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OnPoint Community Credit Union releases updated eBook to help guard against evolving tactics in cybercrime (Photo) - 10/03/22

From ransomware-for-hire to smishing attacks, OnPoint provides guidance on protecting against the newest cybersecurity threats.

PORTLAND, Ore., October 3, 2022 — OnPoint Community Credit Union today released its 2022 “The OnPoint Guide to Personal Cybersecurity” eBook to help consumers and businesses protect themselves amidst a fast-evolving cybercrime landscape. In 2021, ransomware attacks doubled, and in the first half of 2022, malware scams jumped 11%. OnPoint updates the free eBook every October to coincide with National Cybersecurity Awareness Month and help keep the community informed of the latest online threats. From emerging cybercrime business models to a surge in smishing and attacks on small businesses, hackers are continually adapting their tactics to take advantage of vulnerabilities. 

“Financial security and personal data security go hand in hand, and both require a commitment to ongoing learning and education,” said Damian Laviolette, Chief Information Security Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “With everything from phones, cars, drones and home systems connected on the web, cybercrime is only going to keep growing—it is not going away. As cybercriminals evolve their modes of attack, we’ll continue to share best practices and resources so people can stay on top of trends and understand how to protect their identities and their bank accounts.” 

The latest trends in online fraud include:

  • Ransomware as a Service (RaaS): A play on the Subscription as a Service or SaaS business model, RaaS providers market themselves on the dark web, offering their ransomware services and technology to clients in exchange for cryptocurrency. The scale of services ranges from advice and assistance to round-the-clock support that includes negotiating with the victim. While RaaS makes it easier for more bad actors to enter the market, the methods of attack remain the same. Cybercriminals access systems via malware infection or exploitation of a vulnerability. 
  • Smishing surge: This summer, the FCC issued a warning about a rise in smishing, a type of social engineering attack that uses SMS texting. Designed to read like a formal notification from a business, smishing texts operate under the same premise as email phishing scams with a link pointing you to an attacker-controlled server. The smisher may even use your name and location to address you directly and strengthen the validity of the message.
  • Small businesses beware: According to the FBI’s Internet Crime report, the cost of cybercrimes against the small business community reached $2.4 billion last year. And a U.S. Small Business Administration survey found 88% of small business owners felt their businesses were vulnerable to online attacks. While large enterprises have built robust security teams and protocols, small businesses tend to lack the security infrastructure needed in the era of cybercrime, making them an attractive target for hackers.

Top 5 Tips for Cybersecurity:

  • Forget the password. Remember the passphrase. A password typically contains about 10 characters, blending letters, numbers and symbols. However, passwords are relatively easy to crack by hackers. That’s why passphrases are becoming the new industry standard. A passphrase is longer than a password, can contain spaces between words, and should be easy for you to remember but hard for a computer to crack. Consider song lyrics, a quotation or anything memorable to you like “My favorite food is Hawaiian p1zz@,” mixing in symbols and numbers in place of some letters. Even the most proficient password cracking tools break down at about 10 characters, so remember the longer your passphrase is, the harder it will be for fraudsters to hack.
  • Back up your data. Backing up data is an absolute must for small business owners. A ransomware attack will seize up your system and lock you out until you pay the hackers. The average length of business downtime due to ransomware attacks is 20 days. That’s enough time to shut down a small business. In addition to security protocols and threat detection, make sure you have a consistent and reliable way to back up your files with encryption in a system separate from your day-to-day operations.
  • Verify sender before clicking any link. Double check the sender’s address and domain name, and don’t simply rely on the display name. You can hover over a link to see if the URL looks legitimate or has common tricks like a zero in place of the letter “o” or an “s” added to the end of a word like Onpoints.com. Be extra wary of any offer or notification that has poor grammar or typos, comes out of the blue or sounds too good to be true.
  • Stop and ask for help. So, you’ve clicked the link. What now? First, stop using the device and disconnect from the internet to stop the spread of malware. If your device is related to your job, reach out to your IT department by phone. If you’ve entered sensitive information, call your financial institution’s hotline (on the back of your credit or debit card) to report the incident, consider putting a lock on your credit records and set up a fraud alert. For breaches on your personal device, back up your data using an external device like a USB and then scan your device for malware. Lastly, change your passwords across all your accounts. When in doubt, seek out a professional IT expert for help.  
  • Teach your kids. You might be aware of smishing, but are your kids? Laviolette says smishing attacks can be successful when you let a kid borrow your phone to play a game. When the text comes through, they may start tapping the screen to remove the distraction and unknowingly compromise the system. If your kids are using electronic devices of any kind, even for limited periods of time, make sure you’ve educated them about the risks.

