Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries
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News Releases
Be alert for landslides in south central Oregon and southwest Oregon - 02/22/19

Portland, OR—The National Weather Service has issued flood watches for portions of south central Oregon and southwest Oregon, including the Siskiyou Mountains and Southern Oregon Cascades and South Central Oregon Cascades, Central Douglas County, Curry County Coast, Eastern Curry County and Josephine County, Eastern Douglas County Foothills, Jackson County, and South Central Oregon Coast, for Saturday, February 23 from 7 p.m. PST through Tuesday, March 1, 11 a.m.

Heavy rain can trigger landslides and debris flows in steep terrain, and the risk is higher in burn areas.

Find the latest information here: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/or.php?x=1

Debris flows are rapidly moving, extremely destructive landslides. They can contain boulders and logs transported in a fast-moving soil and water slurry down steep hillsides and through narrow canyons. They can easily travel a mile or more. A debris flow moves faster than a person can run. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk.

If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

  • Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
  • Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
  • Travel with extreme caution. Assume roads are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.

For more landslide and debris flow information: https://www.oregongeology.org/Landslide/debrisflow.htm

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Be alert for landslides across much of northwestern Oregon - 02/11/19

Portland, OR—The National Weather Service has issued flood watches for portions of northwest Oregon and southwest Washington, including the central Coast Range, central Oregon coast, central Willamette Valley, the Coast Range of northwest Oregon, the greater Portland metro area, Lower Columbia, north Oregon coast, and south Willamette Valley for Monday, February 11 from 7 p.m. PST through Wednesday, February 13, 4 a.m.

Heavy rain can trigger landslides and debris flows in steep terrain, and the risk is higher in burn areas.

Find the latest information here: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/or.php?x=1

Debris flows are rapidly moving, extremely destructive landslides. They can contain boulders and logs transported in a fast-moving soil and water slurry down steep hillsides and through narrow canyons. They can easily travel a mile or more. A debris flow moves faster than a person can run. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk.

If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

  • Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
  • Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
  • Travel with extreme caution. Assume roads are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.

For more landslide and debris flow information: https://www.oregongeology.org/Landslide/debrisflow.htm

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Tsunami evacuation maps from your smartphone - 01/28/19

Newport, OR— A redesigned, free smartphone app showing Pacific Northwest tsunami evacuation zones is available from the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS) in partnership with the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI).

The NANOOS Visualization System (NVS) Tsunami Evacuation smartphone app provides an at-a-glance view of tsunami hazard zones along the coasts of Oregon and Washington. Users can locate their current location on the map to see if they are in a tsunami evacuation zone, plan their own evacuation routes, download published evacuation brochures for the region and, now, print and save customized evacuation brochures centered on an area of interest.

"This app is great for homeowners on the coast as well as visitors who are planning trips," says Jon Allan, DOGAMI coastal scientist and one of the app developers. "Knowing where you are in the tsunami zone means you will be better prepared should a tsunami occur. You can bookmark places and save or print a unique evacuation map centered on your home, work place, hotel or even camp site. Users can then determine their nearest point of high ground outside the evacuation zone and develop a plan for how to get there."

The free NVS Tsunami Evacuation app is available from the iTunes App Store and Google Play:

•          iPhone:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nvs-tsunami-evacuation/id478984841?ls=1&mt=8

•          Android:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=tsunami_evac.nvs.nanoos.org.nvs_tsunami_android

Customized tsunami evacuation brochures can also be printed from the NANOOS interactive online portal (http://nvs.nanoos.org/TsunamiEvac). Learn more about tsunami preparedness at http://www.oregontsunami.org.

The coasts of Oregon, Washington, and Northern California are exposed to tsunamis from distant earthquakes (such as the March 11, 2011, T?hoku, Japan tsunami) and local earthquake events. The greatest risk to Northwest coastal communities is from very large, locally generated tsunamis produced by an earthquake (magnitude 8-9+) occurring offshore the coast of Oregon and Washington on the Cascadia subduction zone. DOGAMI and the Washington Geological Survey have mapped the zones that would be inundated by a tsunami. The collaborative effort between NANOOS and DOGAMI will serve as an important tool to assist the public with preparing for a potentially catastrophic tsunami event along the Pacific Northwest coast.

The smartphone app was funded by NANOOS through a grant from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), while the custom brochure tool was developed with funding from DOGAMI via the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program of NOAA – National Weather Service.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries provides earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous. Learn more at https://www.oregongeology.org

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