Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office
Emergency Messages as of 6:54 am, Thu. Dec. 12
No information currently posted. Operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office. Please use any browser other than Internet Explorer.
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
District Attorney's Office provides update regarding the homicide of Samuel Fast Buffalo Horse - 12/12/19

December 12, 2019

District Attorney’s Office provides update regarding the homicide of Samuel Fast Buffalo Horse

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill is providing the community an update on the homicide investigation of 27-year-old Samuel Fast Buffalo Horse.

On December 9, 2019, a Multnomah County grand jury returned an indictment that charges 17-year-old Michael Annello Perkins with one count of murder in the second degree with a firearm, one count of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm and one count of riot.

The indictment also charges 44-year-old Fernando Gonzales and 19-year-old Tremayne Coleman with one count of riot and one count of assault in the third degree.

On December 11, 2019, members of the Portland Police Bureau’s Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) located Gonzales and Coleman at a residence in the 9900 block of Southeast Yukon Street in Portland, Oregon where they were taken into custody.

According to the indictment, Gonzales and Coleman unlawfully, while being aided by another person, caused physical injury to Mr. Fast Buffalo Horse; and that by participating with five or more other people, they, along with Perkins, engaged in tumultuous and violent conduct and thereby created a grave risk of causing public alarm; and that Perkins unlawfully possessed a firearm and intentionally used it to cause the death of Mr. Fast Buffalo Horse.

This investigation started on June 12, 2019 when Portland Police received information about a shooting at Broughton Beach.

When police arrived, they found an individual performing CPR on a person later identified as Mr. Fast Buffalo Horse. Despite the life-saving efforts, Mr. Fast Buffalo Horse died on scene.

Gonzales and Coleman are scheduled to make their first court appearance at approximately 9:30 a.m. on December 12, 2019 in Courtroom #3 of the Multnomah County Justice Center.

Perkins is currently in the custody of the Oregon Youth Authority. He will be arraigned at a later date.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is asking that anyone with information on this case - who has not already talked with Portland Police about this incident – to contact PPB Homicide Detective Travis Law at (503) 823-0395 or travis.law@portlandoregon.gov or PPB Homicide Detective Vincent Cui at (503) 823-0049 or Vincent.cui@portlandoregon.gov

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Perkins, Gonzales, and Coleman are innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

James Keith, 57, receives a jail and probation sentence after a jury convicts him of strangling his 85 year old mother - 12/10/19

December 10, 2019

James Keith, 57, receives a jail and probation sentence after a jury convicts him of strangling his 85 year old mother

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 57-year-old James Keith received a six month jail and 24 month probation sentence for assaulting and choking his 85 year old mother at her residence less than a month after being ordered by a judge not to have any contact with her.

“Just weeks prior to this assault, because of his escalating and alarming behavior, the court ordered Mr. Keith not to have any contact with his mother, but he completely disregarded that order and viciously attacked his mother,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Kate Molina, who prosecuted this case. “He purposefully took advantage of someone who is particularly vulnerable. The state has significant concerns for the safety of the community and Mr. Keith’s mother.”

A jury convicted Keith on October 30, 2019 of one count of assault in the fourth degree constituting domestic violence and one count of felony strangulation constituting domestic violence.

This investigation started on August 31, 2019 when the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office responded to reports of an assault. At trial, the state proved that Keith, without provocation, approached his mother in her kitchen and placed both hands around her throat.

The victim told law enforcement that she was unable to breathe for about 20 seconds and that the attack caused severe pain and that she feared that Keith was going to kill her.

In this case, a neighbor called 9-1-1 on behalf of the victim. While being contacted by a deputy, Keith opened a beer can and started drinking it, according to trial testimony. Law enforcement learned that Keith threatened to burn down the neighbor’s house if the incident was reported.

At trial, law enforcement testified that the victim is extremely frail and is a vulnerable person.

On June 27, 2019, Keith was formally served with an Elderly Persons and Persons with Disability Abuse Prevention Act, which was intended to prevent him from contacting his mother and from coming within 150 feet of her residence in Fairview, Oregon.

On July 4, 2019, Keith knowingly went to his mother’s residence in violation of the protection order.

The court found him in contempt on October 16, 2019 of violating the restraining order.

The court sentenced Keith to six months in jail for violating the no contact order. He will have to serve the entire jail sentence day-for-day unless his probation officer deems him eligible for early release for housing or treatment.

On the felony strangulation case, the court put Keith on 24 months of formal probation.

As part of his probation, Keith will be supervised by the Multnomah County Department of Community Justice’s Domestic Violence Unit and will not be allowed to have contact with his mother and cannot go within 150 feet of any location that she frequents, such as a doctor’s office. Furthermore, Keith will have to complete any drug and alcohol treatment, program, classes and counseling that is ordered and must remain offense-free while on probation.

If he violates any part of his probation, he could be sentenced to an additional 10 months in prison.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Domestic Violence Unit is committed to ending family abuse. The unit engages in evidence-based prosecution of domestic violence. It emphasizes the importance of victim advocacy services for all victims and their children. Even when a prosecutor decides to proceed with a case without a victim’s participation, every effort is made to offer the victim advocacy services from available resources.

The Elderly Persons and Persons with Disability Abuse Prevention Act was passed in 1995 to protect elderly and persons with disabilities. Under the act, an “elderly person” is “a person 65 years of age or older who is not subject to ORS 441.640 to ORS 441.665.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes Multnomah County Sheriff Deputy Mark Farmer for his dedicated efforts investigating this case and Multnomah County Victim Advocate Emma Kane for the advocacy and support she provided the victim and her family throughout this case.

Resources:

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-252-James_Keith.pdf
Cayla_Wilson_-_Photo_2_provided_by_the_Wilson_family.png
Cayla_Wilson_-_Photo_2_provided_by_the_Wilson_family.png
Jack Dean Whiteaker receives 16 year prison sentence for causing the death of Cayla Wilson (Photo) - 12/06/19

December 6, 2019

Jack Dean Whiteaker receives 16 year prison sentence for causing the death of Cayla Wilson

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 62-year-old Jack Dean Whiteaker received a 16 year prison sentence for recklessly causing the death of Cayla Wilson while manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life.

In a victim impact statement read to the court, Ms. Wilson’s mother, Denise, said: “My beautiful, sweet and funny girl had her whole life in front of her. She wanted to be successful in life for herself and her child. Cayla was a beautiful soul, so kind and caring and hardworking. She was someone special. She had a heart of gold. … She was loved by so many people.”

Ms. Wilson’s father, Bill, told the court: “We’re trying to figure out how to live again. [Cayla] kept us alive. She always kept the whole family motivated.”

This investigation started at 2:46 p.m. on April 15, 2010 when officers with the Gresham Police Department responded to reports of an injury crash along Southeast Jenne Road near Southeast Jenne Lane. Investigators with the East Multnomah County Vehicular Crash Team determined Whiteaker was traveling southbound into a curve on Southeast Jenne Road at an excessive rate of speed.

Whiteaker lost control of his vehicle, went into a sideways slide, regained traction and drove over the top of Ms. Wilson’s 1990 Buick sedan.

Ms. Wilson, who was 19 years old at the time of the crash, was lawfully traveling northbound in her lane. Ms. Wilson was driving home from a job interview when Whiteaker’s vehicle tore open and crushed the driver’s side of Ms. Wilson’s vehicle. She sustained critical injuries.

Whiteaker was prosecuted and convicted for what was then the assault of Ms. Wilson. The verdict was returned in 2012.

