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News Releases
Sr Vol Month August
Sr Vol Month August
08-11-22 Commissioners Honor Bill Crenshaw as Volunteer of the Month (Photo) - 08/11/22

DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 11, 2022

 

Commissioners Honor Bill Crenshaw as Volunteer of the Month

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress were honored to present Bill Crenshaw with the Douglas County Senior Services Volunteer of the Month award for August 2022, at their weekly business meeting on Wednesday, August 10.

 

“One of the most fun things I have the privilege of doing as a County Commissioner is recognizing the special people who volunteer in our Senior Services programs. Bill Crenshaw is absolutely invaluable to Douglas County. He’s a real fixture here at the Douglas County Courthouse as a greeter and also as a volunteer at our senior dining sites. We are thankful for all the ways he serves seniors in our community.” – Commissioner Tom Kress, liaison Commissioner to Douglas County Senior Services.

 

            Jeanne Wright, Director of Douglas County Senior Services, nominated Bill as a Douglas County Senior Services Volunteer of the Month. She said, “Bill is ‘Mr. Sunshine.’  He has served our department in almost every capacity, from the chair in the reception area of our office to serving as chair of our Senior Services Advisory Council. He is a priceless component to our programs because he is such a great listener. He provides valuable and timely feedback on issues that concern older adults, which allows our team the opportunity to address them proactively.  Bill truly enjoys helping people.  He has dedicated his time in retirement to not only volunteering for Douglas County Senior Services, but also in lending a hand wherever it is needed.”

 

In addition to his role as a greeter at the Douglas County Courthouse, Bill faithfully attends and helps at our Bistro Sixty Glide Senior Dining Site several times a month.  He also assists in distributing information about the services provided by Douglas Senior Services Department in the Glide and eastern Douglas County communities. As a member of our Senior Services Advisory Council, Bill helps to promote the program by inviting older adults to attend meetings or encouraging them to join the Council as a way to ensure positive outcomes for those participating in the programs offered for seniors locally. 

 

Bill retired from Roseburg Forest Products (RFP) in 2003 after a remarkable 40-year career.  He started at the plant in Dixonville and worked his way up through the ranks to supervisor, eventually taking on the role of Safety Director at the Dillard Plywood Plant.  Soon after retiring from RFP, Bill answered a call for help from the Roseburg Senior Center (RSC).  He served on the Board of Directors for RSC for 19 years, 8 of them as the treasurer, before retiring recently to spend more time with his family. When he is not helping others with a ride to church or greeting folks with a friendly face when they walk in the doors of the Douglas County Courthouse, Bill enjoys playing pinochle with friends and has always loved to travel. 

 

Bill said, “I really enjoy visiting with people, but I’ve always been drawn to older folks. I never tire of hearing their individual stories. Each one of them is special. I’m glad I can be a friendly face and I want all to feel welcome.” 

 

            Our Bistro Sixty Senior Dining Sites prepare meals on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at our seven rural dining site locations in Glide, Glendale, Reedsport, Riddle, Sutherlin, Winston and Yoncalla. Senior Services staff know there are others in our communities who could benefit from their Meals on Wheels delivery program and/or meals at their Bistro Sixty Senior Dining Sites.  If residents know of friends or family who are unable to drive, need assistance with daily living activities, would benefit from hot meal delivery or need other assistance, they are encouraged to call the Aging & Disabilities Resource Connection in the Douglas County Senior Services Department at (541) 440-3677 or by sending an email to adrc@co.douglas.or.us

 

            Douglas County’s seven rural Senior Dining Sites and Meals on Wheels programs are managed by Douglas County Senior Services Department staff, but are successful because of the dedication of volunteers like Bill. To get involved with Douglas County Bistro Sixty Senior Dining Sites and Meals on Wheels programs or to learn more about volunteer opportunities, contact Darla Hilburn at the Douglas County Senior Services Department via email at dahilbur@co.douglas.or.us or by calling (541) 440-3677.

 

            Thank you, Bill! You truly are “Mr. Sunshine!”

Attached Media Files: Sr Vol Month August
DC Parks
DC Parks
08-11-22 TEMPORARY CLOSURE NOTICE - Boat Ramp, East Parking Lot at Amacher County Park (Photo) - 08/11/22

DOUGLAS COUNTY PARKS DEPARTMENT

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 11, 2022

 

*** TEMPORARY CLOSURE NOTICE ***

Boat Ramp, East Parking Lot at Amacher County Park

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Beginning on Monday, August 22, 2022, the Douglas County Parks Department will temporarily close the boat ramp and adjacent parking lot on the east side of the railroad trestle at John P. Amacher County Park.  The closure is necessary in order to complete a much needed improvement project that involves the repaving of the parking lot, installation of new curbs, new stormwater catch basins and striping of parking spots.  The project is expected to take about six weeks to complete.  The tentative project timeline is August 22, 2022 thru September 30, 2022.  As with any construction or road project, unforeseen delays due to weather, equipment and material availability could possibly extend the anticipated project timeline.

 

We understand that our park is a popular destination for boaters, rafters, fishermen, picnickers, nature enthusiasts and campers, so we wanted to let park patrons know that it is our goal to have the rest of Amacher Park, including the campground, day use area, pavilion, trails, and parking lots west of the railroad trestle open and accessible for park patrons.  However, please note that there might be short periods of time when the contractor will need to close other areas of the park in order to complete their work.  We ask that patrons please be patient and courteous to workers and obey the posted closure signs until the project has been completed. 

 

We also want to encourage those wishing to float the river or fish off the river banks or kayak in the area to utilize access points near the day use area during the project period.  In addition, during the ramp closure, boaters are encouraged to select an alternate facility that will fit your needs amongst our large inventory of Douglas County Parks with boat ramps.

 

In addition to Parks Department funds approved by the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, the project is being funded in part with grants from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon State Marine Board and the Umpqua Fisherman’s Association.  The total project cost will be roughly $800,000.

 

John P. Amacher County Park and Campground is located along the banks of the North Umpqua River about 6 miles north of Roseburg.  It sits adjacent to the Winchester Bridge at 5750 NE Stephens Street in Winchester, Oregon.  The county park offers day use recreational opportunities like boating, fishing, swimming, rafting, picnicking, hiking, walking and a pavilion for events.  The Campground has 20 full hook -up and 10 non-hook up campground site accommodations with showers and restrooms. It is a great park become your home base to experience what central Douglas County has to offer. 

 

The Douglas County Parks Department appreciates the public’s patience as they continue to improve your recreational experience in our county parks. For more information, or to locate a park, campground or boat ramp near you, log onto the Douglas County Parks Department’s page on the Douglas County, Oregon Government Website at: https://douglascounty-oregon.us/265/Parks.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist (PIO)(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: DC Parks
DC Farmers Markets
DC Farmers Markets
08-10-22 Commissioners Issue Proclamation for National Farmers Market Week (Photo) - 08/10/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 10, 2022

 

Commissioners Issue Proclamation for National Farmers Market Week

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Board of Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress issued a proclamation today at the Weekly Business Meeting calling upon all citizens of Douglas County to observe National Farmers Market Week.  The proclamation was presented by Commissioner Boice, on behalf of the Board and acknowledged that, “Douglas County recognizes the importance of expanding the agricultural and handcrafted marketing opportunities that assist and encourage the next generation of farmers, ranchers and artisans; generating farm and small business income to help stimulate business development and job creation, and building community connections through rural and urban linkages.” A copy of the live video presentation can be found on the Douglas County Government Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasCountyeGovernment.

 

The Commissioners celebrated the bountiful harvest, amazing crafts and beautiful music available at all eleven of our Douglas County Farmers Markets (see complete list below).  Commissioner Boice presented National Farmers Market Week proclamation certificates to Glide Farmers Market: Rebeccah Dunnavant, Market Manager and Dunnavant Baked Goods (Vendor) and Sarah Talcott, Talcott Ranch (Vendor); Umpqua Valley Farmers Market: Chris VanDyke, Market Manager and Local Fixe (Vendor), Richelle Olson, Humble Heart Farm (Vendor) and Joe Ross, local musician; and the Myrtle Creek Farmers Market: Amanda Puls, Market Manager and Two Birdz (Vendor). 

