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News Releases
Disaster exercise on intentional release of plague set for April 30 - 04/25/19

April 25, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Disaster exercise on intentional release of plague set for April 30

Three-day scenario training focuses on rapid distribution of antibiotics

PORTLAND, Ore.—An upcoming Oregon Health Authority-sponsored disaster exercise will train staff and partners on responding to an intentional release of plague.

The focus of the exercise is on quickly getting antibiotics into communities to treat people and prevent the disease’s spread.

Operation OX ("Oregon Exercise") is coordinated by the Health Security, Preparedness and Response Section (HSPR) at the OHA Public Health Division. It will run from April 30 to May 2. The exercise will simulate a response to the release of plague, and how medications and medical supplies—known as "medical countermeasures"—are requested, received, distributed and dispensed from the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS).

"Public health crisis exercises such as Operation OX train and keep the skills of our staff and partners fresh," said Akiko Saito, HSPR manager and director of emergency operations. "We need to be ready to keep people in Oregon healthy through a coordinated response."

Saito added that while the potential for Operation OX’s scenario is real, the likelihood is low. "It’s also important for people to remember that this is only an exercise. There’s no need to call 911 for exercise-related activities in your area."

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response at the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services operates the SNS. It is the nation’s largest supply of potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals and medical supplies for use in a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out.

HSPR will staff an agency operations center (AOC) to coordinate the response to the exercise scenario. HSPR staff will also establish a receipt, stage and store (RSS) site to receive what’s known as the federal Eagle Pack. The pack consists of 20 to 30 pallets of training medication. Staff and volunteers deployed to the RSS will receive the Eagle Pack, select and pack supplies from the pallets, and ship them to a group of counties and tribes. AOC staff will coordinate the supplies’ distribution, ensuring they are tracked and dispensed appropriately. The volunteers are from the state's registry of health professionals available in an emergency, known as SERV-OR.

The SNS may use the federal Shelf Life Extension Program to help maintain its supply. The program allows the expiration date on medications to be extended after they are tested for safety and effectiveness. Products that pass are relabeled with a new expiration date and passed on to agencies receiving SNS. Labels can be in writing, print, or graphic formats, and may be on the packaging or come separately.

"The Shelf Life Extension Program isn’t something most people know about. When people don’t understand the process behind the relabeling, it can cause confusion and misinformation," said Saito. "It can slow a life-saving response."

All Oregon counties and tribes will participate in the distribution portion of the exercise. Some will conduct additional testing and training activities, such as: disease and outbreak investigation; hospital capacity management; emergency operations center administration; pharmacy collaboration; medical volunteer management; dispensing; local distribution site warehouse operations; emergency public information and warning; and information sharing.

Plague, a bacterial disease infamous for killing millions of people in Europe during the Middle Ages, is now treatable with modern antibiotics. However, the disease can cause serious illness or death without prompt treatment.

Humans usually get plague after being bitten by a rodent flea carrying the plague bacterium or by handling an animal infected with plague. Human plague infections still occur in the western United States. Between 2009 and 2017, there were seven cases of plague in Oregon. About seven human plague cases occur each year in the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

There are three types of plague—bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic. The names indicate how the disease affects the body. Each is caused by the same bacterium. More than 80 percent of U.S. plague cases are the bubonic form.

For more information about the exercise, visit http://healthoregon.org/disasterexercise.

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Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Core Leadership Team meets April 30 in Portland - 04/24/19

April 24, 2019

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Core Leadership Team meets April 30 in Portland

What: The third meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Core Leadership Team.

Agenda: Reaffirm the role of the team; highlight common system-level challenges regarding substance use disorders and peer-delivered services; engage with the collaborative's workgroups to identify opportunities to build momentum, alignment and impact.