Ms. Wilson died on March 30, 2018 at the age of 27 as a result of the injuries she sustained. At the time of the crash, she was pregnant.

Doctors delivered her baby by emergency caesarean section five weeks later.

Her daughter is now nine years old. 

The court convicted Whiteaker on October 31, 2019 of one count of manslaughter in the first degree after he changed his plea.

Upon release, Whiteaker will be on three years of post-prison supervision. His driving privileges will be revoked for life.

“Mr. Whiteaker took away a very valuable member of our community,” Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney David Hannon said during today’s sentencing hearing. “His actions are another reminder of the death and destruction that drugs and alcohol can take from our community.”

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Gresham Police Department, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, members of the East Multnomah County Vehicular Crash Team including retired Gresham Police Officers Jeffrey Durbin and David Snider for their dedicated efforts investigating this case.

The District Attorney’s Office also recognizes retired Chief Deputy District Attorney Chuck Sparks who prosecuted Whiteaker in 2010 and retired Lead Victim Advocate Kimberly Phillips-Clark and current Victim Advocate Malia Bruni for the advocacy and support they provided Ms. Wilson’s family throughout the criminal justice process. 

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney David Hannon and Deputy District Attorney Adrienne Anderson.

With the permission of the Wilson family, the District Attorney’s Office is providing media with two photos of Ms. Wilson.

 

Sexual Assault Kit Backlog Elimination Project results in 12th Multnomah County indictment - 12/04/19

December 4, 2019

Sexual Assault Kit Backlog Elimination Project results in 12th Multnomah County indictment

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that as part of the ongoing Sexual Assault Kit Backlog Elimination Project, a grand jury has indicted Frank Domont Hall Jr., 40, for allegedly raping a 30 year old female in 2013.

This is the 12th case to be indicted under the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Sexual Assault Kit Backlog Elimination Project.

The victim in this case does not want media contact. The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is requesting media respect her privacy.

On December 3, 2019, a Multnomah County grand jury returned a single count indictment against Hall Jr. and charged him with one count of rape in the first degree.

It is alleged in the indictment that on or about February 24, 2013, Hall Jr. unlawfully and knowingly, by forcible compulsion, engaged in sexual intercourse with the victim.

The alleged incident occurred in a multi-unit dwelling in downtown Portland, Oregon.

On November 27, 2019, members of the Portland Police Bureau located Hall Jr. near the intersection of Northeast Clackamas Street and Northeast Grand Avenue and arrested him.

This case is being investigated by the Portland Police Bureau as part of its Sexual Assault Kit Initiative Workgroup.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Hall Jr. is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Sexual Assault Kit Backlog Elimination Project

In 2015, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill, along with the Portland Police Bureau, Gresham Police Department, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office and the Oregon State Police Forensic Laboratory collaboratively initiated a project to process thousands of untested Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence (SAFE) kits in Multnomah, Marion and Lane counties.

District Attorney Underhill and others quickly identified funding from the New York County District Attorney’s Office (DANY) and worked collectively with the Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Crimes Unit after the City of Portland received a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance’s (BJA) Sexual Assault Kit Initiative Grant Program.

DANY awarded the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office a total of $1,995,453 in September 2015. Using those funds, a coordinated effort involving local law enforcement and the Oregon State Police was launched to send SAFE kits, dated 2014 or older from Multnomah, Lane and Marion counties, to a private lab in Utah for testing.

Under the DANY grant, nearly 3,000 sexual assault kits from around the state were tested.

In 2018, Oregon became one of the first five states in the country to clear its backlog of Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) kits.

In Oregon, Senate Bill 1571, known as "Melissa's Law," was the Oregon Legislature's response to ensuring all sexual assault kits, except for anonymous kits, are sent to the Oregon State Crime Laboratory for timely testing.

The Portland Police Bureau’s Sexual Assault Kit Initiative Workgroup, which was created in 2015, is comprised of victim-centered and trauma-informed members of the Portland Police Bureau and the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

Results from the kits continue to be investigated and survivors of sexual assaults are being notified. The Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Crimes Unit encourages those who have had a SAFE kit collected prior to 2015 to contact the oseproject@portlandoregon.gov">roseproject@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0125.

Current Multnomah County SAFE kit criminal cases (as of October 10, 2019)

  • State of Oregon vs Jihad Eldeen Moore - 18CR13996 – Convicted Oct. 31, 2018
  • State of Oregon vs Chanh Van Tran - 18CR25167 - Convicted in November 2018
  • State of Oregon vs Curtis Clint Williams - 17CR37474 - Convicted in June 2018
  • State of Oregon vs Steven Guy Tubbs - 17CR08640 - Convicted in August 2018
  • State of Oregon vs Jose Oscar Rosales - 17CR29317 - Convicted in February 2018
  • State of Oregon vs Ricky Alexander Harrison - 18CR59141 - Pending arraignment
  • State of Oregon vs Richard Timothy Ward – 19CR25495 - Pending arraignment
  • State of Oregon vs Jesse Ryan Moser – 19CR53575 – Pending trial
  • State of Oregon vs Donnie Michael Willis Jr. – 19CR55777 – Pending trial
  • State of Oregon vs Leslie L. Thornton – 11-11-34868 – Pending trial
  • State of Oregon vs State of Oregon vs Timothy Nathaniel Hogue - 11-11-34868 – Pending trial
  • State of Oregon vs Frank Domont Hall Jr. – 19CR77675 – Pending trial

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

David Remone Jones charged with murdering James Gerald Richardson - 12/04/19

December 4, 2019

David Remone Jones charged with murdering James Gerald Richardson

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a grand jury has indicted 29-year-old David Remone Jones for murdering 39-year-old James Gerald Richardson.

The indictment, filed on July 9, 2019, charges Jones with one count of murder with a firearm, two counts of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm and one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

It is alleged in the indictment that on April 24, 2019, Jones – a convicted felon – unlawfully and intentionally caused the death of Mr. Richardson by using a firearm.

According to information previously released by the Portland Police Bureau, this investigation started on April 24, 2019 when police responded to the 8400 block of Southeast Foster Road after receiving information about a shooting.

When police arrived, they located Mr. Richardson with what appeared to be a gunshot injury. He was transported to the hospital, but later died.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office determined Mr. Richardson’s death to be the result of a gunshot wound and determined it to be a homicide.

On December 3, 2019, members of the U.S. Marshals Service Pacific Northwest Fugitive Apprehension Task Force transported Jones to Oregon from Texas. Upon his arrival, Multnomah County Circuit Court scheduled an arraignment for December 4, 2019 at 9:45 a.m. in the Justice Center, Courtroom #3.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Jones is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-275-David_Demone_Jones.pdf
Clayton Lamont Howard receives 40 day jail sentence for abusing a corpse - 12/03/19

December 3, 2019

Clayton Lamont Howard receives 40 day jail sentence for abusing a corpse

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 56-year-old Clayton Lamont Howard received a 40 day jail sentence and was put on two years of formal probation after a jury unanimously convicted him of abusing the corpse of a woman who died of an accidental drug overdose.

On November 26, 2019, the jury found Mr. Howard guilty of two counts of abuse of a corpse in the second degree, a Class C felony.

The jury found that by concealing the body of 59-year-old Nita Mangum with clothing, plastic totes, a mattress and then having sex on that mattress with a different woman, Mr. Howard intentionally treated her corpse in a manner not generally recognized by the community and convicted him of two counts of abuse of a corpse in the second degree.