 

I wanted to thank all those that came out today to receive the proclamations, as well as all of the people out there in our community that are a part of our local Farmers Markets. We recognize that it takes someone to organize these markets, and often times it is a labor of love with little to no pay to do the organizational part.  We wanted to say a special thank you to all the market managers for the extra work they do to make sure these markets continue to happen,” commented Commissioner Freeman. 

 

Check out the Farmers Markets in Douglas County:


 

Canyonville Farmers Market

Seven Feathers Casino Resort parking lot

146 Chief Miwaleta Lane, Canyonville

9:30 am-1:30 pm • Wednesdays • May-December

http://www.canyonvillefarmersmarket.org/

https://www.facebook.com/CanyonvilleFarmersMarket

 

Drain Farmer And Artisan Market

308 N. First St., Drain • Lot next to Ray’s Food Place

10 am-2 pm • Saturdays • June-August

https://www.facebook.com/Drain-Farmers-Market-113327013740677/

 

Glide Farmers Market

Glide Community Center • 20062 N. Umpqua Hwy, Glide

10 am-1 pm • Tuesdays • Late May to early October

https://www.facebook.com/Glide-Farmers-Market-202852260113552

 

Lookingglass Brewery Market

Lookingglass Brewery, 192 S.E. Main St., Winston

4-7 pm • Wednesdays • April-September

https://www.facebook.com/lookingglassbrewery/

 

Lookingglass Farmers Market

Lookingglass Grange • 7426 Lookingglass Road

2:30-5:30 pm • Thursdays • Early April to mid-December

https://www.facebook.com/LookingglassGrange927Oregon

 

Melrose Farmers Market

Melrose Grange • 3811 Melrose Road, Roseburg

4-7 pm • Tuesdays • May-October

https://www.facebook.com/groups/331761805099606/

 

Myrtle Creek Farmers Market

Elks Lodge overflow parking lot

106 S. Main St., Myrtle Creek

9 am-1 pm • Saturdays • April-October

https://www.facebook.com/groups/478710847207463/

 

Porter Creek Mercantile Market

116 Haven Lane, Tenmile

42 Connect Pick Up

11 am-2 pm • Thursday, Friday & Saturday • Year Round

https://www.facebook.com/groups/204939537508533/

https://www.facebook.com/Porter-Creek-Mercantile-Market-Place-101998795805603/

 

Reedsport Farmers Market

Old Town Reedsport

392 Fir Ave., Reedsport

10 am-4 pm • Fridays • June-October

http://www.oldtownreedsport.com/

 

Sutherlin Farmers Market

150 S. Willamette St., Sutherlin

Corner of Willamette & Everett Streets

2-6 pm • Thursdays • Early April-October

https://www.facebook.com/SutherlinFarmersMarket

 

Umpqua Valley Farmers Market

1771 W. Harvard Ave., Roseburg

9 am-1 pm • Saturdays • Outdoors year round

http://www.uvfarmersmarket.com/

https://www.facebook.com/UmpquaValleyFarmersMarket


 

 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture proclaimed the first National Farmers Market Week in August 1999, and this year over 8,600 farmers markets across the nation, including 130 farmers markets in Oregon and 11 farmers markets in Douglas County will celebrate National Farmers Market Week from August 7-13, 2022.  The proclamation presented today is a reminder to our residents to get out and support our 11 local farmers markets in Canyonville, Drain, Glide, Winston, Lookingglass, Melrose, Myrtle Creek, Tenmile, Reedsport, Sutherlin and Roseburg.

 

###

 

Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

 

(Proclamation and Photo Collage Attached.  Individual photos available upon request)

 

Douglas County Proclamation Project

Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress recognized that the pandemic traumatized our country, state and county on so many levels.  The impact was not only felt physically, but also mentally, emotionally and financially. The Commissioners collectively decided to start this series of ‘kudos’ proclamations, and are dedicated to recognizing people that have continued to do good things in our community despite the challenges of the past two years.   They plan to continue to highlight the amazing, often selfless work being done in order to encourage our residents to do the same.  The incredible stories being told during our proclamation events shine a huge spotlight on the amazing people and organizations in Douglas County.  We want to focus on what really matters, our people. So far this year, the Commissioners have issued 26 proclamations and honored over 735 Douglas County individuals as a part of our Proclamation Project.  They hope you will join them in supporting, thanking and perhaps volunteering to help these wonderful individuals and service organizations, so we can come together to rekindle and restore our sense of community, our faith in others and the joy that makes Douglas County the best place to live, work and play. 

Freeman, Little and Barnett
Freeman, Little and Barnett
08-09-22 Local Veterans Little and Barnett Honored with Prestigious National Award (Photo) - 08/10/22

DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 9, 2022 

 

Local Veterans Little and Barnett Honored with Prestigious National Award

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress are elated to announce that not one, but two local Douglas County Veterans recently received National Awards.  Commissioner Tim Freeman was honored to be invited to as a special guest for an award ceremony in Ashland, Oregon for the National Chapel of Four Chaplain’s Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion Award presentation for Douglas County resident, Chief Warrant Officer James S. Little (U.S. Navy Retired). The Bronze Medallion is the Second Highest Honor and is presented annually to a very select group of individuals in the United States by the Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation.  The medallion is bestowed only to individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to the well-being of others at the State, Regional or National level, and whose very life epitomizes the spirit of the sacrifice of the Four Chaplains.  Unbeknownst to Commissioner Freeman and other invited guests, a second Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion Award was presented to another Douglas County resident, 1st Sergeant Jim Barnett (U.S. Marine Corps Retired) that same evening. 

 

James S. Little was nominated for the prestigious award by Commissioner Tim Freeman, Mary Newman-Keyes, the Douglas County Veterans Service Director, and Staff Sergeant John Pierson (U.S. Air Force Retired), Member of the Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee and President of Military Honors by the Pipes (a non-profit organization that plays bagpipes for military funerals at no cost to the families).  He was nominated by the trio for his lifetime of selfless service to our country and to his fellow veterans.

 

Little proudly served our county for three decades as a Nuclear Weapons Specialist in the United States Navy (1960-1991).  During his distinguished Navy career, he received 29 service medals and ribbons, as well as various letters of appreciation and commendation.  Paramount to his career was the Meritorious Service Medal, which was awarded to him by the President of the United States, for his outstanding non-combat service to the United States of America.  Since retiring from the Navy, Little has humbly dedicated his life to volunteer work on behalf of his fellow servicemen and women.  As a prolific writer, he has utilized his writing talent in his advocacy work for veterans, and in publishing a memoir chronicling his adventures in the United States Navy, entitled, “Brotherhood of Doom: Memoirs of a Navy Nuclear Weaponsman.” While his military career was spent mostly shrouded in secrecy, the significant contributions he achieved while serving in the military, and now in retirement honorably serving the veteran community, are no secret. In support of the trio’s nomination, they illustrated four of Little’s distinguished accomplishments that garnered national attention for his noble and selfless leadership working with local veterans groups on the Veterans Cremains Project, the Unclaimed Baby Cremains Project, Save Our Roseburg VA Campaign and the Roseburg State Veterans Home Project. He continues working with the group on their mission to ensure that no veteran is ever left behind, and in working with state legislators to change state laws pertaining to unclaimed cremains. Little has never wavered in his dutiful leadership to our local veteran community.  His efforts on the Save our Roseburg VA Campaign resulted in the passing of a resolution by the Oregon State Legislature in support of restoring Roseburg VAMC to a full-service hospital.  Little has received the local Chapel of Four Chaplain’s Legion of Honor Award and is a Master of Ceremonies, presenter & co-organizer of the Legion of Honor Award Program in Roseburg with Jim Barnett.  Additionally, he serves on the Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee and is a local Representative at Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs advisory meetings.  Little is an active member of Douglas County Veterans Forum, Vietnam Veterans Affairs, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Fleet Reserve Association, Douglas County Vet Net, Award Winning Roseburg Veterans Day Parade, Annual Memorial Day Ceremony, Oregon National Guard events for 7th Battalion 158th Regiment Charlie Company, Remembering America’s Heroes & Living History Days, and the annual wreath laying at Roseburg National Cemetery. He also officiates, attends and assists with numerous Military Honors Services, advocates on behalf of Roseburg National Cemetery and coordinates Stand Down events for Roseburg and Medford and so much more.  Little is affectionately known in the community as the “Veterans Advocate, Advocate” 

 

Little is a true champion for other veterans.  His impact on veterans and our community is incredibly profound. He leaves people and organizations stronger, and better, because of his influence. His insight and knowledge are matched only by his honorable and generous heart. Selflessly tenacious, dutifully conscientious, relentlessly industrious, Little’s charisma and lionhearted approach to life epitomizes the spirit of the sacrifice of the Four Chaplains,” proudly stated Commissioner Tim Freeman. 

