Oregon Health Authority
Emergency Messages as of 10:18 pm, Wed. Nov. 13
No information currently posted. Operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Health Authority. Please use any browser other than Internet Explorer.
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  
And/or follow our FlashAlerts via Twitter

About FlashAlert on Twitter:

FlashAlert utilizes the free service Twitter to distribute emergency text messages. While you are welcome to register your cell phone text message address directly into the FlashAlert system, we recommend that you simply "follow" the FlashAlert account for Oregon Health Authority by clicking on the link below and logging in to (or creating) your free Twitter account. Twitter sends messages out exceptionally fast thanks to arrangements they have made with the cell phone companies.

Click here to add Oregon Health Authority to your Twitter account or create one.

Hide this Message


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets November 21 in Salem - 11/13/19

Nov. 13, 2019

Media contact: Rebeka Gipson-King, 503-945-7141, ebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us">rebeka.gipson-king@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets November 21 in Salem

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board.

When: Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital, Callan Conference Room, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, access code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include maintaining mental health stability for staff, maintaining confidentiality in an open landscape environment, employment requirements for nursing staff and a report by the Peer Advisory Council.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets November 14 - 11/12/19

November 12, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets November 14

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: November 14, 1-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome and roll call/introductions; review agenda and approve minutes; discussion: extend meeting time to three hours beginning in December; public comment 1:20-1:30 p.m.; update from obesity evidence-based measure development workgroup; update on health equity measure development work; Oregon’s health system transformation; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

 

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets November 15 - 11/12/19

November 12, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets November 15

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: November 15, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775, Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; committee feedback on HPQMC new and innovative measures criteria; public testimony (10-10:10 a.m.); performance improvement projects (PIPs); 2020 continuous enrollment specifications; kindergarten readiness strategy update; equity measure update; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA reassigns Oregon Health Plan members in 5 counties to new coordinated care organizations for 2020 to preserve access to care - 11/11/19

November 11, 2020

Contact: Robb Cowie, 503-421-7684; obb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us"> robb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA reassigns Oregon Health Plan members in 5 counties to new coordinated care organizations for 2020 to preserve access to care

Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members in 5 counties will be reassigned to different coordinated care organizations (CCOs), when new contracts for Medicaid health plans begin on January 1, 2020. The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is moving members because the CCOs to which some OHP members were originally assigned (or members had chosen during the current member choice period) do not have health care provider contracts in place to serve them.

The changes include:

  • Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties: Trillium Community Health Plan will be ineligible to enroll members until at least April 1, 2020. All members currently slated to be enrolled in Trillium beginning January 1, 2020 (approximately 40,000 members) will be reassigned to Health Share of Oregon, the other CCO that is contracted to operate in the tri-counties at the start of 2020. The Oregon Health Authority is taking this action because Trillium Community Health Plan does not have a hospital in its provider network.
    • On November 8, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority notified Trillium Community Health Plan that the CCO will have until June 30, 2020 to contract with a hospital and meet other network requirements. If not, the CCO would lose its ability to serve the tri-county region over the next 5 years.
  • Jackson County: More than 10,000 members of AllCare CCO will be reassigned to Jackson Care Connect CCO, starting January 1, 2020. Members will be shifted between CCOs to preserve their current provider relationships: the provider network that currently serves the AllCare members affected by this change will no longer have a primary care contract with AllCare at the start of the new year, but will continue to contract with Jackson Care Connect. AllCare will retain OHP members who are served by other providers in Jackson County.
  • Lane County: Members of Trillium Community Health Plan who are served by a primary care provider network, which will no longer have a contract with the CCO in 2020, will be moved to Pacific Source of Lane County. The move is effective January 1, 2020. This change will ensure members continue to have access to their current providers. Trillium will continue to serve other OHP members in Lane County who are not affected by this change in Trillium’s Lane county network.

OHA will notify all affected members of changes in their enrollment in coming weeks, before new CCO contracts take effect on January 1, 2020.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “Our top priority during the transition to new CCO contracts has been to make sure OHP members continue to have access to high-quality, well-coordinated health care. OHP members depend on their CCOs to offer the doctors, counselors and other providers they need to ensure health and well-being for themselves, their families and their communities. We are doing everything we can to make sure nothing disrupts those vital provider relationships.”

On July 9, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced its intent to award 15 organizations contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. CCOs have been undergoing “readiness review,” which includes examination of their updated provider networks, since the summer. CCOs signed new contracts, totaling more than $6 billion for the 2020 contract year, prior to October 1, 2020. Contracts remain contingent on successful completion of the readiness review process.

