Kaiser Permanente Northwest
Emergency Messages as of 1:37 am, Wed. Oct. 5
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Kaiser Permanente Northwest.
Primary email address for a new account:

  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes.
October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes.
Breast Cancer Warning: Dr. Sheila Jhansale available for interviews (Photo) - 10/04/22

PORTLAND, Ore. (Oct. 5, 2022): Breast cancer screening rates declined steeply during the pandemic, with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reporting a drop as much as 87%. Kaiser Permanente data shows those rates beginning to recover, but the number of people coming in for breast cancer screenings is still 30% below pre-pandemic rates.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes. Every woman between ages 40 and 75 is encouraged to catch up on this important preventive care.

“The earlier breast cancer is found, the more easily and successfully it can be treated,” said Dr. Sheila Jhansale, primary care physician lead at Kaiser Permanente Northwest. “As a result of regular self-examinations and mammograms, breast cancer is being detected at an earlier state, but mammogram screening rates are not back to their pre-pandemic numbers.”

Breast cancer will affect one in eight women, according to the CDC, which says that breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. Mammograms have worked wonders for early detection of this cancer, and treatments have made great strides. Death rates in women over age 50 have fallen, according to the American Cancer Society, although the CDC says that African American women are still more likely to die from it.

As a national leader in the percentage of members receiving breast cancer screening, Kaiser Permanente breast cancer patients have a lower mortality rate compared to national benchmarks and we encourage spreading the word this October that screenings can save lives.

Interviews available

Dr. Sheila Jhansale, primary care physician lead at Kaiser Permanente Northwest, is available for available for Zoom or phone interviews with media this Wednesday, Oct. 5 from 1-5 p.m. Contact Karen Vitt to schedule.

 Dr. Jhansale is prepared to discuss:

  • Importance of regular breast cancer screenings (early detection)
     
  • Methods of breast cancer screenings (self-exams, mammograms, etc.)
     
  • Breast cancer risk factors and prevention
     
  • Breast cancer diagnosis and treatments

Breast Cancer Fast Facts:

  • One in eight women in the United States (about 13%) will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.
     
  • Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2022, it's estimated that about 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.
     
  • Death rates have been steady in women under 50 since 2007 but have continued to drop in women over 50.
     
  • In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in Black women than white women. Overall, Black women are more likely to die of breast cancer.

ABOUT KAISER PERMANENTE 

For 75 years, Kaiser Permanente has been committed to shaping the future of health and health care — and helping our members, patients, and communities experience more healthy years. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Since July 21, 1945, Kaiser Permanente’s mission has been to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health.

For more information, please visit: about.kaiserpermanente.org

Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease / Kaiser Permanente Northwest
Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease / Kaiser Permanente Northwest
Fall Virus Surge: Dr. Katie Sharff available for interviews (Photo) - 09/12/22

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept. 12, 2022): With flu season right around the corner, health experts are concerned that concurrent viruses including Flu, RSV and COVID-19 could set the stage for a tough fall and winter. The Omicron booster and flu vaccine offer the protection our communities need this fall and winter as more of us spend time indoors.

“Based on the data we have seen out of the Southern Hemisphere this year, we may have an early and aggressive flu season with significant impact on school-age children,” said Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease for Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore. “The Southern Hemisphere had an early, large flu surge, and the U.S. typically mirrors that pattern. This is not the time to skip flu shots for yourself or your family.”

More viruses are expected to circulate this fall than last, in part due to behaviors changing back to “more normal,” but you can protect yourself and your loved ones by getting vaccinated and practicing healthy behaviors. “For individuals with underlying medical conditions such as heart disease or lung disease, it is essential they have an action plan as we head into viral respiratory season to help keep them healthy and out of the hospital this winter,” said Dr. Sharff.

Additionally, the updated COVID-19 Omicron booster is now available and is expected to offer the best protection against the BA.5 and BA.4 subvariants that are circulating now. To find the updated booster, check with your doctor, local pharmacy or visit any of Oregon Health Authority's (OHA) vaccine clinics listed here.

Flu clinics begin at Kaiser Permanente on September 19, and members can schedule both flu and COVID-19 vaccinations by appointment at kp.org.

Interviews available
Dr. Sharff has been on the front lines of the pandemic from the beginning, treating patients and studying emerging data, and she is making herself available for Zoom interviews with media this Tuesday, Sept. 13 from 11 a.m. to noon; and Wednesday, Sept. 14 from noon to 1 p.m. Contact Karen Vitt to schedule.

Dr. Sharff is prepared to discuss:

Fall + Winter 2022 Virus Surge
• Why are we expecting a more severe flu season this fall and winter?
• What happens when we have concurrent viruses, including cold, flu and COVID-19 circulating at the same time?
• Can you get the flu and COVID-19 at the same time? How can you tell the difference?

Vaccines and boosters
• What is the status of the COVID-19 Omicron booster? Who is eligible and where can you get it?
• Timing of the COVID-19 Omicron booster if you have had a recent COVID-19 illness or previous booster.
• Why is it so important to get your flu shot this fall?
• Can you get your Omicron booster and your flu shot at the same time? What about other routine vaccinations?

Healthy behaviors
• How to practice healthy behaviors as we spend more time indoors in fall and winter
• How to have a winter action plan if you suffer from chronic medical conditions to keep you healthy this winter

ABOUT KAISER PERMANENTE 
For 75 years, Kaiser Permanente has been committed to shaping the future of health and health care — and helping our members, patients, and communities experience more healthy years. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Since July 21, 1945, Kaiser Permanente’s mission has been to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health.

For more information, please visit: about.kaiserpermanente.org