 

Jim Barnett was nominated for the prestigious award by T.J. Morgan, National Junior Vice Commandant and Corporate Treasurer for the National Marine Corps League.  He was nominated for his service to our country, commitment to the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and for the work he has done for fellow veterans. 

 

Barnett entered the USMC at the age of 17 with four of his best friends, shortly after the Korean War broke out. They attended boot camp together in San Diego.  Although he was too young for combat, he was enlisted and assigned to the Naval brig in San Diego for guard duty.  Barnett proudly served our country for 20 years in the USMC and is a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam wars. He served as a drill instructor for the ROTC program at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, and has also worked as a Marine recruiter. It is amazing to note that he still keeps in touch with his past students and continues to honor them for their success.  Barnett, who is nearly 90 is still very active with his brethren in the USMC and in his community.  In support of the nomination, he was recognized for his accomplishments and efforts in fundraising and establishing two major USMC National Memorial Monuments at the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, Virginia, and for spearheading the campaign to create and place a memorial in Roseburg in honor of Major General Marion Carl, a highly decorated ace pilot for the USMC who was tragically killed during a home invasion in Glide in 1998.  The memorial, which Barnett was instrumental in helping to raise $35,000 for, was placed at the Roseburg Regional Airport and includes a bronze likeness of the Major General. He made sure that the cement foundation of the memorial contained soil from each of the battlegrounds over which Carl fought.  Another noteworthy project for Barnett was the coordination, fundraising and installation of the life-size military uniform memorial enclosure at the American Legion Post #16.  The 18½ foot enclosure features various military uniforms from all branches of the military.  He has also received the local Chapel of Four Chaplain’s Legion of Honor Award, the Marine of the Year Award from the Marine Corps League and is a Master of Ceremonies, presenter & co-organizer of the Legion of Honor Award Program in Roseburg with Jim Little.  Additionally, Barnett is an active member of the Marine Corps League, Drill Instructors West Coast Association, Toys for Tots Annual Program, American Legion Post #16, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Vietnam Veterans of America, Remembering America’s Heroes & Living History Days, Annual wreath laying at Roseburg National Cemetery event and many others.  He enjoys working on and sharing Korean War history with various groups all over the United States, traveling everywhere supporting USMC events and fundraisers and stopping by USMC Base Camp Pendleton to visit his USMC brothers on the drill field.  Also, it goes without saying that his famous USMC Museum in his home is second to none.  His collection of over 1,500 pieces of Marine Corps memorabilia from coins to posters to bulldogs is made complete with boxes filled with soil collected from every USMC base in the world, as well as all the major World War II battlefields. 

 

Jim Barnett is one of the finest servant leaders I know. Throughout Jim’s time in the USMC, during his time as a teacher for Notre Dame ROTC program and in retirement has given back 100-fold to his community and beyond,” stated TJ Morgan. “It was my honor to nominate Jim Barnett for this award. His country, his fellow Marines and the Marine Corps League are all proud to call him ours.

 

Dignitaries traveled from the Chapel of Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation office in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to present the prestigious Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion Award to both Jim Little and Jim Barnett.  Representing the Chapel of the Four Chaplains and presenting the award was Lieutenant Colonel Kirk Michelson (U.S. Army Retired) and Master Sergeant William Kaemmer (U.S. Army Retired), who is the Director of Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation.  The event was held at Dana Campbell Vineyards in Ashland, Oregon.  Vineyard owners and event hosts were Patrick Dana Flannery Senior Chief (US Navy Retired) & Paula Campbell Brown 2 Star Admiral (US Navy Retired).  The event was sponsored by Umpqua Bank’s Medford Community and Business Baking Center and also included presentation of Four Chaplains special recognition awards to David’s Chair, whose mission is, “to enrich the lives of mobility impaired people with independence and freedom by empowering them to engage in outdoor activities they previously were unable to, free of charge.”  Also attending the ceremonious event were Commissioner Tim Freeman’s wife Angelia; Jim Barnett’s wife Ann; Jim Little’s wife, Carmen Little and Kellie Trenkle, Douglas County Public Affairs Specialist.  Of special note, Commissioner Freeman, Mary Newman-Keyes, John Pierson, Ann Barnett and Carmen Little are also past recipients of the annual local Legion of Honor Award in Roseburg.  For more information about the Four Chaplains and the Legion of Honor, log onto their website at http://fourchaplains.org/.

 

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist Office (541) 957-4896 | Cell (541) 670-2804 | Email tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Photos Attached.  Additional photos available upon request.

  1. William Kaemmer pictured with Bronze Medallion recipients Jim Barnett and Jim Little, and Commissioner Tim Freeman.
  2. Commissioner Tim Freeman, wife Angelia; Jim Little and wife, Carmen and Jim Barnett and wife Ann.

 

Lighthouse Collage
Lighthouse Collage
08-08-22 Commissioners Issue Proclamations for National Coast Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week (Photo) - 08/08/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 8, 2022

 

Commissioners Issue Proclamations for National Coast

Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman and Tom Kress were on location in Winchester Bay, Oregon on Friday, August 5, 2022 for a special presentation for National Coast Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week.  They issued proclamations and called upon all citizens of Douglas County to observe National Coast Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week in Douglas County.  A copy of the live video presentation can be found on the Douglas County Government Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasCountyeGovernment.

 

Commissioners recognized the brave men and women of our U.S. Coast Guard who protect the personal safety and security of our people; the marine transportation system and infrastructure; our natural and economic resources; the territorial integrity of our nation–from both internal and external threats, natural and man-made and the interests of our navigable waters including U.S. ports, inland waterways, coastlines and international waters.  Commissioner Kress presented National Coast Guard Day proclamation certificates to both the U.S. Coast Guard Sector North Bend and the U.S. Coast Guard Station Umpqua River.  Guests at the presentation were treated to a special ‘flyby’ from a MH-65 Short Range Coast Guard Recovery Helicopter that was on a training mission from Sector North Bend.  Both Coast Guard locations noted that they are actively searching for new recruits to join the U.S. Coast Guard.  If you are interested in learning more about a career in the U.S. Coast Guard and perhaps a tour of the facilities, contact Station Umpqua River at (541) 271-2138 or Sector North Bend at (541) 756-9220.

 

In attendance representing the U.S. Coast Guard were: U.S. Coast Guard Sector North Bend: Maegan Schwartz, Deputy Commander; Dashen Wada, Fireman; Nate Champlin, Lieutenant Commander; Pete Chambers, Lieutenant; Christopher Belisle, Aviation Survival Technician Petty Officer First Class; Connor Haymaker, Aviation Electronics Technician’s Mate Third Class Petty Officer; Weston Blalock, Seaman; Christopher Kofflin, Seaman.  U.S. Coast Guard Station Umpqua River: Officer-in-Charge Benjamin Snider, Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate; Christopher Ouellette, Chief Boatswain’s Mate; Matthew Neff, Machinery Technician Chief Petty Officer; Jonathan Corcoran, Boatswain’s Mate First Class Petty Officer; Chayse Sattler, Petty Officer Second Class; Robert Duprau, Petty Officer Second Class; Trevor Dupuis, Petty Officer Third Class; Michael Lane, Boatswain’s Mate Second Class Petty Officer; Grayson Ritchey, Seaman; Brody Jeeseman, Seaman.

