Douglas Co. Government
Emergency Messages as of 10:49 pm, Tue. May. 26
No information currently posted.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Douglas Co. Government.
Primary email address for a new account:

  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 26, 2020 (Photo) - 05/26/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 26, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Health officials at Douglas County’s two hospitals – Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg and Lower Umpqua Hospital in Reedsport – are reminding residents that they are open, safe and ready to provide care.  “We are screening everyone, including employees, who come into the hospital,” said Jason Gray, MD, Mercy’s Chief Medical Officer. “Patient care staff are wearing masks, and patient safety, as always, is paramount.”

 

Lower Umpqua Hospital is following the same precautions to ensure our community’s safety,” said Ryan Fowler, LUH’s Chief Administrative Officer.

 

Elective procedures have resumed at Mercy and LUH, along with preventative screenings, imaging tests and other services. Both hospitals urge patients who need procedures like these to get them scheduled. “Screenings like mammograms and colonoscopies are key in the early detection of cancer,” Gray commented.  “Across Oregon, people have stayed home and, unfortunately for some, their health has declined as a result. The word ‘elective’ doesn’t mean it’s not needed; it really means it was just scheduled rather than an emergency. We don’t want people to stay away from care any longer.”

 

Routine doctor’s visits are also safe, and are encouraged. Many local physician practices have implemented many new safety measures as well, including phone screening prior to visit when possible; changes to waiting rooms to allow for social distancing; new cleaning protocols; and masks for patients who may not have one. Staff are screening patients wearing gloves, mask, and goggles, and staff members providing direct clinical care will be wearing surgical masks, so that patients can rest easier when they go to their visits. People who need emergency care should go to the emergency room, and anyone experiencing cardiac symptoms should call 911.  Fowler, of LUH, said, “In addition to in-person appointments with your primary care provider, you can also utilize the telehealth option. Your PCP can order labs, X-rays and other diagnostic tests if needed during your telehealth appointment.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Tuesday, May 26, 2020, and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 79 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 26, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2229

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19. 

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

The next DPHN drive-through COVID-19 test is today, May 26th.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  Patients without a Primary Care Provider that are looking for a COVID-19 test should contact the Sutherlin Aviva Health clinic at (541) 459-3788. The first drive through testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 534 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us Friday, May 29, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Red Cross

The American Red Cross is one of 14 member agencies that participated in the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT), helping to ensure the community’s safety through blood drives and other efforts. The Red Cross collects 40 percent of the nation’s blood supply, and holds regular drives in communities all over. COVID-19 was a curve ball.

 

When COVID first happened, we had these pre-scheduled blood drives at businesses and schools that had to be canceled,” said Carisa Hettich, Executive Director of the Red Cross’ Southwest Oregon Chapter.  As schools and businesses shut down, Red Cross organizers had to cancel the first weeks’ worth of drives. They worked with the DCCRT to find alternative sites that were big enough to host a blood drive, and were able to continue with most of the scheduled drives after that first week.  “We did remarkably well,” she said. “By the end of March, we were still able to collect the overall goal.”

 

Community members stepped up too, and continued coming out to donate. Donating blood is considered an essential activity; even during a pandemic, there are still births, accidents and other events that require an adequate blood supply, Hettich pointed out.  There is now an effort underway to collect convalescent plasma, or plasma from people who were previously diagnosed with COVID-19 and have recovered. Those who are eligible and interested in donating convalescent plasma can get started by visiting the Red Cross’ website and filling out a form.  In addition to altering its blood drives, the Red Cross had to change the way it responds to fires. Under normal circumstances, when there is a home fire, Red Cross volunteers are dispatched to the scene to provide comfort, food and other assistance to fire victims. In the age of COVID-19, volunteers still respond to the scene but mostly to drop off supplies.

 

Before COVID, we’d give them a hug, give them blankets,” Hettich said. “It’s the compassion and the hug that people need.” Now, the comfort is still there, but it’s given out from a distance for both victims’ and volunteers’ safety. Much of the follow-up casework is done over the phone. Victims are still provided with resources to pay for hotel rooms and food.

In one of its lesser-known roles, the Red Cross also assists with emergency communication for the military. If a service member is requesting a leave due to a birth, death, illness of a loved one or other hardship at home, the Red Cross verifies the event for the military, which then grants the leave for legitimate hardships. The Red Cross even has staff on military bases overseas to help facilitate those messages. “It’s one of our longest programs,” she said.  As Oregon slowly reopens, Hettich encourages anyone looking for ways to help their community to consider volunteering. “We still have home fires, we’ll still have wildfires, we’ll still need blood,” she said. “If they have time, or really want to do something positive, this is a way they can do that, by volunteering for the Red Cross.”  Information on volunteer opportunities with the American Red Cross and the Southwest Oregon Chapter can be found on their website.

 

Local Blood Drives: Appointments are required, visit www.redcrossblood.org or call (800) 733-2767 to schedule today.

Tuesday, May 26         9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Pine Grove Community Church, 1729 Buckhorn Road, Roseburg

Tuesday, May 26         12:00 pm - 5:00 pm      Family Church, 4384 Carnes Road, Roseburg

Wednesday, May 27    10:00 am - 3:00 pm      Winston Community Center, 440 SE Grape Ave, Winston

 

Insurance Emergency Orders Released

On May 23, 2020, the Department of Consumer and Business Services issued emergency orders for insurance companies providing property and casualty, long-term care, and life and disability insurance. The orders require insurance companies providing these policies to do the following:

  • Provide at least a 60-day grace period to pay any past-due premiums
  • Pay claims for any covered losses during the first 30 days of the grace period
  • Extend all deadlines for reporting claims and other communications, and provide members with communication options that meet physical distancing standards

The orders are effective through June 23, but can be extended in 30-day increments as needed to address the COVID-19 outbreak.  Also, the original emergency order that was issued on March 25 has been extended to June 23. That order applies to all lines of insurance other than health, property and casualty, long-term care, and life and disability insurance. This emergency order requires all other lines of insurance companies to postpone policy cancellations, extend grace periods for premium payments, and extend deadlines for reporting claims. Read the insurance emergency orders here.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. If you have questions about COVID-19 or resources available, call our local COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 26, 2020 (Photo) - 05/26/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 26, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Tuesday, May 26, 2020, and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 79 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 26, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2229

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

The next DPHN drive-through COVID-19 test is today, May 26th.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  Patients without a Primary Care Provider that are looking for a COVID-19 test should contact the Sutherlin Aviva Health clinic at (541) 459-3788. The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 534 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

DCBF
DCBF
Mobile Food Truck Vendors Being Sought For Courthouse Facilities (Photo) - 05/26/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY BUILDING FACILITIES DEPARTMENT

MOBILE FOOD TRUCK VENDORS BEING SOUGHT FOR COURTHOUSE FACILITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 26, 2020

 

(Roseburg, Ore.) The Douglas County Building Facilities Department is excited to announce that they will be accepting mobile food truck vendor applications for trucks interested in providing lunch service at the Douglas County Courthouse.  If approved, the mobile food truck would be allowed to serve to-go meals to patrons and employees of the Courthouse and Justice Building at a pre-determined outside location. 

 

Mobile food trucks would be limited to one truck per day and would be required to submit an application, as well as provide proof of insurance in order to be considered for service. 

 

Interested parties must submit a mobile food truck vendor application, complete with required documentation and be approved prior to placing unit or providing service.  For more information and to obtain a mobile food truck vendor application contact the Douglas County Building Facilities Department via email at:  uildingFac@co.douglas.or.us">DCBuildingFac@co.douglas.or.us or by calling: (541) 440-6001.

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist (PIO)

(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: DCBF
DCBF
DCBF
Mobile Food Truck Vendors Being Sought For Courthouse Facilities (Photo) - 05/26/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY BUILDING FACILITIES DEPARTMENT

MOBILE FOOD TRUCK VENDORS BEING SOUGHT FOR COURTHOUSE FACILITIES

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 26, 2020

 

(Roseburg, Ore.) The Douglas County Building Facilities Department is excited to announce that they will be accepting mobile food truck vendor applications for trucks interested in providing lunch service at the Douglas County Courthouse.  If approved, the mobile food truck would be allowed to serve to-go meals to patrons and employees of the Courthouse and Justice Building at a pre-determined outside location. 

 

Mobile food trucks would be limited to one truck per day and would be required to submit an application, as well as provide proof of insurance in order to be considered for service. 

 

Interested parties must submit a mobile food truck vendor application, complete with required documentation and be approved prior to placing unit or providing service.  For more information and to obtain a mobile food truck vendor application contact the Douglas County Building Facilities Department via email at:  uildingFac@co.douglas.or.us">DCBuildingFac@co.douglas.or.us or by calling: (541) 440-6001.

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist (PIO)

(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: DCBF
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case and Daily Local Update - May 25, 2020 (Photo) - 05/25/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE AND DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 25, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Memorial Day, as a part of the The National Moment of Remembrance, we would like to encourage all our citizens to pause at 3:00 p.m. local time today for a moment of silence to remember and honor those who died in service to our great nation.  It is Monday, May 25, 2020, and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 78 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 25, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2216

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  Patients without a Primary Care Provider that are looking for a COVID-19 test should contact the Sutherlin Aviva Health clinic at (541) 459-3788. The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 534 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case and Daily Local Update - May 24, 2020 (Photo) - 05/24/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE AND DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 24, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Sunday, May 24, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 77 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 24, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2178

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  Patients without a Primary Care Provider that are looking for a COVID-19 test should contact the Sutherlin Aviva Health clinic at (541) 459-3788. The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 534 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case and Daily Local Update - May 23, 2020 (Photo) - 05/23/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE AND DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 23, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Saturday, May 23, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 76 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 23, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2141

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

Another drive-through testing clinic is scheduled for today, Saturday, May 23 in Reedsport.  Our drive-through testing clinics have conducted over 500 nasal swab/PCR tests.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  Patients without a Primary Care Provider that are looking for a COVID-19 test should contact the Sutherlin Aviva Health clinic at (541) 459-3788.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 528 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case and Daily Local Update - May 22, 2020 (Photo) - 05/22/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE AND DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 22, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Memorial Day weekend is upon us.  It is observed on the last Monday in May to commemorate the brave men and women who have died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.  This year, Memorial Day will be observed for the 152nd time.  Long before flyovers, speeches and parades, Memorial Day (formerly known as Decoration Day) was observed during Civil War time, with the humble tradition of decorating the graves of the war dead with hand-picked flowers.  May was believed to have been chosen because flowers would be in bloom across the country. That humble tradition of honor is what matters most today. It is something that no virus or other disaster can take from us. Yes, we may observe it differently, but it cannot and will not stop it or belittle the sacrifices that were made to keep our great nation safe and free. We will never forget their service and sacrifice.

This year, with COVID-19 we are living amidst unprecedented times.  That is why it is more important than ever to continue our time-honored Memorial traditions, although we may have to find a new way to observe them.  We will continue to pay tribute to our heroes, our fallen, our veterans and our military.  It will remain a time to set-aside differences, stand-together, support one-another and honor the sacrifices that have been made to preserve our way of life. 

Just because we can’t gather together in the normal way for Memorial Day, doesn’t mean that we can’t observe these traditions, it just means that we just have to be more creative in our approach.  Although we must honor them from afar, you can still pay tribute utilizing virtual videos, social media posts, yard signs, window banners, proudly flying the American Flag, offering up a toast to our fallen, wear your military gear, taking a stroll through a memorial park or placing flowers on a grave. 

Locally, commemorative wreaths will be placed near our Veterans Memorial at the Douglas County Courthouse, located near the front steps under the beautiful elm tree, that honor our fallen brave soldiers from Douglas County.   Additionally, flags will be placed on graves at the VA cemetery, and more wreaths and flowers will be placed at other memorials and individual grave sites around the county.

The Oregon Department of Veteran’s Affairs will be hosting the first-ever Virtual Statewide Memorial Day Ceremony via the ODVA’s Facebook page beginning at 10:00 am on Monday, May 25, 2020.  The virtual ceremony, will include a messages reflecting on the significance of our great nation and the generations of proud veterans that have safeguarded it.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is offering a new way for the public to pay tribute to our honored veterans with a new online initiative called the Veterans Legacy Memorial.  The site, which contains a memorial page for each veteran and service member interred in a national cemetery, has been available since 2019, but this week the VA is introducing a new way to observe Memorial Day by permitting online visitors to leave a comment of tribute on a veteran’s page. In keeping with tradition, American flags will be flown at half–staff from sun up to sun down across the nation on Monday, May 25, 2020.

Twenty years ago, in the year 2000, Congress passed and the President signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” encouraging all Americans to pause at 3:00 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a moment of silence to remember and honor those who died in service to our nation. Whatever your Memorial Day may traditions hold, make sure to take time out of your day to pay tribute to those that came before us, defended our freedom and made the ultimate sacrifice. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Friday, May 22, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 75 days.  

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 22, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2110

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive-through clinic will be held in Roseburg today, Friday, May 22, 2020.  There is also a drive-through clinic in Reedsport on Saturday, May 23rd.  Our drive-through testing clinics have conducted over 500 nasal swab/PCR tests.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  Patients without a Primary Care Provider that are looking for a COVID-19 test should contact the Sutherlin Aviva Health clinic at (541) 459-3788.

 

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 508 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tonight, Friday, May 22, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

President Orders Flags Lowered to Half-Staff in Honor of the Victims of the Novel Coronavirus Pandemic

President Donald Trump issued a nationwide proclamation today ordering all flags across the U.S. to be flown at half-staff in honor of the victims of the novel coronavirus pandemic.  The order will be in effect until sunset on May 24, 2020.  You can read the full Presidential Proclamation on the White House website.

 

What to Do If You Lost Health Coverage Due To COVID-19

If your health insurance was through your employer and you lost your job due to COVID-19, you may be wondering what to do next to meet the health needs of yourself and your family. The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) has put together a website that explains 7 ways to maintain coverage after a layoff or a reduction in hours:

  • Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace – You can purchase insurance here, and if you’ve just lost your job, you may qualify for a subsidy and a special enrollment period.
  • Oregon Health Plan – OHP provides physical, dental and mental health for households with lower incomes. You can apply for OHP anytime.
  • COBRA – Signing up for COBRA would enable you to continue the coverage you were receiving through your employer. There are costs involved.
  • State continuation – A worker who loses employer-based coverage may be eligible for state continuation. You must have had continuous health coverage for at least three months prior to your coverage ending.
  • Medicare – Those 65 and older, or who have certain disabilities, can enroll in Medicare.
  • Through employer – Some employers may continue to offer health insurance for employees whose hours have been reduced, although coverage may change or employees may face added costs.
  • Accessing coverage through a spouse – If your spouse has employer-based insurance, you may be able to access insurance through your spouse’s plan.

 

More details on all seven options, and helpful links, are available on the DCBS website. If you need assistance in looking at your options, you can contact a licensed health insurance agent. Find a local agent here by entering your ZIP code and selecting the “Health Insurance Agents” option.

 

Self-Serve Gas will Come to an End at Midnight on Saturday, May 23, 2020

The Office of the State Fire Marshal announced yesterday that it’s temporary rules change allowing Oregon gas retailers to provide self-service on a voluntary basis will end at midnight, on Saturday, May 23, 2020. Starting Sunday, May 24, attendants will again be providing service at gas stations in Oregon where self-service is not allowed. Self-service is allowed in some coastal counties and in eastern and central Oregon. Initially, a temporary rules change was implemented to address worker shortages at stations statewide because of COVID-19.

We want to thank Oregonians and the many Oregon businesses who provide gasoline for their patience as we allowed for voluntary self-service at Oregon gas stations where that service had not been available before,” said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “Starting Sunday, self-serve gas will no longer be allowed in counties where it is already prohibited by state law. Areas of the state where self-serve was allowed, in some coastal counties and areas of central and eastern Oregon, will see no change.”

 

Need Help Filing Taxes? CASH Oregon Can Help

CASH Oregon, a program of Metropolitan Family Services is offering free tax filing assistance for Oregonians for households that make less than $69,000 a year.  Because of COVID-19, CASH Oregon is offering the free Volunteer Tax Assistance via phone. IRS certified volunteers can answer your tax questions and guide you through filing your own taxes. For more information, go to the CASH Oregon website or call (503) 966-7942. The free tax help hotline is available Monday through Wednesday, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

Oregon Air National Guard to Continue Air Force Salute Flyovers In Oregon

The Oregon Air National Guard is scheduled to continue flying F-15 Eagle flyovers over hospitals and other locations throughout Oregon Friday, May 22 and Monday, May 25 in order to salute Oregonians.  The flyovers are a joint effort between Oregon’s 173rd Fighter Wing, based in Klamath Falls, and the 142nd Wing, based in Portland, aimed at supporting those on the forefront of the COVID-19 pandemic and thanking those who are working to keep Oregonians safe and healthy each day. The tribute also hopes to lift morale during a time of severe health and economic impacts, and remember those brave service members who have paid the ultimate price for our freedom.   People are encouraged to view the flights from the safety of their own homes and practice physical distancing.  All passes are approximately 2,000 feet above ground level at approximately 400 mph airspeed. Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

 

Estimated Schedule for Flyovers in Douglas County for Monday, May 25, 2020:

11:10 a.m.        VA Roseburg Health Care System, Roseburg, Ore.

11:10 a.m.        Mercy Medical Center, Roseburg, Ore.
11:44 a.m.        Lower Umpqua Hospital, Reedsport, Ore.

 

Health Officials Warn About Toxic Algae Blooms

Warm summer days are on the horizon, and local and state health officials are advising residents to steer clear of toxic algae blooms when visiting rivers, lakes and reservoirs. There is a permanent recreational use advisory for South Umpqua River and Lawson Bar, where harmful blue-green algae blooms have been found in pools in the bedrock along the river’s edge. Signs have been posted at several access points along the river noting that dogs have died after drinking from the pools and children are also at risk of falling ill. People should avoid water contact in these areas and stay away from the rock formations along the shore.  Oregon Health Authority (OHA) officials say toxic algae blooms can occur in rivers, lakes and reservoirs statewide, especially during warm weather.

 

Because cyanobacteria blooms are naturally occurring worldwide, they can form in any body of water,” OHA officials said. “Many blooms are harmless, but under the right conditions – when weather, sunlight, water temperature nutrients and water chemistry are ideal – they can produce cyanotoxins that make people and animals sick.”

 

Exposure can occur when water is swallowed while swimming, or when water droplets are inhaled during high-speed activities such as water skiing or wakeboarding. Symptoms include diarrhea, cramps, vomiting, numbness, dizziness and fainting. Cyanotoxins aren’t absorbed through the skin, but people with sensitive skin may develop a rash if exposed.

Because of their size, young children and dogs are particularly vulnerable. Dogs who drink contaminated water, lick their wet fur, or eat toxins from the floating mats or dried crust along the shore, can fall ill.

 

Not all lakes, rivers and reservoirs are monitored for blooms. This year, due to COVID-19, even fewer bodies of water will be tested. Oregonians are advised to stay away from any water that looks foamy, scummy, thick like paint, and pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red in color. The advice is: “When in doubt, stay out.” Residents can check the latest advisories on the Harmful Algae Blooms website.

 

Douglas County’s Public Health Officer Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer advised caution in general when recreating in or near water. “The biggest risk, clearly, is drowning,” he said. “People should be very careful in the water, which is typically cold and fast flowing.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.

 

If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
LPSCC Agenda
LPSCC Agenda
Notice of Special Meeting - Douglas County LPSCC (Photo) - 05/22/20

** Notice of Special Meeting **

Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC) - Tuesday, May 26, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 22, 2020

 

(Roseburg, OR) A special meeting of the Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC) will take place on Tuesday, May 26, 2020 at 12:00 pm via a virtual conference format.

 

Due to COVID-19, we are taking extra precautions, therefor the meeting will be conducted virtually. We will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to join the meeting via video or by phone. For information on how you can listen in on this meeting, please email the LPSCC Coordinator, Melissa McRobbie-Toll at melissa@co.douglas.or.us or call (541) 450-9768.

 

The meeting agenda is attached and can also be found at www.co.douglas.or.us.

 

 
 

*Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities. If accommodation is needed to participate in this meeting, please contact (541) 450-9768 at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting time.

