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News Releases
Oregon Heritage Commission awards grants to museum projects across the state - 06/16/21

The Oregon Heritage Commission has awarded $74,278 in grants to 13 museums throughout the state. The grants will help fund a variety of projects including collection preservation, visitor education and heritage tourism. Award amounts ranged from $800 - $10,000.

Funded projects:

  • Albany Regional Museum, in Albany, to digitize 16mm film from the U.S Bureau of Mines.
  • Architectural Heritage Center, in Portland, to develop improved collections storage systems.
  • B-17 Alliance Foundation, in Salem, to digitize oral histories of veterans.
  • Crater Rock Museum, in Jackson County, to rehouse the Indigenous America Collections.
  • Deschutes County Historical Society, in Bend, to catalog and digitize photographs from the Bend Bulletin.
  • Elkton Community Education Center, in Elkton, to create and install interpretive signage that incorporates the Native American and European perspectives on the impact of the Hudson’s Bay Company on the land.
  • Five Oaks Museum, in Washington County, to reinterpret and redesign the interpretive pavilion and develop learning materials for local schools.
  • Jordan Valley Owyhee Heritage Council, in Malheur County, for roof replacement at the I.O.N. Heritage Museum.
  • Keizer Heritage Foundation, in Keizer, to install an interactive kiosk and software for visitors to access collections.
  • Sheridan Museum of History, in Sheridan, to catalog and house the collection.
  • The National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Oregon (Hoover-Minthorn House), in Newberg, to install a hanging track system for exhibits.
  • Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, in Tillamook, to upgrade the climate control systems.
  • Willamette Heritage Center, in Salem, to purchase traveling exhibit equipment for the Chinese American and Japanese American history exhibits.

The museum grant program is offered annually by the Oregon Heritage Commission, part of the Oregon Heritage program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The grant program began in 1965 when only 24 organizations were eligible for the program. The grant is funded OPRD lottery dollars.

The Oregon Heritage Commission works to secure, sustain and enhance Oregon’s heritage. The Commission sponsors heritage initiatives that educate the public about the value of heritage and celebrate the state’s diversity.

The Oregon Heritage Commission consists of nine members appointed by the governor and nine agency advisors. Members are chosen from state agencies and statewide organizations, and represent a diverse geographical and heritage background.

To learn more about the Oregon Museum Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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Historic cemeteries commission awards grants to multiple projects - 06/15/21

Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) has awarded $62,500 in grants to 15 historic cemetery projects throughout the state. The funds will help support preservation efforts, repair work and visitor education. Individual award amounts ranged from $596-$9,452.

Funded projects:

  • Marker repair and leveling at the Bonanza Memorial Park Cemetery in Klamath County.
  • Monument repair and cleaning at the Zion Memorial Cemetery in Canby.
  • Marker repair at the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Corvallis.
  • Marker repair at the Dallas Cemetery in Polk County.
  • Installation of security cameras at the Fernwood Pioneer and Fernwood Friends Cemeteries in Yamhill County.
  • Clean and reset headstones at the Hubbard Cemetery.
  • Repair and reset four grave markers and research, design, and install an interpretive panel about the history of the people buried there, including a daughter of a woman who had been freed from slavery and arrived in Oregon in 1853 at Logtown Cemetery in Jackson County.
  • Marker repair at the Lafayette Masonic Cemetery.
  • Complete tree removal and trimming at the Missouri Flat Cemetery in Jackson County.
  • Create and install signs at 10 cemeteries in Columbia County.
  • Repair markers at Riverside Cemetery in Albany.
  • Trim trees at the Scappoose Fairview Cemetery.
  • Clean markers and train volunteers at Tillamook and Bay City IOOF Cemeteries in Tillamook County.
  • Complete a ground penetrating radar investigation at the Weston Cemetery in Umatilla County.

Historic cemeteries are documented by OCHC and must include the burial of at least one person who died 75 years before the current date.

The historic cemetery grant program is offered annually by the OCHC, part of the Oregon Heritage Program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The grant program is supported by lottery and other funds.