Cybercrime comes in many forms and requires vigilance across all channels. To learn even more ways to protect yourself, your family or your business, download The OnPoint Guide to Cybersecurity eBook or talk with a representative at your nearest OnPoint branch. 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 489,000 members and with assets of $9.3 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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OnPoint Community Credit Union Employees Direct More Than $100,000 to Oregon and Southwest Washington Non-Profits (Photo) - 09/20/22

PORTLAND, Ore., September 20, 2022— As part of its sixth annual employee giving campaign, OnPoint Community Credit Union today announced a total of $100,218 directed to Big Brothers Big Sisters Columbia NorthwestGirls Build and Cascade AIDS Project. Each year, OnPoint provides every employee with $100 to split however they wish between three non-profits making a difference in the community. This year’s campaign resulted in donations of $35,056 to Big Brothers Big Sisters Columbia Northwest, $37,806 to Girls Build and $27,356 to Cascade AIDS Project.

“As a community credit union, giving back to our neighbors is a core value for each of our employees,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “From building confidence within our young people to fighting HIV and AIDS, these organizations are making a tangible impact on the lives of people across our community. We are proud to support them and we thank them for their unwavering dedication to improving the places we call home.”

Since the annual campaign began in 2017, OnPoint employees have donated more than $500,000 to 15 local non-profits, including NAYA (Native American Youth and Family Center), Hacienda CDC and the Oregon Zoo. Below are details about each of this year’s recipients:

Big Brothers Big Sisters Columbia Northwest (BBBS Columbia Northwest) is a private non-profit organization affiliated with Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. BBBS Columbia Northwest helps empower youth from all backgrounds by providing dedicated one-to-one mentoring relationships to encourage them to achieve their full potential. The mentoring relationships are designed to support youth by improving their academic achievement and empowering them to make positive life choices, graduate from high school, set high aspirations, show greater confidence, and build positive and supportive relationships. With BBBS Columbia Northwest’s mentorship program, youth are able to build friendships that make a lasting impact on their lives. Currently, BBBS Columbia Northwest has 500 children paired with a big brother or sister and a successful 95% high school graduation rate. To learn more, visit https://itsbigtime.org/

“There are currently 200 young people waiting to be matched with mentors through our programs,” said Cynthia Thompson, Chief Development Officer, BBBS Columbia Northwest. “Successful mentorship requires a community of mentors, volunteers and local organizations to positively impact a young person’s life. We are incredibly grateful for the donation from OnPoint and its employees. It will help us continue expanding so every child on the waiting list has the opportunity to experience one-to-one mentorship.”

Since 2016, Girls Build has been inspiring confidence and curiosity in girls ages 8-15 through the world of building. Girls Build has reached nearly 3,000 girls and their families throughout Oregon through summer camps and after school programming. Hands-on workshops include carpentry, electrical, plumbing, roofing, painting, welding, firefighting, auto and bike mechanics, solar, sheet metal, and more. “Our programming has grown from 40 girls in 2016 to over 400 in 2022, and we are proud to say that nearly half of our campers receive scholarships,” said Katie Hughes, Executive Director, Girls Build. “Our programming is fun, engaging and so fulfilling. We are incredibly grateful to OnPoint’s employees for supporting the education and development of the next generation of builders in our community.” Visit www.girlsbuild.org to learn more and follow Girls Build on Instagram at girlsbuild_org for updates and inspiration. 

For over three decades, the Cascade AIDS Project has become an established part of the community and a local and national leader in the fight against HIV. It is the oldest and largest community-based provider of HIV services, housing, education, and advocacy in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Some who are diagnosed with HIV lose their housing, friends and family, and all avenues of support. Cascade AIDS Project helps them get back on track by securing housing, finding essential medical care, and dealing with other issues that make the difference between giving up or getting up and going on. Learn more about its mission: https://www.capnw.org/.

“Living with HIV and AIDS can cause a huge emotional and financial burden to anyone affected,” said Jessy Baros Friedt, Chief Development Officer, Cascade AIDS Project. “We created our programs to lessen those burdens by providing shelter, life skills training and emotional support to those in need. The support from OnPoint and its employees will allow us to continue providing inclusive health and wellness services for LGBTQ+ people, people affected by HIV, and all those seeking compassionate care, while promoting the well-being of these communities.”

To learn more about OnPoint’s commitment to building strong communities, visit onpointcu.com/community-giving.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 489,000 members and with assets of $9.3 billion. OnPoint membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 800-527-3932.