About coordinated care organizations: Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.

New Seasons Markets recalls fresh ground beef due to E. coli infection - 11/10/19

PORTLAND, Ore.—New Seasons Market is recalling fresh ground beef sold at meat counters in three of its stores because it may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7.

Three people in the Portland metro area have become ill with E. coli O157:H7 infection after having eaten ground beef purchased at different New Seasons outlets. All are recovering from the illness.

E. coli O157:H7 causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The condition is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly, and it can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

The recalled fresh ground beef was sold at the company’s North Lombard, North Interstate and Cedar Hills locations. The product comes in 5%, 10% and 20% fat content varieties and is ground at the stores prior to sale. The products implicated were purchased between Oct. 19 and Oct. 23. OHA recommends customers who purchased the ground beef between these dates throw it away immediately.

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) identified the outbreak after laboratory tests conducted at the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory determined that an identical strain of E. coli O157:H7 was present in all three patients.

New Seasons Market has reported to OHA that it suspended the sale of the product while Oregon Department of Agriculture continues its investigation into the cause of the outbreak.

People who ate the product but did not get sick do not need to do anything. If you developed diarrhea after eating it, you should consult your health care provider and tell him or her about the exposure.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at talktous@newseasonsmarket.com.

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee to meet November 13 in Portland - 11/08/19

November 8, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee to meet November 13 in Portland

What: Meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee

When: November 13, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building; 800 NE Oregon St, Conf. Room 177 Portland, OR 97232

Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; cost growth target introduction; committee charge; charter and operating procedures; process for developing committee recommendations; public meetings law; public comment; next steps

For more information on the meeting, visit the committee’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jennifer Uhlman at 503-739-5267, 711 TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Nov. 21 in Portland - 11/08/19

November 8, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Nov. 21 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO).

Agenda: Potential changes to Public Health Accountability Metrics Process Measures; Public Health Modernization State/Local Learning Collaborative update; letter of support for Environmental Health Assessment Program grant application.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

When: Thursday, Nov. 21, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Where: Two locations – Portland State Office Building Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland OR 97232; Lane County Health and Human Services, 151 W. 7th Ave., Room 530, Eugene OR 97401. No conference call option is available.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs, and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 12 in Portland - 11/07/19

November 7, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 12 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (main floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets November 8 - 11/07/19

November 7, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets November 8

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup.

Agenda: Report on number of proposals submitted for review and review process; define the minimum criteria for proposal review star ratings to deem that a proposal adequately aligns with the project design criteria; discuss the role the workgroup wants to play in the implementation of the project.

When: November 8, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative (RBHC) brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, visit the RBHC website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Universally Offered Home Visiting Rules Advisory Committee meets November 14 - 11/05/19

November 5, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Universally Offered Home Visiting Rules Advisory Committee meets November 14

What: A public meeting of the Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) for Universally Offered Home Visiting. Participation in the meeting will be limited to RAC members but public comments will be taken at the end of every meeting.

When: November 14, 9 a.m. to noon. A 15-minute public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting; comments may be limited to three minutes or less, depending on the number of commenters. Those providing comments are encouraged to send written comments to anna.k.stiefvater@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. The public may join by webinar. For tracking purposes, we ask that you please register so that we know who is attending remotely.

Background: As a result of the passage of SB 526 in the 2019 legislative session, new Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) must be proposed pertaining to a statewide universally offered newborn nurse home visiting program. These new rules will determine how the program is designed and implemented and specify the criteria for newborn nurse home visiting that must be covered by health benefit plans.

Program contact: Anna Stiefvater, 971-673-1490, anna.k.stiefvater@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kathryn (Katie) Kuspis at 971-673-2279, 711 TTY or yn.a.kuspis@dhsoha.state.or.us">kathryn.a.kuspis@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Health Care Workforce Committee meets November 6 in Wilsonville - 11/01/19

November 1, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee.

When: November 6, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Public testimony will be heard 12:20-12:30 p.m. (The Behavioral Health subcommittee will meet from 8 to 9:15 a.m.).

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. The public can also follow the presentation by webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4779646710783762433 and listen to discussion by telephone conference line at 877-411-9748, access code 730407.

Agenda

  • Approval of September meeting summary.
  • OHPB and OHA updates.
  • Presentation and Discussion: COMPADRE Program.
  • Discussion: CCO 2.0.
  • Presentation: Oral Health Grant update.
  • Discussion: committee items.
  • Update: State Workforce Plan.
  • Public comment.