 

 

 

 

 

###

Contact Melissa McRobbie-Toll, Programs & Partnerships (LPSCC) Coordinator, Douglas County

(541) 450-9768 cell - melissa@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: LPSCC Agenda , LPSCC
DC BOC
DC BOC
Notice of Holiday Closure - Memorial Day 2020 (Photo) - 05/21/20

***NOTICE OF HOLIDAY CLOSURE***

Memorial Day 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  - May 21, 2020

 

            (Roseburg, Ore.) The Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to remind citizens that government offices in the Douglas County Courthouse, 1036 SE Douglas Avenue, Roseburg, Oregon, as well as the Douglas County Justice Building, Douglas County Courthouse Annex, Transfer Stations, Landfill and All External Douglas County Government Offices will be closed to the public on Monday, May 25, 2020, in observance of Memorial Day.  Currently, our Fairgrounds and Museums remain closed under the Governor’s COVID-19 executive orders. 

           

            Memorial Day is observed on the last Monday in May to commemorate the brave men and women who have died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.  This year, Memorial Day will be observed for the 152nd time.  First observed during the Civil War, this Federal Holiday was originally known as Decoration Day and was a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers.  May was believed to have been chosen because flowers would be in bloom across the country.

 

            Twenty years ago, in the year 2000, Congress passed and the president signed into law The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” encouraging all Americans to pause at 3:00 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a moment of silence to remember and honor those who died in service to our nation.

 

Even though local celebrations will be limited during the pandemic, your Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to encourage citizens to honor our veterans on this day and pay tribute to our brave men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice for our nation. 

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist (PIO)

(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: DC BOC
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case and Daily Local Update - May 21, 2020 (Photo) - 05/21/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE AND DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 21, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Who Do You Call?  Offices for the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office (DCSO), County Departments, Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN) and our COVID-19 Hotline have been fielding a number of phone calls and emails regarding the ‘rules’ for the Governor’s Phase One Reopening Plan.  As you know Douglas County’s application for Phase One was approved by the Governor last week, and many businesses in our County began the process of reopening on Friday, May 15, 2020.  We are now seven days into the no less than, twenty-one-day trial period for Phase One.  We know that our citizens and businesses have a lot of questions about the Phase One process, unfortunately Douglas County, DPHN or our DCSO was not involved in the creation, issuance or regulation for any of the sector specific guidelines established in the Governor’s Phase One Reopening Plan.  So, who do you need to call?  You need to call the Governor’s Office, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) or the Oregon State Office responsible for regulating your business or the business that you wish to visit, if you have questions about their Phase One Reopening Plan.    

 

State Begins Posting Reopening FAQs

OHA announced yesterday that they recognize the need for answers and guidance to a varied number of questions that they have received regarding the Governor’s Phase One Reopening.  So, OHA began posting a Frequently-Asked-Questions (FAQ’s) segment on their COVID-19 website to address those questions. They said they are working through the questions and developing sector-specific FAQ’s that can be found under OHA Guidance and Signage. The FAQs will be posted at the bottom of each sector-specific section on the site. For instance, OHA has just posted its first FAQ link under the “Restaurants and Bars” section. The restaurant/bar FAQ answers common questions like “Why is there a 10 p.m. curfew for restaurants?” “Do bathrooms need disinfecting between each use?” and other queries.  OHA is working on similar FAQs for stores, personal-service businesses and other sectors, but those have not yet been posted.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Thursday, May 21, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 74 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 21, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2051

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive-through clinic will be held in Roseburg on Friday, May 22, 2020.  Our drive-through testing clinics have conducted over 500 nasal swab/PCR tests.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 508 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon

Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across

government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tomorrow, Friday, May 22, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas

County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

A Special Thank You to Our COVID-19 Hotline Volunteers!

Douglas County, under the direction of DPHN and the support of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, were one of the first counties in Oregon to set up a COVID-19 Hotline, staffed by local volunteers and health care providers. The hotline went live on March 13th, early in the county’s response to the pandemic.  The purpose of the hotline was to provide locally relevant and correct information about the pandemic, provide information about local testing and protection efforts, and to give community residents an opportunity to talk to a health care provider about COVID-19.  The hotline was staffed 7 days a week and over 130 local volunteers staffed the call center, including more than 45 licensed health care providers.

 

“We could not have stood our hotline up as quickly and efficiently as we did without the incredible support from our community of volunteers.  The volunteer spirit has always been strong in Douglas County but this was a unique exhibit of our local residents coming together to provide information, reduce fear and anxiety about the pandemic and provide clinically relevant information about the virus.  We have already taken over 1550 calls at the center and with the support of ten local organizations, we continue to take calls. Local and correct information is vital in our containment and mitigation of COVID-19 and these volunteers have been key in that fight. We are grateful for each and every one of them and the many, many hours they devoted.”  Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.

 

DPHN and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team express their deepest thanks to the volunteers and the organizations that have devoted so many hours to the hotline over the last two months. Those organizations include: Aviva Health, Evergreen Family Medicine, UCAN, VA Medical Center, Douglas ESD, Mercy Medical Center, NOVA Urgent Care, Mercy Foundation, Umpqua Health, Red Cross, YMCA and the Boys and Girls Club.  In addition to heartfelt thanks, a partnership with Loggers Pizza and Aviva Health’s Feed-It-Forward program will be providing pizza gift certificates for all the hotline volunteers.  The hotline continues to operate 7 days a week, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, the number is (541) 464-6550.

 

How to Avoid COVID-19 Scams

Scammers are finding opportunity during COVID-19 pandemic, taking advantage of unsuspecting victims through phony offers of vaccinations, test kits and more. In some cases, the scammers call, email or text victims pretending to be from a government agency. For more information on the latest COVID-19 scams, and how to steer clear of them, visit the Federal Trade Commission’s website.   Here are some tips to avoid falling victim to a COVID-19 scam:

  1. Stimulus checks - Don’t respond to texts, emails, calls or social media messages about stimulus checks. The IRS will not contact you using these methods, especially to ask for your bank account number, Social Security number, or other personal information. Some scammers are even sending fake checks and asking victims to deposit the check and immediately send money back.
  2. Phishing scams – Don’t click on any links in emails, texts or social media messages that you weren’t expecting. These could be phishing scams.
  3. Vaccinations - Ignore online offers for vaccinations.
  4. Test kits - Be wary of ads for test kits. Most test kits being advertised have not been approved by the FDA and aren’t necessarily accurate.
  5. Robocalls – Hang up on any robocalls you receive offering too-good-to-be-true items such as very low-priced health insurance and work-from-home schemes.
  6. Emails claiming to be from CDC or WHO – Be wary of emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control or the World Health Organization. Some scammers are falsely claiming to be with these agencies.
  7. Donations – When donating to a cause, research charities to make sure they are legitimate. Never donate using cash, gift cards or by wiring money.

 

Blood Donations Desperately Needed!

If you are healthy, feeling well and eligible to give blood or platelets, you are urged to make an appointment to donate as soon as possible.  Donate your blood and save a life.  Appointments are required, visit www.redcrossblood.org or call (800) 733-2767 to schedule your appointment today.

Friday, May 22           9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Roseburg Blood Donation Center, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd

Tuesday, May 26         12:00 pm - 5:00 pm      Family Church, 4384 Carnes Road, Roseburg

Tuesday, May 26         9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Pine Grove Community Church, 1729 Buckhorn Road, Roseburg

Wednesday, May 27    10:00 am - 3:00 pm      Winston Community Center, 440 SE Grape Ave, Winston

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case and Daily Local Update - May 20, 2020 (Photo) - 05/20/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE AND DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 20, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

It is astonishing when you take a moment to look back 82 days, when the Oregon Health Authority announced the first positive case of COVID-19 in Oregon.  It was at that moment that the word ‘coronavirus’ became a household term, toilet paper sales oddly soared and the deadly virus that had swept rapidly through China had now penetrated the borders of our State.  At that time, very little was known about the spread, timeline and symptoms of the virus, or what would become of our world, our economy or our local businesses.  Who would have thought our kids would be learning from home, masks would become normal attire, telehealth services would be ever so critical, you would not be permitted to go-out to eat or to a movie, and ‘air hugs’ six feet apart would become common place?  It’s incredible what has happened in our world, our nation, our state and our county in the last 12 weeks.  But, the good news is our citizens have proven time and time again that they are resilient, and that because of the remarkable leadership of our Douglas County Commissioners, our Public Health Official, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, DPHN and local health professionals we have ‘weathered the crisis’ and are moving forward to a new day, a new reality and a renewed sense of purpose.  However, we are not out of the woods yet, so stay vigilant in protecting you and your family’s health. If you did not get a chance to read the editorial written by Michael Kurtz, the Douglas County Human Resources Director, that takes a look behind the scenes of our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, it is well worth a quick read. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Wednesday, May 20, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  Also of note, as of today we have surpassed 2,000 negative test results in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 73 days.  

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 20, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

2020

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

 

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive-through clinic will be held in Roseburg on Friday, May 22, 2020.  Our drive-through testing clinics have conducted over 500 nasal swab/PCR tests.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 508 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Need Help Paying Rent?

The Oregon Housing and Community Services’ COVID-19 Rent Relief Program may be able to help residents who are struggling to pay rent and are at risk of becoming homeless, due to lack of resources, loss of income or a delay in benefits due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Assistance is being offered through a needs-based formula at regional Community Action Agencies (CAA’s), via an $8.5 million allocation from OHCS. The formula was created using severe rent burden data, poverty data, homelessness data and unemployment claims.  CAA’s will begin taking applications soon. Residents lacking rental payment resources should contact their local CAA directly. Residents will be required to provide income loss documentation, as well as other materials in order to access the program. If approved, rent payments will be made directly to their landlord on behalf of the resident.  The $8.5 million was allocated by the Oregon Legislature through the Joint Emergency Board. OHCS said they are anticipating some additional resources from the Federal Government via the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act in the coming weeks. The release said the funds have been allocated statewide to local communities. Click here for a full list of opportunities and contact information.

 

ODF: Prevent Your Campfire from Turning into a Wildfire

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) issued another tip for May’s Wildlife Awareness Month talking about how to prevent your campfire from getting out of hand and causing a wildfire to ignite.  We know that sitting around a campfire in the great outdoors in Douglas County and around our beautiful state is one of the special times we all enjoy, but campfires are also a major cause of wildfires. ODF’s Pacific Northwest Coordination Group urges campers to follow these basic outdoor safety tips:

  • Know before you go: Before going camping, always contact the forest district, agency or landowner first to learn if there are any current campfire restrictions where you plan to recreate.
  • Have water and fire tools on site: Bring a shovel and a bucket of water to extinguish any escaped embers. When you are ready to leave, drown all embers with water, stir the coals, and drown again. Repeat until the fire is DEAD out. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.
  • Select the right spot: Where campfires are allowed, choose a site with an existing ring. Fire pits in established campgrounds are the best spots. If you choose to build a campfire, avoid building it near your tent, structures, vehicles, shrubs or trees, and be aware of low-hanging branches overhead. Clear the site down to bare soil, at least five feet on all sides, and circle it with rocks. Store unused firewood a good distance from the fire.
  • Keep your campfire small: A campfire is less likely to escape control if it is kept small. A large fire may cast hot embers long distances. Add firewood in small amounts as existing material is consumed.
  • Attend your campfire at all times: A campfire left unattended for even a few minutes can grow into a costly, damaging wildfire. Stay with your campfire from start to finish until it is dead out, as required by law. That ensures any escaped sparks or embers can be extinguished quickly.
  • Consider alternatives to a campfire this summer: Portable camp stoves are a safer option to campfires at any time of year. Areas that prohibit campfires outside maintained campgrounds with established fire pits often allow camp stoves.
  • Never use gasoline or other accelerants: Don’t use flammable or combustible liquids, such as gasoline, propane or lighter fluid, to start or increase your campfire.
  • Burn ONLY local wood: Hauling your firewood to a remote campground can potentially transport invasive species. Instead, buy it where you’ll burn it or gather wood on site where permitted. State regulations prohibit the open burning of any other material that creates dense, toxic smoke or noxious odors. Burning paper and cardboard can also easily fly up to start new fires.

 

A reminder that escaped campfires can be costly, and potentially deadly. State and federal law require the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires at any time of year. While citations and fines may apply, the biggest potential cost for an escaped campfire is firefighting costs. These can range from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars or more.  Help us prevent wildfires and visit Smokey Bear’s website and Keep Oregon Green's website for other wildfire prevention tips.

 

Blood Donations Desperately Needed! Donate Blood, Save a Life and Be a Hero!

Yes, these are uncertain times, but leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving and essential need. Those who are healthy, feeling well and eligible to give blood or platelets, are urged to make an appointment to donate as soon as possible by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting www.RedCrossBlood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. Donate your blood and save a life.  Appointments are now required, visit www.redcrossblood.org to schedule your appointment today.

 

Wednesday, May 20     9:00 am - 2:00 pm        Holiday Inn Express, 375 West Harvard Blvd, Roseburg

Friday, May 22             9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Roseburg Blood Donation Center, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd

Tuesday, May 26          12:00 pm - 5:00 pm      Family Church, 4384 Carnes Road, Roseburg

Tuesday, May 26          9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Pine Grove Community Church, 1729 Buckhorn Road, Roseburg

Wednesday, May 27     10:00 am - 3:00 pm      Winston Community Center, 440 SE Grape Ave, Winston

Thursday, May 28        1:00 pm - 6:30 pm        Family Church, 878 W Sixth Ave, Sutherlin

Friday, May 29             9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Roseburg Blood Donation Center, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd

Friday, May 29             10:00 am - 3:00 pm      YMCA of Douglas County, 1151 NW Stewart Pkwy, Roseburg 

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCHR
DCHR
A Peek Behind the Scenes of the County's COVID-19 Response Team (Photo) - 05/20/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – OPINION/EDITORIAL - May 20, 2020

A Peek Behind the Scenes of the County’s COVID-19 Response Team

An Editorial by Michael Kurtz

Like an iceberg, our collective community’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic goes largely unseen – and only a small part of the work reaches the public’s eyes.  I was privileged enough to be witness to part of the work that took place.   I want to share a small glimpse into their story. 

 

I was part of the County’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for the COVID-19 response from its inception.  Those that don’t know how an EOC works, let me give you a quick crash course.  It is driven by a uniform process that is used at every level (local, state, federal) of emergency response called an Incident Command System.  ICS creates a structure that allows emergency responders to speak a common language and organize in a fashion that facilitates the ability to quickly operationalize and logistically support a crisis response plan. 

 

When the EOC was stood up on March 24th, the Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN) had already been several weeks into an operational response mode to COVID-19 and had built an epidemiological team that is still the envy of most Oregon counties.  DPHN is led by their Executive Director, Teresa Mutschler and their Medical Director, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, who is also the County’s Public Health Official.  The delegated leader of the County’s (County government) response was Commissioner Tim Freeman.  He brought in KC Bolton, CEO of Aviva Health who oversees local federally qualified health centers – and is also a retired Army colonel and combat veteran with emergency response experience in standing up hospitals in war zones.

 

KC was quickly designated as the Incident Commander (Teresa Mutschler later became Co-Incident Commander). He and Commissioner Freeman built an incident command team that included physicians (Dr. Dannenhoffer, Dr. Harry “Chip” Taylor, and Dr. Tanveer Bokhari), public health professionals, trained expert emergency managers, logistical experts, fiscal experts, and public information professionals, from within and outside of County government.  This was an impressive group of accomplished professionals, but the question in my mind was how, having never worked together, would they coalesce into highly functioning unit?

 

Commissioner Freeman led this group, and the first order of business was to develop incident command objectives, those included:

1) Minimize loss of life for Douglas County citizens through education, mitigation and containment

2) Protect the medical system from being overwhelmed with cases by coordinating long term strategic response plans and identifying local thresholds with appropriate local response

3) Ensure safety of all health care providers by facilitating the acquisition and distribution of available PPE by utilizing local, state and federal resources

4) Ensure appropriate timely and coordinated communications to cooperators and the public

5) Support operational needs by leveraging available Douglas County resources. 

 

These objectives were the IC Team’s guiding doctrine.  Within days, individuals that hadn’t known each other before were working seamlessly together with common goals and direction.  They worked quickly to gain situational awareness, and finding the key data points to guide the decision making process.  As data was tracked, there was a point early on in the EOC where the trends indicated that the local hospital would likely be overwhelmed with cases by Easter – if not sooner.  Had that happened, plans had already been put in place to be operationalized to deal with this on a medical and community level.  This involved planning and logistical efforts for contracts, securing potential facilities, procuring personal protective equipment (PPE), and coordinating with FEMA requirements.  This was serious work and everybody understood the consequences of not meeting our objectives. 

 

For several weeks I came to the Courthouse, which was closed except for the EOC work, at 5:30 am only to find Commissioner Freeman already in his office either meeting with key staff, members of the medical community, or on the phone with someone in Washington DC in regards to meeting the needs of our local community’s COVID-19 response.  At one point early on Commissioner Freeman stated to the IC Team that there is always a political risk of doing too much – and then the crisis falls short and people say you overreacted.  He then said politics will have no place in this EOC – “if we do too much, it will still have been a training exercise worth doing.” Given the number of global pandemics that the Douglas Covid-19 response team has had experience addressing in the past (exactly 0 if you need reminding), trying to determine just the right amount of a response made absolutely no sense.  So the IC Team planned for the worst case scenario.  Commissioner Freeman looked at the medical and public health experts in the room and said, “tell me what you need.”  Then he and the rest of the Board responded by making it happen.  

 

While the worst case scenario didn’t happen, this continues to be a war fought on many fronts.  There is the front line work of containment done by DPHN through testing and contact tracing – and through the work of local clinics, physicians and Mercy Hospital to test for and treat positive cases.  There is the work of mitigation done by public education through the Joint Information Center where multiple agencies make sure that the most up to date information is getting to the public in a consistent manner (as well as through Dr. Dannenhoffer’s Facebook Live events). There is the planning work done by the EOC to ensure appropriate levels of responsiveness for any level of change in the crisis.  Senior leaders from numerous agencies are working together to make sure all these efforts are coordinated towards the same goals and objectives – to win the war on every front.

 

There is a reason, not dumb luck, that Douglas County has weathered this crisis as well as it has.  That reason is due to hundreds of people working hard behind the scenes to mitigate its impact.  It is also because a responsive community has listened to its leaders and have taken precautions to prevent the spread of the disease.  The County Commissioners have been a part of leading and supporting many of these efforts.  Attitude reflects leadership – and the attitude that I saw in the EOC from every person was to look to the collective group and ask, “what do you need?” – and then make it happen.

 

Michael Kurtz is the Human Resources Director for Douglas County and a former Army Journalist who received the Bronze Star for his work during Operation Desert Storm.  He was also appointed as the Deputy Agency Administrator for the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team.

 

###

Contact: Michael Kurtz, Human Resources Director

Douglas County Human Resources Department, Douglas County Courthouse, 1036 SE Douglas Avenue, Roseburg, Oregon (541) 440-4405 - mkurtz@co.douglas.or.us

Attached Media Files: DCHR
Get Tested
Get Tested
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 19, 2020 (Photo) - 05/19/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 19, 2020

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Wildfire season does not pause for a pandemic, or for that matter, any reason.  With the recent Emergency Drought declaration issued by the Douglas County Board of Commissioners for Douglas County, as well as by the Commissioners in four other SW Oregon Counties, the forecast looks like it will be a very dry summer in our region.  Moreover, wildfire season for our fire crews, fire camps and support staff will have a whole new mode of operation with regard to all the COVID-19 health and safety guidelines.  So, it is imperative that our citizens be even more conscientious this summer in preparing, monitoring activities and preventing the risk of wildfires in our communities.

