more than $2 million over an 18-month contract.

Among other services, Best Care will offer a transition house, offering low-barrier housing opportunities with Warm Springs Tribal members as a priority population. The transition center will also provide wraparound support services.

To receive funding, successful applicants within each Oregon county must provide a slate of services through a funded provider network or BHRN.

This represents the second award from approximately $265 million in funds allocated through regional BHRNs to support substance use treatment providers across Oregon.

It is expected that as many as 10 more BHRNs across the state will receive approval by the end of June.

As of today, OAC subcommittees have approved applications for BHRNs in 33 Oregon counties.

What has been approved so far

More information on the approval process for BHRNs can be found here.

Earlier this month, the OAC voted to adopt a new 18-month grant spending timeline that will extend from July 2022 through December 2023. This means that regardless of when a grant agreement is final, the grant will be extended through December 2023.

Funding will be released no later than 20 days after a BHRN receives full approval and all agreements between Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the providers are executed.

OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension will be offered to Access to Care (ATC) grantees through Sept. 30, 2022. The grantees will receive a pro-rated amount based on their prior award, bringing the total funds disbursed to approximately $39.9 million.

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications.

Access to Care grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services.

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective on Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the Legislature passed Senate Bill 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the Measure 110 OAC to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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