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Juvenile whale that washed ashore near Waldport is euthanized (Photo) - 08/15/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 15, 2019

 

Juvenile whale that washed ashore near Waldport is euthanized

Waldport, Ore., Thursday, August 15, 2019 – A 20’ juvenile humpback whale that washed ashore north of the Alsea River near Waldport on Wednesday, August 14 was euthanized around mid-day today. A team organized by the Oregon State University-based Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network (OMMSN) includes representatives of the Northwest Stranding Network, who work in collaboration with the federal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and who euthanized the whale with an injection.

Students, volunteers, and staff with the OMMSN, Oregon Coast Aquarium, OSU Marine Mammal Institute, and OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center spent Wednesday providing comfort care by digging out around the beached whale while keeping it wet. Oregon State Park beach rangers provided support. During the Wednesday high tide, the whale managed to swim free briefly before stranding itself again. Members of the team stayed on site most of the night; an even higher high tide early in the morning Thursday still left the whale beached.

Brittany Blades, Oregon Coast Aquarium Curator of Mammals stayed overnight to monitor the whale. “The whale exerted a lot of effort to swim past the sandbar to deep enough water. Unfortunately every time the whale oriented itself toward the ocean, it would get pushed broadsided to the waves and come closer to shore,” said Blades. “As the night went on, the whale stranded further on shore due to the strong waves and extremely high tide.”

 Stranding specialists on the team consulted with colleagues nationwide and determined euthanizing it was the only humane option. The team also considered trying to move the animal closer to the water or give high tides another chance, but neither alternative was deemed feasible. “Due to the size of the whale and amount of time spent stranded on land, it is likely that the internal organs suffered irreparable damage that is not externally apparent,” said Blades.

After a necropsy to gather important data on whale biology, a state park contractor will bury it on the beach near the site of the final stranding.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department reminds all residents and visitors the ocean shore is a wild environment, and presents an invaluable opportunity to enjoy wildlife and natural cycles. Wildlife should be given a wide berth and shown respect at all times, however. Any stranded marine mammal should be reported immediately to 541-270-6830. Marine mammals, including carcasses, are protected by federal law and must be left untouched.

The OMMSN began in the 1980s and is involved in collection and analysis of data and biological samples. Data collected from such events are entered into a national database that is used to establish baseline information on marine mammal communities and their health. The Stranding Network is a volunteer organization, with one paid staff member for the entire state of Oregon (the Network Coordinator). Stranding network members are from universities, state and federal agencies, and the general public, and they donate their time. The network does not receive state funds. Information on volunteering or donating to support the network is online at https://mmi.oregonstate.edu/ways-help.

# # #

Photos, video, and audio of the stranding are online and freely available for noncommercial use at https://tinyurl.com/waldportwhale

Attached Media Files: OPRD_shield_email_signature_R.png , OCA
OPRD_shield_email_signature_R.png
OPRD_shield_email_signature_R.png
Juvenile whale that washed ashore near Waldport is euthanized (Photo) - 08/15/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 15, 2019

 

Juvenile whale that washed ashore near Waldport is euthanized

Waldport, Ore., Thursday, August 15, 2019 – A 20’ juvenile humpback whale that washed ashore north of the Alsea River near Waldport on Wednesday, August 14 was euthanized around mid-day today. A team organized by the Oregon State University-based Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network (OMMSN) includes representatives of the Northwest Stranding Network, who work in collaboration with the federal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and who euthanized the whale with an injection.

Students, volunteers, and staff with the OMMSN, Oregon Coast Aquarium, OSU Marine Mammal Institute, and OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center spent Wednesday providing comfort care by digging out around the beached whale while keeping it wet. Oregon State Park beach rangers provided support. During the Wednesday high tide, the whale managed to swim free briefly before stranding itself again. Members of the team stayed on site most of the night; an even higher high tide early in the morning Thursday still left the whale beached.