Did you know that 70 percent of wildfires in Oregon are caused by people? While summer thunderstorms are responsible for sparking some fires, the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) wants people to know that most fires are human-caused and preventable. The top three causes of human-sparked fires are: escaped or rekindled debris burns; sparks or exhaust from power equipment; and escaped campfires.  Escaped debris burns have been the number one cause of wildfires in Oregon for decades, according to ODF. Debris burns are particularly dangerous when people burn during windy conditions; fail to create an adequate clearing; or leave the burn site unattended.  Here are a few tips for burning safely, offered by ODF:

  • Call your local Fire Protection Agency before you burn to check on any local restrictions
  • Place your debris pile in an open area away from structures, trees and power lines
  • Create small piles (4’ by 4’) to better manage the burn
  • Cover portions of the piles with polyethylene plastic (landscape material) to keep a portion dry for lighting later
  • Never burn under windy conditions
  • Create a perimeter around the pile at a minimum of 3 feet, scraped clear to bare mineral soil
  • Keep a shovel and charged hose nearby to manage the burn
  • Make sure the fire is completely out before leaving
  • Return periodically over several weeks to check for any heat or smoke

 

Mowing dry grass during high-fire-danger periods is also perilous. As an example, the 2015 Stouts Creek Fire that burned more than 30,000 acres near Tiller was sparked by a man mowing during restricted hours. The most common cause of mowing-related fires is the mower blade striking a rock or other hard object, creating a spark. Some fires have been started by power saws, weed eaters, motor vehicle exhaust (including motorcycles and ATVs), cutting and welding, and power lines. ODF recommends checking for local restrictions on mowing or similar activities; mowing early in the morning when there is dew in the grass; keeping vehicles in good working condition – including exhaust systems; and creating defensible space early in the spring before conditions get too dry.  When camping, check before you go to see if campfires are allowed. Carry a bucket for water, and a shovel with you. Keep fires small and manageable, and build them in open areas away from grass, brush and overhanging trees. Premade, designated fire pit areas at a campground are one of the safest places to have a campfire. For more information, visit the Keep Oregon Green website.   

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.  The first positive COVID-19 case in Douglas County was announced on March 8, 2020.  Thanks to the great work that Douglas County has done social distancing and staying home, we’ve had 25 cases in 72 days.   

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 19, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

1973

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  

Getting Tested & Testing Clinics

Thirteen residents were tested at the drive-through testing clinic held in Roseburg today, Tuesday, May 19.  As of today, our drive-through testing clinics have conducted over 500 nasal swab/PCR tests.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 508 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

USDA Announces Details of Direct Assistance to Farmers through the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced details today for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP), which will provide up to $16 billion in direct payments to deliver relief to America’s farmers and ranchers impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. Click here for more information.

 

In addition to this direct support to farmers and ranchers, USDA’s Farmers to Families Food Box program is partnering with regional and local distributors, whose workforces have been significantly impacted by the closure of many restaurants, hotels, and other food service entities, to purchase $3 billion in fresh produce, dairy, and meat and deliver boxes to Americans in need. Click here for more information.

 

TIP: How to Keep Your Glasses from Fogging Up While Wearing a Face Mask

Here is a science-based tip is a throwback from 2011, but it’s actually coming in handy right now. For many people wearing face masks has become commonplace at work and when they are running errands.  But, for those of us that wear corrective eye gear, it is not fun dealing with fogged-up glasses. They would rather have foggy glasses than catch or spread this unprecedented virus, or go against their employers or CDC guidelines.  In fact, medical professionals (and many others) have dealt with inconvenient, face-mask-induced spectacle condensation on the job for decades.  That’s why, back in 2011, two scientists published a study in The Royal College of Surgeons of England, that brings to light a super simple, at-home hack for this very phenomenon. Anti-fogging spray products do exist, but this trick requires zero shopping, and adds no risk of putting harsh chemicals near the sensitive eye area.

 

Here’s how it works: Right before putting on a face mask, wash your glasses with soapy water and shake off the excess. Then, let the glasses air dry or gently dry off the lenses with a soft tissue before putting them back on. Now your eye glass lenses should not mist up when the face mask is worn.  It’s a pretty simple trick and it is actually scientifically sound.  As study authors, Sheraz Shafi Malik and Shahbaz Shafi Malik explain, wearing a face mask directs warmer, exhaled breath upward (rather than outward, like normal) where your glasses sit. The warm water vapor condensing on the cooler surface of the lenses causes them to form tiny water droplets and get misty. The droplets form because of the inherent surface tension between the water molecules.  The soapy water’s sneaky role, then, is to leave behind an undetectable surfactant film that reduces said surface tension and allows these water molecules to spread evenly into a transparent layer. The authors also note this unassuming trick, or “surfactant effect,” can be used in any day-to-day attempt to prevent fogged-up glass surfaces.  You learn something new every day.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: Get Tested , DCCRT
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_51820.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 19, 2020 (Photo) - 05/19/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 19, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Tuesday, May 19, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.   Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 19, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

1973

0

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and is now including presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

There is a drive-through testing clinic today, Tuesday, May 19, 2020 in Roseburg.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 495 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon

Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across

government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

###

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

Get Tested
Get Tested
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 18, 2020 (Photo) - 05/18/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 18, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  With each new day of the Phase One Reopening process, we see more and more local businesses and recreational opportunities beginning to open up.  While it is not business as usual, it is encouraging to see our favorite restaurants, bars, hair salons, barber shops and gyms reopen for business.  We will continue to feel the economic impact of the pandemic in our communities for many months to come, but we want to emphasize the importance of continuing to support our local businesses, restaurants, diners, food trucks, beauticians, camping spots and retail establishments.  They need your business now more than ever. #ShopLocal; #DineLocal; #BuyLocal.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Monday, May 18, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  We want to reiterate that there was an error on the OHA website reporting a new case in Douglas County on Friday, May 15, when there was not a new case on that day.  We are currently working with staff at OHA to get the case count corrected.  Douglas County has 25 cases as of Monday, May 18, 2020.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Additional testing technologies such as the Abbot ID Now machine, available locally, have also shortened the wait time for results.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 18, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

1920

0

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive-through testing clinic led by DPHN will be tomorrow, Tuesday, May 19, 2020 in Roseburg.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 495 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Douglas County Operated Campgrounds Offer Additional Recreational Opportunities!

Douglas County Board of Commissioners sent out a notice today reminding citizens that campgrounds operated by the Douglas County Parks Department, while maintaining some limited use restrictions, continue to be open for your recreational enjoyment.  Additionally, as of May, 19, 2020, they are excited to announce that they will be offering additional recreational opportunities, such as tent camping, non-self-contained recreational units and some cabin and yurt use at the parks listed below.  Despite being open and with the new services being offered, we continue to encourage residents to follow the limited use restrictions, as well as the recommended CDC guidelines for physical distancing, sanitation and personal health.

 

We do understand the role our outdoor recreational sites provide in keeping our residents mentally and physically healthy, accordingly our parks do have the capacity to allow you to get out and rejuvenate, while remaining dispersed,” commented Board Chair, Commissioner Chris Boice.  As a reminder, this notice only applies to parks and campgrounds operated by our Douglas County Parks Department and not State, Federal or privately operated parks and campgrounds located in Douglas County. For information on parks and campgrounds operated by those agencies, you will need to contact them directly.

 

Douglas County Operated Campgrounds Adding Additional Recreational Opportunities May 19:

- Charles V. Stanton County Park Campground        - Chief Miwaleta County Park Campground

- John P. Amacher County Park Campground           - Mildred Kanipe Memorial County Park Campground

- Pass Creek County Park Campground                    - Whistler’s Bend County Park Campground

 

Please remember all other restrictions will remain in place, including but not limited to:

  • Staying home if you are sick.
  • Physical Distancing of 6 feet will be required at all times.  Do not overcrowd a campsite.
  • Wearing of masks is recommended.
  • Being Prepared - Bring your own soap, hand sanitizer, towels, toilet paper and disinfectant wipes.
  • All picnic tables and other campground amenities will not be sanitized.  Visitors using facilities will be doing so at their own discretion and must take all necessary precautions to ensure for their own personal health and safety.
  • Leave no trace.  Pack out what you bring in. 
  • Group Camps will remain closed and cabins at Umpqua Dunes will remain closed.
  • Restroom/Showers will be open from 8:00 am to 10:00 am & 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm only
  • Campgrounds will be open only to Oregonians and each campsite will be limited to 8 individuals.
  • Stick to low-risk activities to reduce stress on local emergency response and health care systems.
  • Watch and follow signs at the parks for more information.

Again, please make sure you review and follow the recommended CDC guidelines for physical distancing, as well as our limited use guidelines, so we can continue to keep our parks and campgrounds open.  You are your best defense against COVID-19.  All public facilities are only as clean as the last person who touched them.  Be prepared and bring your own soap, disinfectant wipes or sanitizer with you if you plan to visit a public facility.  Use of our facilities is at your own risk.  Please focus on protecting yourself, your family, and your community.?For more information or questions, please contact our Douglas County Parks Department at (541) 957-7001 or by email at ks@co.douglas.or.us">parks@co.douglas.or.us

 

State Releases Phase One Guidelines for Summer Schools, Summer Camps and Gyms

The State of Oregon has released additional Phase One Reopening guidelines from the Governor for Oregon’s summer schools, summer camps, gyms and public transit systems. The new rules come on the heels of the Governor’s guidelines already released for retail stores, bars and restaurants, and personal-care businesses. Gyms and fitness facilities such as martial arts centers and dance studios can reopen but must follow certain rules, such as limiting the number of people in the space, maintaining 6 feet of distance between individuals, and prohibiting contact sports and activities. Showers, pools, saunas and steam rooms must be closed, and drop-in child care is not allowed. Locker rooms can remain open with physical distancing. Equipment must be wiped down with a disinfectant before and after each use.  In-person summer schools and summer programs must develop communicable-disease management plans that include measures for infection control, physical distancing, screening for COVID-19 symptoms, and contact tracing. Summer camps are also required to have similar plans in place, and must keep detailed daily logs of each child’s pickups and drop-offs; restrict campers who have been exposed to COVID-19; provide hand-washing stations; and other safety measures.  Public transit can operate but must follow guidelines including frequent sanitation and enforcing 3 feet of distance between passengers. Oregonians using public transit must wear face coverings.  Also, according to the governor, all businesses are now required to provide face coverings and require employees to wear them. Members of the public are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings in grocery stores and other places where it’s hard to maintain physical distancing. More information about all Phase One guidelines can be found on the governor’s website.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell/(541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell /(541 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org

 

Attached Media Files: Get Tested , DCCRT
05-18-20 Douglas County Operated Campgrounds Offer Additional Recreational Opportunities - 05/18/20

Douglas County Operated Campgrounds Offer Additional Recreational Opportunities!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 18, 2020

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to remind citizens that campgrounds operated by the Douglas County Parks Department, while maintaining some limited use restrictions, continue to be open for your recreational enjoyment.  Additionally, as of May, 19, 2020, they are excited to announce that they will be offering additional recreational opportunities, such as tent camping, non-self-contained recreational units and some cabin and yurt use at the County parks listed below.  Despite being open and with the new services being offered, we continue to encourage residents to follow the limited use restrictions, as well as the recommended CDC guidelines for physical distancing, sanitation and personal health. 

 

            “We do understand the role our outdoor recreational sites provide in keeping our residents mentally and physically healthy, accordingly our parks do have the capacity to allow you to get out and rejuvenate, while remaining dispersed,” commented Board Chair, Commissioner Chris Boice.

 

            As a reminder, this notice only applies to parks and campgrounds operated by our Douglas County Parks Department and not State, Federal or privately operated parks and campgrounds located in Douglas County. For information on parks and campgrounds operated by those agencies, you will need to contact them directly.

 

Douglas County Operated Campgrounds Adding Additional Recreational Opportunities May 19:

  • Charles V. Stanton County Park Campground
  • Chief Miwaleta County Park Campground
  • John P. Amacher County Park Campground
  • Mildred Kanipe Memorial County Park Campground
  • Pass Creek County Park Campground
  • Whistler’s Bend County Park Campground

 

Please remember all other restrictions will remain in place, including but not limited to:

  • Staying home if you are sick.
  • Physical Distancing of 6 feet will be required at all times.  Do not overcrowd a campsite.
  • Wearing of masks is recommended.
  • Being Prepared - Bring your own soap, hand sanitizer, towels, toilet paper and disinfectant wipes.
  • All picnic tables and other campground amenities will not be sanitized.  Visitors using facilities will be doing so at their own discretion and must take all necessary precautions to ensure for their own personal health and safety.
  • Leave no trace.  Pack out what you bring in. 
  • Group Camps will remain closed.
  • Cabins at Umpqua Dunes will remain closed.
  • Restroom/Showers will be open from 8:00 am to 10:00 am & 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm only
  • Campgrounds will be open only to Oregonians.
  • Each campsite will be limited to 8 individuals.
  • Stick to low-risk activities to reduce stress on local emergency response and health care systems.
  • Watch and follow signs at the parks for more information.

 

Again, please make sure you review and follow the recommended CDC guidelines for physical distancing, as well as our limited use guidelines, so we can continue to keep our parks and campgrounds open.  You are your best defense against COVID-19.  All public facilities are only as clean as the last person who touched them.  Be prepared and bring your own soap, disinfectant wipes or sanitizer with you if you plan to visit a public facility.  Use of our facilities is at your own risk.  Please focus on protecting yourself, your family, and your community.?For more information or questions, please contact our Douglas County Parks Department at (541) 957-7001 or by email at ks@co.douglas.or.us">parks@co.douglas.or.us

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist (PIO)

(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Get Tested
Get Tested
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 18, 2020 (Photo) - 05/18/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 18, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Monday, May 18, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive cases in Douglas County remains at 25.  We want to reiterate that there was an error on the OHA website reporting a new case in Douglas County on Friday, May 15, when there was not a new case on that day.  We are currently working with staff at OHA to get the case count corrected.  Douglas County has 25 cases as of Monday, May 18, 2020.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Additional testing technologies such as the Abbot ID Now machine, available locally, have also shortened the wait time for results.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 18, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

1920

0

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive-through testing clinic led by DPHN will be tomorrow, Tuesday, May 19, 2020 in Roseburg.  As a reminder, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 495 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon

Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across

government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: Get Tested , DCCRT
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Case/Daily Update - May 17, 2020 (Photo) - 05/17/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - CASE & DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 17, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Sunny days are upon us and we know with the increased access to parks and recreation areas in Douglas County, as well as in Oregon, that residents and visitors are anxious to get back outdoors. Just a reminder that as parts of Oregon begin the Governor’s Phase One Reopening process, some Oregon State Parks are now open for limited day-use. But, all overnight camping in Oregon State Parks remains temporarily closed.  Before visiting a state park, check out the park map to see the status of all Oregon State Parks and available services and facilities, including hours of operation.  In Douglas County, our parks have been open since May 1, 2020 for day-use and our RV Parks are open for limited use with self-contained units. Click here for the current guidelines for Douglas County Parks.

 

Park visitors should come prepared and follow these guidelines to keep themselves, their families and others safe:

  • Stay home if you’re sick.
  • If visiting, stay local and close to home, meaning less than 50 miles.
  • Only visit with members of your own household.
  • Bring all supplies with you — food, water, hand cleanser, soap, towels, garbage bags, toilet paper, etc.

 

Reminder: Do not overcrowd a park.  If a park is already crowded, leave and come back at another time. If there’s space at the park, visitors need to visit with care:

  • Stay at least 6 feet away from people who aren’t from your household. More is better.
  • Cover your cough with a tissue (then throw it away), or cough on the inside of your elbow.
  • Leave no trace: Pack out everything you bring with you.
  • Stick to low-risk activities to reduce stress on local emergency response and health care systems.
  • Keep your visit short. Restrooms and other buildings may be closed.
  • Watch for signs at the park for more information.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Sunday, May 17, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of positive tests in Douglas County remains at 25.  We want to reiterate that there was an error on the OHA website reporting cases in Douglas County on Friday, May 15, as such there was not a new case on that day.  We are currently working with staff at OHA to get the case count corrected.  Douglas County has 25 cases as of Sunday, May 17, 2020.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Additional testing technologies such as the Abbot ID Now machine, available locally, have also shortened the wait time for results.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 17, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

25

23

0

1

1768

0

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 491 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon

Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas Public Health Network: COVID-19 Response (Part III of III)

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN) is at the heart of Douglas County’s COVID-19 efforts, and its staff has been working tirelessly to protect residents’ health and keep the County on the cutting edge of responsiveness to the pandemic.

DPHN took a proactive and transparent approach to battling the virus from the get-go, setting up a COVID-19 hotline and launching “Facebook Lives” with Public Health Administrator Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer to provide information and answer community members’ questions in real time.  Led by DPHN, the County was one of the first in Oregon to offer drive-through testing, Dannenhoffer and Dr. Jason Gray, Chief Medical Officer at Mercy Medical Center, did a dry-run of the operation themselves to make sure everything worked and was safe before opening it up to the public.

 

DPHN Executive Director Teresa Mutschler said drive-through flu vaccination clinics performed in recent years paved the way for the COVID-19 testing station.  “Through the emergency preparedness and response program, we’ve done exercises with all of our emergency partners and medical partners, doing drive-through flu vaccination clinics to practice for just this sort of event,” she said.

 

Personal protective equipment (PPE) has also been a main focus of DPHN, which has been managing the local PPE inventory and making sure it gets to where it is most needed. DPHN has also been distributing hand-sewn cloth masks donated by community volunteers. Mutschler said DPHN’s effectiveness has been in large part due to its partnerships and cooperation from the community. “Everything we’re doing over here, we really have huge support from volunteers and from other organizations,” she said.

 

Another of DPHN’s key functions during COVID-19 is contact tracing, or the process of finding out whom COVID-19 patients have been in contact with in order to alert those individuals they are at risk. The goal is to interrupt the chain of transmission by having those individuals self-isolate in order to prevent further spread. Dannenhoffer said contact-tracing efforts have been ramping up recently – the ability to contact-trace 95 percent of new COVID cases within 24 hours is one of the state’s requirements for Phase 1 reopening.   DPHN’s COVID-19 hotline has fielded more than 1,500 calls, Rutledge said. In the beginning, most callers had questions about symptoms and testing. Recently, callers have asked about Oregon’s reopening and what restrictions will be in place.  While DPHN has provided many core functions during the pandemic, the local COVID-19 response as whole is a countywide effort coordinated by the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team and its 14 partner agencies. Mutschler serves as co-incident commander of the team.

 

As difficult as this pandemic has been on all of us individually, organizationally and community-wide, it has been rewarding to be part of such an incredible team and to have the depth and scope of support we’ve had from local partners,” she said. “Our response would have looked fundamentally different if we hadn’t had those key elements.”

 

State Encourages Business Owners to Apply for Paycheck Protection Loans

There is still funding available through the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), and the state is encouraging Oregon business owners to apply for the forgivable loans, according to a press release from the Governor’s office.

 

Any Oregon business impacted by COVID-19 that has under 500 employees – including sole proprietors – may be eligible for this unique, short-term program,” said Linda Navarro, CEO of the Oregon Bankers Association. “Spread the word that there are still funds available – funds we want to get into the hands of Oregonians.

 

The Governor’s office said that roughly 55,000 Oregon businesses have received more than $7 billion in loans through the PPP. The loan program, run by the Small Business Administration (SBA), was authorized by the federal CARES Act.

 

Business owners can apply through their local banks or credit unions. More information about the program is available on the SBA’s website. Here are lists of Oregon banks and credit unions participating in the Paycheck Protection Program. The state has developed a COVID-19 Small Business Navigator website to help business owners keep track of the various resources and funding opportunities available to them. The site has sections on financial assistance, workforce assistance and reopening guidelines. Business owners can also call (833) 604-0880 for assistance.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case/Daily Update - May 16, 2020 (Photo) - 05/16/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - NOON CASE & DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 16, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Over the last 90 days, scientists, physicians, researchers and health care professionals the world over have been in overdrive working to find a cure, comprehend spread, improve testing capabilities and develop technologies to combat the COVID-19 virus.  All of this work involves the same common denominator, the opportunity for human interpretation, as well as human error.  As we continue to report findings, there will be times when our numbers are going to fluctuate and evolve.  We appreciate your patience as we work out the kinks and continue to provide the most up-to-date information available. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Saturday, May 16, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there is one new case of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  This is a new positive case that was confirmed by DPHN today.  There was an error in OHA reporting cases in Douglas County yesterday, May 15, as such there was not a new case yesterday.  Again, the new case was confirmed by DPHN this morning, May 16.  This brings the total number of positive tests to 25, as of today, May 16.  Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test.  Additional testing technologies such as the Abbot ID Now machine, available locally, have also shortened the wait time for results.  Twenty-five people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-five have recovered.  DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 16, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

1

25

23

0

1

1702

0

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for today, Saturday, May 16, 2020 in Reedsport. If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 491 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon

Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas Public Health Network: The People (Part II of III)

The most visible person at DPHN is Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, known by many community members simply as “Dr. Bob.”  While he works tirelessly behind the scenes on all aspects of Douglas County’s COVID-19 response, Dannenhoffer is most known for his “Facebook Live” updates where he’s kept local residents in the loop about new developments and answered questions from community members.

