Oregon Arts Commission
Emergency Messages as of 8:30 pm, Sat. Feb. 23
No information currently posted. Operating as usual.
News Releases
Fisherman at work in Boom Arts’ February production of “Pescador,” supported by an Arts Build Communities grant. Silencio Blanco photo.
Fisherman at work in Boom Arts’ February production of “Pescador,” supported by an Arts Build Communities grant. Silencio Blanco photo.
$175,000 Awarded in 31 Arts Build Communities Grants; Projects Address Community Need Through the Arts (Photo) - 02/20/19

Salem, Ore. – Using the arts as a means of addressing community need is at the heart of 31 projects awarded $175,000 by the Oregon Arts Commission’s Arts Build Communities grant program for FY2019.

The Arts Build Communities program targets broad geographic impact and arts access for underserved audiences in Oregon. More than half of this year’s awards go to communities outside of the Portland area.

“This program provides financial support to arts and other community-based organizations for projects that address a local community problem, issue or need through an arts-based solution," said Arts Commission Vice Chair Jenny Green, who led the review panel. “Local citizens employ creative thinking and collective response to identify a local need and provide an arts-based solution. These modest grants also spark and leverage many other investments and resources, serving as a catalyst for greater economic and civic impact.”

In many cases these awards are seed money to spur additional local funding. In recent years Arts Build Communities projects attracted more than $600,000 in additional investment, much of it representing salaries paid to artists and others as well as products and services purchased in the funded communities.

Arts Build Communities grants are made possible, in part, through a funding partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.

The 2019 recipients are:

Art of Community, Hood River: $5,500         

To support increasing the Hispanic population’s access to and engagement in the public art BIG ART Walking Tour, including the creation of a bilingual Spanish/English Public Art Map.

Arts Alliance of Yamhill County, McMInnville: $3,500

To support the Fire Writers Project and host a youth conference bringing 150 high school writers, teachers and professional writers together for sessions inspiring students to keep their writing practice.

Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, Portland: $6,000

To support the Roots to Rise Mural Project by creating an art plan for a new community center and affordable housing development at the heart of East Portland's Jade District.

Astoria Arts and Movement Center, Astoria: $6,000

To support the formation of Pier Pressure Productions, a non-profit theater organization and venue.

Boom Arts Inc, Portland: $6,000

To support artistic, production and outreach costs associated with a presentation of Pescador, a puppet theatre piece for family audiences by Chilean puppet theatre troupe Silencio Blanco, as well as related educational outreach programs.

Cascade School of Music, Bend: $6,000     

To support the Song Catchers Outreach Music Programs with four partner organizations that for under-served, diverse, pre-k & elementary school children.

Clackamas County Arts Alliance, Oregon City: $6,000       

To support Expanding Youth Arts for Change, adding additional visual arts and theater programming to existing programs in Estacada and Canby middle schools as well as at Oregon City’s Parrott Creek Ranch.

Cornucopia Arts Council, Halfway: $6,200  

To support a Clear Creek Music Festival performance of “Scenes from the Oregon Trail, part V” by Festival Resident Composer Blaise Ferrandino.

Deschutes Public Library Foundation, Bend: $4,700          

To support the Library’s community read program, A Novel Idea. Residents are encouraged to read, discuss, create and explore the selected book together.

Eugene Symphony Association, Eugene: $6,000    

To support the Symphony’s 2019 Link Up partnership with Eugene School District 4J’s BEST Afterschool Program. ESA’s professional teaching artists will deliver an experiential music curriculum.

Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras, Eugene: $6,250      

To support the String Academy program, a youth music education program that provides a full year of beginning strings to underserved children in public schools at low or no cost, plus two second year ensembles.

Experience Theatre Project, Beaverton: $3,300      

To produce the first-ever Westside Shakespeare Festival July 28-30, 2019, a collaboration between local theater companies and art educators that will feature full-length plays, scenes, songs, workshops, food and more.

Fishtrap Inc, Enterprise: $6,550        

To support Fishtrap’s 2019 Big Read when more than 1,700 Wallowa County residents will read and celebrate Ursula K. Le Guin’s “A Wizard of Earthsea.” 2019 goals include building a partnership with Art Center East in Union County and expanding programming.

Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum, Ontario: $4,300 

To support a Tradition Keepers event that features buckaroo/ranching traditions as well as Mexican, Basque, Japanese and Native American arts and traditions.

Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph: $4,900        

To support Women on the Edge, an art exhibit with accompanying programs in March and April of 2019. The exhibit will honor local women artists and invite women artists exploring and experimenting with technique and subject matter.

Klamath Community College Foundation, Klamath Falls: $3,100

To support EDUCATION/TRANSFORMATION for which eight Klamath Community College students with educational challenges will write monologues about how their lives are being transformed by education.

Lane Arts Council, Eugene: $6,800  

To support Empowering and Connecting Lane County’s Latinx Arts Community, a series of professional development workshops and networking events tailored to Latinx artists and arts groups.

Literary Arts Inc, Portland: $5,850    

To support the Oregon Book Awards Author Tour, taking Book Award authors to four to six towns across the state to teach writing workshops, visits schools,and present their work at free community gatherings.

Miracle Theatre Group, Portland: $6,250     

To support Milagro’s bilingual UNIDAD theatre residency with school workshops and a public performance in Redmond, Oregon, in May of 2019.

Music Education & Performing Artists Association, Eugene: $6,000

To support The Rock Orchestra Expansion Project, purchasing equipment and workshop materials for weekly music workshops and community outreach.

My Voice Music, Portland: $6,300    

To support the pilot of My Voice Music’s after school drop-in program focused on serving a diverse group of 100 youth, ages 9-18, referred from social service partners and/or neighborhood schools.

Open Hearts Open Minds, Portland: $6,200

To support the 2019 Theatre at Coffee Creek program at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville. The program consists of two facilitators working with residents for twice-weekly dialogue groups.

Oregon Symphony, Portland: $6,250

To support year two of the Lullaby project in partnership with Portland Homeless Family Solutions, using music as a tool for healing and community-building among families experiencing homelessness.

Outside the Frame, Portland: $6,500

To support Frameworks: Cameras, Creativity, Career and Community, weekly film education programming and outreach/educational programs for homeless and marginalized youth.

Portland Meet, Portland: $6,250       

To support the 2019 Pass the Mic Music Camp for Immigrant and Refugee Youth. Grant funds will be used to help pay for stipends for camp counselors and translators and to help pay for instruments and music equipment.

Portland Taiko, Portland: $4,250       

To support a museum exhibit at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center dedicated to the history of Portland Taiko within the context of taiko in North America. The exhibit will celebrate Portland Taiko’s 25th anniversary season.

Portrait Connection, Long Creek: $6,000     

To support Portraits in Eastern Oregon, engaging a minimum of 12 artists to paint 12 portraits of children struggling with serious health issues. Grant funds will be used to pay artist fees, purchase program supplies, and for 10 percent indirect costs.

Rogue Valley Chorale Association, Medford: $4,000          

To provide three concerts for 3,000 students from area schools at Central High School Theater to motivate children to sing.

Salem Art Association, Salem: $6,550         

To support Art Intersection/Intersección de Arte, connecting the northeast and southeast communities of Salem by increasing art opportunities for Latinx youth and connecting them with the broader art communities.

The High Desert Museum: Bend: $6,500     

To support a collaboration with Arts East. Grant funds will be used to empower middle school students in rural eastern Oregon to engage with artists and explore issues relevant to their community through innovative art experiences.

Write Around Portland, Portland: $7,000      

To support Writing for Social Change: Arts in Affordable Housing, providing eight ten-week creative writing workshops free of charge for 70 to 100 residents of affordable housing buildings.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at:  www.oregonartscommission.org.

 

Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas
Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas
Eight Grants Announced to Support the Acquisition of Artworks by Oregon Artists in the 10th year of The Ford Family Foundation Acquisition Support (Photo) - 02/19/19

Salem, Oregon – The Oregon Arts Commission is excited to announce eight grants made through The Ford Family Foundation’s Art Acquisition Fund, which supports our state’s collecting visual arts institutions, the artists whose work they are able to acquire, and the public who will be guaranteed access to these important works in perpetuity. Funds were awarded by a panel of art professionals to: the City of Halsey, Coos Art Museum, High Desert Museum, Portland Art Museum, Portland State University, Reed College, The Schneider Museum of Art, and Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at University of Oregon. More details about each artist and work are listed below.

