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Committee for Emergency Fire Cost to meet in-person with virtual option on June 7, 2022 - 05/24/22

SALEM, Ore. – The Emergency Fire Cost Committee will meet in-person at the ODF Headquarters in Salem on Tuesday, June 7, 2022, at 10 a.m. A virtual option will be available. Please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment, please contact Chrystal Bader at 503-945-7220.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Financial status of the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund (OFLPF)
  • Insurance policy update
  • Weather update
  • Update on any changes to large fire cost collection efforts
  • Agency/Fire Division report
  • EFCC Administrator report

The meeting is open to the public to attend either in-person or virtually via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the end of the meeting as noted on the agenda. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by contacting Chrystal Bader at 503-945-7220.

The Emergency Fire Cost Committee oversees the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund (OFLPF), established by the Oregon Legislature as an insurance fund with the purpose of equalizing emergency fire suppression costs among the various Oregon Department of Forestry protection districts. The emergency funding system is designed to operate as an insurance policy whereby all districts contribute (pay premiums) into the fund so that money will be available to any individual district to pay fire suppression costs on emergency fires. View more information on the EFCC webpage.

MEDIA ALERT: Oregon Department of Forestry Invites Media to Annual Aircraft Training - 05/16/22

What: The Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Aviation Unit will be hosting a media day at their annual multi-mission aircraft training at the airport in Salem. 

Background: This is an opportunity to train the personnel who will help with wildfire detection using the ODF-owned Partenavia P-68 Observer.

The Partenavia has been in service with ODF since 1983.  It’s had many uses, but its most recent function is as the platform for ODF’s nighttime detection work.  It is equipped with a FLIR infrared camera system that is paired with an augmented reality mapping system.

Visuals: The unit will pull up video demonstrations to show the capabilities and full purpose of the Partenavia when it comes to fire detection. 

When: Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Where: Salem Municipal Airport, 2990 25th St SE, Salem, OR 97302

Time: 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

People on-site available to interview: 

  • Neal Laugle, Fire Aviation Manager
  • Jamie Knight, Fire Aviation Coordinator
  • Cole Lindsay, Main Observer

So we can plan appropriately, please RSVP by 3 p.m. May 17 by emailing Jessica Prakke, ODF Public Affairs, at jessica.prakke@odf.oregon.gov

Board of Forestry hosts a virtual special meeting on May 16 - 05/11/22

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a virtual meeting starting at 7 a.m. on Monday, May 16. The meeting will be livestreamed on the department’s YouTube channel.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • Final orders on Spring Branch Creek contested case 
  • Emergency fire funding legislative concept decision

View the agenda and board meeting details.

Live testimony is available on the emergency fire funding legislative concept decision. Sign-up is required and instructions to provide live testimony are available online. Sign-up closes on Friday, May 13 at 5 p.m. Written public testimony will also be accepted. Written comments can be submitted before or up to the meeting day to boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov, with the appropriate agenda item included with the submission. Items marked as work sessions or executive sessions (*) on the agenda are not open for public testimony.

The board will meet in executive session starting at 7:55 a.m. for the purpose of conferring with legal counsel regarding the consideration of information or records that are exempt by law from public inspection, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(f).

The executive session will also be conducted virtually. Members of the news media who want to attend this portion of the meeting can email Public Affairs Director Joy Krawczyk at joy.p.krawczyk@odf.oregon.gov for information.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.

Wildfire Awareness Month: Prevent wildfire; Wait for the right time to burn debris - 05/09/22

SALEM, OR – The Oregon Department of Forestry and other fire prevention experts urge the public to exercise caution when disposing of yard debris this spring. The drought conditions this year put Oregon at a higher risk of wildfire. 

May is Wildfire Awareness Month, which is a great time to trim trees, bushes, and tidy up plants around your home that could catch fire. This is what we call creating a “defensible space” around your home and property. As you begin spring clean-up, the Oregon Department of Forestry and Keep Oregon Green urge you to consider alternatives to burning. 

Preferable options aside from burning include composting or recycling. Check with your local disposal company for recycling options. You can also cover a part of the pile with plastic to keep it dry until the fall when it’s safer to burn. Delaying your burn plans will give the debris more time to cure and avoids spring holdover fires as fire risk increases with hotter, drier weather. 

“We expect this year to be another dry fire season, so the more we can reduce human-caused fires the better,” said Mike Shaw, Fire Protection Division Chief. “Fire prevention is something that all Oregonians should have at the forefront of their mind. Humans cause the majority of Oregon’s fires, but they can also prevent them.”