Agenda, materials and webinar information will be posted before the meeting on the committee's webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Janet Reves at 503-373-7897, 711 TTY, eves@state.or.us">janet.reves@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2JWiS0T

 

 

Oregon Health Policy Board meets November 5 in Portland - 10/31/19

October 31, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Health Policy Board meets November 5 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: November 5, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: Welcome; minutes approval; liaison updates; OHA report; Health Care Cost Growth Target implementation update; Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest; public testimony, value-based payment; CCO measure performance structure; 2018 CCO measure performance; Metrics and Scoring Committee decisions and next steps. For more information about the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.

*Updated Lane County exposure locations* Health officials report two new cases of measles from Multnomah County exposure - 10/27/19

October 26, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health officials report two new cases of measles from Multnomah County exposure

Hear from the expert

OHA Public Health Physician Ann Thomas discusses recent measles cases in Oregon

A Lane County resident and a visitor to Washington County have been diagnosed with measles. Their illnesses are linked to an individual with the disease who passed through Portland International Airport earlier this month.

The two new cases reportedly were on the same international flight that landed in Portland on Oct. 12, as reported by Multnomah County Health Department, according to the Oregon Health Authority. OHA epidemiologists are working with public health staff in both counties to confirm sites where others may have been exposed.

None of the cases have been fully vaccinated against measles.

“Measles is a highly infectious disease, and it doesn’t take much to spread it from one person to another, particularly in the close quarters of an airline flight,” said Ann Thomas, MD, public health physician at OHA. “It’s a good reminder of how important it is to make sure all adults and children in your household are up to date on vaccines.”

Exposure locations

Most Oregonians have been vaccinated against measles and their risk is low. Risk may be higher for unvaccinated persons who may have been exposed at one of the following locations, dates and times:

Multnomah County

  • Saturday, Oct. 12
    • 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Portland International Airport, Delta Air Lines Inc., Flight 0179 from Amsterdam (AMS) to Portland (PDX)

Lane County

  • Monday, Oct. 21
    • 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Creswell Bakery, 182 S 2nd St, Creswell
    • Noon-4 pm, Bier Stein, 1591 Willamette St, Eugene
  • Wednesday, Oct. 23
    • 4-7:30 p.m., Blue Mist, 1400 Valley River Dr., Suite 130, Eugene
    • 6-9:30 p.m., North Fork Public House, 2805 Shadowview, Eugene

Washington County

  • Sunday, Oct. 20
    • 12:15-3:45 p.m., Wu’s Open Kitchen, 15660 SW Pacific Hwy, Tigard
    • 4:45-8:00 p.m., Costco, 25900 SW Heather Pl., Wilsonville
  • Wednesday, Oct 23
    • 1:15-3:45 p.m., Tous Les Jours, 11735 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy, Beaverton
    • 1:45-4:15 p.m., Starbucks inside Target, 10775 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy, Beaverton

Clackamas County

  • Monday, Oct. 21
    • 12:15-2:45 p.m., Trader Joe’s, 15391 SW Bangy Rd, Lake Oswego

Additional exposure sites might be added as the investigation continues.

Whom to call

Public health officials urge people to first call a health care provider or urgent care center by telephone if:

  1. They have been exposed within the previous 21 days, AND
  2. They have symptoms of measles (such as fever, cough, red eyes or rash).

Having an entry plan helps to avoid exposing others in waiting rooms.

People with questions about measles infection or the measles vaccine should call their primary care provider or their county health department:

ABOUT MEASLES

Measles poses the highest risk to unvaccinated pregnant women, infants under 12 months of age, and people with weakened immune systems.

The symptoms of measles start with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that usually begins on the face and spreads to the rest of the body. Symptoms begin 7–21 days following exposure.

Common complications of measles include ear infection, lung infection, and diarrhea. Swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication.

After someone contracts measles, illness develops in about two weeks, but people can be contagious up to 4 days before they get a rash.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that spreads through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. People are contagious once they have symptoms, which typically start about 4 days before the rash, until 4 days after the rash. The virus can also linger in the air up to two hours after someone who is infectious has left the area.

You are considered immune to measles if ANY of the following apply:

  • You were born before 1957.
  • Your physician has diagnosed you with measles.
  • A blood test proves that you are immune.
  • You have had 2 doses of measles vaccine.

