Oregon Dept. of Corrections
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News Releases
Aubrey Richardson
Aubrey Richardson
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo) - 11/15/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Aubrey Richardson, died today, November 14, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) and passed away at the institution. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Richardson entered DOC custody on November 22, 2016 from Linn County.  His earliest release date was September 19, 2021. He was 76 years old. Next of kin have been notified.

TRCI is a multi-custody facility in Umatilla that houses more than 1,800 men.  It delivers a range of correctional services and programs including education, work opportunities, and cognitive programming.  The minimum facility opened in 1998 and the medium facility opened in 2000.

Attached Media Files: Aubrey Richardson
Michael Krajeski
Michael Krajeski
Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo) - 11/14/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Michael Krajeski died on November 10, 2018. He was incarcerated at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution (EOCI) and passed away in the institution’s end of life care program. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Micheal Krajeski entered DOC custody on July 25, 2012 from Multnomah County.  His earliest release date was August 17, 2019. He was 60 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Next of kin has been notified.

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,700 male inmates. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first inmates in June 1985.

Attached Media Files: Michael Krajeski
Gary Schurgin
Gary Schurgin
Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo) - 11/05/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Gary Schurgin died on November 4, 2018. He was incarcerated at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution (EOCI) and passed away in the institution’s hospice program. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Schurgin entered DOC custody on November 2, 2016 from Clatsop County.  His earliest release date was June 21, 2022. He was 53 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,900 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state. Next of kin has been notified.

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,700 male inmates. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first inmates in June 1985.

Attached Media Files: Gary Schurgin
Robert Acremant
Robert Acremant
The Oregon State Penitentiary reports the passing of a death row inmate (Photo) - 10/26/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Robert James Acremant, died the morning of October 26, 2018. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) on Death Row. He was convicted of aggravated murder in 1997 out of Jackson County. He was also convicted of two counts of Kidnapping I and one count of Robbery I out of Jackson County in 1996. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. He was 50 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,800 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

Attached Media Files: Robert Acremant
Toma Amendolara
Toma Amendolara
The Oregon Department of Corrections reports two in-custody deaths (Photo) - 10/22/18

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Dion Chamblin died on October 20, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) and passed away at a local hospital. Chamblin entered DOC custody on November 6, 2017 from Columbia County and his earliest release date was October 8, 2019. He was 77 years old.

Toma Amendolara died on October 19, 2018. He was incarcerated at TRCI and passed away in the institution’s hospice program. Amendolara entered DOC custody on October 27, 2015 from Clackamas County. His earliest release date was January 13, 2040. He was 72 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Next of kin have been notified for both men.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,800 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

TRCI is a multi-custody facility in Umatilla that houses more than 1,800 men.  It delivers a range of correctional services and programs including education, work opportunities, and cognitive programming.  The minimum facility opened in 1998 and the medium facility opened in 2000.

Attached Media Files: Toma Amendolara , Dion Chamblin