 

Commissioners also recognized National Lighthouse Week.  The Umpqua River Lighthouse and corresponding lighthouse grounds stand as a testament to the commitment of our community members, museum employees, foundation members and volunteers, who have all worked painstakingly and passionately over the years to preserve our lighthouse and coastal history.  Commissioner Kress presented National Lighthouse Week proclamation certificates to the staff, volunteers and foundation members that work tirelessly to keep our Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum, Gift Shop & Café, Art Gallery and Whale Watching Station open and beautiful. 

 

In attendance representing the Umpqua River Lighthouse were: Jamie Davis, Museum Director; Eric Winslow, Museum Operations Technician; David Marshall, Gift Shop Assistant; Douglas County Foundation Members: Carol Phillips, Leslie Sherman, Dale Greenley and Mary Becherer; Former Douglas County Commissioner Doug Robertson and much appreciated volunteers Terry Allen, Shelly Allen and Curtis Scrugham.

 

I want to extend my appreciation to the members of our U.S. Coast Guard in North Bend and Umpqua River for everything you do and for allowing us to celebrate you. The flyover was fantastic!” commented Commissioner Freeman.  “Also, to the Museum Foundation, Staff and Volunteers here at the Umpqua River Lighthouse and Coastal History Museum, thank you.  What an amazing facility we have here in Winchester Bay!  The investments and progress we have made in the last several years at our Lighthouse, Museum and in our coastal communities has been remarkable. I look forward to many more exciting things happening over here in the future.”

 

The proclamations presented on Friday are a reminder to our residents to thank our U.S. Coast Guard men and women for their valued service to our country and our citizens, and to ask that you check out our “gem” on the coast, our Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum, Gift Shop & Café, Art Gallery and Whale Watching Station in Winchester Bay.

###

 

Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

(Proclamations and Photo Collages Attached.  Individual photos available upon request)

Douglas County Proclamation Project

Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress recognized that the pandemic traumatized our country, state and county on so many levels.  The impact was not only felt physically, but also mentally, emotionally and financially. The Commissioners collectively decided to start this series of ‘kudos’ proclamations, and are dedicated to recognizing people that have continued to do good things in our community despite the challenges of the past two years.   They plan to continue to highlight the amazing, often selfless work being done in order to encourage our residents to do the same.  The incredible stories being told during our proclamation events shine a huge spotlight on the amazing people and organizations in Douglas County.  We want to focus on what really matters, our people. So far this year, the Commissioners have issued 25 proclamations and honored over 725 Douglas County individuals as a part of our Proclamation Project.  They hope you will join them in supporting, thanking and perhaps volunteering to help these wonderful individuals and service organizations, so we can come together to rekindle and restore our sense of community, our faith in others and the joy that makes Douglas County the best place to live, work and play. 

SH new boat wash 4
SH new boat wash 4
08-08-22 Commissioner Announce Opening of New Full-Service RV Dump Station (Photo) - 08/08/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 8, 2022

 

Commissioners Announce Opening of New Full-Service

RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor Marina

 

(Douglas County, Ore) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress along with  Douglas County’s Salmon Harbor Marina are elated to announce the opening of a new modern full-service RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor Marina in Winchester Bay.  The RV Dump Station located at the north end of Salmon Harbor  Marina on Ork Rock Road, has been reconfigured to feature twin dump lanes with unlimited capacity, two potable water fill stations, three boat wash stations and an automated pay station that can accept cash, as well as credit and debit cards. 

 

The modern dump station is the latest of several ongoing improvement projects initiated by the Douglas County Board of Commissioners for the Winchester Bay community. Commissioner Chris Boice worked with Salmon Harbor Marina Director Jim Zimmer, the Winchester Bay Sanitary District, and engineers from Dyer Partnership to reconfigure the previous site layout in order to modernize services, increase user efficiency and double the capacity for RV users, travelers, local fishermen and marina visitors alike.   

 

RV dump stations offer an easy and convenient way for RVers and campers to get rid of waste while traveling on the open road. Our modern station allows patrons to pull in, connect a hose, empty their tank and also refill potable water in a relatively short and convenient manner.  The new station replaces an old single lane station that was limited to 25 users per day. The renovation project was completed by contractor Jesse Rodriguez Construction, LLC and also included extending utility services and paving the road to the end of Ork Rock Road. The fee to dump waste at the new station is $10, and both cash and credit/debit cards are accepted at the automated pay machine. 

 

Renovating the RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor not only immediately enhanced the experience for dry campers and RVers by providing the total camping package, but it allowed us to prime the unused empty lot at the end of the marina for future development, which will add value and services to the community long-term,”  stated Commissioner Boice, liaison Commissioner for Salmon Harbor Marina and the Winchester Bay community. “As Commissioners, we are always thinking about how to best optimize projects like this to bring maximum benefits to the residents and travelers recreating in Douglas County.”

 

Salmon Harbor Marina, “the best kept secret on the Oregon Coast,” is one of the largest recreational facilities along the Oregon Coast. Salmon Harbor has immediate access to the Umpqua River, the Umpqua River Lighthouse and Coastal History Museum, the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, the Pacific Ocean, and miles of public white-sand beaches.  The full-service marina offers 550 moorage slips with power and water, two launch ramps, a full-service fuel dock and 124 self-contained first come, first served camping sites with restroom and shower facilities.  They also operate the nationally renowned Winchester Bay RV Resort with 138 large full-hook up sites with newly upgraded WiFi service. 

 

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Kellie Trenkle, Public Affairs Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 440-4493 Email: kellie@co.douglas.or.us 

Photos Attached:

  1. Pictured here are Kevin & Shonda Haglan of Redding, California.  They have visited the Oregon Coast annually for the past 20 years for Shonda’s Birthday and hit Dune Fest on their way home. They came to town looking for the air station and stumbled on the new dump station by accident and were very pleased with the convenience of the dump station, the automated pay machine, as well as the potable water available at no charge. 
  2. New automated pay station
  3. New RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor Marina in Winchester Bay.  
  4. New Boat Wash Station at Salmon Harbor Marina in Winchester Bay.

VAC_LOGO.jpg
VAC_LOGO.jpg
08-03-22 Meeting Notice - Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee (Photo) - 08/03/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 3, 2022

 

** Notice Meeting **

Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee

Tuesday, August 9, 2022

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress are pleased to inform the public that the next Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 9, 2022 at 3:00 pm in Room 216 at the Douglas County Courthouse, located at 1036 SE Douglas Avenue in Roseburg, Oregon. 

 

In compliance with ORS 192.610 to 192.690, we will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to watch the meeting.  To view the live stream, please visit: https://video.ibm.com/channel/douglascountyoregon.  

 

For additional information about this meeting, please contact the Douglas County Veterans Service Office by calling (541) 440-4219 or email at veterans@co.douglas.or.us The meeting agenda can be found on the Douglas County government website at www.co.douglas.or.us.

 

*Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities.

If accommodation is needed to participate in this meeting, please contact (541) 440-4219 prior

to the scheduled meeting time.

 

 

 

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Contact: Mary Newman-Keyes, Director, Douglas County Veterans Service Office, (541) 440-4219 - veterans@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: VAC_LOGO.jpg
DC Parks Appreciation Proclamation
DC Parks Appreciation Proclamation
7-27-22 Commissioners Issue Proclamation for Parks Appreciation Week (Photo) - 07/27/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 27, 2022

 

Commissioners Issue Proclamation for Parks Appreciation Week

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress issued a proclamation today at the Weekly Business Meeting calling upon all citizens of Douglas County to observe July 25-31, 2022 as Parks Appreciation Week in Douglas County.  The proclamation was presented by Commissioner Boice, on behalf of the Board and acknowledged that, “We recognize that Douglas County is home to some of the most beautiful places on Earth, places that inspire us, captivate us and fill us with a sense of great pride.” A copy of the live video presentation can be found on the Douglas County Government Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasCountyeGovernment.