Brittany Blades, Oregon Coast Aquarium Curator of Mammals stayed overnight to monitor the whale. “The whale exerted a lot of effort to swim past the sandbar to deep enough water. Unfortunately every time the whale oriented itself toward the ocean, it would get pushed broadsided to the waves and come closer to shore,” said Blades. “As the night went on, the whale stranded further on shore due to the strong waves and extremely high tide.”

 Stranding specialists on the team consulted with colleagues nationwide and determined euthanizing it was the only humane option. The team also considered trying to move the animal closer to the water or give high tides another chance, but neither alternative was deemed feasible. “Due to the size of the whale and amount of time spent stranded on land, it is likely that the internal organs suffered irreparable damage that is not externally apparent,” said Blades.

After a necropsy to gather important data on whale biology, a state park contractor will bury it on the beach near the site of the final stranding.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department reminds all residents and visitors the ocean shore is a wild environment, and presents an invaluable opportunity to enjoy wildlife and natural cycles. Wildlife should be given a wide berth and shown respect at all times, however. Any stranded marine mammal should be reported immediately to 541-270-6830. Marine mammals, including carcasses, are protected by federal law and must be left untouched.

The OMMSN began in the 1980s and is involved in collection and analysis of data and biological samples. Data collected from such events are entered into a national database that is used to establish baseline information on marine mammal communities and their health. The Stranding Network is a volunteer organization, with one paid staff member for the entire state of Oregon (the Network Coordinator). Stranding network members are from universities, state and federal agencies, and the general public, and they donate their time. The network does not receive state funds. Information on volunteering or donating to support the network is online at https://mmi.oregonstate.edu/ways-help.

# # #

Photos, video, and audio of the stranding are online and freely available for noncommercial use at https://tinyurl.com/waldportwhale

Attached Media Files: OPRD_shield_email_signature_R.png , OCA
Live juvenile whale washes ashore near Waldport - 08/15/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 15, 2019

 

Juvenile whale washes ashore near Waldport

Waldport, Ore., Thursday, August 15, 2019 – A 20’ juvenile humpback whale washed shore north of the Alsea River near Waldport on Wednesday, August 14. A team organized by the Oregon State University-based Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network (OMMSN) responded to the report early  Wednesday morning and coordinated an all-day effort to relieve the animal’s stress while waiting high tide. After two high tides—one mid-day Wednesday and one shortly after midnight Thursday—the whale remains stranded. A team of contractors representing the federal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration arrived early Thursday morning to help with an assessment of the whale.

Depending on the animal’s health, options include waiting for additional high tides, assisting its safe return to the ocean in some way, or euthanasia. The evaluation process will take several hours.

Students, volunteers , and staff with the OMMSN, Oregon Coast Aquarium, OSU Marine Mammal Institute, and OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center spent Wednesday providing comfort care by digging out around the beached whale while keeping it wet. Oregon State Park beach rangers provided support. During the Wednesday high tide, the whale managed to swim free briefly before stranding itself again. Members of the team stayed on site most of the night.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department reminds all residents and visitors the ocean shore is a wild environment, and presents an invaluable opportunity to enjoy wildlife and natural cycles. Wildlife should be given a wide berth and shown respect at all times, however. Any stranded marine mammal should be reported immediately to 541-270-6830. Marine mammals, including carcasses, are protected by federal law and must be left untouched and given 150’ of space in all directions.

The OMMSN began in the 1980s and is involved in collection and analysis of data and biological samples. Data collected from such events are entered into a national database that is used to establish baseline information on marine mammal communities and their health. The Stranding Network is a volunteer organization, with one paid staff member for the entire state of Oregon (the Network Coordinator). Stranding network members are from universities, state and federal agencies, and the general public, and they donate their time. The network does not receive state funds. Information on volunteering or donating to support the network is online at https://mmi.oregonstate.edu/ways-help.

# # #

Photos, video, and audio of the stranding are online and freely available for noncommercial use at https://tinyurl.com/waldportwhale

Grants available for Oregon heritage and history projects - 08/07/19

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants for qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon's cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance. The grant application deadline is October 1, 2019.

