Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office
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Victim in a Bias crime goes through a dark period, but hopes that the convicted man will make the most of his last chance. - 11/28/23

On November 27, 2023, 26-year-old Douglas Quintanilla pleaded guilty to Attempted Robbery and Bias Crime in the First Degree. The guilty pleas resulted from an incident that took place on October 7, 2023. On that date, Quintanilla entered the Safeway on 3380 Lancaster Dr. NE in Salem. Quintanilla grabbed various items for sale by Safeway, then left the store without having paid for these items. The victim, James Murphy (Murphy), is a loss prevention officer for Safeway. Murphy is transgender and prefers the term male to female transitional. Murphy tried to stop Quintanilla when it became apparent that Quintanilla had no intention of paying for the items. When Murphy stopped Quintanilla by the exit doors and grabbed the bag where Quintanilla had placed the stolen items, Quintanilla then pulled on the bag to get it away from Murphy. Quintanilla then threatened to stab Murphy and reached into his pocket as if he had a knife. Thinking that he was about to get stabbed, Murphy let go of Quintanilla’s bag.  It was at this time that Quintanilla called Murphy a slur which is highly offensive toward the LGBTQ+ community. This slur was said multiple times, directly to Murphy’s face, and with great indignation. Police were promptly called and arrested Quintanilla who was a short distance away from Safeway.

While pleading guilty to Attempted Robbery 2 and Bias Crime 1 on 23CR49233, Quintanilla also pleaded guilty to two additional misdemeanor thefts (from the Target on Lancaster) and a probation violation on another case. Defense attorney David Kuhns had arranged for Quintanilla to enter inpatient drug treatment at City Team in Portland. Marion County Circuit Court Judge, Daniel J. Wren, required that successful completion of drug treatment is an expressed requirement of Quintanilla’s probation. During his 3 years of supervised probation, Quintanilla is to have no contact with Murphy, no physical presence at Safeway or Target, and to obey all laws. Should Quintanilla violate the terms of his probation and his probation be revoked, he faces 21 to 24 months in prison.

In a unique conclusion to this matter, Quintanilla wrote an apology letter to Murphy, who was present at Quintanilla’s sentencing. Murphy also had the opportunity to speak directly to the victim, but also to Judge Wren. For Murphy, this was about more than being the victim of an attempted robbery.  Due to the hateful names Murphy was called, Murphy not only lost interest in his job, but he lost interest in living for a couple of weeks. Despite going through this dark period, Murphy stated he wished that this was truly a turning point for Quintanilla and that Quintanilla make the most of this last chance he was given.

The Marion County District Attorney’s Office would like to thank the Salem Police Department in its prompt and thorough investigation into this matter. But, most of all, the District Attorney’s Office would like to thank Murphy for his participation in yesterday’s sentencing, re-enforcing the District Attorney’s commitment that Bias type crimes will not be tolerated in Marion County. 

Contact Person for Marion County Press Release: Email Correction: SLsullivan@co.marion.or.us - 11/21/23

Updated Contact Information: For media questions about content: SLSullivan@co.marion.or.us

For document issues, please contact: Mthornicroft@co.marion.or.us

Sorry folks, got the email address wrong for Ms. Sullivan. It should work now for content questions. She's the DDA to contact.    But for document issues, contact me @ Mthornicroft@co.marion.or.us

Updated: Marion County District Attorney asks Governor Kotek to revoke commutations granted by former Governor Brown - 11/21/23

MARION COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY ASKS GOVERNOR KOTEK FOR REVOCATION OF COMMUTATIONS RECEIVED BY 57 INDIVIDUALS CONVICTED IN MARION COUNTY

 

In an effort to ensure community safety, Governor Tina Kotek formally asked Oregon’s District Attorneys, along with Community Corrections Directors, for their assistance in determining if individuals convicted within their jurisdiction should have their commutations revoked. (Governor’s letter attached) The governor has the power to grant a lesser sentence than was imposed by a judge to any individual who has committed a crime.  Governor Brown used this power in historic numbers to reduce hundreds of sentences resulting in the otherwise premature release of those individuals from prison. As the current Governor of Oregon, Tina Kotek has the authority and discretion to revoke a commutation that was previously granted by Governor Brown.

 

          In response to the Governor’s request, Marion County District Attorney Paige Clarkson examined 138 individual defendants who had been prosecuted by the Marion County District Attorney’s office, sentenced by a Marion County Judge, and then subsequently had their sentences commuted by Governor Brown. The analysis focused on any criminal involvement subsequent to receiving a commutation.  As a result,District Attorney Clarkson has formally asked Governor Kotek to authorize the revocation of commutations received by 57 convicted individuals from Marion County. (District Attorney Letter, Attached)

 

          In an effort to ensure that the requests for revocation were fair and just, District Attorney Clarkson’s staff exerted considerable time, effort, and resources to assess each commutation recipient on a case-by-case basis. (Spreadsheet Attached) In summary, District Attorney Clarkson’s analysis found, as follows:

 

11 of the 138 persons with Marion County commutations have victimized others by committing various person felonies and/or misdemeanors.

 

An additional 28 are currently wanted for crimes and violations or have already been convicted of a non-person crime since their grant of commutation and release from prison.

 

Two are currently serving prison sentences for felonies committed after their release but do not appear to have had their clemency revoked.

 

One is currently awaiting trial for Murder in the Second Degree with a firearm committed within only one year of Governor Brown’s release.

 

District Attorney Clarkson thanks Governor Kotek for her shared desire in keeping Oregon a safe place to live. For Clarkson, “Public safety should be a priority for every leader in our state.  We must remain committed to a process of justice that keeps that goal at the forefront. Our review of these commutations is evidence that prior decisions lost sight of that.  With this request to our Governor, we ask that previous missteps be remedied.” 

 

          In her letter to Oregon’s District Attorneys and Community Corrections Directors, Governor Kotek stated, “If I believe someone is violating their conditions of release or supervision and revocation is warranted, I will not hesitate to use my authority and discretion as Governor to revoke their commutation.”  The Marion County District Attorney’s Office has submitted its formal revocation requests along with detailed supporting documentation to the Governor’s Office.  Governor Kotek’s office has responded that they will review these requests. 

 

Marion County District Attorney asks Governor Kotek to revoke 57 out of a 138 commutations granted by former Governor Brown - 11/21/23

In an effort to ensure community safety, Governor Tina Kotek formally asked Oregon’s District Attorneys, along with Community Corrections Directors, for their assistance in determining if individuals convicted within their jurisdiction should have their commutations revoked. (Governor’s letter attached) The governor has the power to grant a lesser sentence than was imposed by a judge to any individual who has committed a crime.  Governor Brown used this power in historic numbers to reduce hundreds of sentences resulting in the otherwise premature release of those individuals from prison. As the current Governor of Oregon, Tina Kotek has the authority and discretion to revoke a commutation that was previously granted by Governor Brown.

In response to the Governor’s request, Marion County District Attorney Paige Clarkson examined 138 individual defendants who had been prosecuted by the Marion County District Attorney’s office, sentenced by a Marion County Judge, and then subsequently had their sentences commuted by Governor Brown. The analysis focused on any criminal involvement subsequent to receiving a commutation.  As a result, District Attorney Clarkson has formally asked Governor Kotek to authorize the revocation of commutations received by 57 convicted individuals from Marion County. (District Attorney Letter, Attached)

In an effort to ensure that the requests for revocation were fair and just, District Attorney Clarkson’s staff exerted considerable time, effort, and resources to assess each commutation recipient on a case-by-case basis. (Spreadsheet Attached) In summary, District Attorney Clarkson’s analysis found, as follows:

(1) 11 of the 138 persons with Marion County commutations have victimized others by committing various person felonies and/or misdemeanors.

(2) An additional 28 are currently wanted for crimes and violations or have already been convicted of a non-person crime since their grant of commutation and release from prison.

(3) Two are currently serving prison sentences for felonies committed after their release but do not appear to have had their clemency revoked.

(4)One is currently awaiting trial for Murder in the Second Degree with a firearm committed within only one year of Governor Brown’s release.

District Attorney Clarkson thanks Governor Kotek for her shared desire in keeping Oregon a safe place to live. For Clarkson, “Public safety should be a priority for every leader in our state.  We must remain committed to a process of justice that keeps that goal at the forefront. Our review of these commutations is evidence that prior decisions lost sight of that.  With this request to our Governor, we ask that previous missteps be remedied.” 

In her letter to Oregon’s District Attorneys and Community Corrections Directors, Governor Kotek stated, “If I believe someone is violating their conditions of release or supervision and revocation is warranted, I will not hesitate to use my authority and discretion as Governor to revoke their commutation.”  The Marion County District Attorney’s Office has submitted its formal revocation requests along with detailed supporting documentation to the Governor’s Office.  Governor Kotek’s office has responded that they will review these requests.