The court ordered that Mr. Howard not receive any sentencing credits, including credits for time already served, which means he will serve the jail sentence day-for-day.

The court also imposed a $400 fine and 200 hours of community service and ordered Mr. Howard to undergo a drug and alcohol evaluation and complete any treatment that may be recommended. If at any point, Mr. Howard is found in violation of his probation, he could receive an additional jail sentence.

During its sentencing recommendation, the state asked the court to reduce the Class C felony convictions to Class A misdemeanor convictions, which could have made Mr. Howard eligible for a sentence of nearly two years in jail.

“The state believes the community is at risk when Mr. Howard is out of custody,” said Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson, who prosecuted this case. “We could not have, with any good conscience, asked for a sentence that would have provided anything less than complete community safety. Based on his previous convictions, Mr. Howard has demonstrated he is not amenable to treatment and that he does not do well while being supervised on either parole or probation.”

This investigation started on March 22, 2019 when family members of Ms. Magnum called 9-1-1 to report her missing.

"He has hurt several different people..." a family member of Ms. Mangum said by phone during today’s sentencing hearing. “He could have called the police, but he didn't. I need him to know that he's hurt a lot of our family." 

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office determined Ms. Mangum died on Thursday March 21, 2019 because of an accidental drug overdose.

During the investigation, which was led by Portland Police Bureau Homicide Detective Todd Gradwahl, law enforcement learned Mr. Howard - in violation of his parole – was living with Ms. Magnum.

About a week before her death, Ms. Magnum allowed a woman to move into her apartment.

The new roommate testified that Mr. Howard immediately provided her with alcohol and methamphetamine, which exacerbated her substance abuse disorders.   

Very late at night on Wednesday March 20, 2019, the roommate went to sleep in the living room. When she woke up several hours later on March 21, 2019, she asked Mr. Howard about Ms. Mangum’s whereabouts.

Mr. Howard claimed that Ms. Mangum had gone to the coast with a man named “Elvis” and that she would be returning in a couple of days, according to trial testimony.

“That was a lie,” said SDDA Anderson. “After Ms. Mangum died, Mr. Howard buried her. He abandoned her and went on to use drugs and to repeatedly have sex with the other woman on the very mattress that hid Ms. Magnum.”

During the investigation, law enforcement learned that after her death, Mr. Howard took Ms. Mangum’s bank cards and went to various locations to get drug money. 

Ms. Magnum’s family members went to her apartment on March 22, 2019 to check on her. When they arrived, they found Mr. Howard and the other woman inside the apartment. The family members observed Ms. Magnum’s purse and cane. They became increasingly worried about her welfare and called 9-1-1.

When police arrived, Mr. Howard continued to deny knowing Ms. Magnum’s location and denied being in possession of any of her belongings. However, during trial, two of the first responding officers testified that Ms. Mangum’s family called her cellphone, which rang in the presence of police and was found in Mr. Howard’s pocket.

Police also found Mr. Howard in possession of Ms. Magnum’s gold rings at the time of his arrest.

During trial, Mr. Howard testified that he did not call 9-1-1 after finding Ms. Mangum’s body because his parole officer had previously ordered him not to have contact with Ms. Mangum and that he feared he would be arrested if law enforcement found him inside her apartment.

During that same testimony, Mr. Howard confirmed he has prior felony convictions for rape in the first degree, robbery in the first degree and burglary in the first degree.

Furthermore, he testified that upon finding Ms. Mangum deceased, he attempted to render first aid and that the reason he covered her body was to fulfill a “dying declaration,” despite his earlier admission to police that he hid her body to avoid going to jail.

The jury acquitted Mr. Howard of one count of identity theft.

It was the state’s theory that Mr. Howard committed the crime of identity theft by using Ms. Mangum’s bank cards, without permission, hours after her death to either attempt to withdraw money from her accounts or to check the account balances on at least 15 separate occasions.

Prior to closing arguments, the court granted a judgment of acquittal on Count 4 of the indictment, which charged Mr. Howard with one count of attempted theft in the second degree for allegedly having plans to pawn Ms. Mangum’s jewelry after her death.

On November 21, 2019, Judge Thomas M. Ryan found Mr. Howard in contempt of court for using obscene language towards a witness upon the conclusion of her testimony. The court’s order is documented in the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system under case number 19CN05370.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes PPB Homicide Detective Todd Gradwahl and the other members of the Portland Police Bureau for their dedicated efforts investigating this case. Furthermore, the District Attorney’s Office recognizes Victim Advocate Emily Hyde for the support and advocacy she provide to Ms. Magnum’s family and the witnesses in this case.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Alexander Tomas Harrison receives 90 month prison sentence for shooting his roommate in the neck - 12/03/19

December 3, 2019

Alexander Tomas Harrison receives 90 month prison sentence for shooting his roommate in the neck

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 26-year-old Alexander Tomas Harrison received a 90 month prison sentence for shooting his roommate in his neck during a fight inside their shared apartment.

The jury returned its verdict in this case on November 15, 2019 upon the conclusion of a four day trial.

The jury found Harrison guilty of one count of assault in the first degree with a firearm and one count of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm.

During trial, the state presented evidence to show that on April 4, 2019, Harrison and his roommate went out to $1 margarita night at a local restaurant. After drinking at the bar, the two stopped purchased a bottle of rum. After consuming about ¾ of the bottle of rum at the apartment, the two men got into an altercation.

At approximately 10 p.m. on April 4, 2019, Portland Police received information about a shooting. Harrison placed the first 9-1-1 call and reported shooting his roommate. The second 9-1-1 call came in from the victim.

When police got on scene, Harrison flagged them down and confirmed to officers that he was the shooter.

A neighbor testified that shortly after she heard what sounded like a gun being fired, someone knocked on her door for help. It was the victim, covered in blood.

At the hospital, doctors determined the bullet had entered the victim’s chin, went through his neck and caused a cervical spine fracture. The bullet remains in the victim’s neck and will not be removed because of the risks associated with surgery.

The jury rejected Harrison’s self-defense claim made at trial.

According to Harrison’s account to police, his roommate was “raging” – throwing things around the apartment, breaking things and had pushed him into a wall.

Police searched the apartment and found it relatively clean and orderly. During the search, police found a fully loaded Ruger Security Six .357 Magnum revolver under a couch cushion.

While police were on scene investigating they learned about a social media post the victim made shortly after the shooting wherein he described being shot by Harrison. The video was shown to the jury.

Oregon’s self-defense laws are, in part, defined under ORS 161.209 and ORS 161.219.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau’s Gun Violence Reduction Team and PPB GVRT Detective Todd Teats for investigating this case and District Attorney Victim Advocate Tabitha Smith for the support and resources she provided the victim and his family throughout this case.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Rodney Rodell Henry receives six month jail sentence for committing a bias crime days before Pride festival in Portland - 12/02/19

December 2, 2019

Rodney Rodell Henry receives six month jail sentence for committing a bias crime days before Pride festival in Portland

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 45-year-old Rodney Rodell Henry received a six month jail sentence after a jury unanimously convicted him of one count of intimidation in the second degree and one count of harassment following a bias crime that happened days before the community celebrated the annual Pride festival in downtown Portland.

In addition to the jail sentence, the court put Henry on three years of formal probation.

“Only because the victim and witnesses quickly reported this crime to the Portland Police and then courageously followed through by testifying at trial was Mr. Henry held accountable,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Kevin Demer, who prosecuted this case. “My hope is that the court’s significant sentence sends a message that criminal behavior motivated by bias is not acceptable in Multnomah County.”