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OnPoint Community Credit Union Appoints Wendy Beth Oliver as Chief Legal Officer (Photo) - 09/15/22

Oliver will oversee the credit union’s governance and legal functions 

PORTLAND, Ore., September 15, 2022—OnPoint Community Credit Union has hired attorney and finance law expert Wendy Beth Oliver to serve as Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer. She joins the Executive Team of Oregon’s largest credit union with more than 489,000 members and $9.3 billion in assets. 

As Chief Legal Officer, Oliver leads OnPoint’s legal strategy and team, aligns its legal and business goals, and advises the credit union on corporate governance, contracts, compliance and regulatory issues. Oliver previously served as the credit union’s Vice President and General Counsel, managing the credit union’s legal compliance and corporate governance.

“Wendy’s extensive experience in various sectors of the financial services industry over the last 30 years is a great asset to our organization,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “As a dynamic leader with deep legal and institutional knowledge, Wendy will fuel our goals of breaking our charitable giving records, welcoming our 500,000th member and providing services and products that put money back in our members’ pockets, among others. We are fortunate to have her on board in this new role as we continue to build on our commitment to our members, community and employees.”

Oliver has more than 30 years of experience as a legal advisor in the financial services industry, providing outside counsel for a range of financial services companies, including banks, mortgage and small business firms, and a fintech startup. Before joining OnPoint as Chief Legal Officer, she held General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer positions at Grit Financial Inc. and Aven, a California-based fintech startup. 

“For 30 years, I’ve counseled various financial institutions, helping them manage legal risk and compliance,” said Oliver. “It’s an honor to rejoin and expand my role at OnPoint, and I look forward to continuing to evolve its legal functions to protect OnPoint, its members and communities.”

Oliver received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Chicago and her Juris Doctorate from Duke University School of Law. Oliver received her Master’s in Public Administration from the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan, where she was a Gramlich Fellow. 

Oliver serves on the vestry of St. David of Wales Episcopal Church, volunteers at Brigid’s Table to help prepare and serve dinners, and serves on the Oregon State Bar’s Client Security Fund Committee. She lives in Clackamas County and is an avid gardener and adventurous traveler.

The OnPoint Executive Team is comprised of the following members:

  • Rob Stuart, President/Chief Executive Officer
  • Cirith Anderson, Senior Vice President/Chief Risk Officer
  • Jim Armstrong, Senior Vice President/Chief Information Officer
  • Tim Clevenger, Senior Vice President/Chief Marketing Officer
  • Tory McVay, Senior Vice President/Chief Retail Officer
  • Wendy Beth Oliver, Senior Vice President/Chief Legal Officer
  • Jim Hunt, Senior Vice President/Chief Financial Officer
  • Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 489,000 members and with assets of $9.3 billion. OnPoint membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 800-527-3932.

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OnPoint Community Credit Union and Fred Meyer Share 10 Tips to Save on Groceries (Photo) - 09/14/22

PORTLAND, Ore., September 14, 2022— To help Oregonians and Washingtonians make the most of their food budgets, OnPoint Community Credit Union has partnered with Fred Meyer Stores to share a list of smart shopping tips to help people in local communities save on groceries and reduce food waste. 

"It's no secret that food prices are at record highs," said Amy Reeves, Vice President and Southwest Washington Area Manager, OnPoint Community Credit Union. "As precious—and pricey—as food can be, many of us make the mistake of wasting it, contributing to high food spending. The good news is that with a little pre-planning, you and your family can save considerable amounts of money and waste less food." 

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased by 8.3% from August 2021 to August 2022, according to a report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) yesterday. The report indicated that while inflation slowed for a second straight month with declining gasoline prices, consumer prices remain near 40-year highs as the cost of groceries and rent offset decreases in the energy sector

While consumers can't control escalating food prices, they can control how much food they throw away. Consider that Oregon households throw away an average of 6.3 pounds of food per week, according to a 2019 report by Community Environmental Services, a research and service unit of Portland State University. Of that waste, 71% was once edible. 

"From establishing a sustainable meal prep routine to tracking sales and fuel points, there are many strategies customers can employ to create savings in their grocery budget," said Jeffery Temple, Director of Corporate Affairs for Fred Meyer Stores. "We are proud to build on our partnership with OnPoint and equip our shared communities with tools that will help put money back in their wallets."