 

This week the Commissioners are celebrating the men and women of Douglas County that work diligently to preserve, beautify and manage the 100 plus local, county, tribal, state and national parks, trails and recreational sites available in our beautiful county.  Commissioner Boice presented Parks Appreciation Week proclamation certificates to directors and staff from the Douglas County Parks Department – Mark Wall, Parks Director and Deb Pack, Division Business Manager; Douglas County Parks Advisory Board – Jerry Chartier, Board Chair and Lonnie Ferber; Salmon Harbor Marina – Savanna Wright, Division Business Manager and Ryan Sullens, Complex Operations Manager; Lower Umpqua Parks & Recreation District – Highland Pool - Reedsport – Knox Story, Director; Yoncalla Parks & Recreation District – Gary Shook; City of Canyonville – Dawn Bennett, City Administrator; City of Roseburg – Dawn Easley, Public Works Director, Val Ligon, Parks and Recreation Program Manager and Tracy Moser, Parks and Recreation Program Manager; Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians – Jessica Cornell, Facilities Administrative Assistant and Oregon State Parks and Recreation Department - Nathan Seable, Park Manager, Southern Oregon Region.

 

We are fortunate to have so many beautiful parks in our county to visit and enjoy.  It’s amazing what we get done in our vast parks system with so few people.  When you think about the number of acres and assets within those acres and the number of visitors that occupy those spaces, and trying to keep up with that demand with the limited staff we have…it is nothing short of a miracle.  You guys and gals work really hard and it is fortunate for us that you love what you do.  We are very fortunate and I am sure our fellow parks organizations are as well, to have some extremely talented, hardworking and dedicated staff to help maintain and keep our park systems vibrant.  This proclamation is our way to say thank you to all these individuals and organizations for everything they do for our parks,” commented Commissioner Boice, liaison Commissioner to the Douglas County Parks Department. 

 

            Commissioners are proud that the Douglas County Parks Department was established in 1949, and was the first County Parks system developed in the state of Oregon. Our Parks Department has grown to over 2,800 acres of recreational opportunities for residents and tourists alike since 1949.  With over 70 dedicated parks, located in the 100 valleys of the Umpqua River, it is the perfect place to go for camping, picnicking, boating, fishing, hiking, OHV riding, horseback riding, disc golf, swimming, and to access thousands of other recreational opportunities.  For more information about Douglas County Parks, log onto: https://douglascounty-oregon.us/265/Parks.  They are also proud of Salmon Harbor Marina, also a department of Douglas County, which boasts one of the Oregon Coast's largest recreational facilities, all in an area known for its natural beauty. Whatever your interests, visitors will discover a complete vacation experience in Salmon Harbor.  For more information about Salmon Harbor Marina, log onto: https://douglascounty-oregon.us/448/Salmon-Harbor-Marina.

 

Their proclamation today is also a reminder to our residents to check out all the local parks, big and small in every city and corner of our County.  They are also happy to acknowledge and help Oregon State Parks and Recreation Department system celebrate their 100th anniversary this year.  During the proclamation presentation today, Nathan Seable, Oregon State Park Manager, Southern Oregon Region presented an exposition about their centennial, “A hundred years ago, state parks were barely an idea in Oregon, little more than patches of roadside greenery. A 5-acre donation in 1922 — setting aside a special place for everyone — became Oregon’s first official state park. Today, the state park system comprises 254 park properties and more than 100,000 acres.”  The Parks Appreciation Week proclamation from the Commissioners is a reminder to our citizens to take time to thank all of our various parks personnel, and also take time to get outside, reconnect with nature and enjoy the benefits that come from spending time in the great outdoors. 

 

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

(Proclamation and Photo Collage Attached.  Individual photos available upon request)

 

Douglas County Proclamation Project

Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress recognized that the pandemic traumatized our country, state and county on so many levels.  The impact was not only felt physically, but also mentally, emotionally and financially. The Commissioners collectively decided to start this series of ‘kudos’ proclamations, and are dedicated to recognizing people that have continued to do good things in our community despite the challenges of the past two years.   They plan to continue to highlight the amazing, often selfless work being done in order to encourage our residents to do the same.  The incredible stories being told during our proclamation events shine a huge spotlight on the amazing people and organizations in Douglas County.  We want to focus on what really matters, our people. So far this year, the Commissioners have issued 23 proclamations and honored over 700 Douglas County individuals as a part of our Proclamation Project.  They hope you will join them in supporting, thanking and perhaps volunteering to help these wonderful individuals and service organizations, so we can come together to rekindle and restore our sense of community, our faith in others and the joy that makes Douglas County the best place to live, work and play. 

 

DC Parks
DC Parks
7-26-22 Temporary Closure Notice - Amacher Park -- Day Use Area (Photo) - 07/26/22

UPDATE: As of 4:30 pm today, Tuesday, July 26, 2022, John P. Amacher County Park Day Use Area and Campground has reopened.  The Douglas County Parks Department was able to quickly locate and repair the water main leak.  Patrons are now able to access the entire park for recreation.  Thank you for your patience.

Douglas County Parks Department

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 26, 2022

 

** Temporary Closure Notice **

Amacher Park – Day Use Area

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Effective today, Tuesday, July 26, 2022, the Douglas County Parks Department needs to temporarily close the Day Use Area, as well as Campsites 1-6 at John P. Amacher County Park and Campground located at 5750 NE Stephens Street in Winchester, Oregon, in order to urgently repair a broken water main. The temporary closure will unfortunately close access to overflow parking in the Day Use Area for park patrons, boaters and those wishing to float the river. 

 

Please note, the rest of Amacher Park, including the boat ramp, parking east of the railroad trestle and the remaining campsites will remain open for park patrons. We apologize for the inconvenience as we work swiftly to repair the water main and reopen access to the Day Use Area and Campsites affected by this closure.     

 

We are asking patrons to please be patient and courteous to others when parking, consider carpooling, and obey the posted closure signs until the repairs can be completed.  Unfortunately, at this time, we do not have an estimated date for reopening. We will keep the public informed as more information becomes available. 

 

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Media Contact:   Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: DC Parks
Umpqua River Lighthouse and Museum
Umpqua River Lighthouse and Museum
7-26-22 What Can Douglas County Government Do For You? Part Four: Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum (Photo) - 07/26/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 26, 2022

What Can Douglas County Government Do For You?

Part Four: Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) – Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress are elated to add a story to their series highlighting the wide-array of services provided by departments within Douglas County government. Douglas County has 26 separate departments, with an additional 19 divisions associated with those departments.  For part three of “What Can County Government Do for You?”, the Commissioners would like to highlight the amazing services provided by our Douglas County Museums.  Last week we featured our The Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History, and this week we wanted to focus our attention on The Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum.

 

The Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum (Lighthouse Museum) operate under the direction of the Douglas County Commissioners, and are managed by our Museum Director, James (Jamie) Davis.  Jamie has been at the helm for three and half years, but has been a part of our small but mighty museum team since 2009.  Just  like the Douglas County Museum, the Lighthouse Museum relies heavily on volunteers who help with museum operations, lighthouse tours, Gift Shop, Café and Art Gallery operations, grounds keeping, housekeeping, special events and maintaining the various artifacts and collections.  Annually, the Museum has around 50 volunteers that work seasonal shifts.  Our museum system also receives a tremendous amount of support from the Douglas County Museum Foundation.  The Douglas County Museum Foundation was founded in 1982, and is a non-profit 501(3)c organization with a board of directors that help to support, promote and encourage growth of both of our museums. 