He’s an amazing spokesperson,” said DPHN Program Manager Christin Rutledge. “He has a really great way of presenting information in a way that people can understand, while remaining very calm. He’s a calming presence.”

Dannenhoffer chalks up his soothing demeanor to decades of experience as a pediatrician; in addition to serving as Douglas County’s Public Health Officer and DPHN’s Chief Medical Strategist, he still sees young patients part-time at Aviva Health. Dannenhoffer was invited to sit on Governor Brown’s COVID-19 Medical Advisory Panel, which provides advice, input and feedback to the governor and Oregon Health Authority on the state’s response to the pandemic. The panel includes health experts from around the state.  He provides hands-on leadership in Douglas County’s public health response – for instance, he personally participated in the pilot of the County’s drive-through COVID-19 testing station to make sure the process in place worked and was safe for both workers and those getting tested. He’s also made a number of trips to the coast for drive-through testing operations in Reedsport.

I cannot imagine having someone with a better skill set and personality in this role,” Commissioner Tim Freeman said about Dannenhoffer’s leadership during COVID-19. “He has spent a lifetime preparing for this type of an emergency. We are blessed that he was the right person at the right time in the right place! We all owe him a debt of gratitude.”

Teresa Mutschler is DPHN’s Executive Director, and serves as co-incident commander for the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, along with KC Bolton, CEO of Aviva Health. She is also DPHN’s Emergency Preparedness Coordinator, and that’s how she spent the bulk her of her time prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the pandemic began, her schedule has been marked by long days focused on keeping residents safe and healthy.

Rutledge, DPHN’s Program Manager, normally focuses on overseeing programs such as tobacco prevention and education, community health education and the prescription drug overdose program. During the COVID-19 pandemic, among other duties, she’s served as DPHN’s logistics officer, managing the local supply of personal protective equipment (PPE), including receiving, inventory and distribution. You may also have seen her YouTube videos on topics such as how to properly wear homemade masks.

Laura Turpen is DPHN’s Lead Epidemiologist and has done a lot of work on contact tracing, with the help of other DPHN staff. Laura spent time in Gambia working in public health and brings a wealth of experience in infectious disease. Her expertise and knowledge about infectious disease and epidemiology has been instrumental in leading both DPHN’s response.

Vanessa Becker was brought on as DPHN Public Information Officer to steer public communication during the COVID-19 pandemic. She has a graduate degree in epidemiology and previously worked as Deputy Health Administrator for the Douglas County Public Health Department. She also has a consulting business and has authored multiple community health assessments across the state. Vanessa brings crisis communications expertise, and was a key leader in the response to the 2015 UCC shooting as UCC Board Chair.

Brian Mahoney, DPHN Public Health Modernization Program Coordinator, has been doing a lot of operations work for the COVID-19 response. Brian spent time working in Kenya on public health; served for several years with the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta; and worked with the World Health Organization in Geneva. He has also worked for Oregon Health Authority, and ran the Clatsop County Health Department for many years.

Mark Stout is Public Health Generalist, and Katy Dannenhoffer has been acting as Courier.

Dannenhoffer said DPHN’s team has been working long hours on the COVID-19 response, without complaint. “It has been such an incredible team effort,” he said. “With such a small little team here, to do as much as we’ve done, is really pretty amazing.”

Updated Modeling Shows Reduction in Transmission Rates

The Oregon Health Authority reported that they now have access to a revised modeling from the Institute for Disease Modeling specifically prepared for OHA.  It shows that measures taken by Oregonians have lowered COVID-19 transmission rates, with the number of new cases appearing to be at a steady, low number, rather than declining. Read the full report here.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 15, 2020 (Photo) - 05/15/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 15, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  After 53 days, reopening day has arrived for many businesses in Douglas County, and in 30 other counties in Oregon.  It is a welcome relief for local economies, but, this will not be business as usual.  In approving our Phase One Reopening application, the Governor instituted specific criteria, monitoring procedures and stipulated continued physical distancing, hand-washing and staying home if you are sick directives.  Many businesses that were closed or chose to close during the Governor’s COVID-19 executive order are now able to cautiously reopen if they can follow the strict sector specific guidelines established by the State of Oregon.  For a complete list of the Governor’s guidelines click here.  

 

The COVID-19 virus continues to spread throughout the world.  And, for many of our residents the COVID-19 virus is still a looming threat, so we must be vigilant in our personal health and wellness, as well as our care and concern for others during this transitional phase,” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer.

 

The Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to remind citizens that it is important to continue to protect yourself, your family and others from the spread of this virus.  “We know this will not be easy, but if we all work together, we can continue to move forward,” commented Commissioner Tim Freeman. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Friday, May 15, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  Also, 23 of the 24 cases that tested positive have recovered.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 25 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Please note: We want to confirm there are NO new positive cases today in Douglas County. There was another glitch and typo in entry of case data at the State level this morning. DPHN staff confirmed there were no new cases and corrected it in the system, but OHA had already pulled their numbers for the day. We’ve asked OHA to update their posting as soon as possible, and to correct their count to the true number, which is 0 new cases in Douglas County.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 15, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

23

0

1

1654

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for today, Friday, May 15, 2020. There is also a clinic in Reedsport tomorrow, May 16, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 480 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon

Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tonight, Friday, May 15, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas

County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas Public Health Network: The Organization (Part I of III)

Douglas County has a unique model for its public health system - and that model has enabled it to respond nimbly and effectively to the COVID-19 pandemic. Public health services used to be provided directly by Douglas County until January 2016, when the department was decentralized and DPHN was formed as a nonprofit. The County still retains public health authority, but DPHN and its partners provide the public health services, operating as a consortium of nonprofits and for-profit businesses.

 

We work with other nonprofits to do the public health services that were traditionally done through the County,” DPHN Executive Director Teresa Mutschler said.

 

Commissioner Tim Freeman was instrumental in revamping the County’s approach to public health a few years ago. When he joined the Board of Commissioners in 2015, he was fresh from the state Legislature, where he’d served as District 2 representative since January of 2009. In Salem, he became one of the policy experts on health care delivery systems and served as co-chair of the Joint Ways and Means Committee for Health and Human Services, as well as a special joint committee on health care transformation.  Douglas County’s public health department was based in a large building on West Madrone Street that is now Adapt’s headquarters. At one point, 300 health department employees worked there, but by the time Freeman became Commissioner that number had dwindled by about 90 percent as services were scaled back. Freeman found the system ineffective. He got together with a recently retired health care administrator and others to analyze the situation and brainstorm solutions. “We developed something entirely different,” he said.

 

The new approach involved tapping into existing resources: There were a host of local organizations that already provided services similar to certain public health functions. DPHN was formed as a nonprofit, and local nonprofits were invited to join as members of the Board of Directors. Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer came on as County Public Health Officer and was hired as DPHN executive director. Later, Teresa Mutschler took over the executive director role. Dannenhoffer remains the medical director for DPHN. The County retains public health authority and is ultimately responsible for the statutory public health services. Each partner agency manages a specific set of services. For instance, United Community Action Network (UCAN) runs the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program; Aviva Health provides immunization, women’s reproductive health, family planning, sexually transmitted disease, and school-based health services; Adapt/Compass provides adult and school-based mental health services; and Dunes Family Health Care offers some immunization services in the Reedsport area. Entities like Mercy Medical Center and Umpqua Health participate through the Board of Directors.  Having other agencies take on those functions has allowed DPHN itself to focus on things like disaster preparedness, communicable diseases, and prevention. Which has been very critical during the COVID-19 pandemic. While most county public health departments are still providing a full array of public health services during the pandemic, Douglas County’s system allows partner nonprofits to manage day-to-day public health needs while DPHN focuses primarily on COVID-19.

 

With the first Worldwide pandemic in 100 years, our public health system was set up with a large focus on dealing specifically with this type of public health emergency,” Freeman said. “They were able to be incredibly responsive and hit the thing out of the park because of the structure and great dedicated people.”

 

DPHN now has eight employees, and is contracted with the County to oversee communicable disease, emergency preparedness, public health modernization and tobacco prevention programs. DPHN also works on specialized programs involving public health modernization, prescription drug overdose prevention and ensuring access to well-women and reproductive health services. Our public health office didn’t move to far, as DPHN currently operates out of the Adapt building on West Madrone in Roseburg. 

 

New Online Resource For Veterans and Their Families

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs announced that they have developed a new online help guide for veterans and their families in recovery in the wake of the economic crisis caused by COVID-19.  It is called the Veteran Resource Navigator.  The site will also inform them of any changes to their earned benefits. The Veteran Resource Navigator is designed to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the federal, state and local resources that are most needed for their unique circumstances in 2020. This tool includes resources that are organized by topic, including Economic, Health, Education, Housing and Food, and other resources. Veterans can also call ODVA at 800-692-9666 for assistance.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 15, 2020 (Photo) - 05/15/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 15, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Friday, May 15, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  Also, 23 of the 24 cases that tested positive have recovered.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 25 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 15, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

23

0

1

1654

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for today, Friday, May 15, 2020. There is also a clinic in Reedsport tomorrow, May 16, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 480 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.    Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 14, 2020 (Photo) - 05/14/20

Please find an updated daily update attached.  Areas in yellow highlight have been updated. 

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 14, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  In case you have not heard the good news, the Governor has approved Douglas County’s application to begin her Phase One Reopening process starting Friday, May 15, 2020.  Click here to read the Governors approval letter received late last night.  The Douglas County Board of Commissioners released a press release early this morning announcing the reopening approval.  Following the Governor’s press conference this morning, our Commissioners released an update that provides more information about the Governor’s Phase One Reopening guidelines.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to remind residents that the reopening process is completely mandated by the state, and your county officials do not have authority to enforce, change or approve any of these guidelines.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Thursday, May 14, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  Also, 23 of the 24 cases that tested positive have recovered.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 24 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 14, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

23

0

1

1644

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for Friday, May 15, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 480 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Governor’s Press Conference Today About Her Phase One Reopening Plan

Douglas County and 27 other Oregon counties will be allowed to enter the Governor’s Phase One Reopening plan starting this Friday, May 15, 2020, the Governor said at a press conference today. This means residents will be able to eat out at restaurants, schedule an appointment with their hairdresser, and shop at retail stores, as soon as tomorrow.  No approval or applications are needed, as local business will be responsible for researching, following and implementing their reopening based on the Governor’s sector specific Phase One Reopening guidelines. 

 

Businesses will have to follow strict State Mandated Guidelines to keep customers and employees safe. Gyms will be  allowed to operate under Phase One, among other measures, gyms will need to maintain physical distancing between gym users and close all showers and pools. Restaurants and Bars can open for sit-down service if they can keep groups 6 feet apart, cap parties at 10 people, require employees to wear masks, and wrap up food and beverage service by 10 p.m. Hair salons, barber shops and other Personal Service Businesses will need to screen clients before they come in for appointments to ensure the clients are not showing any symptoms of sickness.  Members of the public will be allowed to gather in groups of up to 25, as long as physical distancing can be maintained. It is still recommended that people wear masks in public, practice good hygiene including hand-washing, and stay home if they are sick. Elderly and other at-risk Oregonians are advised to continue to stay home and avoid contact with people outside of their household. People who normally work in an office, but have been working from home during the pandemic must continue to work at home.

 

COVID-19 is still present in Oregon,” OHA Director Pat Allen said. “Every community remains vulnerable to the virus. That means our personal actions each day will either slow the virus or spread it.” 

 

Oregon counties had to apply to the state to be approved for Phase One reopening. Douglas County submitted its application last Friday. The applications were reviewed by state medical and public health experts. Twenty-eight counties were approved; two are pending further review (Marion and Polk), and three have not yet applied (Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas).  Douglas County and other approved counties met prerequisites including: a drop in COVID-19 hospitalization rates; adequate hospital capacity to manage a potential surge; sufficient PPE supply; and sufficient testing, contact-tracing and isolation capabilities. The counties must remain in Phase One for at least three weeks before entering Phase Two. Details of Phase Two are still being worked out. The state recently released new guidelines for Child Care providers, and will be releasing additional guidelines for public transit, summer camps, summer schools and others soon.  They hope to reopen schools statewide in the fall, but plans are still in progress.

 

The Governor did caution that COVID-19 cases are expected to increase as the state reopens, but warns that a significant spike in new cases could result in renewed restrictions. “This is really, really hard. But we know that if we can’t continue to beat back the virus, then we’re going to have to implement restriction measures again. And I don’t think any Oregonian wants to go backward.”  

 

Mercy Participating in Asymptomatic COVID-19 Testing Program

Mercy Medical Center is one of two hospitals in Southern Oregon to participate in a new testing program focused on asymptomatic COVID-19 patients.  Testing started this week in Mercy’s Emergency Department. The goal is to randomly collect and test 15 samples per week. The program helps state and local health officials get an idea of whether COVID-19 has an undetected presence in the community among people who do not show symptoms.  Participation is voluntary; nurses will ask the randomly selected patients if they would like to participate. There is no cost to the patient. Testing involves a nasopharyngeal swab being placed into the back of your nostril for 2-3 seconds (this might make you sneeze, cough, or your eyes water, but it shouldn’t hurt). The swab is then sent to the state public health laboratory, and results will be back in several days. Your doctor will contact you with results.  Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be referred to the local public health authority for follow-up. Results are confidential. Asymptomatic positive cases will be advised to isolate at home until seven days after the date of the test – or, if they develop symptoms, 72 hours after their fever and cough subside. The asymptomatic testing program is being carried out at selected hospitals throughout Oregon to help health officials get an idea of where COVID-19 may be occurring. The random sampling will include patients of all ages. Tests are also still being done on patients who do show symptoms of COVID-19.

 

How to Talk to Kids About COVID-19

It is important to talk to your children about COVID-19.  Many adults are concerned about getting and giving the virus to somebody they love and we know children are also fearful and frustrated by the dramatic life changes we’ve seen in the last 2 months. Children don’t have the same emotional and intellectual tools to manage it like adults do which influences the way one talks to kids about the risk and what they can do to help reduce risk.  This new electronic book/YouTube video is a great resource to share with your kids. 

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 14, 2020 - 05/14/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 14, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Thursday, May 14, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  Also, 23 of the 24 cases that tested positive have recovered.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 24 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-three of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 14, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

23

0

1

1644

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for Friday, May 15, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 480 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

05-14-20 Governor's Phase One Reopening -- What That Means for Douglas County - 05/14/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 14, 2020

 

Governor’s Phase One Reopening – What That Means for Douglas County

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Now that the Governor has approved Douglas County’s application, we can begin the Phase One Reopening process starting tomorrow, Friday, May 15, 2020, under her very specific state mandated safety guidelines.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners would like to remind residents that the reopening process is being completely mandated by the state, and your local officials do not have authority to enforce, change or approve any of these guidelines.  Here is what the Governor’s Phase One Reopening means for Douglas County residents.

 

The Governor’s Phase One Limited Reopening Sectors with Key Guidelines:

  • Restaurants and bars for sit-down service

Restaurants and bars in Douglas County may open for sit-down service, but only with adequate physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings by employees. Customers are encouraged to also wear face coverings, but of course, not while they’re eating.  https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le2342B.pdf

 

  • Personal care and services businesses, including barbers and salons

Personal care businesses, such as salons, barber shops, and gyms may open in a very limited way. We will require physical distancing and increased sanitation, as well as a series of additional guidelines, like wearing face coverings and gloves at salons. Salons must serve customers by appointment only and maintain records for contact tracing. https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le2342F.pdf

 

  • Retail Businesses

Retail businesses can also open using physical distancing, as long as they can follow Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines.  It is recommended to notice guidelines to customers through proper signage, one-way flow in aisles, and using tape markings to delineate space.  https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le2342A.pdf

 

  • Childcare, summer school, and youth programs

Childcare, summer school, and youth programs will also be allowed to resume while adhering to certain guidelines. https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le2353.pdf

 

  • Local gatherings can increase in size to 25, again, with physical distancing.

 

            Further, the Governor stated that Douglas County must remain in Phase One for at least 21 days before becoming eligible to advance to Phase II. According to the state, if we begin to see significant increases in COVID-19 cases or community spread, the Oregon Health Authority will work with local public health officials to evaluate what actions should be taken, and if it could necessitate Douglas County moving back from Phase One to a stay-home status. Details on Phase Two and Three are forthcoming from the Governor, and will be based on data collected during Phase One. The Governor outline that the goal of the Phase Two would be to expand gathering size, allow some office work, and begin allowing visitation to congregate care.  Her Phase Three would include reopening concerts, conventions, and festivals.  The Governor already announced that all large gatherings should be canceled or significantly modified through at least September, and live-audience sporting events won't be possible until a reliable treatment or prevention is available.

 

Additionally, the Governor asked residents to continue following actions to stay safe and prevent the spread of the virus:

 

  • Vulnerable populations must still stay at home
  • Limited visitation to nursing homes, hospitals
  • Limited gatherings
  • Limited travel
  • Increased hygiene, cleaning & sanitation
  • Stay home when sick
  • Telework when possible

 

            As a reminder, we need to continue to stay vigilant and work together to continue to control the spread of the virus, as we will be living with COVID-19 until there is a reliable treatment or prevention, which is still many months off.  Douglas County’s application was submitted on Friday, May 8, 2020 by Board Chair, Commissioner Chris Boice, who worked in conjunction with our Public Health Official, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer to quickly complete and submit our reopening application to the Governor.  Douglas County continues to be recognized as leader in Oregon for our COVID-19 response for our drive-through testing, coordinated planning, prevention messaging and hospital/care facility capacity preparedness.  

Douglas County Approved by the Governor to Begin Phase One Reopening - 05/14/20

Updated: Letter from Governor Attached

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 14, 2020

Douglas County Approved by the Governor to Begin Phase One Reopening

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Board of Commissioners received notice late last night that their application to begin the Phase One Reopening process in Douglas County has been approved by Oregon’s Governor.  The first phase of the reopening process will begin for county businesses on Friday, May 15, 2020.  Douglas County will be among the first of Oregon’s counties to start the process of reopening businesses and kick start our economy after the mandated closures were issued by the Governor in her Executive Order #20-12 dated March 17, 2020 in response to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic. 

 

            “This has been a tumultuous time for many of our citizens, as well as for the livelihood of our local businesses, but hopefully the reopening process will bring renewed life back into our struggling economy.  Douglas County worked hard to make sure every aspect of managing the health and safety of our citizens was carefully prepared and organized in order to be on the forefront of the reopening process,” stated Commissioner Chris Boice.  

 

            Douglas County’s application was submitted on Friday, May 8, 2020 by Board Chair, Commissioner Chris Boice, who worked in conjunction with our Public Health Official, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer to quickly complete and submit our reopening application to the Governor.                                  

 

            “I am glad we have done so well in limiting the outbreaks and keeping our health care facilities from getting overwhelmed during the pandemic.  I think we are as ready as anywhere to safely begin reopening our businesses.  We may see more cases, but we will continue to be vigilant in limiting the impact of COVID-19 to our citizens,” said Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Official. 

 

            Douglas County continues to be recognized as leader in Oregon for our COVID-19 response for our drive-through testing, coordinated planning, prevention messaging and hospital/care facility capacity preparedness.  

 

            “I want to thank the Governor for recognizing the hard work Douglas County has done in combating this virus.  It is a tremendous measure of reassurance for a job well done,” stated Commissioner Tom Kress.  

 

            As the delegated liaison Commissioner to the COVID-19 crisis response, Commissioner Tim Freeman has directed the efforts of the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team. 

 

            “Douglas County owes a tremendous amount of gratitude to Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Official, Douglas Public Health Network and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team for what they have accomplished in successfully managing the COVID-19 pandemic in Douglas County.  If it was not for their cooperative efforts, we would not be able to safely start the process of reopening our businesses in a measured and phased manner.  A huge thank you also needs to be given to the citizens of Douglas County for taking the crisis seriously, helping to flatten the curve for the spread of the virus, and for stepping up to help our fellow citizens in a desperate time.  We ALL made this happen together,” commented Commissioner Tim Freeman.

DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 13, 2020 (Photo) - 05/13/20

UPDATED: PHOTOS ADDED

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 13, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  As the Douglas County Board of Commissioners and our Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer anxiously await a response from the Governor’s office about our Phase One Reopening Application, we would like to remind citizens that while here in Douglas County it might seem like all the restrictions and closures related to the COVID-19 pandemic were all overkill measures, the truth is they were not.  The number one objective here in Douglas County for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team was to minimize loss of life.  A goal we continue to make our highest priority.  We know that all the safety measures, closures and plans put into place have helped to save thousands of lives.  We have an amazing health care system in the United States, and yet, there are locations in the US that have been hit hard by the virus.  We were very fortunate that we took action quickly and put preventive measures in place.  It only takes a moment to look at the statistics in other parts of the world where serious outbreaks and mortality rates have caused unprecedented devastation in both developed and underdeveloped nations like Italy, Germany and China to see what this virus would have caused if we did not have the health care system we do, or had not taken swift action to protect our citizens. As the old adage goes, “It’s better to be safe, than sorry.”  

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Wednesday, May 13, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 23 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 13, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1571

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for Friday, May 15, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 480 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Mask Fit Clinic for Health Care Providers

Guidelines from the CDC have recently changed for dental settings and in an effort to support local dental offices, Douglas Public Health Network held its first fit clinic on Saturday May 9, 2020.  The CDC guidelines for dental settings now require N95 respirator/mask to protect against COVID-19 transmission, those respirators have not been routinely used in these settings in the past. 

 

“The new CDC guidelines have introduced PPE that our dental offices have not previously used.  These N95’s come in an assortment of sizes and manufacturers and we know that one size does not fit all.  We coordinated our first fit clinic to support our local dental providers in this shift and to practically ensure that the mask is working as intended, to prevent contamination leaking into the mask in high exposure risk situations like dental procedures,” commented Christin Rutledge, DPHN Program Manager. 

 

With many dental providers not having used this type of PPE before, DPHN saw the need to hold a fit clinic. On Saturday May 9, 75 dental providers and employees were fit tested for N95 masks. DPHN will continue to offer fit testing for anyone in the dental, medical, or other profession on Wednesdays from 12-6 by appointment only. To request an appointment, email ppe@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.

 

Mercy Medical Center Receives Rapid-Testing Machine for COVID-19 Tests

State health officials announced they have distributed 12 additional Abbott ID NOW rapid-testing machines to health care providers around Oregon, including Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg. The machines process COVID-19 tests in about 15 minutes.

 

These machines will significantly improve the capacity for testing in these communities by allowing greater access to local testing and ensuring that the test specimens do not have to be shipped to distant labs for processing,” Oregon Health Authority (OHA) officials said in a press release.   

 

OHA received a federal shipment of the machines last month, but only sent out three due to a lack of test supplies – one of those three machines went to Curry General Hospital in Curry County. The state now has enough supplies to send out the other 12. Bay Area Hospital in Coos County is also receiving one.   

 

In determining which health care providers would be given a machine, OHA prioritized areas of the state with a high population of older adults and other at-risk groups; a limited number of first-responders; areas with limited or no COVID-19 testing; and areas with few courier services for the state public health lab and commercial labs. The Abbot ID NOW machines are in use across the country, including at the White House.

 

This is an important resource for our community, and we appreciate the support from OHA. Timely results will enable our health care team to make appropriate and more efficient treatment decisions and allow for further conservation of PPE,” said Kathleen Nickel, Mercy’s Director of Communications.

 

The Governor noted in the press release that capability for rapid testing is crucial in order to monitor the prevalence of COVID-19 in various communities as Oregon reopens. Rapid testing also allows for COVID-19 patients to be quickly identified, treated and isolated to prevent further spread.

 

Staying Safe as Oregon Begins the Process to Slowly Lifting the Executive Orders

When the day comes and the Governor starts to slowly lift restrictions on activities and businesses, it’s important to remember that health and hygiene advice that slows the spread of COVID-19 still applies. Actions such as frequent handwashing, staying six feet apart, and wearing face coverings will continue to be a part of our daily lives. Just a reminder to protect the important people in your life and how to stay safe as we continue to navigate the next steps of our future with COVID-19 response together. Click here to see a copy of the OHA stay safe reopen graphic.

 

Aviva Health Glide Clinic Location Reopens - Patients are Required to Call Prior to Visit

Aviva Health announced yesterday that effective immediately, Aviva Health’s Glide location is again open for regular business hours after a 50-day closure due to the COVID-19 emergency. The clinic operates Monday through Thursday, from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm.  As a precautionary measure related to COVID-19, walk-in patients are not yet allowed. Anyone wishing to be seen must call the clinic in advance at (541) 496-3504 to make an appointment.  All patients showing up for an appointment are encouraged to wear a mask and staff continues to adhere to all PPE recommendations of local, state and federal health officials.

 

This is a careful balance,” says Aviva Health CEO KC Bolton. “We want to make sure we are providing our patients the care they need while ensuring their safety and the safety of our staff and larger community.” 

 

While its medical clinics in Myrtle Creek, Sutherlin, North County and Roseburg never closed, Aviva Health’s majority of patient visits at this juncture are virtual. 

 

We continue to monitor the situation in Douglas County and are paying close attention to the governor’s decisions around a phased reopening of the economy,” Bolton says. “We, like so many Oregonians, are eager to return to some semblance of normal, but our top priority remains and always will be the health and safety of our patients, staff and community. For that reason, we’ll continue to follow the recommendations of our local public health authority and state and federal health officials.

 

Tosha Agee, Aviva Health’s Glide Clinic manager, says staff is eager to once again deliver care to the community. 

Our clinic staff is excited to return to serving the people of Glide,” she says. “It’s our mission to provide access to high-quality, affordable medical care to people who wouldn’t otherwise have it, and this reopening is a great representation of that.” 

 

To schedule an appointment at the Glide Clinic, please call (541) 496-3504.  Community members who have questions about or are concerned they have coronavirus should call the DPHN Coronavirus Hotline at (541) 464-6550. For more information, please visit www.aviva.health/coronavirus.

 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

In this challenging time, it’s more important than ever to find ways to care for our own mental health and reach out to family members and friends to make sure they are OK. Compass Behavioral Health is Douglas County’s Community Mental Health Program (CMHP), and has an active Facebook page with tips and resources.   “Compass is highlighting #Tools2Thrive – what individuals can do daily to prioritize their mental health, build resiliency in the face of trauma and obstacles, support those who are struggling, and work towards a path of recovery,” the organization said in a Facebook post.

 

The post linked to the Mental Health America website, which contains a host of tips and information on stress, staying positive, navigating times of change, and when and how to seek professional help.  Compass accepts walk-ins during regular working hours, and can be reached at (541) 440-3532, or through its 24/7 crisis line at (800) 866-9780. You can visit Compass’ website to learn more.

 

There is also the Douglas County Healthy Transitions program, which focuses on strengthening the mental health of local youths ages 16-25. Visit the Healthy Transitions Facebook page to learn more. A recent post linked to a document titled “7 Tips to Get You Through the Coronavirus.” Healthy Transitions has a monthlong campaign using the hashtag #onedayatatime to raise awareness about the mental health needs of youths and young adults.

 

May 30 is the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) “National Day of Hope.” To mark this day, NAMI holds annual fundraising walks. This year, the walks will be virtual; participants will walk where they choose and share their participation on social media. You can walk a 5K through your neighborhood, do loops around your backyard or walk indoors on a treadmill. For more information, visit NAMI’s website or NAMI Oregon’s Facebook page.

 

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies remain seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need. If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented strict sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767.

 

Wednesday, May 13    9:30 am – 2:30 pm      Reedsport High School, 2260 Longwood Drive, Reedsport

Thursday, May 14        12:00 pm - 5:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd, Roseburg        

Friday, May 15             9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd, Roseburg        

Friday, May 15             10:00 am - 3:00 pm      YMCA of Douglas County, 1151 Stewart Parkway, Roseburg                

Monday, May 18          1:00 pm - 6:30 pm        Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd, Roseburg

Monday, May 18          12:00 pm – 5:00 pm      Elks Lodge # 1943, 106 South Main Street, Myrtle Creek

Tuesday, May 19          12:00 pm - 5:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd, Roseburg

Wednesday, May 20     9:00 am - 2:00 pm        Holiday Inn Express, 375 West Harvard Blvd, Roseburg

Friday, May 22             9:00 am - 2:30 pm        Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd, Roseburg

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.   Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT , FitClinic 4 , FitClinic 2 , FitClinic 1
05-13-20 Douglas County Approves Emergency Drought Order - 05/13/20

Press Release from the Douglas County Board of Commissioners

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 13, 2020

Douglas County Approves Emergency Drought Order

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Drought continues to spread across southern Oregon, as Douglas County is the fourth county to declare a drought order this year.  On May 13, 2020, Douglas County Public Works Director, Scott Adams, presented and received approval from the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, at the weekly business meeting for an emergency drought order.  Oregon’s Governor has already declared State of Drought Emergencies in Jackson and Curry Counties, and Coos County has a pending order request in front of the Governor. 

 

Upon official recording of the order, the Douglas County Board of Commissioners will send the order to Oregon’s Governor, requesting an official emergency drought declaration from the state for Douglas County.  The order cited below average precipitation; lack of snow pack; low stream flows; higher than normal temperatures; agricultural, livestock and forest economic hardships and potential for serious injury and losses, resulting from extreme weather conditions in the county, as the basis for the request.

 

As of May 4, 2020, Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) water conditions report stated the Umpqua Basin stream flows are 67% of average.  Snowpack, according to most recent Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) report states part of southwestern Oregon, including the Umpqua Basin snow water equivalent (SWE) remains well below normal.  As of May1, the basin snowpack was 43% of normal, which is significantly lower than the prior month when the snowpack was 75% of normal.  The report also indicates that April precipitation was 41% of average, and since October 1, 2019, it has been 65% of average. 

 

As of April 28, 2020, the U.S. Drought Monitor for Oregon, illustrates the majority of Douglas County is in severe drought.  The most recent three-month outlook prepared by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center (NOAA) indicates, “an increased probability of above-normal temperatures along with below-normal precipitation”.  This could dramatically increase wild land fire danger.

 

 “The Douglas County Board of Commissioners agree that measures must be taken to alleviate stress to citizens, farmland, forestry and livestock, to protect or mitigate economic loss, and to be responsive to the threat of wildfires,” commented Commissioner Tom Kress.

 

Although the drought declaration has not resulted in any residential use restrictions, it is a good reminder that water conservation is always a good idea and that fire danger is likely to be high in many parts of Douglas County this summer.

 

The Governor's drought declaration will allow increased flexibility in how water is managed to ensure that limited supplies are used as efficiently as possible. The Governor’s drought declaration will also authorize state agencies to expedite water management tools to users who would not otherwise have access.

DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 13, 2020 (Photo) - 05/13/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 13, 2020

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Wednesday, May 13, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 23 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 13, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1571

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for Friday, May 15, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 480 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.  Check out the new infographic from DPHN on COVID-19 testing attached to the release.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.    Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DPHN Testing Infographic , DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 12, 2020 (Photo) - 05/12/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 12, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  This week, May 10-16, 2020, we celebrate National Hospitals Week!  Every year on the second week of May, the American Hospital Association recognizes the great work that hospitals, health systems and health care workers do to provide healthcare resources to keep our communities healthy.  This Hospital Week, we are especially thankful for all frontline workers keeping us safe and healthy in the face of a global pandemic. Oregon hospitals and their staff have been making sacrifices to care for patients in order to keep us all safe.   

 

This Hospital Week, join us in saying #ThankYouOregonHospitals for their hard work to keep us healthy – not only during COVID-19, but year round!  Oregon has 62 community hospitals located across 36 counties, according to the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS). It includes public and private hospitals, multi-hospital systems and stand-alone specialty hospitals and affiliated health service providers. The majority of hospitals across Oregon are located in rural areas.

 

In Douglas County, there are two hospitals ~ Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg and the Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport. We are thankful for all of our dedicated local medical professionals and support staff that keep Mercy Medical Center and Lower Umpqua Hospital operating.  A second shout out to all that these two organizations and employees do for our communities.  Show your support, make a post a sign in your yard or your window, or post a note of appreciation on Facebook, make sure you use the following hashtags to thank our hospitals and their staff: #HospitalWeek and #ThankYouOregonHospitals.  

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Tuesday, May 12, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 22 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 12, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1473

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for today, Tuesday, May 12, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas County Board of Commissioners

Douglas County’s countywide COVID-19 response is being led by a mighty team!  Our Douglas County Board of Commissioners were an integral part of the County’s COVID-19 response.  Commissioner Tim Freeman was chosen by his fellow Commissioners to have delegated authority for the COVID-19 health response in early March. As the Board of Commissioners’ public health liaison, Freeman also worked on health care policy issues during his time in the state Legislature, he was a natural choice. Back in February, he’d already connected with HR Director Michael Kurtz to look at how the County could alter its operations to allow some employees to work remotely. When Freeman chose to organize and head up the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT) as the Agency Administrator, Kurtz, a former deputy county health administrator, acted as his backup.

 

The County stood up an Emergency Operations Center and convened a team of local experts to serve on the DCCRT. KC Bolton, CEO of Aviva Health, was asked to take on the role of co-incident commander along with Teresa Mutschler, Executive Director of Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN). Bolton’s dual background in health care and military hospital planning made him the “perfect fit,” for that role, combined with Mutschler, whose background at the local public health office in emergency planning and administration at DPHN made the perfect team, Freeman said.  Additional partners were brought in, including Mercy Medical Center, Lower Umpqua Hospital, Umpqua Health, Evergreen Family Medicine, Roseburg Veterans Affairs, Adapt, the Sheriff’s Office, Search and Rescue, the Red Cross, Roseburg VA and Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA).

 

We had all these experts who had their life’s work available for us to use as a team to react and respond, and to do this incredibly difficult, once-in-a-lifetime pandemic response,” Freeman said. “It really reminds us of what great talent we have in our County.

 

As the response team grew, the existing EOC room was too small to allow for physical distancing, so the operations center moved to a larger room in the Douglas County Courthouse, that had ample space.  The team got to work, tackling projects including planning for hospital surge capacity, setting up alternative-care sites, monitoring and managing personal protective equipment (PPE), and supporting DPHN in all their endeavors, including drive-through clinics, the volunteer hotline and precautionary messaging.

 

The DCCRT established five objectives outlined by county leadership:

  1. Minimize loss of life in Douglas County
  2. Protect surge capacity at hospitals
  3. Ensure adequate availability of PPE
  4. Leverage county resource to support operational needs
  5. Communicate effectively with partners and the public

 

Bolton said the guiding principle of “save as many Douglas County lives as possible” has been his “North Star,” in keeping the DCCRT on track.  Public communication was a top priority. The County had learned from recent county emergencies that it needed a channel for letting residents know what was going on behind the scenes in times of crisis. A public information officer position was created in 2018, and Tamara Howell was hired to fill that role. She has managed the public information side of the DCCRT, including the County’s daily COVID-19 newsletter and the joint information center.  “That continues, to this day, to be an important part of this response,” Freeman said.

 

All three of our County Commissioners have been in regular contact with State and Federal Officials, as well as City Administrators throughout Douglas County during the crisis.  Our Commissioners have been making trips to all parts of the county including the outer lying areas like Reedsport, to make sure that they have what they need to assist citizens. 

While Freeman headed up the DCCRT as the Agency Administrator, his fellow Commissioners focused on other fronts in the battle against COVID-19 and its impacts.

 

Board Chair Chris Boice worked on economic issues and efforts to protect local businesses. “My role really has been to stay on top of and understand what’s been available for financial help for businesses, both on the state and federal levels, and to get that information out to businesses as soon as possible, so they can take advantage of those programs,” Boice said.   

 

Boice also drafted one of the first letters in the State to the Governor proposing a regional Phase One reopening for southern Oregon. He garnered the support of five SW Oregon County Commissioners, who joined us in unanimously approving and signing the letter before it was sent to the Governor’s Office on April 24. When the state announced last week that it would start to accept applications for counties to begin Phase One reopening, Boice worked directly with our Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, to fill out Douglas County’s application in order to submit it last Friday - the first day the state was accepting them.

 

Last, but not least, Commissioner Tom Kress who is the liaison to many County Departments worked to make sure our county departments and employees were still active and assisting our citizens through the crisis.  Kress, who is the liaison to the Public Works Department, helped to orchestrate additional operations during the crisis by working with public works crews to provide logistical support to DPHN for the drive-through testing clinics, as well as management of the local PPE supply. As liaison to our Senior Services Department he also helped in the reassignment of Public Works, Assessor’s Office and Fairgrounds employees, who delivered meals to seniors through our Meals on Wheels and senior

dining site programs, when volunteers who were in the high risk category were asked to stay home and stay safe.  Kress, is also the liaison to the Fairgrounds, where the local drive-through testing clinics are held.  Additionally, he helped to coordinate the delivery and donation of surplus daily products from Umpqua Dairy to our local UCAN Food Bank.   

 

The Commissioners really did a good job of dividing up responsibilities and roles among themselves and making sure that all aspects of County government were still up and operating well throughout the pandemic,” Kurtz said. He also stated that Commissioner Freeman’s orchestration of Douglas County’s COVID-19 response has been incredibly effective.

 

Leadership at that level is, in large part, the ability to get the appropriate people to the table, get everybody focused on the same mission, and then help provide the resources for people to do good work and move things forward,” Kurtz said. “He did all of those things very, very well.

 

Commissioner Boice said that because of Commissioner Freeman’s leadership and a strong team effort, “Douglas County was probably better prepared, and responded better than anyplace else in the country.”

 

The State of Oregon Details Phase One Reopening Requirements for Businesses

Officials with the State released details on Phase One of Oregon’s Reopening Plan. Douglas County has applied to enter Phase One reopening, which if approved, could start as early as Friday, May 15.  They are awaiting approval from the Governor. Below are some key components the State listed as Phase One Reopening rules for businesses. These are just highlights; for the complete list of guidelines, visit OHA’s website.

 

  • Retail - Several categories of retail stores, including furniture stores, jewelry stores and boutiques, will be able to operate statewide as of Friday. Other retail businesses will only be allowed to reopen once Douglas County is approved for Phase One. Retail reopening guidance can be found here. Employees will be required to wear masks. There are specific guidelines for shopping centers and malls.
  • Restaurants – Restaurant operators must space tables six feet apart, limit parties to 10 people or fewer, and provide masks to workers. Employees must maintain “meticulous” hand hygiene. Guidelines also state that on-site food and drink consumption must wrap up by 10 p.m. Counter/bar seating is prohibited. Menus must be touch-free or single-use.
  • Personal services – This category includes barber shops, hair salons, spas, nail and tanning salons and tattoo parlors. Clients must be screened prior to appointment (“Have you had a cough?” “Have you had a fever?,” etc.) If the client answers “yes,” the appointment must be rescheduled. Client information, including contact info and date/time of appointment, must be recorded. Clients must be spaced at least six feet apart. Employees must wear masks. There are stringent requirements for disinfecting work stations.
  • Gyms – Gyms are also included in Phase 1, but detailed guidelines have not yet been released.

Once Douglas County is approved for Phase One Reopening, the above businesses can resume operations in accordance with the state guidelines. For the general public, the state advises the following during Phase One:

 

  • Stay home if you are sick or vulnerable
  • Practice good hygiene, including thoroughly washing hands
  • Strongly consider using a face covering in public
  • Maintain physical distance
  • Stay close to home; avoid overnight trips and minimize non-essential travel
  • Gatherings are limited to 25 people, with social distancing

The state is still considering what Phase Two and Phase Three of Reopening Oregon would look like, as well as when they could possibly happen. Phase Two could potentially allow for gatherings of up to 100 people and for non-essential travel to resume. Phase Three which may not begin until a vaccine or treatment is available – would lift the ban on large gatherings like sporting events and conventions.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week. 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 12, 2020 (Photo) - 05/12/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 12, 2020

Our Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Tuesday, May 12, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 22 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 12, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1473

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19, advising and supporting quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for today, Tuesday, May 12, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.    Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 11, 2020 (Photo) - 05/11/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 11, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  A Salute to National Peace Officers Day and Week.  The first National Peace Officer Memorial Day was held on May, 15, 1963, after President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated that day and the week in which it falls as Police Week in "honor of those peace officers who through their courageous deeds have lost their lives or have become disabled in the performance of their duty."