For more information on measles for the public, visit the OHA measles web page.

Lake Selmac recreational use health advisory lifted October 25 - 10/25/19

October 25, 2019

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Lake Selmac in Josephine County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Lake Selmac are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

 

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets October 30 - 10/25/19

Room number corrected

October 25, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Develop proposal for projects to: 1) establish culturally specific, peer run, inclusive emergency housing homes to support people with substance use disorders, transitioning out of or awaiting treatment, and 2) use intentional recruiting strategies to recruit, train and retain peers to support the emergency housing resources; training will be available to the community.

When: October 30, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•        Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•        Written materials in other languages

•        Braille

•        Large print

•        Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

http://bit.ly/2BFTPdI

 

Task force approves opioid tapering guidelines in Oregon - 10/25/19

October 25, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Listen to OHA Chief Medical Officer Dana Hargunani’s statement

Task force approves opioid tapering guidelines in Oregon

Portland, Ore. -- The Oregon Opioid Tapering Task Force today completed clinical guidelines on opioid tapering it developed in the past several months.

The guidelines build on the work of previous task forces that developed statewide opioid guidelines for chronic pain, acute pain, dentists and pregnant women. They draw from available evidence, other federal and state guidelines, expert opinion, and public comment to guide clinical decisions, and encourage safe and compassionate prescribing and pain treatment statewide.

Oregon Opioid Tapering Guidelines Task Force members represent diverse perspectives and experiences with long-term use of opioids

and tapering, including community members with lived experience. The task force met publicly each month from March to October. "Before the development of these guidelines there were few resources and evidence related to tapering that clinicians could look to for guidance," said Dana Hargunani, M.D., chief medical officer at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). "We hope bringing together experts and community members around the state helped us develop useful guidelines that promote trusting dialogue, individualized care and patient safety."

As part of Oregon’s broader efforts to reduce and prevent opioid-related harms, OHA implemented the Opioid Initiative in 2015. It brings statewide partners and communities together to reduce deaths, non-fatal overdoses, and harms to Oregonians from prescription opioids, while expanding use of non-opioid pain care. Work groups have convened and projects are underway, all aimed at reducing opioid misuse and overdose.

Significant steps forward include:

  • Approval of statewide prescribing guidelines by a work group of statewide providers.
  • Chronic-use opioid reduction strategies with the Oregon Health Plan's coordinated care organizations' statewide performance improvement project.
  • Naloxone availability.
  • Increase in medication-assisted treatment.
  • Coverage of non-opioid therapies for pain.
  • Community interventions in high-burden regions.
  • Ongoing monitoring of controlled substance prescribing and drug overdose outcomes (calculated by hospitalizations and deaths).

OHA’s efforts to change the conversation and promote evidence-based pain treatment are contributing to significant progress in the opioid epidemic. Oregon’s prescription opioid-related deaths have decreased by 52 percent since 2006 and the rate of opioid prescription fills decreased by 29 percent since 2015.

Attached Media Files: OOTG-Dana-Hargunani-Statement.m4a
Willow Creek Reservoir recreational use health advisory lifted October 25 - 10/25/19

October 25, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Willow Creek Reservoir recreational use health advisory lifted October 25

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Willow Creek Reservoir in Morrow County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Willow Creek Reservior are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.

Vaping_-_What_Parents_Can_Do_Spanish.png
Vaping_-_What_Parents_Can_Do_Spanish.png
New data show rapid rise in youth marijuana, nicotine vaping (Photo) - 10/24/19

EDITORS: Video and audio clips of Dr. Dean Sidelinger discussing new vaping data are available at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ERD/Pages/media-resources.aspx.

October 24, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

New data show rapid rise in youth marijuana, nicotine vaping

Health officials worry vaping puts new generation at risk for addiction

PORTLAND, Ore. — While overall use of marijuana among Oregon youth has remained flat, the primary way they’re using the substance — vaping — has dramatically increased, an Oregon Health Authority analysis has found.

This finding adds to evidence that vaping is subjecting many more youth to addiction. New data show one in four Oregon 11th-graders reporting vaping a nicotine product, with youth use of e-cigarettes like Juul increasing nearly 80 percent between 2017 and 2019. Marijuana use changed dramatically as well, according to the data, with youth shifting from smoking marijuana to vaping.

Youth vaping of marijuana increased 295 percent — from 11 percent to 44 percent among 11th-graders using marijuana — between 2017 and 2019, even as 11th-grade overall marijuana use stayed constant at 20 percent. The data come from Oregon Healthy Teens (OHT), a survey of middle- and high-school students that OHA administers every two years.