 

A little bit of history about the Umpqua River Lighthouse: On December 31, 1894, with work finally complete, Marinus Stream, the first head keeper of the new Umpqua River Lighthouse, lit the oil lamp inside the tower’s first-order Fresnel lens, thus beginning the lighthouse’s beacon career.  The lighthouse, a sister to the one at Heceta Head, stands sixty-five-feet tall and has a focal plane of 165 feet above sea level. The tower, consisting of brick overlaid with cement plaster, is five feet thick at the base and tapers to twenty-one inches at the parapet.  The tower’s first-order Fresnel lens was handcrafted in 1890 by Barbier & Cie of Paris, France, and is a truly a magnificent gem.  The lens, originally illuminated by a Funck mineral oil lamp, has twenty-four bull’s-eye panels, consisting of 616 glass prisms, completes a revolution every two minutes, producing a signature of two white flashes followed by a red flash. Every seventy minutes the original keepers would have to wind up the weight mechanism that rotated the lens.  In 1934, a generator building was built near the lighthouse, and the station was electrified. The light was finally automated in the 1960s and most of the oil and storage buildings were torn down around the lighthouse.  Before automation, the light was active from one hour before sunset until one hour after sunrise, and curtains were drawn around the lantern room during the day to protect the lens from the sun. Now, the automated light is active twenty-four hours a day.  This is not the first Umpqua River Lighthouse, the first lighthouse was illuminated on October 10, 1857, and was noted in history as the first light along the Oregon Coast.  The first Umpqua River Lighthouse, with a third-order Fresnel lens was designed in the Cape Cod style, with keepers' quarters on either side of the 92-foot-tall tower. The first keeper was Fayette Crosby, a former Scottsburg hotelkeeper.  But, due to the poorly selected location, the original lighthouse suffered catastrophic damage from high force gale winds, flooding and violent storms from 1861-1863 and was declared unsafe and abandoned in January of 1864.  The Umpqua River Lighthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977. 

 

In 1939, a U.S. Coast Guard Station was established on Lighthouse hill with officer barracks, a boat storage house and personnel cabins erected.  At this point the Coast Guard took charge of the Lighthouse and grounds.  In 1962, the Coast Guard decided to relocate their main station, known now as Station Umpqua River to 335 Beach Blvd in Winchester Bay, where it is located today. Even though the main operations of the Coast Guard moved closer to the ocean, a few of the cabins from the station on Lighthouse hill are still being used to house personnel today.  Following the move, the historic Coast Guard officer barracks building located about 100 yards north of the Lighthouse was converted into the Coastal History Museum by Douglas County, and in 1976 Douglas County Parks Department took over maintenance of the lighthouse grounds.  During its 125-year history, the Lighthouse has survived many battles, including budget cuts, repairs and controversies in 1983 and 2009 over having the iconic Fresnel lens decommissioned and the lighthouse permanently closed.  In 1985, after the chariot wheels of the clockwork mechanism that rotated the lens broke the Coast Guard talked about decommissioning the Fresnel lens for good or replacing the entire mechanism and lens with a new one.  But, strong outcry from the public, county officials and local congressmen forced the Coast Guard to relent and restore the original lens instead.  In 2009, the Lighthouse was once again embroiled in controversy with talks about being decommissioned after a Coast Guard study deemed it, “no longer a critical component for safe navigation.”  However, this time the Coast Guard was open to allowing the ‘light’ to be operated as a Private Aid to Navigation (PATON) by a local government agency, nonprofit corporation or community development organization.  Douglas County Commissioners, Joe Laurance, Doug Robertson and Susan Morgan promptly stepped up to save the Lighthouse, and inked a deal with the Coast Guard.  In 2010, Douglas County took ownership of the lighthouse and leased the Fresnel lens so that its cherished icon will continue to operate for many generations to come. During a ceremony on April 14, 2012, the U.S. Coast Guard officially gave Douglas County control of the operation and maintenance of Umpqua Lighthouse and its coveted Fresnel lens. The Douglas County Commissioners have always played a major role in the development and growth of our county, and the Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum is no exception.  It really stands as a testament to the commitment of our Douglas County Commissioners, community, employees, foundation members and volunteers, who have worked painstakingly and passionately over the years in preserving our coastal history.  To honor its latest milestone, Douglas County and the Douglas County Museum Foundation hosted a gala event on December 31, 2019 to celebrate the Umpqua River Lighthouse’s 125th anniversary. 

 

The Coastal History Museum features three floors filled with hundreds of documents, photographs and artifacts that illustrate the early history of the area including Fort Umpqua, local shipwrecks and turn of the century transportation, as well as the story of the Umpqua River Lighthouse from its early existence as a Lifesaving Station to turn of the century lighthouse keeper instructions to period uniforms to interactive displays that illustrate the way of life for lightkeepers and coast guard personnel alike.  The Lighthouse and Museum grounds are also home to the Umpqua River Lighthouse Gift Shop & Cafe, the Umpqua River Lighthouse Art Gallery and the newly acquired Gray Whale ‘spy hopper’ viewing station.  The Gift Shop and Café, which moved to its current location in the renovated historic 1939 Coast Guard boat storage building in March 2020, offers a wide range of nautical and Oregon themed gifts and souvenirs, as well as delicious soups, sandwiches, coffee, cookies and sweets. From toys and books for little children to adult clothing and collectables to Umpqua Valley wines and fudge, you will find just the right memento of your great visit.  The Art Gallery is located in the basement of the Coastal History Museum, which once housed the original Coast Guard barracks. The space features an eclectic variety of hand-made treasures from 25 southern Oregon Artisans, and supports the Lighthouse & Museum.  Across from the lighthouse, facing the Pacific Ocean is the Gray Whale ‘spy hopper’ viewing station compete with maps, charts and binoculars to help visitors spot migrating whales. The viewing station, still under the authority of the Coast Guard, changed from Douglas County Parks management to Douglas County Museum management in 2022.  With the help of many volunteers, young and mature alike, the area was cleaned up and repainted to welcome visitors.  The Lighthouse and Museum are also host to a number of special events including monthly public swap meets, wine tastings, art exhibits, community events, kids camp and the grounds are also available to rent for intimate wedding ceremonies.

 

Recently the Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum and Gift Shop were recognized by Tripadvisor as a 2022 Traveler’s Choice Award Winner.  Every year, Tripadvisor celebrates attractions that consistently deliver amazing experiences with a Travelers' Choice Award—and this year, the Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum and Gift Shop made the list.  That means that they have earned positive reviews and ratings over the past year that places them in the top 10% of attractions worldwide

 

The breathtaking hill top overlook above Winchester Bay that is home to our Umpqua River Lighthouse, Museum, Gift Shop, Art Gallery and whale viewing area is truly a treasure for Douglas County and our citizens.  Beyond the fact that I think it is one of the best properties in Oregon, this gem represents a collective of individuals who have fought hard to keep it alive and prospering for over 125 years.  Kudos to Jamie and his dedicated team of employees and volunteers for helping to make this an internationally recognized tourist attraction that brings visitors from far and wide,” stated Douglas County Museum Liaison, Commissioner Tom Kress. 

 

The Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum, Gift Shop & Cafe, Art Gallery and Gray Whale ‘spy hopper’ viewing station are located atop the hill facing the Pacific Ocean at the mouth of the Umpqua River at 1020 Lighthouse Road in Winchester Bay, Oregon, six miles south of Reedsport off Oregon Hwy 101.  The Lighthouse, Museum, Gift Shop and Cafe are open daily October to February from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm and March to September from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm and they are closed Christmas Day.  It takes roughly an hour to tour the museum and lighthouse depending on your pace. The Art Gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm.  Admission is free for members, ages 0-4 are free, students 5-17 are $4.00, adults are $8.00, seniors and veterans are $5.00.   Admission includes a guided tour of the historic 1890 Umpqua Lighthouse and famous Fresnel lens.  For more information or to volunteer at our Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum check out our website at https://umpquavalleymuseums.org/ or call the Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum at (541) 271-4631 museum or the Umpqua River Lighthouse Museum Café & Gift Shop and Art Gallery at (541) 271-1894. 

 

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Media Contact:   Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

 

Photo Collage Attached: Individual Photos Available Upon Request

LPSCC_Color_Logo.png
LPSCC_Color_Logo.png
07-25-22 NOTICE - DC LPSCC - Behavioral Health & Housing Subcommittee Meeting (Photo) - 07/25/22

DOUGLAS COUNTY LOCAL PUBLIC SAFETY COORDINATING COUNCIL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 25, 2022

 

** Notice of Virtual Meeting **

Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC)

Behavioral Health and Housing Subcommittees

Tuesday, July 26, 2022

 

(Douglas County, OR) The next meeting for the Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council’s (LPSCC) – Behavioral Health and Housing Subcommittees will take place on Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 11:30 am via a virtual conference format.