 

Typically, tens of thousands of law enforcement officers from around the world converge on local, state and national Law Enforcement Memorials, to participate in a number of events which honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice.  However, this year, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the on-site events have been canceled.  In Douglas County, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office will hold a private vigil and place wreaths at the Douglas County Peace Officer Memorial located near the front steps of the Douglas County Courthouse to honor our fallen this week.

 

In October of 1991, President George H.W. Bush dedicated the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington D.C.  Along the walkways are stone walls that are inscribed with the names of over 21,000 federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty.  Click on the link above to watch the 32nd Annual Candle Light Vigil on Tuesday, May 12 at 5:00 pm (PST).  You can find our fallen officers on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial at the following locations on the National Memorial:

 

Officer Donald DeSues, Roseburg Police Department - EOW - August 7, 1959                            16-W:5

Special Deputy Ronald H. Terwilliger, Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - July 23, 1985    51-E:17

Corporal Virgle D. Knight Jr., Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - July 23, 1985                39-W:6

Sergeant Gerald G. Chirrick, Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - July 23, 1985                  43-W:15

Deputy Morris L. Taylor, Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - September 14, 2002              30-W:23

 

Police officers wear the badge because it is their duty, their calling, their honorable purpose to serve and protect.  Peace Officer Memorial Day and Week are times that remind us that we must never take our life and liberty, our peace and security, for granted. The officers we honor gave their lives so that these values will endure forever.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Monday, May 11, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 21 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 11, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1456

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for tomorrow, Tuesday, May 12, 2020.  will If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tonight, Monday, May 11, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas

County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

Wellness Tips During COVID-19

We know many of you are anxious to emerge from your homes and reopen our communities.  But, before you venture out, here are some tips for maintaining your mental, emotional and physical health as we transition to a new normal with COVID-19:

 

  • Eat regular meals, drink water and get enough rest. These may seem like basics, but these are things we tend to neglect during times of stress. If you’re not up for cooking, many local restaurants are open for takeout and delivery, and may soon be open for limited seating.  It is important to support our local businesses.
  • Get outdoors. Try to get some fresh air and exercise each day. County parks are open, or take a stroll around your neighborhood. Make sure to maintain your distance.  If it’s raining, try to stay active inside your home.
  • Stay connected to your friends and family. Combine your daily walk with a phone chat, or have a video chat while cooking. Chatting while doing another activity can make you feel like you’re “hanging out” with the other person.
  • Be nice to yourself. For instance, if you’ve had a lazy day, don’t be too hard on yourself for not getting enough done. Instead, do something nice for yourself.
  • While it’s important to stay up to date on developments, too much media consumption and social media time can weigh on your spirit. Try to limit the amount of time you spend browsing social media or watching the news. Get your information from reliable sources. Local, state and federal COVID-19 updates can be found on the websites of Douglas Public Health Network, Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority and the CDC.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week. 

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 11, 2020 (Photo) - 05/11/20

Updated: Daily Chart to indicate May, 11, 2020.

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 11, 2020

Our Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

It is Monday, May 11, 2020 and as of 12:00 pm today, there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 21 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 11, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1456

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive through clinic led by DPHN is scheduled for tomorrow, Tuesday, May 12, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week.    Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 10, 2020 (Photo) - 05/10/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 10, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Celebrating Mom’s Today and Every Day: The modern observance of Mother's Day was first celebrated in 1908, when Anna Jarvis held a memorial for her mother at St Andrew's Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia.  Did you know that more phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year? These Mom Day chats often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37%, but the love they send makes hearts swell well over 150%.  As with most holidays that have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic, Mother’s Day 2020 will be celebrated a little differently. But, that doesn’t mean you have the skip the fanfare to honor our amazing Moms.  There a several ways you can still honor, celebrate and tell Mom, thank you from afar, today and every day.

 

Cook for Mom

    1. Have a meal delivered, or if she lives near you, cook her a meal and drop it off outside her door.
    2. Send her a food basket.
    3. Have groceries delivered to her house.
    4. Send your mom a card with a certificate for a meal out when restaurants are open again.

Send Mom a Gift

    1. Have flowers delivered to your mother’s porch.
    2. Order a good book, puzzle, or craft activity for her.
    3. Send Mom an electronic Mother’s Day card
    4. Write Mom a poem or letter and email it to her.

Call Your Mom

    1. Make time to have a long, uninterrupted phone call with your mom.
    2. Send her a picture of yourself with a Happy Mother’s Day sign.

Video Chat with Mom

    1. If possible, make a video call with your Mom.
    2. Have a virtual dinner together by setting your computer on the table while you’re eating and have her set hers up at her table as well.
    3. Play a game or watch a movie together over a video call.
    4. Tell your mother how much she means to you in a video call.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

Another good day, as there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County. There has only been one positive case reported in the last 20 days and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 10, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1443

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying

individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered.

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Necessary and Routine Health Care for Children During COVID-19

We understand that health care routines have been interrupted during the pandemic, but it is important to continue your well child visits.  Your primary care provider and pediatrician’s offices have more than likely instituted new safety protocols and visitation alternatives.  The Oregon Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Oregon Pediatric Society), Oregon Academy of Family Physicians (OAFP), and Children’s Health Alliance strongly encourage families to contact their doctor’s office for newborn, child, and adolescent medical and behavioral health appointments for urgent, preventive, chronic, and specialist issues. The Oregon Health Authority and physicians across the county have reported a significant decrease in child health visits and vaccinations in the last two months, and are concerned that delaying vital preventive or illness care may create problems for children in the months ahead. In addition to maintaining important well child checkups and vaccine schedules for children five and younger, OHA encourages parents to utilize telemedicine appointments with their child’s primary care provider to discuss new illnesses when possible. This could include issues such as allergies, asthma, sleep concerns, or other general health questions. Whatever the health concerns you might have for your child, we encourage you to reach out to get the care they need.

 

For Some Mother’s Day is Difficult

Not every Mother’s Day is a joyous occasion.  For some today will be a struggle for a number of reasons. For those who have lost your mother or a child, struggled with infertility or have difficult relationships, Mother’s Day might be painful. If you are struggling today, make sure you are taking care of yourself and reach out if you need help. 

 

Here are a few tips to help you get through the day:

  • Acknowledge your feelings.
  • Give yourself permission to opt out of social media or other media for the day or weekend.
  • If it feels right, take time to remember and honor the person you are missing.
  • Connect with a friend or family member who can provide you with the conversation you need, whether it’s recognition of your painful feelings or distraction from them.

 

Residents who are in crisis should call 911 or if you have behavioral health needs contact Compass Behavioral Health at (541) 900-6020.

 

How to Get Help Paying Your Utility Bills

Are you having trouble paying your electric bill? The Oregon Energy Fund provides money for energy assistance to organizations throughout the state to help local residents cover their bills. Oregonians can visit the Fund’s website for details and to find an organization near them.

 

In Douglas County, that organization is United Community Action Network (UCAN). UCAN’s website states that in addition to helping with electric bills, eligible residents can get assistance in paying their heat bills and receive a “conservation kit” to help them reduce energy usage. To reach UCAN, call (541) 672-3421.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550 from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week. 

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Douglas County Government, Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 10, 2020 (Photo) - 05/10/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 10, 2020

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

Another good day, as there NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 20 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, as DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 10, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1443

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 9, 2020 (Photo) - 05/09/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 9, 2020

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Have you been putting off routine or follow-up care because of the COVID-19 crisis? The Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, along with our partner healthcare professionals encourage our residents to keep up with their personal and family health care needs, especially for routine wellness, as well as treatment and testing for chronic conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Now's a great time to call your doctor and ask questions you might have about your healthcare, telehealth options and more. They can help you determine if you need an in-person visit, and talk to you about new office protocols for social distancing and patient safety.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

The good news continues as there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 19 days and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 9, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1431

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office has been a core part of the countywide response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including through the participation of County Emergency Manager Wayne Stinson.  Douglas County Emergency Management is a division of the Sheriff’s Office, and Stinson was one of the original members of the Douglas County   COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT) when it was formed back in March. Stinson has a lot of experience in helping steer the County through crisis situations. County HR Director Michael Kurtz said, “We have had, over the last several years, a number of incidents that have required the County to engage in this type of emergency response. There was the UCC shooting, and of course last year we had what’s commonly referred to as ‘Snowmageddon,’ and then this year we have the COVID-19 pandemic.”  Stinson was involved in all of those responses. “He’s amazing,” said KC Bolton of Aviva Health, who served as co-incident commander of the DCCRT. “Nobody understands emergency operations better than Wayne.” Sargent Brad O’Dell, also with the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office is involved with the DCCRT, working on special projects and with public communication, as a member of the Joint Information Team.  Sgt. O’Dell stepped up to help run the JIC, as Interim Lead PIO during the crisis. “I’ve assisted through the event as requested,” he said. Sheriff John Hanlin and Undersheriff Jeff Frieze are in daily communication with the DCCRT to ensure the Sheriff’s Office is doing all it can to protect public safety during the pandemic.  The Sheriff’s Search and Rescue Team was also part of the effort, providing volunteer support for traffic control for several of the local COVID-19 drive-through testing clinics. 

Health Insurance Companies Required to Give Customers Grace Period

A new emergency order issued by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services requires health insurance companies to give customers at least a 60-day grace period to pay any past-due premiums. The companies must also pay claims for any covered services during the first 30 days of the grace period and extend deadlines for reporting claims.

The order is in effect through June 3, and will be extended in 30-day increments during the COVID-19 outbreak. You can read the full text of the order here.

 

Precautions Wheelchair Users Can Take to Protect Themselves from COVID-19

There are special measures wheelchair users can take to stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. Here is some advice from Peter Axelson, a wheelchair user, designer and engineer with Beneficial Designs:

  • Wash your hands frequently, and hand sanitize when you are not able to wash your hands. Axelson notes that any virus that might be on your hands is transferred to your wheelchair hand rims if you have a manual wheelchair. Avoid touching the tires on your wheelchair.
  • Clean your wheelchair, paying special attention to the hand rims. Axelson cleans his hand rims by adding water and antibacterial soap to a washcloth or paper towel, then pushing himself around and sliding the washcloth on the hand rims as he goes. He notes that it may be easier to clean the rims if someone else is pushing you. Also clean the wheel locks, arm supports, foot supports and any other exposed surfaces. He warns that some plastics may react poorly to bleach.
  • Clean surfaces in your home that you touch getting in or out of your wheelchair, like grab bars.
  • Wear a mask in public and maintain social distancing. Axelson notes that because wheelchair users sit lower than most people who are standing, they may be more exposed to saliva droplets and should adhere to the guideline of staying 6 feet away from others.

This is an extraordinary trial we are going through,” Axelson said. “These precautions mean that it will take you much longer to practice hygiene than it will for everyone else. If you are alive and pushing a manual wheelchair independently, you have already proven to yourself that you have the perseverance to continue living your life. Do not give up because of a virus.”

 

Umpqua National Forest Announces Phased Reopening of Recreation Areas

The Umpqua National Forest (UNF) announced the first phase of reopening the forest to recreational users. Beginning today, Saturday, May 9, some boat ramps and most trail heads on the forest will be reopened to the general public for use. The boat ramps that are remaining closed have not been cleared from winter debris or are located within areas designated as closed under the current Regional Closure Order. The trailhead to the Umpqua Hot Springs will remain closed. For a complete list of boat ramps, both open and closed, please check the Umpqua National Forest’s website at: https://bit.ly/3chpx1H .  Reservations for campsites, fire lookouts, cabins, and picnic site will remain unavailable through Recreation.gov.  Existing reservation holders will be notified if there are any changes affecting their reservation.  Refunds will be issued for all canceled reservations. To align with the Governor’s executive order, the UNF will continue the closure of all other developed recreation sites, to include campgrounds, cabins and fire lookouts.  This closure order is still in effect through September 30, 2020, unless rescinded earlier.  The remaining recreation closures are necessary to address current social distancing guidelines, and to help reduce pressure on emergency services in already stressed local communities. To this end, they strongly encourage the public to be cautious while recreating outdoors and not take any undue risks. As always, tell someone of your plan; where you intend to go, what time you plan to be back and any specialized information in the event emergency crews may need it.  Also, facilities will not be maintained, so members of the public will be using them at their own discretion, and must take necessary precautions to ensure their own personal health and safety. They cannot guarantee a COVID free facility. They suggest you provide your own sanitation and be as self-contained as possible on your outing. 

 

"While we are happy to begin the process to re-open previously closed areas of the forest, the health and safety of the public and employees remains our number one concern,” said Alice Carlton, Umpqua National Forest Supervisor. “This is foremost in our mind as we continue our coordination with our local Counties and State leadership through this crisis.” 

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 9, 2020 (Photo) - 05/09/20

Update: Chart below has been updated to indicate May 9, 2020.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 9, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

The good news continues as there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 19 days and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 9, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1431

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 466 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

DC BOC
DC BOC
05-08-20 Douglas County Submits Phase One Reopening Application (Photo) - 05/08/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 8, 2020

Douglas County Submits Phase One Reopening Application

(Douglas County, Ore.) Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, led by Board Chair, Commissioner Chris Boice, worked diligently in conjunction with our Public Health Official, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer to quickly complete and submit our reopening application to the Governor earlier today.  Our application is a part of the Governor’s Phase One Plan requirements to begin the process of reopening our county.  Today, May 8, 2020 is the first day the State began accepting the reopening applications.  The decision to grant Douglas County businesses permission to begin a Phase One Reopening now lies in the hands of the Governor.  According to the reopening plan guidelines, the submitted applications will be reviewed, and counties that receive approval from the Governor, could enter Phase One as soon as May 15, 2020.

 

We are hopeful and encouraged by the opportunity to submit our reopening application.  Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of Commissioner Tim Freeman, along with the incredible work accomplished by our Public Health Official, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer and Douglas Public Health Network, have paved the way for Douglas County to be in the right position to begin the reopening process in a safe and organized manner,” commented Commissioner Boice.  “We have done our due diligence, met the criteria outlined and we are ready!”

 

Douglas County continues to be recognized as leader in Oregon for our COVID-19 response for our drive-through testing, coordinated planning, prevention messaging and hospital/care facility capacity preparedness.   As more information becomes available about our reopening application, we will provide updates and guidance to our residents.  For more information about the Governor’s Phase One Reopening Plan, click here.

Attached Media Files: DC BOC
SOWI
SOWI
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 8, 2020 (Photo) - 05/08/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 8, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Through the extensive work done by the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, which includes members from Douglas Public Health Network, our Douglas County Public Health Official, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer and our Douglas County Commissioners Freeman, Boice and Kress, Douglas County continues to be recognized as leader in Oregon for our COVID-19 response for our drive-through testing, coordinated planning, prevention messaging and hospital/care facility capacity preparedness.  As a part of this, we want to let our residents know that we have the capacity to do more COVID-19 testing.  So, if you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

The good news continues as there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 18 days and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 8, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1303

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

Get Tested & Testing Clinics

The next drive-through clinic in Roseburg will be today Friday, May 8th, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 435 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tonight, Friday, May 8, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas County Departments

The Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT) involves collaboration among a sweeping array of partners – including a number of Department Heads and their employees within Douglas County Government.  In the early days of the DCCRT, no one knew quite what to expect – projections about the virus’ spread was alarming, and it looked as if Douglas County could potentially be facing a shortage of hospital beds and personal protective equipment, should there be a surge in COVID-19 cases. It was an all-hands-on-deck situation. Under the direction of Commissioner Tim Freeman, who was designated by his fellow commissioners to take the lead on the COVID-19 response, the County began pulling together partner agencies from health care and other fields to tackle the virus as a team. Organization was needed, so partners stood up an Incident Command System (ICS), a hierarchical structure that makes it easier for groups to communicate and respond collaboratively.

Human Resources Director, Michael Kurtz worked with Commissioner Freeman, co-incident commander KC Bolton, CEO of Aviva Health, and others to get the team up and running. Kurtz has a military and wildland-firefighting background, and is well-versed in the ICS structure. He helped to determine which County employees to pull in to get the job done.  In making those staffing recommendations Kurtz stated that he not only looked for relevant background and skill set, but for individuals who also knew how to cut through bureaucracy to get work done quickly.  “In a crisis we don’t have time for a lot of excuses for why things can’t be done,” he said, “We need people who know how to find solutions and are actively looking for ways they can support accomplishing the mission of the team.”

Those employees included Emergency Manager, Wayne Stinson, and Chief Financial Officer, Jessica Hansen, who ran the finance end of things and ensured expenditures were being tracked in order to request reimbursement from FEMA down the road. Sean Fallon, the County’s IT Director, made sure the Emergency Operations Center was functional and had the technology to ensure effective communication. The District Attorney’s Office provided administrative support to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) through their Legal Assistant, Cierra Weger. Cierra was invaluable in helping manage the day-to-day operations of the EOC.  With hospital capacity in question, the DCCRT worked to prepare alternative-care sites to provide overflow bed capacity if needed. County Fleet Division Manager Omar Assed and Building Facilities Director David Palmer worked hard on that effort.  County Public Works, under the direction of Director Scott Adams, supported Douglas Public Health Networks’ drive-through testing by providing setup and traffic-control for those operations.  Tamara Howell, the County’s Public Information Officer (PIO), went into overdrive, coordinating DCCRT’s communication with the public and crafting the daily DCCRT newsletter to keep residents up to date. “That role really gets ratcheted up in a crisis, and it’s exactly the reason the PIO position was created several years ago,” Kurtz said.

The number of active local COVID-19 cases has been going down, but Douglas County is now much better positioned to handle any future surge because of the DCCRT’s efforts. Kurtz said every County employee who was asked to help out with the team gave “110 percent,” working long hours and sometimes nights and weekends.  Meanwhile, other County staff, including employees from public works, the fairgrounds and the assessor’s department, began delivering meals to seniors. This filled a gap, because many of the regular volunteer drivers are seniors themselves, and were staying at home to avoid contracting COVID-19.

For me, as an HR Director, it was really satisfying to see that we have County staff that holds the value of their work and the safety of the public in such high esteem, and were willing to set aside their own personal comforts and their normal work days to make sure that the work got done,” Kurtz said.

He noted that DCCRT is not just a County mission, but also a “County-facilitated mission that is led and staffed and supported by a lot of other agencies.”  Partner agencies on the DCCRT include Douglas Public Health Network, Mercy Medical Center, Umpqua Health, Aviva Health, Evergreen Family Medicine, Lower Umpqua Hospital District, Adapt, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office and Search and Rescue, the Roseburg VA, Douglas Forest Protective Association, and the Red Cross. Having all of those agencies communicating and bouncing ideas off of each other bolstered the planning process.  

 

Seeing our staff working seamlessly with all of these partner agencies really highlights the level of professionalism the County has within its senior management team,” Kurtz stated.  “It was also reassuring to see that same level of professionalism and subject matter expertise in our partnering agencies.  The resources that everyone around the table was able to bring to this effort were remarkable.  The work isn’t over, but this is certainly a community that is up to the challenge.

Thank you Nurses!

We ask our community to join us in thanking the nursing profession for their dedication to patient care. May 6 – 12, 2020 is National Nurses Week. Nurses have worked in the frontlines, along with doctors, providing care and comforting the sick for decades.  Nurses’ week ends on May 12th honoring Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Nightingale opened the very first nursing school. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, there are more than 3.8 registered nurses nationwide and comprise the largest component of the healthcare workforce. Many nurses chose to advance their careers through additional schooling and obtaining a Master of Science in Nursing degree or continue to the highest level degree which is a Doctor of Nursing Practice.

 

Nurses work in many capacities, although the more traditional role is in the acute care setting. Nurses can be found in primary care clinics, specialty clinics, urgent care, home health care, hospice, private practice, health maintenance organizations, public health agencies, outpatient surgicenters, nursing school-operated clinics, insurance and managed care companies, schools, mental health agencies, hospice, the military, nursing education, healthcare research and administrative roles.  The Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team and all of our partner agencies would like to wish all our Douglas County nurses and all the nurses out there, a ‘Happy Nurses Week’ and also send out a sincere thank you for their dedication and service. 

 

“Reopening Your Business” Webinars – Monday, May 11, 2020

It is possible that counties in SW Oregon will be entering Phase One of the Governor’s reopen Oregon plan starting on Friday, May 15, 2020.  The Governor’s Office, in cooperation with local Chambers of Commerce, South Coast Development Council, Umpqua Economic Development Partnership and CCD Business Development Corp is offering a series of webinars to help small business owners understand the guidelines for this phase despite the continued risk of COVID-19 transmission.  Three webinars which will focus on the guidelines for specific business types will be offered Monday, May 11, beginning at 1:00 pm.  The webinars are available for businesses in a zoom internet format or by calling into a phone line.  Specific access information for each webinar is available here.   