As the price of food and energy continues to impact family budgets, OnPoint and Fred Meyer released their 10 tips to save money at checkout and throw away less food:

  1. Inventory your pantry, refrigerator and freezer, and shop with a list. Create an inventory list that includes expiration dates and quantities of all food and household items you have on hand. Update your list as you use each item and then add them to your grocery list. This will help you avoid buying too many of one item or not enough of another, saving you additional trips to the store that will cost you more money.
  2. Be methodical when buying in bulk. While buying in bulk can cost more initially, it can save you money in the long-term if you are shopping strategically. Bulk items can limit trips to the store, saving you time, money and gas. However, bulk items don't pan out if you don't purchase and preserve them properly. Nonperishable bulk items like pasta and spices are generally cheaper per unit versus nonperishables like produce, dairy and meat because they have a longer shelf life. If you do buy perishables in bulk, look at the expiration date and be realistic about whether you can consume the product before it expires. If not, think twice about your purchase or be sure to wash, package and freeze your items before they go bad.
  3. Create a sustainable meal prep routine. Spending time every week planning your meals is good for your physical and financial health—a true win-win. Create a sustainable meal plan by starting small, making it enjoyable and maximizing your ingredients. If you are new to meal prepping, begin with planning a few meals and snacks, and build momentum from there. Make meal planning fun by engaging the whole family, from choosing the menu to preparing the meal. Choose ingredients that can be used in other meals. For example, if you're making spaghetti one night, save some sauce and make lasagna.
  4. Pre-portion snacks for kids. Growing children can eat a lot. Prepare your fridge and your budget by cutting up fruit and veggies, a cheaper and healthier alternative to packaged snacks. Purchase value packs of cured meats, cheeses and crackers and make portioned baggies. Keep water and healthy non-perishable snacks like trail mix or jerky in your car. Having water and snacks on hand can limit portions and cut down on last-minute trips to the drive-through.
  5. Use your freezer. Everything from cheese and lunch meat to nuts and pre-cooked meals has a freezer life. Freeze perishable items to extend their shelf life. If you are making a casserole, soup or other freezable meal, double or triple your recipe and freeze additional meals for another time.
  6. Avoid wasting food. Being a good steward of food saves you money. Keep your fridge at 40 degrees Fahrenheit to avoid over-freezing vegetables or undercooling meats and dairy. Store vegetables, fruit, meat and butter in their specific compartments. Store items like pasta, coffee and grains in a dark, cool, dry place so they don't grow mold. Keep bananas, tomatoes, peppers and other items that emit gas in your pantry. If a food item doesn't have a long shelf life, don't purchase it until right before you're going to eat it.
  7. Check the unit price of your item. Check the unit price for the item you're about to purchase (it's always on the shelf tag or listed on the product page online). A larger package size could have a smaller per-unit item price.
  8. Keep an eye out for sales and opt-in to digital savings. From weekly deals and savings events to "Must Buy" deals, each Fred Meyer offer is a little different. Double-check the coupon to ensure you are taking full advantage of the savings. Stay on top of every savings and special sales event by checking that your digital account preferences are set up to receive every email. Explore Fred Meyer's mobile app to uncover additional digital savings, then clip coupons directly to your loyalty card for your next shop.
  9. Keep track and earn fuel points. Don't let those points expire! Using your Fuel Points to fill up at a local Fred Meyer can save you up to $1.25 per gallon. Discover more ways to save, such as filling prescriptions at Fred Meyer pharmacies, using Kroger Ship for big purchases, joining the Fred Meyer Boost membership program, and taking advantage of extra earning events.
  10. Create a mindful budget with help from the pros. With costs going up, it's crucial to be mindful of where your money is going. For help creating a sustainable grocery budget, visit one of OnPoint's 55 locations (including 20 locations inside Fred Meyer stores) where branch teams can help you create a realistic financial roadmap that includes responsible monthly grocery expenditures.

OnPoint and Fred Meyer's partnership began when the 90-year-old credit union announced it would open 20 new branches within the grocer's stores, which was the largest branch expansion of any credit union in the country in 2021. Since then, OnPoint has helped members, Fred Meyer shoppers and employees conveniently build financial wellness. Visit onpointcu.com/locations-atms to view a full list of OnPoint's 55 branch locations. 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 489,000 members and with assets of $9.3 billion. OnPoint membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT FRED MEYER STORES

Fred Meyer Stores, based in Portland, Ore., offers one-stop shopping at its 132 multi-department stores in four western states. More than 39,000 Fred Meyer associates help customers fill their food, apparel, and general merchandise needs in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Stores range in size from 65,000 to 200,000 square feet and carry more than 250,000 products under one roof. Additionally, Fred Meyer contributes $5 million to communities across the Northwest each year through grants from the Fred Meyer Foundation as well as product donations, cash donations and sponsorships. Fred Meyer also donates 5 million pounds of food to local food banks each year via the Food Rescue Program. Fred Meyer Stores is a division of The Kroger Co. (NYSE: KR).  For more information, please visit our Web site at www.fredmeyer.com.

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