OCHC maintains a list of all pioneer and historic cemeteries in the state. The seven-member appointed commission helps people and organizations document, preserve and promote designated historic cemeteries statewide.

For more information about the grant program or the OCHC, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Smith Creek Village at Silver Falls State Park opens June 11; lodging reservations available - 06/11/21

SILVERTON, Oregon—The Smith Creek Village in Silver Falls State Park is now open after a six-month closure. Silver Falls Hospitality is the new management company operating the village in an agreement with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The area was previously known as Silver Falls Lodge and Conference Center.

“We’re very happy that park visitors now have these overnight options and services once again,” said Park Manager Guy Rodrigue. “Silver Falls Hospitality has hit the ground running and we’re eager to help them succeed in this new partnership.”

Cabin and lodge reservations are now available for stays beginning June 11 and beyond via a new website, www.smithcreekvillage.com. Information regarding the Foothills and Davidson Ranches, weddings, group events and meeting spaces is available by contacting Partnerships & Events Manager Shalimar at shalimar@silverfallshospitality.com.

"Hosting has become both a lifestyle and a practice for us. We started Silver Falls Hospitality with the intention of providing comfortable experiences in the outdoors," said co-owner Brooke Gerken. "We are so grateful to have been given the honor of being the stewards of this space and are looking forward to working closely with OPRD to bring our vision to life. We are stoked to be getting started and to have our guests on-site very soon!"

Big Leaf Coffeehouse will be open daily to all park visitors from 7 a.m.-11 a.m. They will be serving both hot breakfast and take+trek meal options, with a full espresso bar coming soon.

The South Falls Café at the South Falls Lodge in the park day-use area is open daily, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. The café is managed under a separate agreement with the Oregon Commission for the Blind Business Enterprise Program team.
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Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission meets June 22-23 via conference call - 06/08/21

SALEM, Oregon — The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will convene June 22-23 via conference call.

On June 22, commissioners will attend a virtual work training session from 1-2:45 p.m.

On June 23, commissioners will convene an executive session at 8:30 a.m. to discuss real estate, legal issues, and the agency director’s performance evaluation. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. and will be open to the public.

Anyone may listen to the business meeting; instructions on how to attend will be posted on the commission web page prior to the meeting. The agenda also includes a time for public comment. Registration is required to speak at the meeting, and is available online at bit.ly/registerjunecommission. Time per speaker is limited to three minutes. Please submit written public comments by 5 p.m. June 18 to is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov.

The full agenda and supporting documents are posted on the commission web page. Notable requests:

Anyone needing special accommodations to join the meeting should contact Denise Warburton, commission assistant, at least three days in advance: denise.warburton@oregon.gov or 503-986-0719. People who plan to present oral testimony are asked to email a copy of their statement to Warburton in advance.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.

State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation meets June 18 via conference call - 06/08/21

SALEM, Ore. – The State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) will meet June 18 via conference call to consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. This meeting is open to the public.

 

The SACHP meeting will begin at 9:00 a.m. to consider nominations to the National Register. The weblink for the call is posted on our website at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/Pages/Commissions.aspx#SACHP

 

Friday’s meeting agenda: hearings of one proposed amendment and three proposed nominations.

 

For specific hearing times, refer to the online agenda: www.oregonheritage.org (click on “Commissions & Committees” at top of page and look under “State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation”).

 

The committee will review one proposed amendment: Oregon State University Historic District (Boundary Decrease), Corvallis.

 

The committee will review three proposed nominations: Portland Golf Club Clubhouse, Portland; O.K. Jeffery Airplane Factory, Portland; West Linn City Hall, West Linn.

 

This effort aligns with the Oregon Historic Preservation Plan goal to increase the thematic diversity of Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places. It also supports the goals to include more voices and increase access to Oregon heritage that are part of the Oregon Heritage Plan.

 

Nominations recommended by the SACHP go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

The SACHP is a nine-member governor-appointed citizen commission with credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

 

The conference call is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting may be made with at least three days of advance notice by calling (503) 986-0690.