Seventy percent of wildfires in Oregon are human-caused fires, with debris burning being the number one cause. By waiting to burn or taking extra steps to control a fire, Oregon can significantly reduce the risk of creating a large wildfire. 

If burning now is the only option to dispose of yard debris, fire prevention specialists ask people to follow safe burning practices. The following tips can help stop run-away burn piles:

  • Call before you burn –  Burning regulations vary by location depending on the weather and fuel conditions. If you are planning to burn, check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry district, fire protective association, fire department, or air protection authority to learn about current burning restrictions or regulations, and if you need a permit.
  • Know the weather – Burn early in the day and never burn on dry or windy days, because fires can spread out of control more easily.
  • Clear a 10-foot fuel-free buffer around the pile – Make sure there are no tree branches or power lines above
  • Keep burn piles small – Large burn piles can cast hot embers long distances. Keep piles small, maximum of four feet by four feet. Add debris to the pile in small amounts as the pile burns.
  • Always have water and fire tools nearby – When burning, have a charged water hose or a bucket of water, and shovel on hand to put out the fire. Drown the pile with water, stir the coals, and drown again, repeating until the fire is out cold.
  • Stay with the fire until it is out cold – State laws requires monitoring of debris burn piles from start to finish until it is out cold. This law is intended to ensure sparks or embers that jump from the fire can be put out quickly.
  • Recheck burn piles. They can retain heat for several weeks and restart when the weather warms up and winds blow.
  • Never use gasoline or other flammable or combustible liquids to start or speed up your fire.
  • Burn only yard debris – State laws prohibit burning materials or trash that create dense smoke or noxious odors.
  • Costs of run-away debris burns– State law requires the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires all year. If your debris burn spreads out of control, you may have to pay for suppression costs, as well as the damage to your neighbors’ properties. This can be extremely expensive.

More tips on wildfire prevention, including campfire safety, motorized equipment use, and fire-resistant landscaping can be found on the Keep Oregon Green website. Find public use restrictions for Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands before your burn.

###

Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee meets May 13 via Zoom - 05/06/22

SALEM, Ore – The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee will meet virtually Friday, May 13 at 2 p.m. Items on the committee’s agenda include: 

  • Formulating testimony for the June 8 Board of Forestry meeting

This meeting is open to the public. The Zoom log-in is https://odf.zoom.us/j/98745838963. The meeting agenda with links to reference materials will be posted on the department’s web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

Public comment is scheduled at the beginning of the meeting. To submit written comment, email ftlac.comment@odf.oregon.gov. Written comment sent at least 48 hours before the meeting will give the FTLAC time to review and consider information. Comment submitted after that window of time will be sent to the FTLAC after the meeting, entered into the record and posted online. Comment is not accepted after the meeting concludes. 

The Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 72 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.

Joint Northwest, Southwest, and Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committees meets May 11 - 05/06/22

SALEM, Ore. – The Joint Northwest, Southwest, and Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committees will meet virtually Wednesday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to noon. To join the virtual meeting, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment at this virtual meeting, please email forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov. 

Topics to be covered include:

  • Forest Resources Division updates: Private Forest Accord bills, rule drafting, and review process
  • Roundtable discussion

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

Regional Forest Practices Committees are panels of citizens – mandated under Oregon law – that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practices Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest and Southwest regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of the committees’ members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.

Oregon’s forests are among the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefitsView more information on the RFPC webpage.

Committee for Family Forestlands meets May 12 - 05/05/22

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually Thursday, May 12 from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. To join the virtual meeting, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment at this virtual meeting, please email forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Forest Resources Division update
  • Plan and draft report to Board of Forestry 
  • Round table discussion

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.

Board of Forestry hosts a virtual special meeting on May 10 - 05/03/22

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a virtual meeting starting at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, May 10. The meeting will be livestreamed on the department’s YouTube channel.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • Presentation on Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) 
  • Q&A: Opportunity for Board members to ask questions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) team and Federal Services 
  • Facilitated conversation between Board of Forestry members and Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee (FTLAC) members

View the agenda and board meeting details.

No testimony will be available but written public testimony will be accepted. Written testimony may be submitted for all information items, before or up to two weeks after the meeting day to boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov, and include the agenda item number with the submission.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.