When: April 30, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges with a focus on peer delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2XF6CGc

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets April 25 - 04/24/19

April 24, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets April 25

What: An additional public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: April 25, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St, Portland. Space is limited. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3255183736506546957 and conference line at 415-655-0060, listen-only access code 302-601-317.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; abbreviated updates; TAG feedback on equity measure specifications (meaningful access to culturally responsive health care services); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2UReN5s

OHA announces applicants for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts - 04/23/19

April 23, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA announces applicants for 2020-2024 coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has received nineteen applications from organizations seeking contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. The contracts start January 1, 2020, and go through December 31, 2024. Awards for the CCO contracts are expected to be announced in July 2019

"OHA’s goal is to transform health care for every Oregonian by reducing costs, improving access to mental health services, rewarding providers for improving health outcomes, and addressing issues outside the doctor’s office that impact health," said OHA Director Patrick Allen. "OHA will be evaluating the applicants based on their ability to deliver on these goals."

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs.

In October the Oregon Health Policy Board approved a comprehensive set of policies to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state. This next phase of health care transformation is known as "CCO 2.0."

The four priority areas for improvement identified by Governor Kate Brown and advanced by the Oregon Health Policy Board’s policy recommendations are:

  • Improve the behavioral health system and address barriers to access to and integration of care.
  • Increase value and pay for performance.
  • Focus on social determinants of health and health equity.
  • Maintain sustainable cost growth and ensure financial transparency.

OHA’s request for applications (RFA) criteria asks applicants to demonstrate their capacity to achieve the objectives of CCO 2.0. Applications will be evaluated in the following areas:

  • Care coordination and integration: Ability to coordinate with outside entities (including public and community-based organizations), between levels of care, for special populations of members and to integrate behavioral and oral health services.
  • Delivery system transformation: Innovating to improve care delivery and quality (including primary care), access to culturally and linguistically appropriate care, measurement of value and efficiency of services.
  • Community engagement: Strength of the Community Engagement Plan and of community engagement in developing the application.
  • Clinical and service delivery: Utilization monitoring, ensuring appropriate access to services, clinical review and prior authorization, and approach to addressing complaints and grievances.
  • Business administration: CCO business processes, member engagement and outreach, adoption of electronic health records, data systems, and supporting members during transition.
  • Finance: Applicant solvency, ownership and affiliations, National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) reporting, arrangements with pharmacy benefit managers, plans for increasing value-based payments, tracking and reporting of social determinants of health investments and outcomes, managing within the global budget, and cost containment.

Applications will be reviewed by teams with expertise in the areas under review.

Based on the applications, Oregon Health Plan members in every county in Oregon would have at least one CCO to coordinate their health care. In many parts of the state, multiple organizations submitted applications to operate in the same counties, giving Oregon Health Plan members more than one CCO choice.

Applications received by OHA and proposed service areas

Applicant

Proposed Service Area

AllCare CCO, Inc.

Josephine, Jackson, Curry and partial Douglas

Cascade Health Alliance, LLC

Partial Klamath

Columbia Pacific CCO, LLC

Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook

Eastern Oregon Coordinated Care Organization, LLC

Baker, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Lake, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler

Health Share of Oregon

Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington

InterCommunity Health Plans dba InterCommunity Health Network Coordinated Care Organization

Linn, Benton and Lincoln

Jackson County CCO dba Jackson Care Connect

Jackson

Marion Polk Coordinated Care

Marion, Polk, partial Benton, Linn, Clackamas and Yamhill

Northwest Coordinated Care Organization LLC (Moda Health Plan Inc.)

Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook

West Central Coordinated Care Organization LLC (Moda Health Plan Inc.)

Lane

PacificSource Community Solutions - Central Oregon

Deschutes, Jefferson, Crook and partial Klamath

PacificSource Community Solutions - Columbia Gorge

Hood River and Wasco

PacificSource Community Solutions - Lane County

Lane

PacificSource Community Solutions - Marion and Polk Counties

Marion and Polk

Primary Health

Josephine, Jackson and partial Douglas

Trillium Community Health Plan, Inc.