 

More information about the National Register of Historic Places process is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Attached Media Files: SACHP_AGENDA.pdf , Press Release
Three north coast trails to stay closed until 2023 due to 2020 storm damage - 06/01/21

NOTE: Resending with this link to photos and maps. 

 

Three sections of the north coast trail system in Tillamook County will remain closed until at least spring 2023 while crews remove dangerous trees left from the September 2020 windstorm. A trail at Cape Lookout State Park and two sections of trails at Oswald West State Park are impassable due to downed trees and will require extensive work to reopen, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) announces.

OPRD is working with FEMA and other federal partners, Oregon Department of Forestry, private consultants, South Fork Forest Camp and volunteers to map the damage and plan for a safe reopening.

“We want to thank visitors for their patience as we work as quickly as possible to reopen these historic and culturally important trails,” said North Coast District Manager Justin Parker. “In the meantime, we encourage visitors to explore one of the many open trails along the north coast.”

The following trail segments are closed:

  • Cape Lookout State Park: The entire North Trail at Cape Lookout State Park that connects the Day-use Area to the Cape Trail. 
  • Oswald West State Park: The 1.4-mile Arch Cape section of the Arch Cape to Cape Falcon Trail, from the north trailhead to the crossing at U.S. Highway 101.
  • Oswald West State Park: A 1.6-mile section of North Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain Trail from U.S. Highway 101 to the summit.

These trail segments have been closed since Labor Day 2020, when the same winds that fueled wildfires in other parts of the state caused extensive blowdown on about 185 acres within Oswald West and Cape Lookout state parks. An especially wet and stormy fall and winter followed, knocking down more trees already weakened from the windstorm and weakening others. In the hardest hit areas, up to 90 percent of the trees — made up of hemlock, Douglas-fir and giant Sitka spruce as tall as 140’ — are down or in danger of falling.

Repairing trails and restoring the landscape will require selectively removing fallen and dangerous trees by helicopter within 200’ on either side of the trail — a total of 67 acres. Where possible, OPRD will leave downed trees to provide habitat. With helicopter crews committed to wildfire cleanup elsewhere in the state, this winter is the soonest OPRD could begin the work.

Once trails are clear, ground crews can safely enter the area to assess damage and rebuild trails, a process that’s expected to take a year.

“We are focused on keeping workers and visitors safe, while being good stewards of this public land,” Parker said. “We don’t want to rush the process, knowing that decisions we make today will affect how the forest looks for hundreds of years.”

The closed sections are all part of the Oregon Coast Trail that stretches along the 362-mile coastline. Many other trails on the north coast are open — information on trails managed by OPRD is at stateparks.oregon.gov.

Historic cemeteries commission welcomes new members - 06/01/21

Three commissioners have been appointed to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries. Lisa Sumption, director of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, which houses the Oregon Historic Cemeteries made one appointment last fall and the other two in May.

Shawn Steinmetz, appointed in October 2020, is an archaeologist living in La Grande. His interest in non?destructive technologies that can be employed to document, preserve, and help interpret historic properties is a benefit for historic cemetery management. He fills the position held for a tribal perspective and brings that perspective through his work experience at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and his personal experience.

 

Sarah Baylinson was appointed in May to fill a vacated central Oregon position. She is the Collections Manager and Exhibits Coordinator for the High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon. With over a decade of experience in the museum field, Sarah has had the opportunity to work in a variety of cultural institutions as well as volunteer in meaningful ways. Sarah is the Vice-President of the Oregon Museums Association as well as a mentor for Oregon Heritage Commission's Mentor Corps. In her free time she likes to explore rivers, trails, and camping opportunities as well as diving deep into personal genealogical research. 

Lisa Sears was also appointed in May and will fill the vacated coastal position. She is a genealogist and family history researcher who is actively volunteering in Tillamook County. Realizing that she had a natural curiosity about cemeteries and the histories that lie within, she visited a wide range of national and international cemeteries while researching or on vacation.  After retiring from teaching in 2020, she started conducting outreach in Tillamook County to work on cemetery preservation and community history.

 

 

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving, and maintaining their appearances.