Oregon communities receive grants to lower wildfire risk for National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day - 05/03/22

SALEM, Ore. – This year, 17 neighborhoods in 11 Oregon cities and towns were awarded $500 each in a nationally competitive process to assist with wildfire prevention projects to mark Wildfire Community Preparedness Day on May 7. For the eighth consecutive year, State Farm Insurance provided financial support, allowing these Oregon communities to join 100 others nationwide to reduce their wildfire risk and create a safer future.

Communities receiving awards in Oregon are:

  • Ashland (5)
  • Bend (2)
  • Canby
  • Depoe Bay
  • Grants Pass
  • Halfway
  • Leaburg
  • Otis
  • Portland (2)
  • Salem
  • Sisters

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) helps organize Wildfire Community Preparedness Day. The NFPA encourages people of all ages to participate in wildfire preparedness and mitigation, making their home and community a safer place to live during fire season.

What the experts say:

“2021 was the second year in a row of significant wildfire, with over 800,000 acres burned in Oregon,” says Jenna Trentadue, National Fire Plan Coordinator for the Oregon Department of Forestry. “This year, we’re urging people to do something to lower the fire risk for their community and home before peak fire months. There are many ways to participate in Wildfire Community Preparedness Day to protect homes and property, even though some activities may have to be altered to adjust for social distancing due to lingering COVID-19 concerns.”

"Fire seasons are arriving sooner, lasting longer, and increasing in severity," says Oregon Department of Forestry's Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields. While the number of fires has remained relatively static over time, the average number of acres burned from 10 years ago to today has gone from 21,000 to 95,000 on lands protected by ODF. "The more we can do now to protect our homes and communities before fire strikes will pay dividends in the long run. With the lion's share of fires caused by people, it is time we take personal responsibility not only for our property but also for our actions that could ultimately prevent disaster from striking at all."

In light of possible drought this summer, Keep Oregon Green (KOG), the Office of the State Fire Marshal, and the Oregon Department of Forestry are working hard to spread an important prevention message about defensible space:

Oregon's recent fire activity stresses the need for removing and managing fuels around your property. Kristin Babbs, KOG President and CEO says that "The majority of Oregon's wildfire ignitions are human-caused and start near the home. Good defensible space stops accidental fires from escaping the property and spreading to neighbors and adjacent forestland. Conversely, it also serves as a buffer slowing a wildfire's advance by starving it of fuel as it reaches your property."

Claire McGrew, Chief Deputy at the Office of State Fire Marshal, adds, "wildfire safety starts with you and your property. Now is the time to take action to prepare our homes, families, and communities for wildfires by starting on our property before there is smoke on the horizon."

Projects for Wildfire Preparedness Day can range from a few hours up to an entire day. Below are some examples of things you can do to reduce the risk of homes and property becoming fuel for a wildfire:

  • Remove debris and dry leaves 3 to 5 feet from a home's foundation and up to 30 ft. if possible.
  • Keep your roof and gutters free of downed tree limbs, broken branches, and leaves.
  • Distribute wildfire safety information via email or website, or order free Firewise and emergency preparedness materials from the Firewise catalog or READY.gov.
  • Join forces with neighbors and pool your resources to pay for a chipper service or large debris bin to remove slash.
  • Make a map of the community and indicate where elderly neighbors and people with animals may need more help during an emergency and assign community members to account for them.

Find additional project ideas and learn more about the National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day event on May 7 by visiting the NFPA website.

Keep Oregon Green (KOG) is a 501 (c)3 nonprofit organization that promotes programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire. Their work targets residents, particularly those in the wildland-urban interface, and recreationists using Oregon's public and private lands.

State Farm's mission is to help people manage the risks of everyday life, recover from the unexpected, and realize their dreams. State Farm and its affiliates are the largest providers of auto, home and individual life insurance in the United States. They serve more than 83 million policies and accounts. Commercial auto insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is available. For more information, please visit their website.

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) was founded in 1896, NFPA is a global, nonprofit organization devoted to eliminating death, injury, property and economic loss due to fire, electrical and related hazards. The association delivers information and knowledge through more than 300 consensus codes and standards, research, training, education, outreach and advocacy, and by partnering with others who share an interest in furthering the NFPA mission. View the NFPA codes and standards for free.

Oregon Department of Forestry's mission is to serve the people of Oregon by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability.