This year marks the 10th that the Arts Commission has administered these funds for The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program. Since 2010, funds have been granted to 20 organizations throughout the state and advanced the careers of more than 50 artists: Robert Adams, Corey Arnold, Rick Bartow (1946–2016), Carol Benson, Christine Bourdette, Harrison Branch, Michael Brophy, Pat Courtney Gold, John Van Dreal, Gale Everett, Judith Poxson Fawkes. Betty Feves (1918–1985)

Sally Finch, Stephen Hayes, Robert Hess (1935–2014), Yuji Hiratsuka, Deborah Horrell (1953–2018), Jeffrey Hull, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Malia Jensen, Chris Johanson and Jo Jackson, Mel Katz, Lee Kelly, Arnold J. Kemp, Kristan Kennedy, Michael Knutson, Cynthia Lahti, James Lavadour, Ellen Lesperance, Evan La Londe, Elizabeth Malaska, Victor Maldonado, Akihiko Miyoshi, Christiaan H. Mostert, Multiple quilt artists and Sisters Quilt Festival, Jay Stratton Noller, Whitney Nye, Geraldine Ondrizek, Andy Paiko and Ethan Rose, Henk Pander, Lucinda Parker, Don Prechtel, Wendy Red Star, Vanessa Renwick, Susan Seubert, Randall David Tipton, Samantha Wall, Heather Watkins, Marie Watt, and Phyllis Yes.

 

2019 grants are awarded to:

 

 

 

City of Halsey ($1,500) to acquire Gale Everett, “From the Land,” 2016, aluminum, PVC, galvanized steel bolts, plywood (13 panels)

Gale Everett (b.1969. Lives and works in Albany, Oregon) is a visual artist who works and lives in the heart of the Willamette Valley. Her work connects to the forest and rivers, to native plants, farmlands and a love of animals. She moves between hand-cut paper, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture. "From the Land" will be a permanently installed at Halsey City Hall.

Coos Art Museum ($2,800) to acquire Christiaan H. Mostert, “High Truckin',” 2017, acrylic on canvas

Christiaan H. Mostert (Dutch) (b. 1950. Lives and works in North Bend, Oregon) is a prominent artist on Oregon's South Coast. He was born into an artist family in the Netherlands in 1950. The family immigrated to Southern California in 1961 where he attended art classes at the Art Center School of Design in Pasadena. He started his own design and illustration studio in 1979, doing mostly commercial art and architectural renderings. In 1990 he moved to Oregon to open his own fine art studio and gallery. Since then, Dutch has concentrated mostly on painting the maritime environment, in the studio and on location, gathering numerous awards for his work on both coasts. Dutch is the West Coast representative for the American Society of Marine Artists. He helped found the Annual Maritime Art Exhibition at Coos Art Museum 25 years ago.

High Desert Museum ($15,000) to acquire James Lavadour, “Golden,” 2018, oil on panel

James Lavadour (b.1951. Lives and works on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon) is one of Oregon’s premier artists. His work has been exhibited internationally, including recent group exhibitions at Converge 45, “You in Mind,” 2017, Portland, Oregon; “State of the Art” 2014-15, Crystal Bridges, Bentonville AR; and the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition “Personal Structures,” along with numerous regional one-person exhibitions. Growing up on the Umatilla Reservation, his work reflects his deep connection to the landscape of Eastern Oregon and incorporates Indigenous views of the land and sense of place. The High Desert Museum’s collection currently includes two of Lavadour’s early works. By acquiring one of his more mature works, they expand their capacity to trace his development as an artist and make his artwork accessible to broad audiences in their rural region. Lavadour is represented by PDX CONTEMPORARY ART

Portland Art Museum ($20,000) to acquire Chris Johanson and Jo Jackson, “Furniture Sculptures,” 2018, wood, cotton

Chris Johanson's (b. 1968. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) multidisciplinary art encompasses painting, sculpture, installation and music; his works touch on universal themes of spirituality, sociology and environmentalism. Johanna Jackson (b. 1972. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) transforms common objects and materials to  explore the confluence of life and work, art and craft, magic and the ordinary in her handmade, functional objects and domestically-scaled installations. Both artists have exhibited internationally and are significant members of Portland’s artistic community. Working together, they created the exhibition design that transformed a gallery for the museum’s exhibition series WE.CONSTRUCT.MARVELS.BETWEEN.MONUMENTS. The artist team’s murals, furniture and spatial interventions shifted the white cube into a warm, lively environment. Acquiring these furniture pieces is an important testimony to the transformative, community-centered ambitions of the WCMBM series. Johanson is represented by Mitchell-Inness & Nash, New York.