 

In compliance with ORS 192.610 to 192.690, we will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to watch or listen to the meeting via video or by phone. For information on how you can watch or listen to this meeting, please see the agenda or contact the LPSCC Coordinator, Melissa McRobbie-Toll at melissa@co.douglas.or.us or call (541) 450-9768.

 

The meeting agenda is attached and can also be found at www.co.douglas.or.us.

 

  
 

*Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities.

If accommodation is needed to participate in this meeting, please contact (541) 450-9768 prior to the scheduled meeting time.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Contact Melissa McRobbie-Toll, Programs & Partnerships (LPSCC) Coordinator, Douglas County

(541) 450-9768 cell - melissa@co.douglas.or.us

 

 

 

 


 

 

Attached Media Files: LPSCC_Color_Logo.png
Douglas County LPSCC
Douglas County LPSCC
07-22-22 Meeting Notice DC LPSCC - Justice Reinvestment Subcommittee Meeting (Photo) - 07/22/22

Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 22, 2022

** Notice of Meeting ** 

Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC)

Justice Reinvestment (JRI) Subcommittee

Monday, July 25, 2022

(Douglas County, OR) The Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC), Justice Reinvestment (JRI) Subcommittee will hold its next meeting on Monday, July 25, 2022 at 12:00pm in Room 310 at the Douglas County Courthouse.

In compliance with ORS 192.610 to 192.690, we will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to watch or listen to the meeting via video or by phone. For information on how you can watch or listen to this meeting, please see the agenda or contact the LPSCC Coordinator, Melissa McRobbie-Toll at melissa@co.douglas.or.us or call (541) 450-9768.

The meeting agenda is attached and also available at: www.co.douglas.or.us

*Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities.
If accommodation is needed to participate in this meeting, please contact
(541) 450-9768 at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting time.

 

###

 

 

Contact: Melissa McRobbie-Toll

Programs & Partnerships (LPSCC) Coordinator, Douglas County

(541) 450-9768 cell - melissa@co.douglas.or.us


 

Attached Media Files: Douglas County LPSCC
Eric Winslow
Eric Winslow
7-21-22 Douglas County Museum Opens New Exhibit The History of Wine in the Umpqua Valley (Photo) - 07/21/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 21, 2022

 

Douglas County Museum Opens New Exhibit, The History of Wine in the Umpqua Valley

 

            (Roseburg, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman and Tom Kress, along with our Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History are pleased to announce that the latest exhibit, “History of Wine in the Umpqua Valley,” is now open for visitor enjoyment.  The new limited-time exhibit navigates visitors through the illustrious and rich history of the wine industry in the Umpqua Valley, from pre-prohibition to post-prohibition to the wide array of world-renowned vineyards we see growing in our beautiful valley today.   

 

The wine exhibit took about eight months to complete and was curated by Museum Operations Tech, Eric Winslow, with help from Museum Director James Davis, Museum Research Librarian Karen Bratton and Museum Department Assistant Meredith Hutchison. Many historians credit the beginning of the Oregon wine industry to pioneer immigrants that settled and planted grape varietals in the fertile lands of the Melrose area of the Umpqua Valley.  Eric, who has a passion for viticulture worked with fifth generation descendants from Umpqua Valley’s first wine families, Doerner and Von Pessl, as well as wine innovators Girardet, Abacela, Henry Estate, Hillcrest and Reustle Prayer Rock Vineyards to collect memorabilia, artifacts and tell the stories that celebrate our rich wine history.  From the first vineyards in 1880s to the 70 vineyards that encompass over 1,500 acres today, our wine industry has come a long way.  In addition to the exhibit, the Museum also plans to feature periodic tastings of Umpqua Valley wines within the new exhibit and opportunities for local winery tours.

 

            Being at the heart of a natural resource-based economy, the Douglas County Museum pays homage to the mining, fishing, farming and timber industries in Douglas County.  Open to visitors for over 50 years, the Museum boasts Oregon’s largest natural history collection with more than 7,500 preserved items that help tell the ancient and contemporary stories of the Umpqua River Valley.  It showcases the wonderful ecological diversity of our county, as it traverses an amazingly wide range of elevations, environments, vegetation and creatures from the snowcapped peaks of Mt. Thielsen in the Cascade Mountain Range, through the Umpqua Valley – which is defined by the watershed basin of the Umpqua River, then over the Coastal Mountain Range to the crashing surf of the Pacific Ocean in Winchester Bay.  The Museum also features cultural and period relics from a time when Native Americans inhabited the mountains, streams and shores of the County. Home to humans for more than 10,000 years, the valley is named for the Umpqua Tribe that still call this area home. It then chronicles the journey of the first non-native explorers, pioneers and settlers that came to our area as fur trappers, missionaries, prospectors, loggers, farmers and fishermen. 

 

The Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History is located at 123 Museum Drive in Roseburg, Oregon (adjacent to I-5 off Exit 123 and the Douglas County Fairgrounds).  It is open Tuesday through Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.  It can take 1-3 hours to tour the museum depending on your pace.  The Lavola Bakken Research Library is open Tuesday through Saturday 1:00 pm – 4:30 pm.  Admission is free for members, ages 0-4 are free, students 5-17 are $2.00, adults are $8.00, seniors and veterans are $5.00.  The "Museum Mercantile," our Museum gift shop, offers the area’s leading source of books on Douglas County’s natural and cultural history, as well as a wide range of Oregon souvenirs and other great gift items including educational and historic toys.  For more information or to volunteer at our Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History check out our website at https://umpquavalleymuseums.org/ or call the Douglas County Museum at (541) 957-7007.

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Media Contact:   Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us Photo Attached

Attached Media Files: Eric Winslow
2022 DC Museum
2022 DC Museum
7-18-22 Part Three: What Can Douglas County Museum Do For You? (Photo) - 07/18/22

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 18, 2022

What Can Douglas County Government Do For You?

Part Three: The Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) – Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress are excited to add another story to their series highlighting the wide-array of services provided by departments within Douglas County government. Douglas County has 26 separate departments, with an additional 19 divisions associated with those departments.  For part three of “What Can County Government Do for You?”, the Commissioners would like to highlight the amazing services provided by one of our most engaging and interesting departments, our Douglas County Museums.  Our Douglas County Museum system is made up of two museums our Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History and our Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum.  For Part Three we will cover the history and exhibits of our Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History.  Stay tuned for Part Four of our series on “What Can County Government Do For You” with a feature story on our Umpqua River Lighthouse & Coastal History Museum.

 

            Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History (Museum), whose motto is “giving our past a presence,” operates under the direction of the Douglas County Commissioners, and is managed by our Museum Director, James (Jamie) Davis.  Jamie has been at the helm for three and half years, but has been a part of our small but mighty museum team since 2009.  Besides, Jamie, the Museum has one full-time employee, Eric Winslow, our Museum Operations Tech and two part-time employees, Karen Bratton, Museum Research Librarian, who has been at the Museum for over 24 years, and Meredith Hutchins, Department Assistant who has been with the museum for 10 years (5 as a volunteer and 5 as an employee).  The Museum relies heavily on volunteers who help with museum operations, events, gift shop, collection maintenance, the creation of new exhibits, artifact restoration and cataloging items. Annually, the Museum has 8-10 volunteers that work seasonal and year-round shifts, including 30 year volunteer Janet Beebe and 18 year volunteer Nick Lehrbach.  Our museum system also receives support from the Douglas County Museum Foundation.  The Douglas County Museum Foundation was founded in 1982, and is a non-profit 501(3)c organization with a board of directors that help to support, promote and encourage growth of both of our museums. 

 

            The Douglas County Commissioners have always played a major role in the development and growth of our county, and the Museum is no exception.  Over five decades ago, Douglas County Commissioners, Stanford Buell, Al Flegel, and Ray Doerner laid the ground work for the establishment of a historical exhibition hall that would provide a safe-harbor for the numerous artifacts, collections and oral accounts that pay tribute to the rich and diverse history of the Umpqua Valley, its lands and its inhabitants. In August 1969, under the supervision of the Douglas County Commissioners and the Museum’s first curator, George B. Abdill, the Museum's first building was completed.  With everyone anxious to see the new facility, they decided to open to the public on the first day of the 1969 Douglas County Fair. An official open house and dedication was held in May 1970, after the completion of construction of the rest of the original museum design. 