“We are grateful to have such enthusiastic and skilled people join the commission,” notes Kuri Gill, commission coordinator. “They will be a benefit to our historic cemeteries.” The new commissioners join: Milo Reed, chair, from Portland; Bev Power, vice-chair, from Medford; Charlotte Lehan, from Wilsonville; and Sarah Silbernagel, from Pendleton.

For more information about commission activities visit www.oregonheritage.org, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685, or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Date designation change for Oregon historic cemeteries - 05/27/21

Governor Brown signed into law a bill recently passed by the Oregon legislature to change the designation date for a historic cemetery. Oregon is one of a few states with a historic cemetery designation and preservation program. The bill extends the designation beyond the original date of February 14, 1909 to 75 years or older.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, housed within Oregon Heritage in Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, has worked toward this changed for over a decade. They recognized that many cemeteries didn’t qualify under the original designation which was based on the establishment of Oregon as a state on February 14, 1859. Designated historic cemeteries are eligible for grants and other protections under state law. The commission found many cemeteries that didn’t qualify still had historic significance. For example, central Oregon saw western settlement at a later time than the rest of the state. Many of the cemeteries in that area date to the 1910s and 1920s.

 

The commission recognized that historic value and significance changes over time. So, the rolling date became the goal. The current law for a historic cemetery is “any burial place that contains the remains of one or more persons who died before the date that is 75 years before the current date.” An estimated 180 cemeteries are currently eligible for listing with the commission under the new date. Operating cemeteries are not required to list as historic with the commission, but they are eligible.

 

“We are delighted with the Legislature’s passage of HB 2123 — introduced at Gov. Brown’s request — which makes it possible for the Congregation Kesser Israel Cemetery to be included among Oregon’s historic cemeteries,” said Sura Rubenstein, the cemetery’s volunteer manager.

 

The Orthodox Jewish cemetery, located in Southeast Portland, was established in 1924 and had its first burials in 1925. Many of the earliest of the 300-plus burials in the cemetery are of immigrants from Poland and Russia. They came to Oregon in 1890-1924 as part of the great waves of Jewish immigration seeking better lives for themselves and their families. In some cases, the stories of the people in the cemetery tell of hardships and sorrows.

 

“Although we do have notable people among the burials, the cemetery tells more of a ‘people’s history’ of Jewish life in Oregon,” Rubenstein said. “We are looking forward to working with the Commission on Historic Cemeteries on issues of preservation, restoration, and long-term planning for the cemetery’s future — and are grateful for the opportunity.”

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances.

For information on historic cemeteries, available resources, and to designate a cemetery visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at 503-383-6787 or i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

Committees to review historic property and archaeology grant applications - 05/25/21

Two separate committees will meet to score and rank applications for the Preserving Oregon and Diamonds in the Rough Grant programs. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation for final review and approval June 18, 2021.

Both meetings will be online.

The Diamonds in the Rough Grant Review Committee will meet June 3, 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Please see the agenda for access details.

The Preserving Oregon Grant Review Committee will meet June 8, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Please see the agenda for access details.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling 503-986-0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

Oregon and Washington collaboration provides tool to access and share digital archives - 05/25/21

Salem, OR - The Oregon Heritage Commission, State Library of Oregon, and Washington State Library have partnered to launch Northwest Digital Heritage, an online platform for Oregon and Washington based libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations to digitize and make accessible cultural heritage materials.

Northwest Digital Heritage also operates as a service hub of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), which helps bring these unique and local Northwest collections to a wider audience. This gives local galleries, libraries, museums, research institutions, historical societies, and others in both states the opportunity to upload their digitized collections onto DPLA’s extensive library of online archives.

Northwest Digital Heritage features two primary digital efforts. One is a central point of access for online users looking to discover primary source materials and other resources related to Oregon and Washington history. This offers easy access to a variety of collections which currently includes nearly 80,000 records from over 60 institutions. The second is to support organizations in digitizing their collections following best practices and make them accessible through the online service hub.  NWDH provides cultural institutions the following services:

  • Metadata “Harvesting.” Records are copied from their home systems, standardized, and then transferred to DPLA.
  • Digital Collection Hosting offers smaller institutions an online platform to host their digitized items including historical documents, photographs, oral-history recordings, and more.
  • Training and Support. Service hub staff, composed of teams at both state libraries and the Oregon Heritage Commission, train cultural heritage organizations to digitize collections, edit and preserve digital files, and catalog material to archival standards.