Portland State University ($27,000) to acquire Jessica Jackson Hutchins, “Woman Be Free,” 2018, fused glass

Jessica Jackson Hutchins (b. 1971. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) is a Hallie Ford Fellow and an important American artist. Her expressive and intuitive studio practice produces dynamic sculptures, collages, paintings and large-scale ceramics, all hybrid juxtapositions of the handmade. She has received recent solo exhibitions at the Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus, OH (2016); the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (2014); the Hepworth Wakefield Museum (2013); and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, MA (2011). Significant group exhibitions include the 55th Venice Biennale, and The Whitney Biennial (2010). Her work has been incorporated into public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

Hutchin’s fused glass panel “Woman Be Free” will complete a series of three, with “Totem” and “19 Years Old” –each made in residence at Bullseye Glass, Portland, that will be permanently displayed at PSU’s 724 Harrison building (formerly Neuberger Hall), as part of a collection of works that explore issues of material expression of identity. Other artists represented in the grouping are Ursula von Rydingsvard, Hank Willis Thomas, Lorna Simpson, Wendy Red Star, and Saya Woolfalk. Hutchins is represented by Marianne Boesky, New York.

Reed College ($12,500) Heather Watkins, “Recordings, 2018, twelve individually framed works, thread on linen

Heather Watkins (b. 1969. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) has exhibited her work regionally and beyond since earning her MFA in Typography and Design at RISD in 2000. Trained in type and graphic design, textiles, bookmaking and printmaking, Watkins’ mature work exhibits the sensitive interweaving of these mediums. As an undergrad Watkins studied Classics at Pitzer College, studying in Athens, Greece, and her art evinces this study of classical art and poetics. Watkins has held solo exhibitions at: the Portland Art Museum; The Art Gym; and PDX CONTEMPORARY; and group exhibitions at CANADA NY; the lumber room, and other spaces. Her work is in the collection of: MoMA, NY; the Miller-Meigs Collection; among others. She has installed major public artworks at PSU and PCC. Her accomplished work is critical to the region’s history of design, craft and spiritual abstraction. Watkins created the “Recordings” while “waiting” in various spaces, mainly medical environments. Each intricate embroidery expresses the mind and body negotiating time and space. Watkins is represented by PDX CONTEMPOARY ART.

Schneider Museum of Art, $4,562, Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas

Elizabeth Malaska (b. 1976. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) received her MFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art and BFA from California College of the Arts. With a recent critically acclaimed solo exhibition at Russo Lee Gallery in Portland and a 2018 Hallie Ford Fellowship, Malaska is emerging as an important Oregon artist. In a recent Art Form Critic's pick, Stephanie Snyder writes, "Elizabeth Malaska’s recent paintings celebrate the pathos and resilience of the anima, asserting its reproductive and spiritual power over millennia of oppression... Malaska’s pieces exorcise and overcome the clichéd representations of the feminine form seen throughout art history."  Malaska is represented by Russo Less Gallery.

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, $4,500, University of Oregon, Victor Maldonado, “The Fallen,” 2018, Acrylic on canvas

Victor Maldonado (b. 1976. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) was born in Michoacán, Mexico, and raised in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley. Maldonado draws from their experiences in a family of migrant field laborers to create multidisciplinary art that explores identity, cultural symbols and perceptions… yet they call it “art about nothing,” “Lucha libre” is a recurring theme in the work. The iconic Luchador mask, a symbol of Mexican freestyle wrestlers, stands for the struggle between two forces. In addition to their work as a conceptual, visual, performance, and installation artist, Maldonado is also a freelance curator and writer and assistant dean of diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer at Pacific Northwest College of Art. This is the first work of Maldonado to enter the JSMA collection. Maldonado is represented by Froelick Gallery.

