Oregon Dept. of Forestry
Emergency Messages as of 5:05 am, Sat. Apr. 10
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Dept. of Forestry.
Primary email address for a new account:

  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Release
Saving these street trees around the Midtowne Project in Eugene helped earn Essex General Construction an Urban and Community Forestry Award from Oregon Community Trees and the Oregon Department of Forestry.
Saving these street trees around the Midtowne Project in Eugene helped earn Essex General Construction an Urban and Community Forestry Award from Oregon Community Trees and the Oregon Department of Forestry.
Essex General Construction in Eugene is honored by Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Community Trees - 04/01/21

EUGENE, Ore. – Essex General Construction, with offices in Eugene and Lake Oswego, is being recognized in 2021 by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the non-profit organization Oregon Community Trees (OCT) for urban development projects that support tree preservation wherever possible.  

OCT Vice President Teresa Gustafson chairs the committee that reviews nominations for urban and community forestry awards. She said Essex, a general contracting firm which was started in Eugene in 1987, was enthusiastically nominated by the City of Eugene’s urban forestry staff.

Eugene Urban Forestry Management Analyst Scott Altenhoff wrote in the nomination that, ”Over the last 15 years that I've been working for the City of Eugene, I've been so impressed with Essex General Construction team. They are a municipal arborist's/urban forester's dream come true. Their company's commitment to doing the right thing and going the extra-mile for trees and green infrastructure is truly exceptional.”

Altenhoff stated that at all stages of a project the Essex team showed an enthusiasm for protecting existing trees or planting new, high-quality trees.

As an example, Altenhoff cited the Midtown project, a mixed-use, multi-story building in downtown Eugene.

“The design and construction teams worked tirelessly to retain as many street trees as possible at this site (most other developers would have removed them all). Also, they were super diligent about protecting the trees to be retained, and they even milled and repurposed two street trees that had to be removed for the project (and integrated the wood into the ceiling of the ballet studio on the ground floor),” he wrote.

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Kristin Ramstad, who manages the agency’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program, said the award recognizes the importance of developers seeing the value of retaining healthy, non-invasive large trees during redevelopment.

“If a builder takes appropriate measures to protect root zones and avoid soil compaction, these mature trees provide an immediate asset to the people who move into the new housing or commercial spaces,” said Ramstad.

Others honored by Oregon Community Trees this year are Tony Mecum, urban forester in Grants Pass, and City Councilor Charlotte Lehan in Wilsonville.

                                                                   # # #

View more news releases from Oregon Dept. of Forestry.