 

Projects may include theatrical performances, collections preservation and access, exhibits, oral history projects, public education events, organizational archives projects, films and more. Previously funded projects included a variety of projects around the state.

 

Past projects included:

  • Chetco Historical Memorial Committee installed an interpretive area in partnership with local Tribes.
  • The High Desert Museum revamped their spring education program to include more diverse stories.
  • Linn County Museum partnered with Oregon Black Pioneers to incorporate African American history in the permanent exhibit.
  • Cascade AIDS Project collected oral histories and made them accessible.
  • Oregon Nikkei Endowment digitized, translated and made available online historical newspapers and Japanese American internment related FBI documents.
  • The Vanport Mosaic Festival collected and presented the history of the Albina neighborhood in Portland.

 

“We hope to see projects from a variety of organizations that engage Oregonians in heritage,” states Kuri Gill, heritage grants program coordinator. “We encourage the documentation, preservation and exploration of all aspects of Oregon’s heritage.”

 

Applications are submitted online. There is plenty of support for preparing them.

 

 “Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process,” notes Gill. Oregon Heritage grants programs staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

 

To learn more about the grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Statewide trail grant advisory committee seeks volunteers to fill vacancies - 08/02/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers for three positions on the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) Grants Advisory Committee.

Upcoming vacancies:

  • Biking representative
  • Off-Highway Vehicle representative
  • Accessibility representative

The ten-member committee typically meets once or twice per year to evaluate grant proposals for statewide trail projects. Members serve three-year terms; successful candidates will begin their terms Jan. 1, 2020. Members are eligible to serve a second term.

Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon and will have experience in at least one of the following areas: land management, recreation planning, trail planning, project management, grant management or recreation-related volunteerism.

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD grant advisory committee appointment interest form by Tuesday, October 15. The form is available online: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/RTP-Committee.aspx

RTP grants are funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to nonprofits and governments for motorized and non-motorized trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and developing or improving trail facilities.

For more information about the advisory committee or application process, contact Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP grant coordinator, at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.

Volunteers needed to fill two upcoming vacancies on statewide ATV Advisory Committee - 07/25/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers for two upcoming vacant positions on the All-Terrain Vehicle Advisory Committee (ATV-AC). Successful candidates will also serve on the ATV Grant Subcommittee.

OPRD is accepting applications for the following positions:  

  • Class I (Quad) ATV user organization representative
  • Class IV (Side-by-Side) ATV user organization representative

The Oregon Legislature established the ATV-AC in 2010 and tasked it with these duties: reviewing accidents and fatalities resulting from ATV recreation; reviewing changes to statutory vehicle classifications as necessary for safety considerations; reviewing safety features of all classes of Off-Highway Vehicles (OHV); and recommending appropriate safety requirements to protect child and adult OHV operators.

The ATV-AC typically holds one public meeting per year. Members will begin service Jan. 1, 2020.

The ATV Grant Subcommittee is responsible for reviewing and recommending grant funding in support of ATV recreational activities throughout the state. Activities include operations and maintenance, law enforcement, emergency medical services, land acquisition, and planning and development.

The Subcommittee holds up to four public meetings per year. Computer access and experience is mandatory. Knowledge of OHV riding areas throughout Oregon is beneficial.

To apply for one of the open positions, navigate to the ATV-AC webpage [https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/ATV/Pages/ATV-Advisory-Committee.aspx] and click the “Committee Interest Form” link at the bottom of the page. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Aug. 30.

For more information contact Jeff Trejo, OPRD ATV safety education coordinator, at ejo@oregon.gov">jeff.trejo@oregon.gov or 503-986-0585.

Campfires, other flame sources prohibited in three Columbia River Gorge state parks - 07/23/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is prohibiting all campfires, open flames and propane fire rings in Ainsworth State Park, Memaloose State Park and Viento State Park effective 8 a.m. Wednesday, July 24.