PLEASE NOTE. More images available on request.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

About The Ford Family Foundation Visual Arts Program

Established in the memory of one of its co-founders, Mrs. Hallie Ford, the goal of the Foundation’s Visual Arts Program is to accelerate an enhanced quality of artistic endeavor and bodies of work by mid-career Oregon visual artists through support of their exploration, conceptualization, production, exhibition and documentation of new work, and to improve Oregon's visual arts ecology. 

In addition to the Art Acquisition Funding, other resources are being dedicated to the following:

Fellowships:  five annual Hallie Ford Fellows are provided unrestricted grants to support the conceptualization and the development of new work.

Artists-in-Residences:  bi-annual awards "Golden Spot" residency programs in Oregon that provide opportunities for artists to explore and conceptualize new work.

Exhibition & Documentation:  funding for the curation, preparation, materials and traveling of exhibitions

Capital Projects:  resources to improve and/or expand studio and exhibition space at key Oregon visual arts institutions

Curator/Critic Tour:  visitations by national curators to consult with Oregon's visual artists and interact with the arts community

Opportunity Grants:  resources to Oregon visual artists who face unanticipated circumstances that could aid in significantly advancing the creation, production or exhibition of their work. These grants are managed by the Oregon Arts Commission on the foundation's behalf.

About The Ford Family Foundation

The Ford Family Foundation is the sole funder of this Visual Arts Program.  It partners with Oregon's leading visual arts educators, gallerists, museum and arts professionals to help implement program elements and leverages funding with other state and national resources.

The Foundation was established in 1957 by Kenneth W. and Hallie E. Ford. Its Mission is “successful citizens and vital rural communities” in Oregon and Siskiyou County, California.  The Foundation is located in Roseburg, Oregon, with a Scholarship office in Eugene.  For more information about the Foundation, please visit the website at www.tfff.org.  

About the Oregon Arts Commission

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

Intisar Abioto, “Akela Jaffi,” 2018. Digital pigment print. 24 x 36 inches. Courtesy the artist.
Intisar Abioto, “Akela Jaffi,” 2018. Digital pigment print. 24 x 36 inches. Courtesy the artist.
Intisar Abioto's "Black Legend, Black, Oregon" to be exhibited in the Governor's Office Feb. 4 -- March 29 (Photo) - 01/25/19

Salem, Oregon – Portland artist Intisar Abioto will exhibit “Black Legend, Black, Oregon” in the Governor’s Office of the Capitol Building in Salem from Feb. 4 to March 29.

“Black Legend, Black, Oregon” explores the lore and living legend of black presence in Oregon through photographs of artists, elders, poets, historians, luminaries and beloved community members. Works in the exhibition include images from the artist’s ongoing photographic endeavor and exploratory blog The Black Portlanders as well as photographs taken around Oregon for the Urban League of Portland’s “State of Black Oregon” 2015 publication. She has been photographing and writing about people of African descent in Oregon since 2013.

Abioto is an artist engaged in dancing, photography and writing. Her work is united by a form of story inquiry that takes as it subject the authentic stories of people within the global African diaspora. Abioto has shown her photographs of people of African descent in Oregon at venues including at Multnomah County Public Library, Powell’s City of Books, University of Oregon White Box Gallery, Portland State University Littman Gallery and Ori Gallery. Her publication “The Black Portlands” documents the stories and experiences of black people in Portland alongside photographs of the interviewees. She was a contributing photographer to “MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora” (2017).  Abioto presented her work at TEDx Portland in 2016. She was selected in 2018 for Oregon Humanities’ fellowship program Emerging Journalists, Community Stories. Abioto has a degree in dance and has performed at Paragon Gallery, Portland Art Museum and Disjecta Contemporary Art Center.

The Art in the Governor’s Office Program honors selected artists in Oregon with exhibitions in the reception area of the Governor’s Office in the State Capitol. Artists are nominated by a statewide committee of arts professionals who consider artists representing the breadth and diversity of artistic practice across Oregon, and are then selected by the Arts Commission with the participation of the Governor’s Office. Only professional, living Oregon artists are considered and an exhibit in the Governor’s office is regarded as a “once in a lifetime” honor. Artists whose work has previously been shown in the Governor’s office include Henk Pander, Michele Russo, Manuel Izquierdo, James Lavadour, Margot Thompson, Gordon Gilkey and Yuji Hiratsuka.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.