Lane, Washington, Multnomah, Clackamas, partial Douglas and Linn

Umpqua Health Alliance, LLC

Douglas

Western Oregon Advanced Health, LLC abn Advanced Health

Coos and Curry

Yamhill County Care Organization

Yamhill and partial Clackamas, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Washington

Additional information about the CCO 2.0 RFA process can be found on the CCO 2.0 page on the OHA website.

# # #

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community meets April 25 - 04/22/19

April 22, 2019

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community meets April 25

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community.

Agenda: Developing an outline for peers in medical settings toolkit, which will be the final product of this workgroup. The goal is to identify the target audience, draft an outline and identify experts to invite each month to advise on best practices.

When: April 25, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2GAkPyx

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup April 25 in Portland - 04/18/19

What: The second meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup

Agenda: Learn from existing integrated medical models; begin to develop a context for a toolkit; establish audience, purpose and messaging for a toolkit.

When: April 25, 2019, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. The collaborative is focused on peer delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at (https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets April 25 in Portland - 04/18/19

April 18, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets April 25 in Portland

What: The second public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Continue visioning process; identify possible outcomes.

When: Thursday, April 25, 2-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Avoid getting sick from chicks, ducklings during Easter celebrations - 04/17/19

April 17, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Avoid getting sick from chicks, ducklings during Easter celebrations

Easter planning is in full force as many families prepare to celebrate the holiday this weekend. Going to events that offer chicks and ducklings for petting might be on the itinerary, but health experts say people may want to think twice before taking home one of these Easter-themed animals.

Oregon Health Authority infectious disease experts say the fluffy animals, no matter how cute and cuddly, can carry bacteria that can make people sick. Children often pick them up, hold them close to their faces, and even kiss them. And children often don’t wash their hands after handling the pets.

“Chicks and ducklings don’t make good Easter gifts,” cautions Emilio DeBess, public health veterinarian at OHA. “Children younger than 5 can get very sick from Salmonella contamination because their immune systems at that age are not fully developed.”

Salmonella infections can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever symptoms lasting three to seven days, DeBess said. People with compromised immune systems could become very ill and die of the infection. The last major salmonellosis outbreak, in 2018, occurred after people handled, kissed and kept poultry inside the home.

For those attending events where animals will be present, these tips can help prevent infection:

  • Don’t allow children younger than 5 years of age, older adults, or people with weak immune systems handle or touch chicks, ducklings or other live poultry, or rabbits.
  • Ensure that kids wash their hands with soap and water immediately after touching any type of animal.
  • If chicks are handled, never nuzzle or kiss them.
  • Don’t eat or drink in the area where the animals roam.

Salmonella, a Twitter account personifying the salmonella bacteria using humor, has reappeared just in time for Easter. The Salmonella social media campaign kicked off last year during the holidays to bring attention to this important public health issue.

For more information about baby birds and Salmonella, visit the OHA Salmonella webpage.

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Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kBHgAyXwS4

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets April 25 in Portland - 04/15/19

April 15, 2019

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets April 25 in Portland

What: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee (TRAC) is holding a public meeting.

When: Thursday, April 25, 1-3 p.m.

Where:  Join the meeting in person at the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1C, in Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Agenda: Tobacco 21 Evaluation overview, mass-reach communications update, legislative efforts check-in.

Background: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor and comprised of both private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.   

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Trisha Brennan or Brad Beauchamp at 971-673-0984, 711 TTY, or isha.L.Brennan@dhsoha.state.or.us">Trisha.L.Brennan@dhsoha.state.or.us or radley.M.Beauchamp@dhsoha.state.or.us">Bradley.M.Beauchamp@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 19 - 04/12/19

April 12, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 19

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: April 19, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln) (421 SW Oak St., Portland, OR, 97204) Suite 775, Transformation Training Room. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3895887851300669185 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; public testimony 9:20-9:30 a.m.; Metrics & Scoring feedback on equity measure; continue individual measure review (childhood immunization status; adolescent immunization status; Emergency Department (ED) utilization; disparity measure – ED utilization among members with mental illness); review 2020 Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC) menu; continue individual measure review; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA hires third-party contractor to review chronic pain proposal - 04/12/19

April 12, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA hires third-party contractor to review chronic pain proposal

The Oregon Health Authority today announced it has hired Washington-based Aggregate Analytics Inc. to conduct a third-party review of a policy proposal to cover more services for Oregon Health Plan members with certain chronic pain conditions.