The Office of State Fire Marshal's mission is to protect people, property, and the environment from fire and hazardous materials. The office carries out these duties through prevention education, inspections, code enforcement, and preparedness and response activities. Our vision is to provide premier public safety services.

Amid deepening drought, Wildfire Awareness Month campaign urges need for extreme caution this summer - 04/29/22

SALEM, Ore. – May is Wildfire Awareness Month. Keep Oregon Green, in partnership with federal, state and local fire organizations, is reminding Oregonians that May is a crucial time for communities to create defensible space around homes this spring and learn how to prevent careless, unwanted wildfires this summer.

Persistent Extreme and Severe Drought

So far in 2022, temperatures have been above average and conditions drier than normal. More than half of Oregon’s land area have received emergency drought declarations, and the potential for large, costly wildfires is expected across the Pacific Northwest as early as May or June in central and southern Oregon.  

“The snowpack improved with the recent snow and rainfall in April, but there is still real worry ahead”, said Kristin Babbs, president of the Keep Oregon Green Association. “With fire seasons routinely starting earlier than usual and the current drought situation, we are emphasizing the need for Oregonians to pay attention to the conditions, not the calendar. Sparks or embers from early season activities could get traction, so it’s important to be ready and have fire tools on hand at all times.”

Over 70% of Oregon’s wildfires are started by people, placing the power of prevention squarely in the hands of Oregonians. Public lands will see high visitation numbers for the third year in a row, making the need for wildfire awareness and prevention practices more important than ever. Before heading outdoors, contact the agency or landowner who manages the lands at your destination for an update on current fire restrictions or bans. Residents staying close to home must also check fire restrictions before building backyard campfires or using equipment that could ignite dry vegetation, such as lawn mowers or weed trimmers. 

Keep Oregon Green’s annual wildfire prevention campaign encourages residents and tourists to practice basic wildfire safety while enjoying the outdoors. Wildfire safety tips can be found at keeporegongreen.org and its various social media platforms.
 

Coming soon: Weekly wildfire awareness tips 

During May, a new wildfire prevention topic will be introduced each week to help homeowners and recreationists learn how to prevent their outdoor activities from sparking the next wildfire. 

For more wildfire preparedness and prevention information, visit the websites for Keep Oregon Green at https://keeporegongreen.org/, the Oregon Department of Forestry’s restrictions map https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/Pages/fireprevention.aspx, OSU’s Fire Program at https://extension.oregonstate.edu/fire-program and OSU’s Oregon Wildfire Risk Explorer tool: https://oregonexplorer.info/topics/wildfire-risk?ptopic=62

 

Attached Media Files: WAM_Proclamation.doc
Public comment period for WUI, statewide wildfire risk map rules extended, additional information session scheduled - 04/28/22

SALEM, Ore.—Public hearings were held April 19–21 to gather feedback on a rules package establishing the identification criteria for the wildland-urban interface and development of a statewide wildfire risk map, as required by Senate Bill 762 (2021). 

During public hearings, the department heard several requests for more time to provide comments on the proposed rules. Based on that input, the department is extending the public comment period to noon on May 9, 2022. That is the latest time the department can accept input and present the rules to the Board of Forestry for adoption. The department must also allow time for Oregon State University to complete the map based on the adopted rules by the statutory deadline of June 30, 2022. 

ODF is also hosting an additional virtual information session on Friday, April 29, 2022, at a 3 p.m. Zoom meeting. No public hearing will be held, but written comments can be sent to sb762.rulemaking@oregon.gov until the extended deadline of noon, May 9, 2022.

The Board of Forestry approved the public hearing process for the proposed rule package, Oregon Administrative Rules 629-044-1000 to 629-044-1041 and 629-045-1025, during their March 9 meeting. See the notice of proposed rulemaking for draft rule language. The department consulted a rulemaking advisory committee comprised of 26 members representing a wide variety of stakeholder interests while drafting the proposed rules. 

The rules will be used by Oregon State University to develop and maintain the statewide wildfire risk map, which includes assigning one of five risk classes to individual properties. The rules establish the notification process to property owners and how to appeal assignment of a risk classification.

ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
Southern Oregon featured in a new Oregon Department of Forestry video series on restoring federal forests (Photo) - 04/27/22

SALEM, Ore.— Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has released four new videos including one made in southern Oregon as part of its Federal Forest Restoration (FFR) Program. The series is called “Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests.” These videos show how the FFR Program is helping mitigate climate change and address federal forest health challenges in Oregon, including risk of catastrophic wildfire, insect pests, and disease.