 

            A point of historical fact: The iconic structure that houses our museum collection has local ’tree’ roots that pre-date the opening of the museum by almost 100 years.  You see, prune orchards were first planted in the Umpqua Valley in 1878, and by 1903, over 91 truckloads of dried prunes were exported to destinations all over the west coast and beyond. By 1910, prunes were being planted, cultivated and dried on almost every farm in the region. The prune industry reached its prime in 1919, and three years later was named the largest single fruit crop in Oregon.  But, by 1932, the depression had taken a toll on the prune market.  Orchards were abandoned due to labor shortages and falling prices, and by the mid-1940s, most of the prune orchards were gone.  Other crops and industry would soon replace the prunes, but the tall wooden structures used to dry the prunes remained.  A few of the tall prune drying buildings are still standing today, dotting the valleys of the Umpqua like watch towers. Architect Howard Backen, who had grown up in Roseburg, was selected to design the new museum.  Backen decided to give the museum complex a retro farm look, by simulating those prune drying buildings, as well as, hop dryers and barns reminiscent of the heyday of our agricultural industry from a century before. His modern interpretation, paying homage to the once flourishing industry, included a grand entry ‘prune drying’ tower comprised of a foyer and administrative offices. The ‘prune drying’ tower was connected via a transparent sky bridge that led to little “museum pods or barns” which held the exhibitions. The museum design was even given an Award of Merit at the 1969 Bay Area Awards Program from the American Institute of Architects.  In 1978, the Douglas County Commissioners authorized the construction of a major addition to the Museum, which nearly doubled its size to 40,000 total square feet, including a 20,000 square foot storage facility, a classroom, an outdoor interactive display,  expanded natural history galleries, a research library and a photography lab.  Today, after a few alterations and updates the museum stands as a pinnacle monument in Douglas County….with the iconic ‘prune drying’ tower standing as the welcome beacon for visitors and travelers alike.

 

            When people take the time to walk thru the smartly appointed 20,00 square feet of artifact and ‘limited time’ exhibit pods at the Museum, many are shocked at the scale of our vast collection.  They are astonished that a community this size has a historical institution of this magnitude and quality.  Many artifacts on display are so fragile that staff has to limit the amount of time they are handled or exposed to air and light (the two main enemies of preservation) in order to hang onto the relics for generations to come.  Each and every item has been painstakingly cataloged, preserved and stored.  All the items in our museum collection have been graciously donated or loaned to us over the years.   Each item our museum chooses to add to their collection must go through a careful selection process, with the first priority being recognized as having provenance to Douglas County.  It really stands as a testament to the commitment of our Douglas County Commissioners, employees, foundation members and volunteers, who have worked painstakingly and passionately over the years in preserving our local history.   

 

            Being at the heart of a natural resource-based economy, the Museum pays homage to the mining, fishing, farming and timber industries in Douglas County.  The Museum boasts Oregon’s largest natural history collection with more than 7,500 items that help tell the ancient and contemporary stories of the Umpqua River Valley.  It showcases the wonderful ecological diversity of our county, as it traverses an amazingly wide range of elevations, environments, vegetation and creatures from the snowcapped peaks of Mt. Thielsen in the Cascade Mountain Range, through the Umpqua Valley – which is defined by the watershed basin of the Umpqua River, then over the Coastal Mountain Range to the crashing surf of the Pacific Ocean in Winchester Bay.  Visitors can check out mammoth tusks and ancient fossils, creature mounts featuring native beaver, elk and harbor seals, interact with interpretative dioramas, play in the hands-on archeological dig area and revel in one of the Northwest’s most comprehensive plant collections in its research herbarium with nearly 3,000 catalogued specimens. 

 

            The Museum also features cultural and period relics from a time when Native Americans inhabited the mountains, streams and shores of the County.  Home to humans for more than 10,000 years, the valley is named for the Umpqua Tribe that still call this area home.  It also chronicles the journey of the first non-native explorers, pioneers and settlers that came to our area as fur trappers, missionaries, prospectors, loggers, farmers and fishermen.  Their epic stories are told through cultural artifacts ranging from prehistoric spear points, traded beads and expertly woven baskets to family quilts brought over the Oregon Trail; from life-size displays featuring covered wagons, farming tools and oxen yokes to the last standing depot of the Oregon & California Railroad; from actual blast remnants to an entire archive of photos of the catastrophic 1959 Roseburg Blast. For History Channel fans, it’s as if you are at a live taping of ‘Mysteries at the Museum,’ when you discover a strange artifact and read the sordid tale associated with it – visitors should ask about our rare beaver coin or the preserved hair wreath! 

 

            Did you know that at any given time, only about 5% of the Museum’s vast collections are on display?  That’s right, in order to keep the museum relevant to locals and tourists alike, as well as preserve the integrity of artifacts, the museum staff continually updates the exhibit halls and offers ‘limited edition’ viewings of certain collections 2-3 times a year. In recent years they have showcased limited time exhibits featuring antique wedding gowns, curios and curiosities, bicycles, snakes, pioneer medical tools, one room classrooms, vintage lithographs and quilts.  Just this last month they opened a brand-new exhibit highlighting the pioneers of the wine industry in Douglas County.  Coming this Fall they will be collaborating with Douglas Timber Operators on a special exhibit about the 2020 Archie Creek Fire.

 

            A unique feature of our Museum is our extensive research library.  It holds Oregon’s second largest historic photograph collection with more than 25,000 images going back as early as the mid-19th century. The Museum provides public access to research materials for those who are interested in the people, places and events of Douglas County. Through the Lavola Bakken Research Library, public access is granted for a wide array of printed materials including books, manuscripts, photos, ledgers, newspapers, audio tapes and much more.  Lavola Bakken was a local writer and historian who wrote extensively on the history of the Native Americans and early pioneers of the North Umpqua. She was the first Research Librarian at the Museum and was responsible for acquiring and cataloging the first of the Museums extensive manuscript, book and ephemera collections. After her passing in 1980, the Library was named in her honor. The Museum is an annual field trip destination for third and fourth grade classrooms across the county as students study the Oregon Trail.  It is also home to the Umpqua Edventure Academy, a nature-based preschool.  The museum often hosts summer educational kids camps and programs, outdoor family movie nights, event and meeting space rentals, winery tours and special events. 

 

            “Our Douglas County Museum is more than just a place to stop and look at ‘old things.’  It is a monument to our living history.  It represents our heritage and provides a sneak peek into a way of life and industry from yesteryear. Together with our dedicated museum staff, foundation and volunteers, the Douglas County Museum has had, still has, and will continue to showcase our amazing Umpqua Valley, and most important of all, the pleasure of inviting visitors from far and wide, so we can share our stories, our land and our people,” stated Douglas County Museum Liaison Commissioner Tom Kress. 

 

            The Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History is located at 123 Museum Drive in Roseburg, Oregon (adjacent to I-5 off Exit 123 and the Douglas County Fairgrounds).  It is open Tuesday through Saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm.  It can take 1-3 hours to tour the museum depending on your pace.  The Lavola Bakken Research Library is open Tuesday through Saturday 1:00 pm – 4:30 pm.  Admission is free for members, ages 0-4 are free, students 5-17 are $2.00, adults are $8.00, seniors and veterans are $5.00.  The "Museum Mercantile", our Museum gift shop, offers the area’s leading source of books on Douglas County’s natural and cultural history, as well as a wide range of Oregon souvenirs and other great gift items including educational and historic toys.  For more information or to volunteer at our Douglas County Museum of History & Natural History check out our website at https://umpquavalleymuseums.org/ or call the Douglas County Museum at (541) 957-7007.

 

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Media Contact:   Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Photo Collage Attached: Individual Photos Available Upon Request

Attached Media Files: 2022 DC Museum