The jury, which returned its verdict on October 31, 2019, found that Henry unlawfully and intentionally, because of his perception of the sexual orientation of the victim, subjected the victim to offensive physical contact and that he unlawfully and intentionally harassed and annoyed the victim.

This investigation started on June 7, 2019 when Henry rode his bike up to a group of Portland Sidewalk Ambassadors assigned to the City of Portland’s Clean & Safe District.

The Sidewalk Ambassador Program provides information and assistance to downtown visitors, residents and workers.

When this incident occurred, the group was at a kiosk by Pioneer Place.

One of the ambassadors had a Pride rainbow bandana hanging from his backpack.

During trial, one of the ambassadors testified that Henry yelled out “federal target” to the group, which did not immediately understand the meaning.        

Henry then “flicked” the rainbow flag and said something to the effect of “we don’t like that on these streets,” referring to the flag.

The victim challenged Henry and told him to leave, which is when Henry abruptly tried to punch the victim with a full swing, according to court testimony. The victim was able to lean back to avoid being punched in the chest.

Officers with the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force responded and obtained surveillance video that showed Henry approach on the bike acting aggressively and flicking the victim’s rainbow flag, according to evidence presented during trial.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

This case was issued before Oregon’s new bias crime law went into effect. As a result, the crime Henry was convicted of should be referred to as “intimidation in the second degree.”

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a case is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

If you are the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you are the victim of a bias crime and the suspect is no longer present or if you have information about a bias crime committed in the past, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-273-Rodney_Rodell_Henry.pdf
Jason Christopher Baker-Blair receives 180 month prison sentence for raping, sexually abusing a child - 11/27/19

November 27, 2019

Jason Christopher Baker-Blair receives 180 month prison sentence for raping, sexually abusing a child

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that earlier this week 41-year-old Jason Christopher Baker-Blair received a 180 month prison sentence for raping a child.

Baker-Blair changed his plea and was convicted of one count of rape in the first degree, one count of sexual abuse in the first degree and one count of attempted sexual abuse in the first degree.

By changing his plea, Baker-Blair admitted that he knowingly engaged in sexual intercourse with a child under the age of 16 and that on two separate occasions he either actually touched or attempted to touch a sexually intimate part of the child.

This investigation started on December 11, 2018 when a mandatory reporter called the Oregon Department of Human Services’ Child Abuse Report hotline after receiving information about possible abuse involving a child.

During the forensic child abuse evaluation, the victim disclosed that Baker-Blair started touching her when she was approximately 12 years old.  

Evidence analyzed by the Oregon State Police confirmed Baker-Blair’s DNA was present in the victim’s Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence (SAFE) kit.  

It was through the coordination, communication and collaboration of the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team that this case was investigated and prosecuted.

The Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team includes representatives from local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, courts, health departments, the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), and the Oregon Department of Employment Child Care Division.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and managing child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, the Portland Police Bureau, PPB Detective Jonathan Hunt and the staff at CARES Northwest in Multnomah County for their dedicated efforts investigating this matter.

The District Attorney’s Office also recognizes Victim Advocate Malia Bruni for her commitment to supporting the victim and her family throughout the criminal justice process.

CARES Northwest, Multnomah County’s child abuse assessment center, is a community-based medical program for the evaluation, treatment and prevention of child abuse. The organization is one of the largest child abuse assessment centers in the nation and serves more than 5,000 children annually.

Upon his release, Baker-Blair will be on post-prison supervision and will have to register as a sex offender.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Amity Girt.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Jury unanimously convicts Clayton Lamont Howard of two counts of abuse of a corpse in the second degree - 11/27/19

November 27, 2019

Jury unanimously convicts Clayton Lamont Howard of two counts of abuse of a corpse in the second degree

Late Tuesday evening, a 12-person jury unanimously convicted 56-year-old Clayton Lamont Howard of two counts of abuse of a corpse in the second degree following a lengthy trial in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

During the 10 day trial, the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office testified 59-year-old Neta Mangum died on Thursday March 21, 2019 of an accidental drug overdose inside her residence.

The jury found that by concealing Ms. Mangum’s body with clothing, plastic totes and a mattress and then having sex on that mattress with a different woman, Mr. Howard unlawfully abused the corpse of Ms. Mangum.

This investigation started on Friday March 22, 2019 at approximately 7 p.m. when Ms. Mangum’s family called 9-1-1 to report her missing.

When police arrived at Ms. Mangum’s residence they located Mr. Howard and another woman.

The other woman with Mr. Howard testified that she met Ms. Mangum and Mr. Howard several days prior and that Ms. Mangum allowed her to move in so she could get off the streets.

The woman testified that she had last seen Ms. Mangum in the very early morning hours of March 21, 2019 shortly before she went to sleep in the living room. When she woke up hours later, she asked Mr. Howard where Ms. Mangum was.

Mr. Howard claimed that Ms. Mangum had gone to the coast with a man named “Elvis” and that she would be back on Sunday.

During the day of March 21, 2019, Mr. Howard and the other woman used drugs and had sex multiple times in Ms. Mangum’s bedroom and specifically on the mattress that covered her body. The other woman was unaware of Ms. Mangum’s whereabouts.  

Throughout the time Ms. Mangum was missing, Mr. Howard used her cellphone to send her family text messages and pretended to be Ms. Mangum. Her family testified they knew immediately, based on the style and substance of the text messages, someone else was using her phone.

When police contacted Mr. Howard on Friday March 22, 2019, he was found in possession of Ms. Mangum’s cellphone and other personal items including her bank cards and jewelry.

During trial, Mr. Howard testified that he did not call 9-1-1 after finding Ms. Mangum’s body because his parole officer had previously ordered him not to have contact with Ms. Mangum and that he feared he would be arrested if law enforcement found him inside her apartment.

During that same testimony, Mr. Howard confirmed he has prior felony convictions for rape in the first degree, robbery in the first degree and burglary in the first degree.

Furthermore, he testified that upon finding Ms. Mangum deceased, he attempted to render first aid and that the reason he covered her body was to fulfill a “dying declaration,” despite his earlier admission to police that he hid her body to avoid going to jail.

The jury rejected these claims.

Sentencing is scheduled for December 3, 2018 with Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Thomas M. Ryan.

The jury acquitted Mr. Howard of one count of identity theft.

It was the state’s theory that Mr. Howard committed the crime of identity theft by using Ms. Mangum’s bank cards, without permission, hours after her death to either attempt to withdraw money from her accounts or to check the account balances on at least 15 separate occasions.

Prior to closing arguments, the court found that the state had not proven Count 4 of the indictment, which charged Mr. Howard with one count of attempted theft in the second degree for allegedly having plans to pawn Ms. Mangum’s jewelry after her death.

On November 21, 2019, Judge Ryan found Mr. Howard in contempt of court for using obscene language towards a witness upon the conclusion of her testimony. The court’s order is documented in the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system under case number 19CN05370.

This case is being prosecuted by Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson who supervises the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Domestic Violence Unit.

It was investigated by members of the Portland Police Bureau’s Homicide Detail. The lead investigator on the case was PPB Detective Todd Gradwahl.

A booking photo of Mr. Howard is available through the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 

David Thomas Haugen charged with manslaughter in the second degree following fatal crash in Gresham, Oregon - 11/26/19

November 26, 2019

David Thomas Haugen charged with manslaughter in the second degree following fatal crash in Gresham, Oregon

On November 25, 2019, a four-count charging document was filed against 38-year-old David Thomas Haugen for allegedly causing and then fleeing the scene of a deadly crash in East Multnomah County.