A 2018 survey conducted by Oregon Heritage, confirmed that organizations with heritage collections are digitizing or want to digitize their collections to increase access and as a disaster mitigation method. Of the 178 organizations that responded, 128 have digitized their collections, but only 42 of those are available online. Of the 50 respondents that do not have digitized collections, 45 are interested in digitizing and making their collections accessible. The goal of this project is to help Oregon organizations with heritage related collections that are interested in digitization and making their collections accessible find a path using Northwest Digital Heritage.

The Oregon Heritage Commission’s role in this partnership is to serve as a liaison with small heritage organizations, including museum, libraries, genealogical societies, etc. in Oregon and provide grants, technical assistance, and solutions for getting their cultural heritage materials digitized and accessible online. This is a key project of the Oregon Heritage Commission as it addresses all four goals of the 2020-2025 Oregon Heritage Plan:

  • Goal #1 Include more voices – with access to digitizing collections, Oregon heritage organizations can make available online stories from previously excluded or marginalized voices. For example, The Densho Digital Repository includes a wealth of collections documenting the Japanese-American experience, with a focus on World War II-era incarceration. It also includes collections from Densho’s partner institution in Oregon, the Japanese American Museum of Oregon, and the Frank C. Hirahara Collection, which documents Portland’s Japanese community from 1948-1954. Another example is Multnomah Library’s Our Story Collection featuring the African-American experience in Oregon.
  • Goal #2 Increase access to heritage – Not only does inclusion of archives in Northwest Digital Heritage mean more access by those statewide, but by having these archives included in a DPLA service hub, they take Oregon stories out to a wider national audience.
  • Goal #3 Promote the value of heritage – by having these materials available online, heritage organizations can use this availability of online resources to communicate the value of heritage to their community and to decision makers.
  • Goal #4 Pursue best practices – With digitization being a primary method of preservation, this project aims to help organizations define processes and procedures that accomplish this to a certain standard in order to ensure proper preservation. 

“Finding a pathway to digitizing the archives and collections of Oregon’s small heritage organizations has been a long time effort of the Commission,” says Katie Henry, coordinator of the Oregon Heritage Commission. “The State Library of Oregon has been a critical partner in these conversations since the Northwest Digital Collections Summit in 2015 and this partnership is further strengthened with the addition of the Washington State Library. We look forward to getting the important collections of Oregon’s heritage organizations online, accessible, and preserved.”

Whether an organization has robust digital collections available online or it is starting from scratch, Northwest Digital Heritage invites any Oregon or Washington-based museum, public library, tribe, or organization with cultural heritage materials to contact us about potential participation.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact coordinator Katie Henry at (503) 877-8834 or y@oregon.gov">katie.henry@oregon.gov.

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Oregon Heritage Commission to meet June 7 - 05/24/21

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via online meeting on June 7 at 9am. The agenda includes an overview of Oregon Heritage grants, follow up from the Heritage Volunteer Study, and an important update regarding Northwest Digital Heritage. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at 503-877-8834 or katie.henry@oregon.gov.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Pacific Power and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department agree to transfer operation of Wallowa Falls Campground beginning June 1, 2021 - 05/24/21

JOSEPH, Oregon – Pacific Power will transfer management of the Wallowa Falls Campground to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The 10 walk-in campsites are south of Wallowa Lake State Park and adjacent to the Little Alps Day-use Area, which is also managed by OPRD. The campground will open to first-come, first-served stays June 1, 2021. The tent rate will be $10 a night for each campsite.

“Pacific Power has been proud to offer opportunities for people to enjoy the Wallowa Falls Campground and day- use area for more than 50 years,” says Lori Wyman, regional business manager for Pacific Power. “To be able to maintain and operate the park in the most efficient way, we are now turning over operation to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Their partnership and expertise in recreational management is the best choice for the park and its users going forward.”