Webinars being Offered Include:

1:00 pm: Reopening Retail

2:00 pm: Reopening Restaurants/Bars/Tasting Rooms

3:00 pm: Reopening Personal Services Businesses (hair and nail salons, massage, tattoo parlors, etc.)

Each webinar will include; a review of the time-line; a review of general business guidelines; a review of guidance for specific industry sectors and an opportunity to ask questions (and get answers!).  Businesses can also access a written version of the information here.  (Look for “OHA Guidance and Rules” beneath Governor’s Orders and OHA Guidance about half-way down the page.)

 

Families of Children Who Receive Free or Reduced-Price Meals to Receive Assistance

Families with children who are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals can now get cash benefits for the meals their children would have received at school prior to the COVID-19 closures, the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) and the state Department of Education (ODE) announced.  Qualifying households will receive $5.70 per child for each normal school day for the months of March, April, May and June. This is the approximate value of one breakfast and one lunch. These cash benefits will be retroactive to March 16. That means, eligible families will receive the following amounts totaling $384: $69 for March; $126 for April; $120 for May and $69 for June.

 

Eligible households that receive SNAP benefits will have their March, April and May amounts automatically deposited into their Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) accounts in late May. Households with students who are eligible for free or reduced-price meals who do not receive SNAP benefits will automatically receive an Oregon Trail Card in the mail.  Families will receive this assistance even if they have been getting meals from schools during the closures. Officials say this assistance will benefit more than 351,000 students statewide. If you have experienced significant income loss and you believe your family may be newly eligible for free or reduced-price meals, there is still time to apply online or contact your local school. To apply for Nutrition Assistance, visit needfood.oregon.gov or call 2-1-1.

 

Together, DHS and ODE are working to ensure no child in Oregon goes hungry during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Dan Haun, DHS Self-Sufficiency Programs Director. “This resource is the result of our strong collaboration and will provide additional support for child nutrition and expand families’ options for healthy food.

 

Unemployment Benefit Claims Processing Update

The Oregon Employment Department reported that they have now processed 83% of the more than 381,800 regular unemployment benefit claims received between March 15 and May 2.   Claim processing continues seven days each week, with 635 employees currently assigned, more hiring underway, and a new contact center opening next week.  The Employment Department reported they have also processed more than 10,000 Pandemic Unemployment Assistance benefit claims filed by self-employed, contract, gig and other workers (who are not eligible for regular unemployment benefits).  They encourage citizens to continue to apply and process their claims.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

Attached Media Files: SOWI , Get Tested , DCCRT
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Noon Case Update - May 8, 2020 (Photo) - 05/08/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM – NOON CASE UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 8, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

The good news continues as there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 18 days and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 8, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1303

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive-through clinic in Roseburg will be today Friday, May 8th, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 435 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 7, 2020 (Photo) - 05/07/20

Updated to show the copy to match the chart:

Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 7, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Oregon is on the brink of a phased reopening, and today the Governor released details in a press conference about what residents and business owners can expect. In order to begin Phase One of the Governor’s reopening process, individual County Governments will need to submit an application to the state that demonstrates they can do so safely.  The State said the first day that counties can submit a reopening application is Friday, May 8, 2020.  The Douglas County Board of Commissioners plan to submit our reopening application as soon as possible on the first day the state is accepting them. The applications will be reviewed, and counties that receive approval from the Governor, could enter Phase One as soon as May 15, 2020.  See below for more details about the Governor’s Phase One Reopening.

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

The good news continues as there are NO new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 17 days and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned. Testing continues, DPHN has been holding 2-3 clinics a week and hospitals, urgent cares and clinics continue to test. Twenty-four people have tested positive in the county and twenty-two of those twenty-four have recovered.   DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 7, 2020

Total Confirmed Cases

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total COVID-19

deaths

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Result

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

22

0

1

1289

0

*confirmed cases are people who have tested positive with a PCR/nasal swab test

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19. 

DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. 

 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive-through clinic in Roseburg will be Friday, May 8th, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 435 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously. 

The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tomorrow night, Friday, May 8, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

The Governor’s Phase One Reopening Details

Here are some activities that the Governor will allow under Phase One:

  • Gatherings of up to 25 people, as long as physical distancing can be maintained.
  • Restaurants and bars may open for sit-down service, with adequate physical distancing, the wearing of face coverings by employees and other measures.
  • Gyms and personal-care businesses such as barber shops and salons will be allowed to reopen if they can follow requirements such as client screening. Salons will operate by appointment only and maintain records for contact tracing.
  • Retail businesses can reopen, with physical distancing encouraged through proper signage, one-way aisles, tape markings and other measures.
  • Outdoor recreation areas can reopen with some restrictions, including blocking off areas that are likely to attract crowds, such as playgrounds, picnic shelters, basketball courts and overnight-use areas.
  • As restrictions lift, the public is still encouraged to maintain physical distancing of 6 feet, wear face coverings in public, wash their hands, stay home if they are sick and take other precautions. Elderly residents are encouraged to continue to stay at home and avoid contact with others.

Large gatherings, including live sporting events, concerts, festivals and conventions will be prohibited until there is a reliable treatment or vaccine for COVID-19, the governor said. Any large gathering scheduled through September should be canceled or “significantly modified.”

We are not returning to business as usual,” Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Director Pat Allen said. “We are venturing into uncharted territory: safely reopening businesses and other activities during a pandemic. We know there will be many questions. Each employer, retailer, restaurant owner and personal care provider will know best how your business operates. These guidelines tell you how you can operate safely. Follow them.”

Counties applying for the Governor’s Phase One reopening need to meet prerequisites including having sufficient hospital capacity and enough personal protective equipment (PPE) to handle a potential surge in COVID-19 cases. Counties also need to have adequate testing and contract-tracing capabilities, and have seen a sustained drop in the number of COVID-19 hospitalizations. Counties must remain in Phase One for a minimum of 21 days before moving on to the next phase to ensure that any uptick in COVID-19 cases can be properly managed. The full Phase One guidelines can be found on OHA’s COVID-19 page. The guidelines for Phase Two and beyond are still being developed. Next week, the State said they will be issuing guidelines for the expansion of child care services, summer school, summer camps, youth programs and public transit.

Health officials at this morning’s press conference said actions by Oregonians, including staying at home and maintaining physical distancing, have resulted in the state’s anticipated COVID-19 infection rate dropping by 70 percent. Oregon has the fourth-lowest infection rate and the eighth-lowest death rate in the U.S. The state has more than 2,000 hospital beds available and 775 ventilators. Dr. Renee Edwards, Chief Medical Officer for OHSU Healthcare, said emergency rooms statewide have seen a drop in the number of people seeking care for even non-COVID-related symptoms. She urged people to go to the hospital if they need care.

I want all Oregonians to know that we want you to seek care for those health conditions that require care, rather than not be in contact with your provider, or be concerned that seeking health care could place you at risk for contracting COVID,” she said. “Know that it is safe. Know that we are here for you, and that we are open, and continue to treat all conditions for which Oregonians seek care.”

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 6, 2020 (Photo) - 05/06/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 6, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County Commissioners participated in a conference call with the Governor on Tuesday, May 5, 2020 to discuss the plan for reopening Douglas and other counties. The virtual meeting, held via Zoom, was attended by all three Douglas County Commissioners: Board Chair, Chris Boice, Tim Freeman and Tom Kress. Dozens of elected officials from other counties also participated – including Josephine, Jackson, Curry and Coos, the four other counties that co-signed a letter to the governor last month asking her to allow them to begin reopening.  

 

In the Zoom call, county leaders learned they would have to fill out an application and have the application approved by the state in order to begin Phase One reopening. The Governor’s office will begin accepting applications this Friday, May 8. If approved, some counties may be allowed to lift some restrictions as soon as May 15, 2020.  The governor has stated that the prerequisites for reopening include: Sufficient hospital capacity and enough personal protective equipment (PPE) to handle a surge in COVID-19 cases; the ability to conduct widespread testing; and a strong system in place for contact tracing to determine who may have come into contact with individuals who test positive for the virus.

 

County leaders believe Douglas County meets those requirements and is well-positioned to reopen, thanks to the extensive collaborative efforts of local partners through the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team.

 

We’ve done the work over weeks and weeks to make sure that when this date came we were ready, and we believe we’re ready,” Commissioner Tim Freeman said in a radio interview today. “We are now waiting for the final application process so we can get it submitted, and we can get it approved, and get the county’s businesses back open.”

Details of exactly how the reopening will occur are still in the works, but safety requirements will likely include ongoing physical distancing and other precautions.

There are lots of sector requirements.  Certain businesses have to do certain things, the County has to do certain things, and the State has to do certain things,” Freeman said. “We are working through all of that.  Believe me, we are using every County resource possible and working as hard as we can.”

For those that have stated that the County Commissioners can just reopen the County, please know that our County Commissioners are limited by state statutes and laws, and we cannot launch a reopening against the Governor’s orders. Freeman noted that the County has reopened everything it has authority over, including County buildings and parks, with some limitations and conditions.  Freeman said the County is in good shape to reopen largely because of the efforts of the collaborative Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team. Members include the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas Public Health Network, Mercy Medical Center, Umpqua Health, Aviva Health, Evergreen Family Medicine, Lower Umpqua Hospital District, Adapt, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office and Search and Rescue, the Roseburg VA, Douglas Forest Protective Association, and the Red Cross.  The County and the DCCRT will keep residents informed of all developments related to the reopening timeline and requirements for businesses, once those details have been determined. 

Douglas County COVID-19 Test Results

The good news continues as there are NO new cases and only 3 active cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County today.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 16 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned.

Here are the current numbers for Douglas County:

New Cases

as of 12:00 pm

May 6, 2020

Total Residents That Have Tested Positive

Total Active Positive

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Recovered

Cases

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Deaths

Related to COVID-19

Total

Currently

Hospitalized

 

(of those that tested positive)

Total Negative Test Results

Total Presumptive Cases

0

24*

3

21

0

1

1258

0

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management and will now include presumptive COVID-19 cases.  DPHN will also be reporting presumptive cases and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19. 

DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.   

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be Friday, May 8th, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 435 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously. 

The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

Douglas County to Still Honor Fallen Law Enforcement Officers

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation designating May 15 as Peace Officer Memorial Day and the week in which it falls, National Police Week.  Across the United States, ceremonies are held to remember those serving in law enforcement who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to their communities.  The Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Board of Commissioners and local law enforcement agencies traditionally hold a local Peace Officer Memorial Ceremony on the front steps of the Douglas County Courthouse to pay tribute to the five law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty:

•    Officer Donald DeSues - Roseburg Police Department - EOW - August 7, 1959

•    Special Deputy Ronald H. Terwilliger - Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - July 23, 1985

•    Corporal Virgle D. Knight Jr. - Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - July 23, 1985

•    Sergeant Gerald G. Chirrick - Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - July 23, 1985

•    Deputy Morris L. Taylor - Douglas County Sheriff's Office - EOW - September 14, 2002

In light of current social distancing recommendations due to COVID-19, a public memorial ceremony not be held this year. Instead, a small contingent of law enforcement Honor Guard personnel will raise a memorial flag, place wreaths at the memorial wall beneath the flag pole and pause in memory of all who have given their lives in the line of duty. In a press release earlier today, Sheriff Hanlin asked the community to take a moment to remember all of our fallen law enforcement officers and their families. Their service and sacrifice to our communities cannot and will not ever be forgotten.

"I want the families of these men to know that their memory will not fade from our thoughts as we continue the service they dedicated their lives to," said Sheriff Hanlin. "This County is forever grateful for their sacrifice and we vow to honor their memory, even in times like this."

Douglas County Public Works: Road Construction and Work Zone Safety  

As the weather warms up, Douglas County Public Works (DCPW) crews are gearing up to start summer road construction projects, and we wanted to remind citizens to slow down and exercise caution as they travel through construction zones and detours.  Safety is always a priority for the motoring public, as well as the road construction workers, construction equipment operators and flaggers.  We are asking citizens to pay extra attention and obey all posted signs, warnings and flagger instructions.  Please plan ahead and seek alternate routes whenever possible.

As a part of this, DCPW announced a railroad crossing project today that will include the temporary closure of a railroad crossing and Hwy 99N near Sutherlin, Oregon.  DCPW in conjunction with Central Oregon and Pacific Railroad will be working on a railroad crossing project on Old Highway 99 North (Oakland-Shady Highway/South Calapooia Street) about 1.3 miles south of Sutherlin, Oregon from 7:00 am on Monday, May 11 through 7:00 pm Tuesday, May 12, 2020. The project will include the replacement of existing rail ties, the releveling the tracks to meet their standards for safety and adjacent road approach paving. 

The project will require the closure of Old Highway 99N where the road intersects the railroad tracks, and motorists will be asked to detour their route during this period.  Due to the road closure at the railroad tracks, southbound motorists are asked to detour from Hastings Avenue to Taylor Street to Comstock Road in Sutherlin.  Likewise, northbound traffic is asked to detour utilizing Comstock Road in Sutherlin.  Click here to read the complete story.     

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Douglas Forest Protective Association

Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) typically focuses on wildfires, but its expertise at setting up incident command structures has come in handy in Douglas County’s response to COVID-19.  DFPA is a private nonprofit corporation formed more than a century ago by local landowners for the purpose of wildfire detection, prevention and suppression. It has 17 full-time employees and 110 seasonal workers whose priority is to protect more than 1.6 million acres of forest and grazing lands within Douglas County. DFPA is part of the Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) complete and coordinated system of fire protection and has employees who serve on each of ODF’s three All-Hazard Incident Management Teams.  When the COVID-19 pandemic took hold, DFPA was called in to participate in the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT).

We were initially asked to come down to the Emergency Operations Center and help do some coaching on incident command systems,” DFPA District Manager Pat Skrip said. 

While a virus is not the same as a wildfire, an effective response to any crisis involves organization and communication, and DFPA worked quickly to put those things into place for Douglas County’s COVID-19 response. DFPA staff facilitated briefings, generated a daily incident action plan, and provided coaching and other assistance.

The first order of business is to bring order to chaos,” Skrip said. “You get a battle rhythm going, then they’re up and running, and each day they stay true to their process.” 

Skrip said it’s important to have a clear mission and role. Otherwise, things get confusing and there can be unwanted surprises. He said he acted as “that little voice in the background,” reminding fellow DCCRT members to stay true to the objectives outlined by County Commissioners.  He said DFPA was happy to help out.

 “This is a great way we could leverage local knowledge. I believe the best answers come locally,” he said. “I hope they found value in our participation.”

When KC Bolton took over as co-incident commander along with Teresa Mutschler of Douglas Public Health Network, Bolton asked Skrip to stay on as deputy incident commander.  DFPA has also taken internal measures to keep its employees safe during the pandemic by providing personal protective equipment and maintaining social distancing. Many workers are telecommuting. Meanwhile, fire season is quickly approaching with early forecasts pointing toward another busy fire season for the majority of the state.

We’ve been working with state and federal partners in figuring out what a busy fire season looks like while maintaining that social distancing, and what we can do to mitigate that exposure,” Skrip said. Visit DFPA’s Facebook page to follow updates about wildfire season.

How to Apply for Food, Child Care and Cash Assistance from Home

The state Department of Human Services (DHS) wants to get the word out that Oregonians can apply for food, child care and cash assistance from home. The all-in-one online application, available in several languages, can be found on DHS’ website along with instructions for applying.  DHS said Oregonians are facing “unprecedented economic instability and food insecurity” due to COVID-19.

Assistance is available in the form of SNAP benefits, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the Refugee Program and the Child Care/Employment Related Day Care (ERDC).   The online application experiences heavy traffic between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. and may be unavailable intermittently during that time period, DHS noted. If you are unable to apply online, DHS can send you the application via email or regular mail. You can also apply for benefits over the phone.  

Douglas County residents can call the local DHS offices in Roseburg or Canyonville for more information. The Roseburg DHS office can be reached at (541) 440-3301, and the number for the Canyonville office is (541) 839-6901.  Additional food resources are available on the website of Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon. Residents can also call 2-1-1 or email help@211info.org for information on local food pantries or child care providers.

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents in March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

RR_Crossing_Hwy_99N_Sutherlin_Map.jpg
RR_Crossing_Hwy_99N_Sutherlin_Map.jpg
DCPW: Railroad Crossing Project (Photo) - 05/06/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 6, 2020

*** NOTICE: RAILROAD CROSSING PROJECT ***

Project to Include Temporary Closure of Railroad Crossing and Hwy 99N

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County Public Works Department (DCPW) in conjunction with Central Oregon and Pacific Railroad will be working on a railroad crossing project on Old Highway 99 North (Oakland-Shady Highway/South Calapooia Street) about 1.3 miles south of Sutherlin, Oregon from 7:00 am on Monday, May 11 through 7:00 pm Tuesday, May 12, 2020. The project will include the replacement of existing rail ties, the releveling the tracks to meet their standards for safety and adjacent road approach paving. 

The project will require the closure of Old Highway 99N where the road intersects the railroad tracks, and motorists will be asked to detour their route during this period.  Due to the road closure at the railroad tracks, southbound motorists are asked to detour from Hastings Avenue to Taylor Street to Comstock Road in Sutherlin.  Likewise, northbound traffic is asked to detour utilizing Comstock Road in Sutherlin. 

DCPW will install reader boards with advance warning notices, as well as barricades with road closed signs to notify the motoring public of the railroad crossing closures. During the closures, motorists will be asked to detour their route.  All road closures will have alternate routes, except as noted with a detour on site. However, the alternate routes will not be signed as a detour.

Safety is always a priority for the motoring public and we are asking motorists to use caution as they travel in the area and to seek alternate routes whenever possible.   Please follow and obey all posted signs, warnings and flagging instructions.  For more information, please contact Douglas County Public Works Department at (541) 440-4481.           

Please note that the railroad closure will affect your drive time. Safety is always a priority for the motoring public, as well as road workers, railroad workers and flaggers.  We are asking motorists to use caution as they travel through construction zones and detours.  Please follow and obey all posted signs, warnings and flagging instructions.  Please plan and seek alternate routes whenever possible.   A map of the detour, construction timeline and railroad crossing closure is attached.  For further information, please contact the Douglas County Public Works Department at (541) 440-4208.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 5, 2020 (Photo) - 05/05/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 5, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  The good news today is in the numbers.  Douglas County continues to see a flattening of the curve for positive COVID-19 cases.  There has only been one positive case reported in the last 15 days, and that case was reported as recovered before their test results were returned.  And as you will see below, of the 24 cases reported since March 8, 2020, only 3 cases remain on the active list.  Douglas County has been proactive in our response to the COVID-19 pandemic from the start, and is considered a leader in the State for our response efforts.  The cooperative efforts of the entire Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team working in conjunction with our Douglas County Commissioners, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, and Douglas Public Health Network have been extraordinary in bringing these numbers to fruition.  Let’s keep the curve flat!      

 

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, May 5, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County. The total number of Douglas County residents who have tested positive is twenty-four*.  Of the twenty-four cases, twenty-one have recovered.  One of the individuals that tested positive remains hospitalized.  There have been zero deaths and 1212 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. There are zero presumptive cases of COVID-19 in the county.  

 

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced recently that they are expanded their reporting for COVID-19 case management.  They are now citing presumptive COVID-19 cases, as well as the zip codes of residents where positive cases have been confirmed.  DPHN will also begin reporting presumptive cases, and will use the OHA’s definition of presumptive as having had close contact with a known, confirmed COVID-19 case, showing symptoms and not yet having a positive nasal swab/PCR test for COVID-19.  Additionally, DPHN will also add zip code reporting for positive cases that is in line with OHA’s recommendation.  Douglas County has confirmed positive cases for residents for the following zip codes: 97417, 97462, 97467, 97469, 97470, 97471, 97479, 97457.

 

DPHN continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be today, Tuesday, May 5, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

 

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 421 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Disaster Loans Now Available to Agricultural Businesses Affected by COVID-19

Farms and other agricultural businesses are now eligible to apply for the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL Advance programs. The EIDL portal reopened Monday after legislation signed by President Trump last week authorized additional funding for farmers, ranchers and certain other agricultural businesses.