Haugen is charged with one count of manslaughter in the second degree, one count of failing to perform the duties of a driver and two counts of driving under the influence of intoxicants.

According to court documents, officers assigned to the Gresham Police Department and deputies assigned to the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office responded to the intersection of Northeast Halsey Street and Northeast 192nd Avenue on November 23, 2019 on reports of a vehicular crash that resulted in a fatality. 

Law enforcement learned that a truck traveling eastbound at a high rate of speed on Northeast Halsey Street struck 21-year-old Zachary O'Leary who was crossing the street in a marked crosswalk, according to court documents.

Mr. O’Leary was hit with such force that he flew into the air, according to court documents.

Law enforcement determined the impact threw Mr. O’Leary approximately 100 feet from the point of impact, court documents state.

Approximately 25 minutes after the crash was reported a man, later identified as Haugen, walked into the crime scene and told officers that he caused the crash, according to court documents. It was later determined that Haugen had returned to the scene in the same vehicle he was driving at the time of the crash, court documents state.

The vehicle Haugen was driving was determined to be a pickup. It was found with significant damage to the front, according to court documents.

When law enforcement contacted Haugen, he was observed with bloodshot, watery and glassy eyes and he had “a strong and distinct odor of an alcoholic beverage” coming from his breath, according to court documents.

A certified drug recognition expert conducted a drug recognition examination of Haugen. During that examination, Haugen admitted to drinking alcohol in the afternoon before the crash and to smoking marijuana in the morning.

Law enforcement determined Haugen was under the combined influence of alcohol and marijuana and was unable to operate a vehicle safely, according to court documents.

Haugen had a blood alcohol content of .11%, according to court documents.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Haugen is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-270-David_Thomas_Haugen.pdf
Mitchell Beckwith accused of raping woman, forcing her to engage in sex acts for money - 11/26/19

 

November 26, 2019

Mitchell Beckwith accused of raping woman, forcing her to engage in sex acts for money

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the filing of a 12-count indictment against 27-year-old Mitchell Beckwith for allegedly kidnapping, raping and sexually abusing a woman and then telling her that she needed to make him money after the two met on a dating application.

Beckwith is charged with two counts of kidnapping in the first degree, one count of sexual abuse in the first degree, one count of strangulation, three counts of sodomy in the first degree, two counts of rape in the first degree, two counts of promoting prostitution and one count of compelling prostitution.

According to court documents, this investigation started on November 17, 2019 when law enforcement responded to a residence in the 4700 block of West Powell Boulevard in Gresham, Oregon on reports of a disturbance. Officers arrived and contacted an adult female who was shaking and having trouble speaking. The woman reported that a person name “Mike” raped her.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned that on November 16, 2019, the victim met up with a person she had met on a dating application approximately two days prior, according to court documents. The victim told police the name of that person was “Mike.”

The victim told police that “Mike” picked her up and drove her around, according to court documents. The two ultimately ended up at Rocky Butte in Portland, Oregon. Once at Rocky Butte, “Mike” started touching the victim against her will, according to court documents.

Despite her pleas to stop, “Mike” continued to physically and sexually assault the woman, according to court documents.

According to court documents, the victim told police that during the sexual assault, Beckwith allegedly held his forearm across her throat, which prevented her from breathing. As the victim started to scream, Beckwith told her to stop, reached under the seat and grabbed a roll of duct tape, according to court documents.

After the alleged assault, the suspect took both of the victim’s phones and put them in the vehicle’s center console and told her that she could only have them back if she brought him money. Once back at the victim’s residence, the victim obtained money and gave it to “Mike” who then said he needed the victim to make him additional money.

In addition to the sex crimes allegations, Beckwith is accused of unlawfully using force and intimidate the victim to engage in or attempt to engage in sex acts so that he could be able to receive money or some form of compensation.

While the victim was at the hospital receiving medical treatment, law enforcement learned “Mike” had returned to the apartment.

Officers responded and contacted the man, later identified as Beckwith. Upon looking inside Beckwith’s vehicle, law enforcement located a roll of duct tape.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Beckwith is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-272-Mitchell_Beckwith.pdf
Rawland Strong sentenced to probation after tricking two girls into taking up-skirt photos - 11/23/19

November 23, 2019

Rawland Strong sentenced to probation after tricking two girls into taking up-skirt photos

On Friday November 22, 2019, Rawland Strong, 32, a registered sex offender, was put on three years of formal probation for taking up-skirt images of two children after he enticed them with free frozen yogurt from the grocery store he was working at.

“This was obviously very concerning behavior. It was a traumatic incident for the two victims,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney BJ Park, who prosecuted this case. “Mr. Strong could have faced much more serious charges had he successfully taken nude images of these children. This sentence is appropriate because it keeps Mr. Strong on supervision for an extended period of time and ensures that he receives specific treatment so this behavior never happens again.”

The victims and their parents were continuously updated throughout the progression of this case and are in support of this resolution, which protects the victims from having to be pulled out of school for a trial and testify about this incident. Furthermore, the victims’ families expressed a stronger desire for Strong to receive treatment over incarceration.

If the court finds Strong in violation of his probation, at any point during the next three years, he could receive additional sanctions, including up to 364 days in jail.

This investigation started on April 8, 2017 when Portland Police received information about a suspicious circumstance involving two minors and an adult male in the 4100 block of Northeast Fremont Street.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned that Strong was working at the market when the two victims entered the store to get some frozen yogurt.

One victim was wearing a skirt with shorts underneath and the other victim was wearing shorts. The clothing the girls wore prevented any intimate part of their body being photographed.

Law enforcement reviewed surveillance video, which showed Strong offering the victims free frozen yogurt if they would allow him to take pictures of their feet. The victims agreed.

Strong led the girls outside to an area next to the store and had each sit on the ground and raise their feet while he took photos of them with his phone.

Strong then had both girls sit next to each other. He instructed them to raise their feet higher while he crouched down in order to take more photos.

“She was at the market for approximately 15 minutes that afternoon and in that time you identified and coerced her into posing with her feet in the air with legs spread so you could take photos under the premise you were taking funny photos for the market blog,” the mother of one of the victim’s said in an impact statement read by the District Attorney’s Office during sentencing.

After taking the photos, Strong walked away.

As the victims – who are friends – were walking home, they felt strange about the incident and reported it to their mothers. The mothers reported the incident to manager of the market. In response, the manager terminated Strong’s employment and called the police.

Police opened an investigation, but could not locate Strong. On April 4, 2019, law enforcement located Strong in the 4000 block of Northeast Fremont Street and took him into custody.

Strong changed his plea and was convicted of one count of invasion of privacy in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Under Oregon law, the maximum sentence for a Class A misdemeanor is 364 days in jail.

While on probation, Strong will not be allowed to be in contact with minors and will need to undergo a mental health evaluation and comply with any treatment that is ordered.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau for their dedicated efforts investigating this case.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-267-Rawland_Strong.pdf
Court sentences man to 90 days in jail, orders him to write an essay for yelling 'go back to your county' and then spitting in a person's face - 11/23/19

November 23, 2019

Court sentences man to 90 days in jail, orders him to write an essay for yelling ‘go back to your county’ and then spitting in a person’s face

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 37-year-old Harold Eugene Denson III will have to write a 500-word essay after he told an immigrant to “go back to your country” and then spit in that person’s face.