Oregonians in many walks of life interact with and value their federal forests. The FFR Program works to conserve and protect these forests, which are critical to maintaining clean water, fish and wildfire habitat, jobs, and recreational opportunities.

“The video series highlights the collaborative work the FFR Program has accomplished through strong partnerships and a commitment to increasing the pace, scale and quality of forest restoration work to create heathier forests and safter communities,” said Kyle Sullivan, Federal Forest Restoration Program Lead.

The four video titles are:

  • Restoring the Backyard Forest: Central Oregon
  • Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests
  • Building Community: Oakridge and Westfir

Resilience in the Face of Change: Southern Oregon

Fostering strategic partnerships leads to more strategic treatments that protect communities, our firefighters, the water we drink, and the forests we recreate in. This video highlights the importance of the FFR Program’s investments in forest collaboratives. These collaboratives work to create a common language and common vision for how to solve federal forest health challenges.

Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests

The videos showcase partners, stakeholders, and department representatives outlining the purpose and history of ODF’s Federal Forest Restoration Program and highlighting its goal of creating landscapes resilient to climate-driven disturbances.

Building Community: Oakridge and Westfir

Forest restoration and stewardship are important throughout the state. The restoration activities that ODF performs are of particular importance to rural, forest-dependent communities and provide benefits of improved fish and wildlife habitat, wildfire risk reduction, improved watershed conditions, and enhanced recreation for both rural and urban communities. 

Restoring the Backyard Forest: Central Oregon

Historically, low-intensity wildfire was a frequent event in many of Oregon’s forests, which had adapted to such fires. The absence of frequent fire creates unnaturally dense forest weakened by drought, and attacks by insects and diseases. This puts them at high risk for a stand-replacing wildfire. This video shows that by mimicking historical low-intensity fire disturbance through mechanical thinning or other means, followed by the reintroduction of fire, we can restore natural ecological processes and make forests healthier. 

# # #

ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
Lane County featured in a new Oregon Department of Forestry video series on restoring federal forests (Photo) - 04/27/22

SALEM, Ore.— Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has released four new videos including one made in Lane County as part of its Federal Forest Restoration (FFR) Program. The series is called “Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests.” These videos show how the FFR Program is helping mitigate climate change and address federal forest health challenges in Oregon, including risk of catastrophic wildfire, insect pests, and disease.

Oregonians in many walks of life interact with and value their federal forests. The FFR Program works to conserve and protect these forests, which are critical to maintaining clean water, fish and wildfire habitat, jobs, and recreation opportunities.

“The video series highlights the collaborative work the FFR Program has accomplished through strong partnerships and a commitment to increasing the pace, scale and quality of forest restoration work to create heathier forests and safter communities,” said Kyle Sullivan, Federal Forest Restoration Program Lead.

The four video titles are:

  • Restoring the Backyard Forest: Central Oregon
  • Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests

Building Community: Oakridge and Westfir

Forest restoration and stewardship are important throughout the state. The restoration activities that ODF performs are of particular importance to rural, forest-dependent communities and provide benefits of improved fish and wildlife habitat, wildfire risk reduction, improved watershed conditions, and enhanced recreation for both rural and urban communities. 

Resilience in the Face of Change: Southern Oregon

Fostering strategic partnerships leads to more strategic treatments that protect communities, our firefighters, the water we drink, and the forests we recreate in. This video highlights the importance of the FFR Program’s investments in forest collaboratives. These collaboratives work to create a common language and common vision for how to solve federal forest health challenges.

Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests

The videos showcase partners, stakeholders, and department representatives outlining the purpose and history of ODF’s Federal Forest Restoration Program and highlighting its goal of creating landscapes resilient to climate-driven disturbances.

Restoring the Backyard Forest: Central Oregon

Historically, low-intensity wildfire was a frequent event in many of Oregon’s forests, which had adapted to such fires. The absence of frequent fire creates unnaturally dense forest weakened by drought, and attacks by insects and diseases. This puts them at high risk for a stand-replacing wildfire. This video shows that by mimicking historical low-intensity fire disturbance through mechanical thinning or other means, followed by the reintroduction of fire, we can restore natural ecological processes and make forests healthier. 

# # #

ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
Central Oregon featured in a new Oregon Department of Forestry video series on restoring federal forests (Photo) - 04/27/22

SALEM, Ore.— Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has released four new videos including one filmed in central Oregon as part of its Federal Forest Restoration (FFR) Program. The series is called “Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests.” These videos show how the FFR Program is helping mitigate climate change and address federal forest health challenges in Oregon, including risk of catastrophic wildfire, insect pests, and disease.