"This is alarming," said Dean Sidelinger, MD, MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division. "It confirms what we’ve long known: Vaping is putting a new generation at risk for addiction. These products can get young people started on using nicotine and marijuana, and it is easy to get hooked."

OHT and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a survey the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention annually administers in partnership with states, both found that nicotine vaping products are most popular among children and young adults: 23 percent of 11th-grade students and 13 percent of young adults, ages 18 to 24, use nicotine e-cigarettes versus just 3 percent of adults age 25 and older.

About half of Oregon high school students who currently use e-cigarettes report they never smoked conventional cigarettes — not even one time.

In Oregon, youth vaping overlaps with use of conventional tobacco and flavored tobacco products, the OHT analysis showed. More than half of Oregon eighth- and 11th-graders who use tobacco use flavored tobacco. Roughly half of all youth who currently use conventional tobacco products started with vape products. Nearly two in five Oregon 11th-grade vape users also currently smoke conventional cigarettes.

A February 2019 study in the journal JAMA Network Open, one of the first studies to track youth e-cigarette users over time, found that young people who vape e-cigarettes are nearly three times as likely to start smoking cigarettes as peers who don’t vape.

A fact sheet on OHA’s analysis of youth vaping data is available on the agency's tobacco prevention website.

OHA continues to participate in the investigation of a nationwide outbreak of respiratory injuries associated with use of vaping devices. It is working with local public health and health care partners to track related illnesses in Oregon, which now has 12 cases, including two deaths.

OHA advises the public not to use e-cigarettes or vape products. Those who want to quit are urged to take advantage of free cessation resources, including:

Additional resources


OHA response page

healthoregon.org/vaping.

Information for parents

Information for students

Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets October 28 - 10/23/19

October 23, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets October 28

What: The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is convening a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to Dental Pilot Projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Agenda: Review draft amended rules and next steps.

When: 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 28

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 900, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 1-888-273-3658, access code: 76-64-09

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Oregon State Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Materials: Meeting materials are at the Dental Pilot Project Program’s webpage: healthoregon.org/dpp

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Protect people around you: Get a flu vaccine - 10/22/19

Spanish / Español

Videos

Don't let flu take you out of the picture

No permitas que la influenza (gripe) te deje fuera de la foto.

October 22, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Protect people around you: Get a flu vaccine

OHA officials urge everyone 6 months and older to get immunized

Portland, Ore. – Health officials say they have started to see cases of flu in Oregon. They recommend everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccine.

People who get vaccinated not only protect themselves but may also protect those around them. People at higher risk of severe illness include babies and young children, adults older than 65, pregnant women, and those with chronic medical conditions or weak immune systems.

"Healthy adults who get vaccinated help prevent the flu from spreading quickly. But only a third of adults 18 to 49 get the flu vaccine," says Ann Thomas, M.D., public health physician at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division. “Even if adults do not get a vaccine for themselves, they may want to get vaccinated to protect those they love."

The flu vaccine may take up to two weeks to become effective, so getting it earlier in the season is ideal. Flu vaccine is available from health care providers, local health departments and many pharmacies. The vaccine is free or low cost with most health insurance plans. To find flu vaccine clinic, visit http://www.flu.oregon.gov/ and use OHA’s flu vaccine locator tool.

Flu is a virus that causes mild to severe respiratory illness. In severe cases it can lead to hospitalization and even death. The virus kills thousands of people in the U.S. each year. Oregon had two flu-related deaths of children during the 2018-2019 flu season.

Flu vaccines can be life-saving for children. A 2017 study was the first of its kind to show that flu vaccines can significantly reduce a child’s risk of dying from influenza. Studies have also shown flu vaccines reduce the severity of illness in people who get vaccinated but still get sick, preventing thousands of hospitalizations each year.

Public health officials also encourage health care workers to get vaccinated for the flu. Immunized health care workers help prevent the spread of influenza in health care settings, particularly among hospitalized patients at high risk for complications from the flu. Data on 2017-2018 Oregon health care worker influenza vaccination rates are available in the Oregon Health Care Worker Influenza Vaccination report.

Additional ways people can help prevent the spread of flu:

  • Stay home from work or school when you are sick and limit contact with others.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue out when you are done.
  • Wash hands with soap and water. Use an alcohol-based hand rub if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may have flu germs on them.
  • Avoid getting coughed and sneezed on.