“This is a unique resolution to a very serious incident,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Nicole Hermann who prosecuted this case. “Mr. Denson needs to understand the impact his actions had on the victim and our immigrant communities. This is an opportunity for him to reconcile his behavior through compassion, learning and understanding.”

On November 22, 2019, Denson pleaded no contest to one count of unlawful use of a weapon and one count of bias crime in the second degree. Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Christopher A. Ramras proposed the idea of having Denson write the essay as part of the sentence imposed.

Denson received 90 days of jail with credits for time served on the unlawful use of a weapon conviction.

He now has until March to complete the essay, which the court ordered be focused on the process and challenges people can have when moving to the United States from another country.

If the court accepts Denson’s essay, the state and the victim both support the court allowing Denson to withdraw his plea to the bias crime charge. The charge would then be dismissed.

However, if Denson does not complete the essay in the appropriate time or it does not meet the court’s requirements, Denson will be convicted of the bias crime and could face additional sanction.

This investigation started on August 25, 2019 when the victim, an immigrant from Ukraine, was working at a local car dealership. As the manager, he was told that there was someone on property who had thrown trash all over. The victim grabbed a trash bag and approached the male, who was later identified as Denson. He gave Denson the trash bag and asked him to clean up the area.

Denson initially said thank you, which prompted the victim start walking away. However, Denson suddenly became agitated and started yelling that the car dealership was not the victim’s property and proclaimed it was “American soil.”

Denson asked the victim if he was American and where he was born. The victim turned around and briefly spoke with Denson who became more agitated. Denson spit in the victim’s face and told him him to go back to his own country.

Denson reached down and picked up a box cutter, with the blade extended, and pointed it at the victim and threatened to cut him.

The victim was able to separate himself. Police responded and located Denson nearby and recovered a box cutter from his pocket upon arrest.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a misdemeanor crime is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

Las month, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill and other members of the office attended the fourth annual Building Bridges of Understanding in Our Community event hosted by the Muslim Educational Trust in Tigard, Oregon as part of the office’s efforts to combat bias crime. To read more about that event click here.

If you are the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you are the victim of a bias crime and the suspect is no longer present or if you have information about a bias crime committed in the past, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Oregon man accused of communicating with minors in seven different states for sexually explicit purposes - 11/22/19

November 22, 2019

Oregon man accused of communicating with minors in seven different states for sexually explicit purposes

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the filing of a 90-count indictment against 58-year-old David Cohron for allegedly going online and communicating with seven different female minors in seven different states.

As alleged in court documents, at the time of these alleged offenses the victims were between the ages of 13 and 14 years old. It is alleged Cohron induced and compelled each of the minors to send him sexually explicit photos, videos and other sexually explicit materials that the minors had self-produced using a texting application. During their online communications, all of the victims told Cohron their true age, making it clear they were minors.

It is alleged that Cohron represented himself with a username of "Perry Williams" as he communicated to all of these victims, according to court documents.

Cohron is accused of using flattery, manipulation, begging, daring them, insulting them, as well as threatening the victims in order to get them to provide him with sexually explicit material.

This investigation started in April when law enforcement in North Carolina contacted the Portland Police Bureau about concerns that an unknown individual, later determined to be Cohron, was communicating with minors online for sexually explicit purposes.

Cohron is charged with 23 counts of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct, five counts of luring a minor, one count of online sexual corruption of a child in the second degree, one count of attempted coercion, 30 counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree and 30 counts of encouraging child sexual abuse in the second degree.

On November 21, 2019, Cohron was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center. He had previously been arrested in Riverside County, California and was extradited back to Oregon.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Cohron is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-266-David_Cohron.pdf
Man found guilty except for insanity after randomly attacking man in front of his wife, children - 11/22/19

November 22, 2019

Man found guilty except for insanity after randomly attacking man in front of his wife, children

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a judge found 40-year-old Dameon Hoover-Rhodes guilty except for insanity for violently attacking a man with a machete in front of his wife and two children.

The court placed Hoover-Rhodes under the jurisdiction of the Oregon Psychiatric Security Review Board for up to 20 years.

Under Oregon law, a person is guilty except for insanity if, as a result of a qualifying mental disorder at the time of engaging in criminal conduct, they lack substantial capacity either to appreciate the criminality of the conduct or to conform the conduct to the requirements of law.

This investigation started on January 25, 2018 when Portland Police responded to the report of an assault at the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) Local 8 Hall, located at 2435 Northwest Front Avenue.

As officers responded to the scene, they learned the victim had been randomly attacked and was being driven to the hospital by his wife.

During this investigation, law enforcement learned that the victim had exited the ILWU Local 8 Hall to meet his family with plans to go to dinner with them. As the victim exited, he briefly spoke with Hoover-Rhodes who appeared to be sleeping in a doorway.

Hoover-Rhodes chased the victim. As he attempted to flee, the victim started doing circles around the car in an attempt to get inside, but the doors were locked. The victim made a conscious decision to run away from the car and into the street because he didn’t want to put his wife and two children in danger.

As the victim ran into the street, Hoover-Rhodes chased after him and struck him multiple times with the machete in the head.

The victim’s wife backed her vehicle out of the parking lot in an attempt to follow and help her husband. As the vehicle’s headlights illuminated her husband and Hoover-Rhodes in the roadway, the victim’s wife and two children screamed out and pleaded that he not kill him.

As they did, Hoover-Rhodes stood over the victim, raised the machete over his head and swung down towards the victim who had fallen to the ground.

The victim blocked the machete from coming down on his head or neck by raising his arm. The machete’s blade broke both bones in his arm.

At this point, the victim’s wife got out of her vehicle and confronted Hoover-Rhodes who appeared startled. She picked up her husband who was critically injured, threw him into the backseat of her vehicle and drove him to the hospital.

“This was a horrific attack made worse by the fact that the victim’s family watched everything unfold and could do little to help without putting themselves in extreme danger,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson, who prosecuted this case. “The psychological trauma of witnessing your father being attacked and then having him thrown in the backseat of the car, covering the children in blood as their mother raced him to the hospital will be something these children will remember for the rest of their lives.”

As the victim’s wife sped off to the hospital, Hoover-Rhodes took one final swing and broke one of the vehicle's windows.

The two children inside the vehicle were not injured.

The court found Hoover-Rhodes guilty except for insanity of one count of attempted murder and one count of unlawful use of a weapon.

The victim and his family were consulted throughout every stage of this prosecution and are supportive of this resolution.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau’s Assault Detail for its dedicated efforts investigating this case.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Justin Antoine McDonald receives 16 month prison sentence for repeatedly spitting on police - 11/21/19

November 21, 2019

Justin Antoine McDonald receives 16 month prison sentence for repeatedly spitting on police

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 39-year-old Justin Antoine McDonald received a 16 month prison sentence upon his fourth conviction for intentionally spitting on police officers.

On October 19, 2019, an officer assigned to the Portland Police Bureau responded to the intersection of North Oberlin Street and North Huron Avenue to conduct an area check after police received information a person who appeared agitated and who was waiving a knife. As the officer was responding, he learned that suspected had threatened the 9-1-1 caller and had fled.

Officers located a man, later identified as McDonald, nearby and detained him pursuant to the investigation.

While police contacted McDonald, he started yelling to be let go and started yelling racial slurs.

While being search by law enforcement, McDonald said “I’m going to spit on you.” McDonald was told that he could be charged with a felony if he did. At that point, McDonald turned his torso, kicked his feet and spit on the arresting officer.

Law enforcement located a folding knife in McDonald’s pocket while searching him.