Pacific Power is leasing the campground area to OPRD on a long-term basis. The adjoining day-use area has been leased to and operated by the Wallowa Lake Management Unit of Oregon State Parks for several years. The park had been closed for the last two years as Pacific Power performed extensive work on the hydroelectric project above the campground.  PacifiCorp retains ownership of lands between the Wallowa Falls Campground and the U.S Forest Service property and current easements for trails and other public access.

 “We’re excited to offer a new camping experience for Oregon State Parks visitors,” says Mac Freeborn, Wallow Lake Management Unit manager. “The walk-in campground is the perfect jump-off point for day hikes into the Eagle Cap Wilderness. We’re also exploring overnight options for backpackers heading out on multi-day trips.”

Water will be available from several spigots in place throughout the campground. Firewood will be available for $5 a bundle. For more information, visit the Wallowa Falls Campground web page or call Wallowa Lake State Park at (541) 432-8855.

 

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Historic cemeteries commission to meet June 4 - 05/24/21

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via online meeting on June 4 at 1:00 p.m. Discussion includes approval of the 2021 Oregon Historic Cemeteries grants. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

New beach driving restrictions start in south Tillamook County, Cape Kiwanda fence improved - 05/20/21

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE // May 20, 2021

Media Contacts:
Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept., 503-931-2590
Jason Elkins, Park Manager, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept., 503-884-6195

New beach driving restrictions start in south Tillamook County, Cape Kiwanda fence improved

Pacific City, Oregon – The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission approved a new rule restricting driving on some beaches in south Tillamook County around Cape Kiwanda. A new fence atop the Cape was also unveiled this week, providing hikers with different views of the rocky headland and surf.

Driving on the beach from Tierra del Mar, an unincorporated community north of Pacific City, north to the mouth of the Sand Lake estuary was previously open for part of the year, and is now closed to all motor vehicles year-round. The beach south of the Tierra del Mar access remains open to driving. Signs at the beach access make the driving rules clear.

The Cape Kiwanda beach access in Pacific City is reached from a county-owned parking lot and boat ramp. The beach north of the boat ramp is available for parking by people launching or retrieving a boat. The beach from the county boat ramp is closed to motor vehicles from there south about a quarter mile. Boats may occasionally launch from this area when the area just north of the ramp is unsafe for launching or retrieving boats.

The beach was temporarily closed to motor vehicles in 2020 in cooperation with the county to reduce COVID-related crowding concerns, and due to staff and revenue shortages also prompted by COVID-19.

“This change moves nearly all the motor vehicles to designated parking areas off the beach on the south side of Cape Kiwanda,” says Park Manager Jason Elkins. “It’s great seeing families having a natural experience on the beach without dodging cars.”

Cape Kiwanda is a sandstone headland just north of Pacific City and reachable by walking up a steep dune. The area is prone to erosion and has several sheer drops to the ocean. An old fence kept hikers more than a hundred yard back from the cliff edges in most areas, except for a small viewpoint. Hikers regularly ignored the fence and ventured into risky areas of the cape. Between 2014-2016, six people died due to falls. A new fence that creates several new views of the ocean and geologic features was unveiled May 20, 2021.

“We want visitors to enjoy better views without being tempted to cross a fence,” says Park Manager Jason Elkins.

The fence has gone through different configurations since the area became a state park in 1973, and the elements and crumbly sandstone have made past attempts difficult to maintain. The new fence uses the same kinds of hardy wooden posts used in vineyards and for growing hops, with coated, nonreflective chain link covering the spaces under the rails.

State Park and Department of Corrections crews installed 2,500’ feet of fence at a cost of $30,000 over the last year.

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Editors:

Photos and 720p video online at https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1oTgCRr2scTfOTn6Ln3Rr3C5RJ-9pNevr?usp=sharing

Repaving project to close Prineville Reservoir day-use area May 23-24 - 05/19/21

The day-use area and boat ramp at Prineville Reservoir will be closed beginning at about 9 p.m. May 23 through May 24. The area will reopen May 25.