OHA accepting applications for Public Health Advisory Board - 10/18/19

October 18, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA accepting applications for Public Health Advisory Board

The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is seeking applicants for the state Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB)

OHA invites applications from people who meet the following criteria:

  • A public health expert in academia.
  • A local public health administrator who supervises public health programs and activities in Benton, Clackamas, Deschutes, Jackson, Lane, Marion, Multnomah or Washington counties.

This position serves a four-year term that begins on Jan. 1, 2020. Board members are appointed by the Governor.

To apply, submit the following documentation to executive.appointments@oregon.gov by Dec. 1:

  1. A completed executive appointment interest form, which is available on the Governor’s office website.
  2. A resume or brief biographical sketch.
  3. A brief statement of interest.

Information about the Public Health Advisory Board is available on the board’s webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/phab

For more information, contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup meets October 22 - 10/18/19

October 17, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup meets October 22

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Medical Community Collaboration Workgroup.

Agenda: Brainstorm and discuss content for a resource document to assist medical settings and recovery peer agencies that are adding or contemplating adding recovery peers to enhance medical responses to individuals with substance use disorders.

When: October 22, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Tabor Space, 5441 SE Belmont Street, Portland.

The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges, with a focus on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, visit the RBHC websit.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets October 25 - 10/18/19

October 18, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets October 25

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force.

When: October 25, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 177, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the task force, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary. There will be time for public comment at the beginning of the meeting at approximately 9:05 a.m.

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force webpage.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

OHA issues corrective action plan to Health Share of Oregon - 10/18/19

October 17, 2019

OHA issues corrective action plan to Health Share of Oregon

Plan addresses OHP members' transportation problems

Salem, Ore. -- The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has issued a corrective action plan that requires Health Share of Oregon to improve non-emergent medical transportation (NEMT) services that it provides to Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members.

Health Share of Oregon (HSO) is a coordinated care organization that serves approximately 309,000 OHP members in Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties. NEMT is a core benefit of the Oregon Health Plan. Members can access these transportation services for rides to their medical, dental and behavioral health appointments.

Health Share of Oregon has been working with OHA to improve this critical service for its members. Health Share has been meeting with OHA to provide monitoring data and discuss improvements it has made in the program.

In issuing the corrective action plan, OHA found that Health Share did not provide reliable non-emergent transportation services to covered appointments and that access to care for members has been, and continues to be, disrupted.

OHP members in Health Share’s service area have notified OHA of problems they have experienced arranging transportation to non-emergency health care appointments including: transportation providers failing to pick members up for appointments or after appointments to return home, late arrivals, cancellation of rides with short notice, long call center wait times, and lack of appropriate equipment in vehicles to support members' needs. Transportation providers have complained that Health Share’s vendor, GridWorks, has not paid them for rides.

Health Share is required to provide OHA a turn-around plan within 14 days to correct the current non-compliance with NEMT contract requirements and rules. OHA recommends Health Share hire a consultant experienced in NEMT to help improve services for OHP members.

OHA is requiring Health Share to provide weekly reports that include the following performance data, which HSO began reporting Sept. 13:

  • On time, late or “no shows” performance.
  • Total ridership by mode.
  • Total call volume.
  • Average speed to answer calls.
  • Call center service level.
  • Average call handle time.

# # #

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets October 18 - 10/17/19

October 17, 2019

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: October 18, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 775 Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/3895887851300669185 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, review minutes, and general updates; public testimony; Quality Incentive Program and CCO 2.0; obesity measure update; new travel reimbursement policy; continuous enrollment for 2020; documenting reasons for 2020 measure retirement; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Missing Oregon State Hospital patient located - 10/16/19

October 16, 2019

The patient reported missing Monday by Oregon State Hospital has been located. Please reference Eugene Police Department Case Number EPD 19-16811.

On Tuesday, Oct. 15, an employee of the hospital recognized the patient at Washington Jefferson Park in Eugene. The staff member called police, who took him into custody at about 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. The patient is at the Lane County Jail, awaiting transport back to the hospital.

# # #

 

Recreational use advisory issued October 16 for North Tenmile Lake - 10/16/19

October 16, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued October 16 for North Tenmile Lake

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for North Tenmile Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lake is in Coos County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit North Tenmile Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities, regardless of whether a recreational use health advisory is in place, should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas. Dogs can also be exposed to cyanotoxins when present by licking their fur, licking cyanobacteria off rocks or eating cells from a bloom.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.