Police put McDonald into the back seat of a patrol vehicle in order to transport him to the Multnomah County Detention Center. While in the back, McDonald spit all over the seat and continued trying to spit on the officer. Upon doing so, McDonald made a statement to the officer which suggested he had AIDS or HIV and said “I hope you have it now.”

At the time of his arrest in October, McDonald had three opening cases for separate instances where he spit on an officer.

Earlier this week, a judge convicted McDonald of one count of aggravated harassment and one count of resisting arrest. By changing his plea, McDonald admitted that he unlawfully and intentionally propelled saliva at a person he knew to be an on-duty police officer and that the saliva came into physical contact with the officer and that he unlawfully and intentionally resisted while being arrested by law enforcement.

McDonald also resolved the two other cases wherein he spit on police.

In total, the court sentenced McDonald to 16 months in prison. Upon release, McDonald will be on 36 months of post-prison supervision. He will also be on probation through the Multnomah County Justice Reinvestment Program for approximately three years after his release.

As stated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV is not spread through saliva.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 

No criminal charges to be filed following investigation into the handling of abuse reports received by Multnomah County Adult Protective Services - 11/19/19

November 19, 2019

No criminal charges to be filed following investigation into the handling of abuse reports received by Multnomah County Adult Protective Services

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that after reviewing a criminal investigation into how Multnomah County Adult Protective Services (APS) handled abuse and neglect reports, there is insufficient evidence to support criminal charges against any county employee.

A full copy of the prosecution decline memorandum can be obtained by clicking here.

The criminal investigation ultimately confirmed that there were instances in which APS screened abuse or neglect reports made to its reporting line but did not notify law enforcement when they arguably should have.

However, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is in agreement with the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office in concluding that prosecution in this matter is not warranted.

Specifically, there is insufficient evidence to prove that any Multnomah County worker knowingly violated any statutes relating to the office of the person; that any Multnomah County worker obtained or intended to obtain a personal benefit; that any Multnomah County worker intentionally harmed or intended to harm another person by not notifying law enforcement about abuse reports. Furthermore, there is no evidence of discrimination related to any failure to report.

As stated in the memorandum, APS operates a reporting phone line wherein the agency receives and conducts preliminary screenings of abuse and neglect cases that involve seniors and persons with a disability. Under Oregon law, the county-based APS employees who staff the phone line are mandatory reporters and are thereby required to notify law enforcement if there is reason to believe a crime has occurred.

In August 2018, Multnomah County officials requested a meeting to discuss concerns about how APS handled reports submitted to its phone line. Some of the concerns specifically involved the Unity Center for Behavioral Health, located in the 1200 block of Northeast 2nd Avenue in Portland, Oregon.

Multnomah County started an administrative inquiry into the matter, which was later paused in order to not jeopardize any potential criminal case.

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office and the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office were asked to assist by investigating and determining whether any county employee could be held criminally liable for not notifying law enforcement as required by law.

This investigation specifically examined criminal liability for official misconduct.

Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill recognizes Multnomah County Sheriff Captain Harry Smith, MCSO Detective Jay Pentheny, Oregon State Police Detective Ted Moisan and Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Melissa Marrero for their dedicated efforts investigating this matter.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office has no additional comment regarding this matter.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Breaonna Rae Nicklin receives formal probation, jail sentence in check cashing scheme - 11/19/19

November 19, 2019

Breaonna Rae Nicklin receives formal probation, jail sentence in check cashing scheme

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 27-year-old Breaonna Rae Nicklin was put on 48 months of formal probation and given a 15 day jail sentence for committing identity theft and fraudulently cashing checks that resulted in a business losing more than $15,000.

In 2016, the Portland Police Bureau’s White Collar Crimes Unit started receiving reports of multiple checks being fraudulently cashed. During the investigation, detectives identified at least two bank accounts wherein the fraudulent checks were being deposited.

Detectives determined the person making the deposits was Nicklin. In exchange for her being allowed to use the bank accounts to deposit the fraudulent checks, the two account holders were provided drugs.

One of the checks deposited by Nicklin was in the amount of $15,171. An insurance company issued the check as part of a life insurance policy. Another check, also issued by the insurance company, was in the amount of $474.70. Both checks were deposited several days before the victim reported them as never received.

Approximately a month after the first two checks were deposited, a check in the amount of $5,026.26 was deposited. The check was reported stolen by a separate victim after it had been issued by a higher education institution.

In 2019, police received information that a person’s identity had been unlawfully used to rent a hotel room in Multnomah County. During that investigation, law enforcement determined Nicklin had completed the registration process at the hotel using the identity of another person. She was also found to be in possession of numerous peoples’ personal identifying information.

By changing her plea to two counts of aggravated identity theft in the first degree in the two different cases, Nicklin admitted she unlawfully, and with intent to defraud, was in possession of personal identifying information of 10 or more people, and that she unlawfully, and with intent to defraud, converted to her own use the personal identification of another person that resulted in losses of $10,000 or more.

As part of her sentence, Nicklin will be required to receive an evaluation for drug addiction and comply with any treatment that is ordered. If the court finds Nicklin in violation of her probation, she could receive a sentence of up to 35 months in prison.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Leslie Wu.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office reminds the public that check fraud can occur in multiple ways. Checks sent by mail, including those in birthday and holiday cards, are susceptible to theft. Once a thief has a check in their possession, it could be tampered with.

Checks include a wealth of personal information such as a person’s name, address and full bank account information. That information could be used by a person for nefarious purposes such as draining the account’s funds and/or opening new credit accounts.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office and the Portland Police Bureau's White Collar Crimes Unit continue to advocate that all organizations take preventative measures to limit their exposure to potential embezzlement. Furthermore, any organization that suspects the intentional misuse or misappropriation of funds or property by an employee should report those suspicions to law enforcement immediately.

Additionally, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office reminds the community that it is important that businesses and non-profit organizations have redundancies in place to ensure proper accounting for cash, checks and credit/debit card transactions. All businesses should undergo routine financial audits that are conducted by a person or organization separate from the primary accountant. If employees are expected to handle cash, including making nightly deposits, businesses should ensure that there is always more than one employee present during cash counts and drop offs.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Jury rejects self-defense claim, convicts man of shooting his roommate in the neck - 11/18/19

November 18, 2019

Jury rejects self-defense claim, convicts man of shooting his roommate in the neck

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a jury convicted 26-year-old Alexander Tomas Harrison of unlawfully and intentionally shooting his roommate in the neck.

The jury heard testimony over the course of four days last week and returned its verdict late Friday afternoon.

The jury convicted Harrison of one count of assault in the first degree and one count of unlawful use of a weapon. By doing so, the jury rejected Harrison’s claim of self-defense.

At trial, the state presented evidence to show that on April 4, 2019, Portland Police responded to the 12400 block of Southeast Powell Boulevard after emergency dispatchers received a 9-1-1 call from a person who said that he shot his roommate in the neck.

As police were responding, a second 9-1-1 call came in from the roommate who confirmed he had been shot but was still conscious.

When police got on scene, Harrison flagged them down and told them he was the shooter.

Law enforcement learned that Harrison and the victim had recently moved in together. On April 4, 2019, the two got into an argument.

A neighbor testified shortly after she heard what sounded like a gun being fired, someone knocked on her door for help. It was the victim who was covered in blood.

At the hospital, doctors determined the bullet had entered the victim’s chin, went through his neck and caused a cervical spine fracture. The bullet remains in the victim’s neck and will not be removed because of the risks associated with surgery, according to the victim’s doctor who testified.

Harrison told detectives that prior to the fight, he and his roommate were drinking. The argument unfolded upon returning to the apartment. According to Harrison’s account to police, his roommate was “raging” – throwing things around the apartment, breaking things and had pushed him into a wall.

Police searched the apartment and found it relatively clean and orderly. The officers did not observe any obvious signs of damage or any evidence of a fight. During the search, police found a fully loaded Ruger Security Six .357 Magnum revolver under a couch cushion.

While police were on scene investigating they learned about a social media post the victim made shortly after the shooting wherein he described being shot by Harrison. The video was shown to the jury.

Oregon’s self-defense laws are, in part, defined under ORS 161.209 and ORS 161.219.

Sentencing in this matter is scheduled for December 12, 2019.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Upon discovery of exculpatory evidence, state releases man held in custody, dismisses criminal case - 11/14/19

November 14, 2019

Upon discovery of exculpatory evidence, state releases man held in custody, dismisses criminal case

On September 17, 2019, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office sought and was granted court authorization to seek the release of 58-year-old George Brotherton.

Mr. Brotherton was in custody on an indictment charging him with three counts of sexual abuse in the first degree, two counts of coercion, three counts of unlawful use of a weapon, two counts of unlawful sexual penetration in the first degree, one count of assault in the second degree and one count of attempted assault in the second degree.

The decision to seek Mr. Brotherton’s immediate release was made in consultation with Mr. Brotherton’s defense attorney after the Portland Police Bureau informed the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office that it had discovered new and potentially exculpatory material in this case.

Upon Mr. Brotherton’s release, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office and Portland Police Bureau urgently conducted investigative follow up and sought additional help from the Oregon State Police Crime Lab.

While on release, Brotherton’s criminal case remained active while the Portland Police Bureau and the Oregon State Police conducted the investigative follow-up. The court placed Mr. Brotherton on GPS monitoring and put him on a curfew from 9 p.m. until 7 a.m. and ordered that he not have possession of any weapons.

The forensic analysis conducted by the Oregon State Police cleared Mr. Brotherton of wrongdoing.

On November 7, 2019, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office informed the court that it could no longer proceed on Brotherton’s case, which was filed on August 21, 2019.

In its dismissal order, the state informed court that the ends of justice will be best served by the dismissal of this matter.

The court’s dismissal order was filed with the court on November 13, 2019.

At every step of this process, the state provided frequent updates to Mr. Brotherton’s criminal defense attorney and the victims.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office and the Portland Police Bureau continues to seek to identity the person responsible for these attacks. The first attack happened on July 5, 2019 and was reported that day by an adult female who said an unknown male sexually assaulted her while she walking to work. The second attack happened on July 25, 2019 and was reported on July 29, 2019 by an adult female who said she was walking at night when an unknown male came up behind her and sexually abused her. The third attack happened on July 26, 2019 and was reported that day by an adult female who said she was sleeping on the street when an unknown male sexually abused her. In all of these attacks, the suspect used a knife to threaten the victims. 

Police reports and other documents maintained by law enforcement and the District Attorney’s Office in this case are currently exempt from disclosure due to the continuing investigation.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office is unable to provide any additional details about this case and has no additional details to provide.

The victims in this case are requesting privacy and do not want media contact. The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office requests media refrain from attempting to or actually contacting them.

Anyone with information on this case is asked to call Portland Police Bureau Detective Ross Dormady at 503-823-0880.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

Attached Media Files: PR-19-260-George_Brotherton.pdf
Vanbueren Alexander Dormaier receives 52 month prison sentence after stealing multiple cars, crashing into police vehicle - 11/13/19

November 13, 2019

Vanbueren Alexander Dormaier receives 52 month prison sentence after stealing multiple cars, crashing into police vehicle

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 33-year-old Vanbueren Alexander Dormaier received a 52 month prison sentence after he pleaded guilty to stealing multiple cars throughout Multnomah County before ultimately crashing into a police patrol SUV when he fled from officers.

“Mr. Dormaier put the public in extraordinary danger the three times he fled from police in these stolen vehicles,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Alexander Garcia, who prosecuted this case. “In one particular instance, Mr. Dormaier T-boned a vehicle that was occupied by two people. Our community members are substantially inconvenienced when their vehicles are stolen. Often – even when someone’s vehicle is recovered – the vehicle is so badly damaged that it is deemed totaled or no longer safe to operate.”

Dormaier pleaded guilty on November 8, 2019 to four counts of unauthorized use of a vehicle, two counts of recklessly endangering another person, one count of felony fleeing and attempting to elude, and one count of misdemeanor driving under the influence of intoxicants. In total, these eight criminal offenses encompass three separate criminal cases involving Dormaier.

On November 13, 2018, a woman reported her vehicle was stolen in the area of Southeast 151st Avenue and Southeast Stark Street in Portland, Oregon. The thief left behind a note, which read “Hope you won’t be angry with me.” Law enforcement determined Dormaier’s identity after flipping over that note and seeing that it had been written on paperwork from Clackamas County Circuit Court. An identification card with his name on it was also located nearby.

On November 17, 2018, a man reported his vehicle was stolen from the 3600 block of Northeast 162nd Avenue in Portland, Oregon. That same day, Portland Police responded to a T-bone crash involving the stolen vehicle near the intersection of Southeast 92nd Avenue and Southeast Morrison Street. Witnesses reported the crash occurred at speeds estimated to be 50-60 miles per hour. Dormaier was found in the driver’s seat of the stolen vehicle. He was transported to the hospital with serious injuries. At the hospital, it was determined Dormaier was under the influence of high levels of amphetamines and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

On April 12, 2019, a Portland Police Bureau officer ran the license plate of a vehicle he saw in the area of Southeast 153rd Avenue and Southeast Stark Street. The vehicle’s information came back as stolen. The officer attempted to conduct a traffic stop but Dormaier drove the vehicle into oncoming traffic at a high rate of speed. Due to the dangerousness of Dormaier’s driving, no pursuit was initiated and Dormaier evaded capture. Several hours later, a sergeant with the Portland Police Bureau saw that same stolen vehicle and attempted to conduct a second traffic stop. Dormaier fled by once again driving into oncoming traffic at a high rate of speed. Officers then located Dormaier and the vehicle he left unoccupied nearby. As officers attempted to take Dormaier into custody, Dormaier stole another vehicle and rammed that vehicle into a police patrol SUV. When the crash occurred, there was an officer standing close to the SUV attempting to take Dormaier into custody. That officer escaped injury by quickly jumping out of the way. Dormaier then backed up and rammed two parked vehicles before once again driving into oncoming traffic at a high rate of speed. Dormaier was later located in the area of Southeast 119th Avenue and Southeast Stark Street and taken into custody.

Dormaier was remanded to the custody of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office before starting his prison sentence.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office encourages community members to take proactive steps to avoid becoming a car theft victim by:

  • Avoid making your vehicle a target by removing all items and keeping it “showroom ready”
  • Be careful about where you park; if able, park in a well-lit area
  • Close all windows
  • Consider adding a GPS tracking device to your vehicle
  • Consider adding a vehicle disabling device to your vehicle
  • Consider adding an in-vehicle camera that can be used in real-time to identify any persons inside the vehicle
  • Keep your doors locked at all times, even when driving
  • Never leave your car unattended in an effort to cool it down or heat it up
  • Never leave your keys inside your vehicle after parking
  • Use steering wheel locks

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us