The proposal, which is under consideration by the Health Evidence Review Commission (HERC), would add new coverage for five conditions: chronic pain due to trauma, other chronic procedural pain, other chronic pain, chronic pain syndrome, and fibromyalgia.

It would expand access to prescription opioids for four of these conditions. In addition, it would add coverage for alternative therapies such as acupuncture, physical therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. Finally, the proposal would cover supportive, individualized opioid tapers if the patient has fibromyalgia or their opioid prescribing is not aligned with the statewide opioid prescribing guidelines.

OHA Director Patrick Allen asked the HERC to pause deliberations when, in March, agency leadership became aware of potential conflict of interest concerns by a contracted medical consultant to the HERC. He also directed Chief Medical Officer Dr. Dana Hargunani to conduct a top-to-bottom review of the HERC’s conflict of interest policies and procedures.

The scope of Aggregate Analytics’ work will be limited to reviewing whether the OHA proposal reasonably aligns with the clinical evidence that was reviewed during its development. The findings of the analysis will be shared with the HERC at its May 16 meeting. If the HERC adopts the proposal in May, it would be effective Jan. 1, 2020.

“Transparency and integrity are at the core of OHA’s policy-making processes,” Hargunani said. “We need to have confidence that policy recommendations that we make to the HERC were developed objectively and in alignment with the best available evidence. Aggregate Analytics are experts on this body of evidence and are best suited to critically assess this work.”

Dr. Catherine Livingston is a family medicine physician who serves as a contracted medical consultant to the HERC. In her role, she helps develop evidence-based policy recommendations for consideration by the HERC. In addition, she is a co-investigator on two studies evaluating the impact of HERC’s previous decision to expand pain management coverage for people suffering from back pain.

The proposal currently in question, while separate from the back-pain policy, shares a similar framework.

Livingston is not a voting member of the HERC.

About the HERC

The Health Evidence Review Commission reviews medical evidence to prioritize health spending in the Oregon Health Plan and to promote evidence-based medical practice statewide through comparative effectiveness reports, including coverage guidances and multisector interventions, health technology assessments and evidence-based practice guidelines.

The commission consists of 13 governor-appointed and senate-confirmed volunteer members, including five physician representatives (one of whom must be a doctor of osteopathy and another a hospital representative), a dentist, a public health nurse, a behavioral health representative, a provider of complementary and alternative medicine, a retail pharmacist, an insurance industry representative and two consumer representatives.

# # #

EMS Committee meets April 12 in Portland - 04/09/19

April 9, 2019

Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

EMS Committee meets April 12 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon EMS Committee.

Agenda: Oregon EMS Information System; Medical Direction and Quality Improvement; Patient Surge workplan.

When: Friday, April 12, 8:30 a.m.-noon

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar.

Background: The EMS Committee is established under ORS 682 for achieving continuous improvement in the quality of EMS care in Oregon. The committee is made of 18 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority. 

Program Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, OHA Public Health Division, 971-673-1322, ausch-Scott@dhsoha.state.or.us">Stella.M.Rausch-Scott@dhsoha.state.or.us

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Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-Scott@state.or.us">Stella.M.Rausch-Scott@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

State Trauma Advisory Board meets April 12 in Portland - 04/09/19

April 9, 2019

Media Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

State Trauma Advisory Board meets April 12 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Trauma Advisory Board (STAB).

Agenda: Case presentation; discuss “Oregon Stop the Bleed” program; future state trauma hospital surveys; Oregon trauma registry data.