The ban applies to all areas in those parks and will be in effect until further notice from OPRD.

Clay Courtright, Columbia River Gorge state parks manager, says the ban is precautionary. Recent high temperatures and strong winds in the Gorge have elevated the danger of accidental, human-caused wildfires.

Ban details:

  • The ban applies to wood, charcoal, wood pellets and all other flame sources that cannot be extinguished immediately.
  • Propane fire rings are prohibited too, including smaller propane rings that may fit inside or on top of existing campground fire rings.
  • Other valve-operated flame sources, such as liquid fuel cooking devices, are allowed under the ban, but cannot be left unattended.
  • Smoking is allowed under the ban, but still subject to existing rules about smoking in Oregon State Parks.

OPRD does not have an estimate for when the ban will be lifted. The agency will continue to evaluate conditions based on weather, available resources and information from state and local fire officials.

Stay up-to-date with the latest state park fire restrictions on the official webpage: bit.ly/2uLzdwY 

National Park Service returns proposed Eastmoreland Historic District nomination - 07/22/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Ian Johnson, Associate Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer
Cell: (971) 718-1137
ian.johnson@oregon.gov

Chris Havel, Office of the Director
Cell: (503) 931-2590
chris.havel@oregon.gov

July 22, 2019

National Park Service returns proposed Eastmoreland Historic District nomination

SALEM, Ore., Monday, July 22, 2019 -- The National Park Service (NPS) has returned the Eastmoreland Historic District nomination to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), a division of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The federal NPS cited continuing uncertainties related to counting owners within the proposed district boundaries. The SHPO plans to go through a formal rule-setting process to address federal concerns.

The State Advisory Commission on Historic Preservation, a governor-appointed volunteer commission of people with interest and skill in Oregon history, first reviewed and recommended approval of the nomination in February 2017. The nomination was returned and resubmitted twice to the NPS since then over issues related to counting owners and objections. If more than 50% of owners in a proposed district object, the district is not listed in the National Register.

The SHPO most recently submitted the nomination for federal review on May 23, 2019. The NPS identified at least two unresolved issues: a complete, accurate count of property owners and objections, and a conflict between federal guidelines related to trusts and a recent ruling by the Oregon Court of Appeals that requires a federal regulation or state rule recognizing trusts as owners for purposes of the program prior to the SHPO counting objections from trusts.

View the full text of the nomination document and the park service’s return letter online: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/Pages/Eastmoreland-Historic-District.aspx .

As a potential resolution, OPRD intends to propose administrative rule revisions that implement the National Register program in Oregon.  The process will likely begin in late 2019 and extend into 2020 before the State Historic Preservation Officer would consider final adoption of rules.  SHPO will then determine whether to resubmit the nomination if rules are adopted and resubmission is appropriate under such rules. Other nominations could still move through the existing nomination process as long as they don’t involve the same complicated issues that have affected the Eastmoreland nomination.

The proposed Eastmoreland Historic District is located in Portland, Multnomah County. It encompasses approximately 475 acres and is generally bounded SE Woodstock Blvd on the north; SE Cesar E Chavez Blvd and SE 36th Ave on the east; Berkeley Park and SE Crystal Springs Blvd on south; and SE 27th and 28th Ave on the west. The Eastmoreland Historic District is considered significant for its relationship to community planning and development trends in Portland in the early twentieth century, most notably for its reflection of City Beautiful planning principles, and for its eclectic yet cohesive mix of early twentieth century architectural styles.

# # #

Salmonberry Trail meeting set for August 2 in Banks - 07/22/19

BANKS, Ore. - The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Aug. 2 at the Banks Fire District, 13430 NW Main St., Banks. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: an update about the development of a new nonprofit dedicated to the development of the Salmonberry Trail, the board’s adoption of the completed strategic plan, and a discussion of next steps for implementing the plan.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 84-mile corridor that follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and terminates in Banks. The proposed route connects eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the Oregon Coast Range.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Dennis Wiley at least three days in advance of the meeting.