Between now and the closure, visitors should expect delays accessing the day-use parking lot and boat ramp, and will see heavy equipment in the area.

For information, contact Brian Vaughan at 541-416-0645 x103.

Keep your camping trips safe and memorable with these campfire tips - 05/19/21

SALEM, Oregon – Many of us enjoy a campfire because it evokes memories of past camping trips with family and friends. We sit around the fire and talk, laugh and enjoy the company. The warmth of the moments rivals the heat from the campfire.

Consider ways to build a safe campfire as you start your summer camping preparations. Also, keep in mind that our drier than normal spring weather is a concern for Oregon and the West. Be sure to research conditions for the area near where you’re camping before you head out. Fire restrictions may be in place at the park, county or state level. The Oregon State Parks website will post the latest information about campfires in state parks.

“Regularly reviewing campfire safety practices, even if you’re a seasoned camper, is a good habit,” said Chris Havel, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) associate director. “It’s especially important if you’re camping with children or folks that are learning about responsible outdoor recreation.  If you have a question or a concern, talk with a park ranger or camp host.”

OPRD offers the following tips for a safe and enjoyable campfire, and to continue the tradition of great camping memories for everyone.

  • Maintain campfire flames at knee height, or roughly two feet high. A smaller flame helps prevent ash and embers from rising into the trees or dry vegetation. If you see the wind stirring up embers, play it safe and put the fire out.
  • Only build campfires in the existing fire ring in your campsite. Fire rings are placed in areas with buffer zones and away from vegetation.
  • Always keep plenty of water nearby so you can use it to safely put out the campfire. Drown the flames with water and carefully stir the embers to make sure everything is wet. The stirring step is important: ash and wood debris often maintain heat and embers unless they are drowned out.
  • Beach campfires should be on open sand and away from driftwood or vegetation. Slowly pour water on your beach fire to put it out. Don’t pour the water too quickly because hot sand can fly up and hit anyone nearby. Also, don’t use sand to put out a beach fire. Covering the fire with sand will insulate the coals, keeping them hot enough to burn someone hours or even days later.
  • For propane fire rings, follow the same safety precautions you would with a log-based campfire. The use of propane fire rings may vary statewide, depending on local conditions.
  • Make sure everyone in your campsite is familiar with campfire safety, including children. Always keep an eye on your campfire; many accidental fires are started because campers left their fire unattended for “just a minute.”

During May, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, the Office of Emergency Management, Keep Oregon Green, the U.S. Forest Service, OPRD and other federal, state and local emergency and response agencies are promoting programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire.

Information about recreation and wildfire safety is at keeporegongreen.org. Visit stateparks.oregon.gov for information about Oregon State Parks.

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Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council calls for nominations for Doug Newman and Stewardship Awards - 05/19/21

The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) is calling for nominations for two awards: the annual Doug Newman Memorial Award and a new award category for outstanding trail stewardship partners.

The Doug Newman award honors an individual whose hard work, integrity and social responsibility have made significant statewide contributions to non-motorized trails within Oregon. The award pays tribute to Doug Newman, an Oregonian whose efforts have inspired, benefited and contributed to the trails and trail users of Oregon. Doug was an avid outdoorsman, author, outdoor writer for the Eugene Register-Guard and ORTAC member. The memorial award was established shortly after his passing in 1992.

A list of past awardees is available at oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Documents/ORTAC-Doug-Newman-Award-Recipients.pdf.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Oregon Recreation Trails System Act, ORTAC is also accepting nominations for outstanding stewardship partners. Nominations can be submitted for individual volunteers or trail groups that volunteer their time to build, maintain and advocate for trails in Oregon. Nominations are also accepted for professionals in the land management or other sectors of the trail industry who exemplify partnership in their work and leadership.

Nominations for both awards are due by June 30, 2021, and can be submitted via our online nomination form. Awardees will be recognized at the 2021 Recreation and Trails Summit, set for Oct. 17-23.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

For more information, contact Program Coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-856-6316 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov.