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Tucker Malarkey
Tucker Malarkey
High Desert Museum Now Accepting Submissions for the 2024 Waterston Desert Writing Prize (Photo) - 02/21/24

BEND, OR — What do bestselling author Tucker Malarkey, Emmy award-winning actor Sam Waterston and one winning writer have in common? 

All will take part in the High Desert Museum’s 10th annual Waterston Desert Writing Prize which honors excellence in literary nonfiction about deserts. The Prize is now accepting submissions until May 1, 2024. 

This year the Waterston Desert Writing Prize will recognize the winner with a $3,000 cash award and a reception and reading at the High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon on September 26, 2024. The winner and finalists will be selected by the 2024 guest judge Sam Waterston – renowned actor and brother of Prize founder Ellen Waterston.

Known for his work in theater, television and film, Sam Waterston gained stardom portraying DA  Jack McCoy on the NBC crime series Law & Order (1994–2010, 2022–), for which he has received a Screen Actors Guild AwardGolden Globe Award and Emmy Award. Today you can also catch Sam’s performances in the Emmy-nominated Netflix Original series Grace and Frankie and Hulu’s award-winning limited series The Dropout in which he plays George Schultz. Other accolades include an Academy Award nomination for his role as journalist Sydney Schanberg in The Killing Fields (1984) and OBIE and Drama Desk awards in theater.

Sam Waterston will announce the 2024 winner and address attendees during the Waterston Desert Writing Prize ceremonies alongside the 2024 Prize winner and the 2024 keynote speaker, Tucker Malarkey, who will attend in person. 

Nationally bestselling author of the critically acclaimed and national bestselling novels An Obvious Enchantment and Resurrection, Malarkey’s first major work of nonfiction, Stronghold, describes one man’s journey to save salmon habitat in the U.S. and Russia. Stronghold was an editor’s pick for The New York Times, National Book ReviewOutside and Forbes. With a career that began at The Washington Post, Malarkey’s love of human culture and wilderness have since taken her all over the world.

The Prize was established in 2014, inspired by author and poet Ellen Waterston’s love of the High Desert — a region that has been her muse for more than 40 years. The Waterston Desert Writing Prize celebrates writers whose work reflects a similar connection to a desert, recognizing the vital role deserts play in ecosystems and the human narrative.

“To see how the Waterston Desert Writing Prize has grown in 10 years is exciting,” said Ellen Waterston. “Tucker Malarkey and my brother Sam Waterston will help us reach new audiences and promote the literary arts as the High Desert Museum has done since the Prize became a Museum program four years ago.” 

The winner of the 2023 Waterston Desert Writing Prize was Anna Welch. Her submission, “Momentum: A Trans-Continental Bicycle Journey,” details her 2019 adventure 3,700 miles across the continental United States. During that substantial bicycling trip, Welch encountered her first desert. Her work has been published in Wilderness Magazine and was most recently featured in the anthology True Travel Tales by Fine Line Press. 

“The many gifted writers who submit their work for the Waterston Desert Writing Prize expand how we think about desert ecosystems,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “We look forward to how our perspectives will grow in 2024.”

Emerging, mid-career and established nonfiction writers who illustrate artistic excellence, sensitivity to place and desert literacy with the desert as both subject and setting are invited to apply. The award supports literary nonfiction writers who are completing, proposing or considering the creation of a book-length manuscript. It is recommended that the writing sample submitted is part of the proposed project or closely represents it in content and style.

The Waterston Desert Writing Prize Ceremony will take place at the High Desert Museum on September 26, 2024. To RSVP, visit highdesertmuseum.org/2024-waterston-ceremony.

To learn more about the Waterston Desert Writing Prize and how to submit an entry, visit highdesertmuseum.org/waterston-prize. Submissions will be accepted through May 1, 2024.

 

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and was a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

 

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Attached Media Files: Tucker Malarkey , Sam Waterston
Photo courtesy of the Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center
Photo courtesy of the Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center
High Desert Museum Opens New Exhibition Timber Culture (Photo) - 02/09/24

BEND, OR — As the timber industry boomed across the High Desert a century ago, a small company town sprung up against the Wallowa Mountains called Maxville.

Operated by the Bowman-Hicks Lumber Company from 1923-1933, the town was home to Black and white loggers who worked side by side despite official segregation laws. As a result, their families often intermingled and interracial friendships were formed. For a few decades, Maxville thrived.

The story of this town and its people is now shared at the High Desert Museum through Timber Culture, a traveling photography exhibition curated by the Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center in Joseph, Oregon. The Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center highlights the cultural history of the area by collecting, interpreting and preserving the history of Maxville and similar logging communities across the West.

“The role of African American loggers in Oregon’s timber industry is a history that’s often untold,” says Donald M. Kerr Curator of Natural History Hayley Brazier, Ph.D. “This exhibit provides the opportunity to explore that story.”

Although Timber Culture is a traveling exhibition, the Museum’s exhibitions team added their own special touches. The exhibit features historic objects from the Museum’s collection illustrating everyday life in the era as well as a few hands-on interactives for kids like a wash basin with wash boards and a cross section of a massive old growth ponderosa pine tree.

“We’re excited to share more stories of people in the High Desert through the opening of Timber Culture,” says Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “The black-and-white images bring to life the timber industry and the lives of the people during that time.”

Most residents left the community during the Great Depression and the town was completely abandoned by the early 1940s. Today, little remains to mark the townsite except one collapsed building. Still, Maxville’s unique history and legacy remains. Timber Culture will remain open at the Museum through April 28, 2024.

Timber Culture is made possible by the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation and the Visit Central Oregon Future Fund with support from CHUBB. Learn more about Timber Culture at highdesertmuseum.org/timber-culture.

ABOUT THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: The High Desert Museum opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and was a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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