When: Friday, April 12, 1-4:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar.

Background: The State Trauma Advisory Board is established under ORS 431 for achieving continuous improvement in the quality of emergency medical services care in Oregon. The committee is made of 18 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority. 

Program Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, OHA Public Health Division, 971-673-1322, ausch-Scott@state.or.us">Stella.M.Rausch-Scott@state.or.us.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-Scott@state.or.us">Stella.M.Rausch-Scott@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Stroke Care Committee meets April 11 in Portland - 04/09/19

April 9, 2019

Media Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Stroke Care Committee meets April 11 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Stroke Care Committee (SCC).

Agenda: Discuss stroke care in Oregon; 2018 “Get With The Guidelines” data; 2019 committee report update.

When: Thursday, April 11, 7-8:30 a.m.

Where: Legacy Emanuel, 2801 N. Gantenbein Ave., East Wing, Conference Room 1003, Portland. The meeting also is accessible via webinar.

Background: The Oregon Stroke Care Committee is established under ORS 431.673 for the purpose of achieving continuous improvement in the quality of stroke care in Oregon. The committee is made of 10 members appointed by the director of the Oregon Health Authority. 

Program Contact: Stella Rausch-Scott, 971-673-1322, ausch-Scott@dhsoha.state.or.us">Stella.M.Rausch-Scott@dhsoha.state.or.us.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Stella Rausch-Scott at 971-673-1322, 711 TTY or ausch-Scott@dhsoha.state.or.us">Stella.M.Rausch-Scott@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet April 11 in Wilsonville - 04/09/19

April 9, 2019

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet April 11 in Wilsonville

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: April 11, 1-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College, Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5441985918617611266 and listen-only conference line at 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome, updates; public comment 1:15-1:25 p.m.; HPQMC – year in review; 2019-2020 HPQMC calendar and workplan; legislative update: SB735; presentation: public health – update on State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Two Rivers Correctional Institution
Two Rivers Correctional Institution
DOC, OHA partner on sodium-reduction effort to improve health of people in custody, all Oregonians (Photo) - 04/09/19

April 9, 2019

Media contacts: Jennifer Black, 503-569-3318, .Black@doc.state.or.us">Jennifer.Black@doc.state.or.us

Delia Hernandez, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

DOC, OHA partner on sodium-reduction effort to improve health of people in custody, all Oregonians

This press release is jointly issued by the Oregon Department of Corrections and the Oregon Health Authority.

Portland, Ore. -- A partnership between the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) led to a significant reduction in the amount of sodium in meals served since 2016 to adults in custody (AIC) at the state’s 14 correctional institutions.

DOC’s Food Services staff, and the AICs who work in the kitchens, serve more than 16 million meals a year. With a food budget of just $2.55 per AIC per day, the DOC, in consultation with OHA, drove down sodium in meals close to 20 percent in the first two years of the project. This was accomplished by purchasing and substituting low-sodium versions of food products, as well as revising recipes and food preparation techniques. DOC supports these efforts by offering AIC classes about overall health and how to reduce sodium intake.

For example, prior to this work, DOC purchased tortillas from outside vendors. Now, they are prepared by the incarcerated men at Two Rivers Correctional Institution. The handmade version has 20 percent less sodium, and the objective is to reduce sodium in all bread recipes by the same amount.

Multiplied across a statewide prison population of nearly 15,000 adults, these kinds of changes hold enormous potential for slowing the rapid rise in cardiovascular disease among adults in custody, as well as the costs to taxpayers of treating them. Lower sodium items are generally more expensive. When there is higher demand for healthier low-sodium items, the cost of these items may come down.

“Most of the salt we consume isn’t added at the table. It comes in the processed, packaged and restaurant foods we eat in mealtime staples,” said Lillian Shirley, public health director for the Oregon Health Authority. “High blood pressure damages a person’s circulatory system and is a major contributing factor to heart attacks and strokes, which are costly medical conditions to treat.”