Oregonians in many walks of life interact with and value their federal forests. The FFR Program works to conserve and protect these forests, which are critical to maintaining clean water, fish and wildfire habitat, jobs, and recreational opportunities.

“The video series highlights the collaborative work the FFR Program has accomplished through strong partnerships and a commitment to increasing the pace, scale and quality of forest restoration work to create heathier forests and safter communities,” said Kyle Sullivan, Federal Forest Restoration Program Lead.

The four video titles are:

Restoring the Backyard Forest: Central Oregon

Historically, low-intensity wildfire was a frequent event in many of Oregon’s forests, which had adapted to such fires. The absence of frequent fire creates unnaturally dense forest weakened by drought, and attacks by insects and diseases. This puts them at high risk for a stand-replacing wildfire. This video shows that by mimicking historical low-intensity fire disturbance through mechanical thinning or other means, followed by the reintroduction of fire, we can restore natural ecological processes and make forests healthier. 

Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests

The videos showcase partners, stakeholders, and department representatives outlining the purpose and history of ODF’s Federal Forest Restoration Program and highlighting its goal of creating landscapes resilient to climate-driven disturbances.

Building Community: Oakridge and Westfir

Forest restoration and stewardship are important throughout the state. The restoration activities that ODF performs are of particular importance to rural, forest-dependent communities and provide benefits of improved fish and wildlife habitat, wildfire risk reduction, improved watershed conditions, and enhanced recreation for both rural and urban communities. 

Resilience in the Face of Change: Southern Oregon

Fostering strategic partnerships leads to more strategic treatments that protect communities, our firefighters, the water we drink, and the forests we recreate in. This video highlights the importance of the FFR Program’s investments in forest collaboratives. These collaboratives work to create a common language and common vision for how to solve federal forest health challenges.

# # #

ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
ODF's Kyle Sullivan is lead on the agency's Federal Forest Restoration Program, which encourages collaborative efforts to improve the health and fire resilience of federal forests in Oregon. He appears in a new video series being released this week by ODF
Oregon Department of Forestry releases video series on restoring federal forests (Photo) - 04/27/22

SALEM, Ore.— Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has released four new videos as part of its Federal Forest Restoration (FFR) Program. The series is called “Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests.” These videos show how the FFR Program is helping mitigate climate change and address federal forest health challenges in Oregon, including risk of catastrophic wildfire, insect pests, and disease.

Oregonians in many walks of life interact with and value their federal forests. The FFR Program worksto conserve and protect these forests, which are critical to maintaining clean water, fish and wildfire habitat, jobs, and recreation opportunities.

“The video series highlights the collaborative work the FFR Program has accomplished through strong partnerships and a commitment to increasing the pace, scale and quality of forest restoration work to create heathier forests and safter communities,” said Kyle Sullivan, Federal Forest Restoration Program Lead.

The four video titles are:

Forward Together: Restoring Oregon’s Federal Forests

The videos showcase partners, stakeholders, and department representatives outlining the purpose and history of ODF’s Federal Forest Restoration Program, and highlighting its goal of creating landscapes resilient to climate-driven disturbances.

Building Community: Oakridge and Westfir

Forest restoration and stewardship are important throughout the state. The restoration activities that ODF performs are of particular importance to rural, forest-dependent communities and provide benefits of improved fish and wildlife habitat, wildfire risk reduction, improved watershed conditions, and enhanced recreation for both rural and urban communities. 

Resilience in the Face of Change: Southern Oregon

Fostering strategic partnerships leads to more strategic treatments that protect communities, our firefighters, the water we drink, and the forests we recreate in. This video highlights the importance of the FFR Program’s investments in forest collaboratives. These collaboratives work to create a common language and common vision for how to solve federal forest health challenges.

Restoring the Backyard Forest: Central Oregon

Historically, low-intensity wildfire was a frequent event in many of Oregon’s forests, which had adapted to such fires. The absence of frequent fire creates unnaturally dense forest weakened by drought, and attacks by insects and diseases. This puts them at high risk for a stand-replacing wildfire. This video shows that by mimicking historical low-intensity fire disturbance through mechanical thinning or other means, followed by the reintroduction of fire, we can restore natural ecological processes and make forests healthier. 

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