“Ninety-five percent of Oregon’s incarcerated adults will eventually be released. When they re-enter society healthier, that saves money on health care costs and contributes to healthier communities for all of us,” Shirley said.

The two agencies collaborated to create two videos to share the successes of the work at DOC. One video features the story of an AIC and lead cook at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville. And the second video features interviews with DOC leaders responsible for nutrition and purchasing. The videos are posted on OHA’s Place Matters Oregon website, which includes data and evidence-based strategies to help Oregonians move more, eat healthfully, be tobacco-free, and decrease excessive drinking http://placemattersoregon.com/my-place/ and http://placemattersoregon.com/what-the-experts-say/.  

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding to OHA to reduce daily sodium intake by bringing public health and institutional food service providers together to make lower sodium foods more readily available. Combined, heart disease and stroke are the leading cause of death in Oregon, accounting for a quarter of all deaths in 2017. Diets high in sodium can increase blood pressure, leading to increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

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Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets April 9 in Portland - 04/05/19

April 5, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets April 9 in Portland

What: Public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup.

Agenda: Brainstorming and discussion of workgroup goals and strategies; identification of peers and peer groups who can provide expertise and input on goals.

When: April 9, 2-4pm

Where: Five Oak, 421 SW Oak Street, Suite 775, Transformation Center Training Room, Portland

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet April 12 in Portland - 04/05/19

April 5, 2019

Contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet April 12 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

When: Friday, April 12, 2019 from 2-4:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland, Oregon

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/SUBSTANCEUSE/OPIOIDS/Pages/task-force.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

PartnerSHIP meets April 11 in Portland - 04/05/19

April 5, 2019

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347 Christy.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us

PartnerSHIP meets April 11 in Portland

What: The PartnerSHIP, tasked with developing the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP), will hold a meeting to discuss the framework for the 2020-2024 SHIP.

Agenda: Provide update on subcommittee formation, finalize health equity framework, discuss criteria for strategy and measure identification.

When: Thursday, April 11, 1-2 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A 5-minute public comment period will be held at about 1:05 p.m. Comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Via webinar at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/890713053 or via phone at (669) 224-3412 access Code: 890-713-053

Background: Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in our state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath in our state. The SHIP will be based on findings from the State Health Assessment.

  • Health departments develop and implement a health improvement plan at least once every five years.
  • The Public Health Division is using the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) framework, widely used by Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs) and local health departments. The MAPP framework uses six phases. The SHA is developed over the first three phases, while the SHIP is developed and implemented over the second three phases.
  • Information about the PartnerSHIP can be found at healthoregon.org/2020ship.
  • The current State Health Improvement Plan identifies seven priorities related to tobacco use, obesity, oral health, immunizations, suicide, communicable disease and substance use. The current plan will conclude in December of 2019.  

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide include:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jenny Subil via call or text at 971-930-7486, 711 TTY or il@dhsoha.state.or.us">jenny.m.subil@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets April 9 in Medford - 04/05/19

April 5, 2019

Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets April 9 in Medford

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission (OCC). A listening tour will follow the meeting. 

Agenda: OHA update: Public Health website; review standing subcommittees and vote; legislative session update; previous public comment review; review ORS 475B, OAR 333-008 and -007 (OMMP rules), and OAR 845-025 (OLCC rules); public comment period regarding OCC meeting discussions

When: April 9, 1-4 p.m. Listening tour: 4-5 p.m.

Where: Medford Public Library, 205 South Central Ave, Medford.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information, please visit the commission's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets April 11 in Portland - 04/03/19

April 3, 2019

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets April 11 in Portland

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee.

Agenda: State EMS and Trauma Program; Sleep Safety Project; EMSC Program; safe sleep; Pediatric Readiness Quality Collaborative.

When: April 11, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call option: 877-336-1831, access code 640551.

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at http://www.oregonemsc.org/.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or achel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us">rachel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board meets April 18 - 04/03/19

April 3, 2019

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets April 18

What: The regular public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Hear updates on public health modernization with a focus on health equity; hear updates from PHAB subcommittees; hear updates on the current State Health Improvement Plan; hear an update on the Public Health Block Grant.

When: Thursday, April 18, from 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Conference Room 1A, Portland, OR 97232. Also available remotely by webinar: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/4888122320415752707, or by phone: 1-877-873-8017; access code: 767068#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kati Moseley at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or ina.moseley@dhsoha.state.or.us">katarina.moseley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Medical marijuana growers who don't report inventory face penalties - 04/03/19

April 3, 2019

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Medical marijuana growers who don’t report inventory face penalties

OMMP giving about 1,600 growers a chance to come into compliance

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) is warning hundreds of cannabis growers they need to come into compliance with inventory reporting requirements or face stiff penalties.

The OMMP is issuing a bulletin today that reminds medical growers at grow sites required to use the Oregon Medical Marijuana Online System (OMMOS) that they must report their onsite cannabis inventory and any product transfers. Growers are required to log into OMMOS to report they had no inventory or product transfers during the month.

“Reporting to OMMOS is crucial in that it requires growers to report cannabis products going into or out of their site, or remaining onsite, which helps to prevent diversion to the black market,” said Megan Lockwood, OMMP manager.

Lockwood noted that a recent Oregon Secretary of State Audit that identified administrative shortcomings at the OMMP listed OMMOS tracking enforcement as an area the program needed to address to reduce diversion.

Oregon Administrative Rules 333-008-0033(3) and 333-008-0630 state that a grower must report the previous month’s transfers and onsite inventory by the 10th of each month. Those required to report must create an online account in OMMOS to submit reports. OMMOS reporting has been a requirement since July 2016.

A total of 1,618 of 1,903 growers who fall under the OMMOS rule did not report their inventory and transfers for February.

Growers can expect to receive warning letters later this month, allowing them time to come into compliance, before notices of civil penalty are issued in May. If a grower fails to come into compliance, a civil penalty of at least $200 will be issued. Failure to pay the civil penalty once issued, and come into compliance, may result in additional civil penalties and grower card registration revocation.

Growers at grow sites with two or fewer patients must report monthly to the OMMP using OMMOS if they:

  • Are the designated grower for an OMMP patient other than themselves.
  • Are a patient growing for themselves at their own residence and they are transferring marijuana items to a medical processor or dispensary.
  • Are a patient growing for themselves at a grow site address that is not their residence.

The state reporting rules don’t apply to patients growing only for themselves at their residence, unless they are transferring usable marijuana to a registered processing site or dispensary.

The bulletin is posted to the OMMP website: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/bulletins.aspx.

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Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets April 9 by webinar - 04/02/19

April 2, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee meets April 9 by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board's Incentives and Funding Subcommittee.

Agenda: Approve March 12 meeting minutes; make recommendations for distributing funds to local public health authorities at a funding range of $5-10 million.

When: April 9, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar and by conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Incentives and Funding Subcommittee develops recommendations for the board's consideration.

For more information, visit the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, a.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Total Diagnosis Committee meets April 8 - 04/02/19

April 2, 2019

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Total Diagnosis Committee meets April 8

What: A public meeting of the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s Total Diagnosis Committee.

Agenda: Review purpose of committee; discussion of use of the phrase "total diagnoses"; next steps.

When: April 8, 10-11 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. A 15-minute public comment period will take place at the end of the meeting.

Where: By conference call only. Call-in number 877-336-1829, access code 2075141.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board’s (NSAB) Total Diagnosis Committee advises the full NSAB and the Oregon Health Authority on the use of diagnoses in formulating staffing plans and staffing appropriately.

Program contact: Matt Gilman, 971-673-2317, matt.s.gilman@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact the Health Care Regulation and Quality Improvement Section at 971-673-0540, 711 TTY or ox.HCLC@dhsoha.state.or.us">mailbox.HCLC@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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