The SBA is accepting new EIDL applications on a limited basis.  The low-interest, long-term loans are meant to assist agribusinesses while stabilizing the nation’s food supply chains. Loans of up to $2 million are available.  Agricultural businesses were initially excluded from applying for the disaster loans. If an agricultural business previously applied anyway through the EIDL portal, the original application will be processed now and the applicant will not have to reapply, according to the SBA. All other applications will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

Limited Access Now Allowed at a Few State Parks and Boat Ramps

The state announced today that a small number of parks will now be open for limited access starting Wednesday, May 6, 2020. The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) released a list of the locations that will be reopened for limited day use. The closest location to Douglas County is the Joseph Stewart Boat Ramp on Lost Creek Lake near Shady Cove. Here is the rest of the list:

  • Tyron Creek in Portland
  • Willamette Mission North of Keizer
  • Mongold Boat Ramp at Detroit Lake
  • State Capitol State Park in Salem
  • The Cove Palisades Boat Ramp at Lake Billy Chinook near Culver
  • Prineville Reservoir Boat Ramp near Prineville
  • Pilot Butte in Bend will be open to pedestrians only

OPRD noted that, not all restrooms will be open and parking will be limited. No opening date has been set for campgrounds or camping. Some extra safety measures may be in place at parks, and visitors are encouraged to take the following precautions:

  • Stay at home if you are sick
  • Check to confirm what is open before leaving home
  • Only visit parks with members of your household
  • Bring all supplies with you: food, water, soap, towels, sanitizer and toilet paper
  • Wear a face covering
  • Stay at least six feet away from people who aren’t in your household, including parking spaces.
  • Keep your visit short and visit during off-peak hours
  • Stick to low-risk activities while visiting parks
  • Leave no trace: Pack out everything you brought with you

Additional parks will be reopened for limited use starting next week. Locations are selected for reopening “based on the readiness of the community around the park to welcome visitors, and how prepared the park is will staff, supplies and equipment.” State parks officials warned that parks will open and close with little advance notice, but that updates will be posted on the State Parks website. Visitors can also check park status by calling (800) 551-6949 during normal business hours.

 

We know these last six weeks have seemed longer, but your health is important to us” ORPD Director Lisa Sumpton said. “It is true that outdoor recreation boosts our mental and physical health, but parks concentrate people in a community, and we have to do this carefully if it’s going to work. We need your cooperation to keep the parks open.”

 

Tenant Protections and Rental Assistance During COVID-19

The Oregon Law Center and Legal Aid Services of Oregon have created a video to help tenants understand their rights under temporary state rules meant to protect them from eviction.  Through June 30, it is illegal for a landlord to evict tenants for nonpayment of rent, fees or utilities. Landlords also cannot impose late fees or seek no-cause terminations during that time.  Tenants who are temporarily unable to pay rent due to COVID-19 are advised to inform their landlords in writing of their inability to pay. While the new state rules give tenants more time to pay the rent they owe, it is important to note that the rent is still due eventually. Tenants who can pay partial rent are advised to do so, since they will have to pay it later anyway. For those who live in subsidized housing, evictions for nonpayment are barred until at least July 30.   Legal Aid Services of Oregon’s Douglas County Office is not taking walk-ins but is offering services by phone. For intakes, to make an appointment with a lawyer, or for general information, call (541) 673-1182. LAS Douglas County is also on Facebook. The statewide Legal Aid website has additional resources. A great guide to tenants’ rights in Oregon can also be found online here

 

Separately, the state Legislature’s emergency board has set aside $12 million in housing assistance, the bulk of which will go toward Oregonians who are at risk of losing their housing due to effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The state assistance will be distributed through local agencies that provide homeless services. Anyone who can’t pay rent should call 211 and be connected to their nearest agency, or go online to the 211 Website for more information.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents in March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

 

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 4, 2020 (Photo) - 05/04/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 4, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.) We hear you!  We know you are anxious and concerned about reopening Douglas County.  We know families and businesses are struggling.  We are all tired and want life to get back to some resemblance of normal.  We are proud of our residents and businesses for hanging in there.  That is why we are pushing hard to get the state to safely begin the reopening process sooner, rather than later.  The bottom line is, the only person that can issue the reopening orders is our Governor.  Douglas County Commissioners do not have the authority to override the Governor’s executive COVID-19 orders.  But, that doesn’t mean we are not trying.  As you know, Douglas County Commissioner Chris Boice spearheaded an urgent letter to the Governor on April 24, 2020, asking her to seriously consider an immediate Regional Phase One Reopening of SW Oregon.  The letter was unanimously approved and signed by every County Commissioner in the 5 SW Oregon Counties (Douglas, Jackson, Coos, Curry and Josephine).  To date, we have not heard back from the Governor on our proposal, but we will continue to actively advocate for a reopening plan.  What can our residents do in the meantime?  We encourage you to continue to support local businesses, help your neighbors and get involved in the public process by writing those letters, sending those emails, posting those REOPEN signs and making those phone calls directly to the Governors’ Office and to your State Legislators. Let them know we have a voice to be heard. 

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, May 4, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County. The total number of Douglas County residents who have tested positive is twenty-four*.  Of the twenty-four cases, eighteen have recovered.  One of the individuals that tested positive remains hospitalized.  There have been zero deaths and 1196 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be Tuesday, May 5, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 421 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tonight, Monday, May 4, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

You May Qualify for OHP Coverage if Your Work Situation Has Changed

If your employment status has changed recently and you have lost income, you may qualify for free health care coverage under Oregon Health Plan (OHP), the state’s Medicaid program.  To be eligible for OHP coverage, you must be an Oregon resident and have income that doesn’t exceed a certain amount – for instance, individuals between the ages of 19 and 64 must make no more than $1,436 per month to qualify. For more information on eligibility, visit Oregon’s OHP website. You can apply online, and the site contains a link to the application.

Addressing Concerns about Pets Getting COVID-19

If you have pets, you may be wondering if your cat or dog is at risk of contracting COVID-19, or if they might somehow give it to you. State and federal health officials say that while there have been a few cases of animals contracting COVID-19 after having close contact with an infected human, the risk of transmission is very low. And there is no evidence of cats or dogs playing a role in spreading the virus to humans.  

However, until more is learned about the virus in relation to animals, Oregon Health Authority and the CDC recommend taking a few precautions:

  • Do not let pets interact with people or other animals outside the household.
  • Keep cats indoors when possible to prevent them from interacting with other animals or people.
  • Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining 6 feet of distance from other people and animals.
  • Avoid dog parks or public places where large numbers of people and dogs gather.

“CDC is working with human and animal health partners to monitor this situation and will continue to provide updates as information becomes available,” the agency said on its website. “Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19.”  Have more questions? Visit the CDC’s FAQ page on pets and COVID-19, or read updates on the agency’s “If You Have Pets” page.

Spread Positivity and Gratitude with Homemade Signs

We’re all in need of a little positivity these days, and you can help! If you’re looking for a fun project to do yourself or with your kids, make a sign to put in your yard or window offering a positive message of support for a hero in your life.  Make a sign that says how proud you are of your Aunt that is a nurse, your Grandpa that is helping with school lessons at home, your Mom that is working as a cashier, your Brother that is serving up food at the drive thru, your Dad that is driving a semi-truck or to show support for your favorite local store that is struggling.  Chances are, you have the materials at home to do this without leaving the house – think cardboard, plywood, old sheets, paint, chalk, Christmas lights, or magic markers. Lowe’s Home Improvement created a list of ideas and instructions for creating homemade signs for your heroes. Search for #BuildThanks on social media to see some examples of what people across the country have come up with. The added bonus of spreading positivity and giving thanks is that it can help brighten up your own life by making others feel important!

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents in March 8, 2020. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state or federal COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 3, 2020 (Photo) - 05/03/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -May 3, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Today, we would like to send a shout out to our neighbors, friends and family in Douglas County for your continued support, and for your dedicated efforts in staying home and staying safe during the COVID-19 crisis.  THANK YOU DOUGLAS COUNTY RESIDENTS for doing your ‘home’ work these last six weeks and following the ‘Stay Home, Save Lives’ guidelines.  We know it is difficult to stay apart from those we love right now, but with modern technology many have been able to stay connected using video chats or hosting Facebook Live virtual events.  It is important for our mental and physical well-being to maintain those relationships. But, keeping in touch with friends and family during COVID-19 might not be easy for everyone.  For residents that need help to stay connected with family and friends, the Oregon Lifeline program may be able to help make staying in touch more affordable. 

If you qualify, here are some benefits the Oregon Lifeline can provide with a participating service provider in your area:

  • Receive a discount on your phone bill of $10.75 per month.
  • Receive a discount on your broadband bill of up to $12.75 per month.
  • Receive free cell phone and data service.

Those already receiving benefits from select public assistance programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) may qualify for the program.  Residents may also qualify if their total household income is at or below 135 percent of federal poverty guidelines.  To apply and for more information: Call (800) 848-4442, Monday through Friday from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm; or email puc.rspf@state.or.us or click here of the Oregon Lifeline website.

 

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, May 3, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.    The total number of Douglas County residents who have tested positive is twenty-four*.  Of the twenty-four cases, eighteen have recovered.  One of the individuals that tested positive remains hospitalized.  There have been zero deaths and 1171 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be Tuesday, May 5, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 411 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Volunteer & Support Your Local Community

The Southwestern Oregon Workforce Investment Board (SOWIB) and the Greater Douglas United Way (GDUW) have launched a new volunteer coordination match site. The new volunteer match-style site reduces barriers to volunteering by skipping the typical time-consuming search for a good fit for both volunteers and organizations. Potential volunteers enter a one-time personal profile, identifying as many skills and interests as they want to highlight and any limitations they may have.  Organizations also develop a profile, outlining volunteer opportunities they need to fill.  For example, and organization could request “someone near Myrtle Creek who can lift at least 25 pounds,” or “someone in Roseburg who can pass a background check and wants to do outreach calls from home” then the software generates potential matches.  Contacts are provided for matches and then the organization and potential volunteer connect and set up volunteer work.  Volunteering is a great way to give back and support your local community during times of need. And, GDUW has added an additional perk; those that sign up to volunteer with the new volunteer coordination match site will automatically be entered into a drawing for a prize. 

 

Reducing Your Family’s Stress and Building Resilience

In difficult times, children take cues from their parents on whether they should be afraid, and how they should feel and act. Here are some tips from the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship on how to maintain a calm, reassuring and resilient atmosphere at home during the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Provide consistency and structure – Establish a simple daily routine for your family. Get your children involved in the planning process to give them a sense of control.
  • Stay alive – Take regular breaks to go outside for fresh air and exercise. Look for free online resources for youth-focused at-home workouts, such as Fitness Blender Kids Workout.
  • Be present with your family – Work on tasks and projects alongside your children and set aside time to give your family your undivided attention.
  • Use technology wisely – Get your news and COVID-19 updates from reputable sources, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know which technology your children are using, and participate in it alongside them.

Daily Tips: Backyard Sunday

 

Your backyard is full of small wonders, and there are resources that can help you find the magic hidden among the weeds. Looking for a book filled with backyard activities and experiments you can do with your kids? Try “Hack Your Backyard: Discover a World of Fun with Science Buddies,” which teaches you how to make your own compass, tell the temperature from crickets and count the stars. Or, check out “The Pocket Book of Backyard Experiments: Discover the Laboratory in Your Garden.” Both are available for purchase on Amazon and elsewhere, or you can inquire with your local library about online options for accessing them.

For hours’ worth of fun and ideas, try the “Backyard Science” YouTube channel hosted by Kids Science. Episodes include “Make Your Own Mini Greenhouse,” “How to Measure Wind,” and “Playing Music with a Garden Hose.” Please note that some of the videos are for older kids and feature activities that require parental supervision.

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

5/01/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg 5/01/2020         10:30 am - 4:00 pm      Sutherlin Community Center, Sutherlin 

5/04/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg 5/05/2020         12:00 pm – 5:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg 5/08/2020         11:00 am – 4:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

BZP Sherms
BZP Sherms
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 1, 2020 (Photo) - 05/02/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 2, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  A rainy day, is a rainy day, even during the COVID-19 crisis.  If your plans this weekend were foiled by a rainstorm and you are stuck inside the house, you don’t have to be bored.  There are plenty of fun and productive things to do on a rainy day without ever leaving the house. Here, some of ways you and your family can pass the time.

1)         Vacation: Get online and research ideas for future family vacations.

2)         Look into starting a side business:  A side business can also provide a creative outlet, help you feel more fulfilled, and even make you more productive at your day job.

3)         Get your finances in order: Spend the afternoon unsubscribing from unnecessary services, negotiating new insurance rates, setting up paperless billing or comparing prescription costs. You'll be surprised by how much money you can save.

4)         Reconnect: You may feel like your grandmother gets plenty of updates via social media or texts have you up-to-date on your BFF’s life, but there's nothing like a real conversation. Set aside a few hours this weekend to check in on those nearest and dearest to you—via a good old fashioned phone call. 

5)         Clean & Organize: Cleaning might not be high on anyone's list, but what better time to do the dreaded task than a rainy weekend? If you're not motivated enough to take on the whole house, pick a few spring cleaning chores (like going through that clutter drawer that's been driving you crazy) then kick back and relax.

6)         Cook or bake: Take this time to try out that new recipe or maybe bake something yummy with your kids. 

7)         DIY project: Maybe you've been meaning to paint the guest room for months? Or maybe you've always wanted to make a DIY bookshelf? A rainy afternoon is the perfect time to finally cross that project off of your to-do list.

8)         Gaming: Hold an online video or board game tournament: Forget about that movie marathon—have a board game tournament instead. Invite friends and family to join you for an online tournament of your favorite board or video game. 

9)         Make a bucket list:  Use the opportunity to create a list of resolutions or craft a bucket list.

10)       Pamper yourself: Try out that mud mask, give yourself a pedicure or manicure or take a long soothing bubble bath. A rainy day is the perfect opportunity to treat yourself.

 

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, May 2, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  The total number of Douglas County residents who have tested positive is twenty-four*.  Of the twenty-four cases, eighteen have recovered.  One of the individuals that tested positive remains hospitalized.  There have been zero deaths and 1159 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be Tuesday, May 5th, 2020.  The fourth drive-through clinic in Reedsport is happening today, May 2nd.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.  

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 411 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Adapt

Adapt, a multi-pronged agency that provides substance abuse treatment, behavioral health services and primary care, has been an active part of the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT).  Adapt CEO Dr. Greg Brigham said his agency has coordinated with DCCRT partners on projects including planning alternative care sites for a potential surge in COVID-19 patients; the fever clinic at Evergreen Family Medicine; and working with the VA to plan for patient overflow should Mercy Medical Center reach capacity. It was important to Adapt to have alternative care sites in place because many of the people it serves in its residential treatment programs don’t have a place to stay after they are discharged. If they got sick, there was a question of where they would go.

So far, many of the measures put in place by the DCCRT, such as the alternative care sites, have not been needed because the local number of COVID-19 cases has remained low. But Dr. Brigham said the benefits of such extensive collaboration will likely last well beyond the current pandemic.  “I think our local process has been very robust, and probably better than in most communities … Every time we get on a project that brings us all together, it’s really a very positive thing. We come out of it stronger and better-ready to provide services.”

He pointed out that, while Douglas County has stood up emergency response teams for previous crises, such as the UCC shooting, wildfires and “snowmageddon,” this is the first emergency response in memory that has been medical in nature. “This is new for our community,” he said.

Adapt provides behavioral health services through Compass Behavioral Health, and primary care services through South River Community Health Center. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, it was a priority to offer mental health resources to front-line health providers. Adapt helped stand up the Douglas County Healthcare Worker Support Line at (541) 677-5800, as well as a website that contains additional resources for protecting medical workers’ mental and emotional health.

 “We worked with the DCCRT to take on the project of developing behavioral health supports for medical providers in the event that their own personal stress from doing the job requires some attention,” Brigham said.

Internally, Adapt took measures early on to mitigate COVID-19-related risk at its facilities. In-person meetings and gatherings were canceled, and patients, visitors and staff were screened at the door. Adapt also expanded sick leave to encourage its employees to stay home if they were not feeling well. Most appointments are currently done virtually through Telehealth. However, people experiencing mental health issues are still able to walk in to Adapt and Compass to receive services. Compass also offers a 24/7 mental health crisis line at (800) 866-9760. Adapt is based in Roseburg but also provides services in Coos, Curry and Josephine counties. 

We’re fully open and ready to go,” Brigham said. “We still have open access for mental health services. There’s no wait at all.

Explore the Wonders of National Parks from Home

Take a tour of a national park. Study Native American history. Earn a Junior Ranger’s Badge – who knew these were all things you could do from home? The Department of the Interior’s website is chock-full of online learning opportunities that will transport you out of your living room and into some of the most stunning natural landscapes in the U.S.

You can learn about geology, study up on birds or explore the stars. Read about Pele, the mythical Hawaiian volcano goddess. Watch live webcams of Yosemite or Yellowstone National Parks. There’s even a worksheet to predict the next eruption of the famous geyser Old Faithful – after you fill it out, watch the Old Faithful webcam to see if you’re right! For a fun project, learn about the Yellowstone Caldera, then make your own caldera at home. Curious about water and want to learn more about streams, oceans and precipitation? Check out the U.S. Geological Survey’s Water Science School, which has lessons taught by a drop of water named “Drippy.” The site also has links to coloring pages and learning activities for kids, as well as resources for teachers.

ODOT: Reminds Motorists to Please Slow Down

National officials are reporting that with fewer people on the road and fewer traffic jams, many drivers are getting more reckless when they are out and about on our roads and highways.  Highway safety officials across the country are seeing a severe spike in speeding, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association. Many states have reported alarming speed increases, with some noting a significant surge in vehicles clocked at 100 mph or more. Their mission is to save lives – so if you must drive, buckle up, follow the posted speed limit, and look out for pedestrians and bicyclists. Emergency rooms in many areas of the country are at capacity, and the last thing they need is additional strain from traffic crash victims.

Daily Tips: Hobby and Craft Saturday

Toilet paper is in high demand these days, but you probably don’t think twice about throwing away the cardboard tube in the middle after the roll is used up. These tubes – and the tubes at the center of paper towel rolls – can be turned into art! Good Housekeeping has a video tutorial on how to do this. Supplies you’ll need include scissors, tape or glue, paint, and the tubes themselves. You can create animal figurines, a miniature car, or whatever your imagination comes up with. The video will get you started with ideas, but they sky’s the limit. You can also incorporate items such as sprinkles, yarn or glitter to brighten up your creations!

Heroes Work Here

Stay Home, Save Lives! Community members have done well in heeding these instructions to “flatten the curve” through social distancing, donning masks and gloves on limited excursions from the safety of their homes, and trying to make the most of this new, however temporary, normal. But what about those on whom we all relay for the essentials? Curbside garbage continues to be picked up. Groceries remained stocked. Mail arrives. Medical providers are still there for you. While it has its challenges, having the ability to self-quarantine may be a luxury that some cannot afford.

Community members head to the frontlines on a daily basis to keep our world spinning and Blue Zones Project-Umpqua is celebrating these local heroes. Walking in and out of work each day, dedicated workers at Blue Zones Project Approved and participating organizations will see large signs stating “Heroes Work Here” to remind them that taking the risk of exposure to COVID 19 while continuing their essential duties has not gone unnoticed by their community, and that they are valued. As essential workers continue to serve, with sometimes longer hours and tougher conditions during this unprecedented time, this is just one way to add a little sunshine to their day.

This is our way of showing appreciation to those that are putting themselves in harm’s way to serve the community,” said Blue Zones Project, Organization Lead, John Dimof. “They are juggling so much right now and the least we can do is cheer them on and recognize that they are heroes for making these sacrifices for the rest of us.”

Blue Zones Project will continue to spread this campaign to other essential workers around the community, and invites those that are benefiting from these services to also express their gratitude. After all, heroes don’t just live in the comic books, they’re working hard for us, right here, in the Umpqua Valley.

 

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

5/04/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/05/2020         12:00 pm – 5:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/08/2020         11:00 am – 4:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

Attached Media Files: BZP Sherms , BZP Evergreen , BZP Aviva , Get tested
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - May 1, 2020 (Photo) - 05/01/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 1, 2020

Our Daily Local COVID-19 Updates represent the coordinated effort of the 14 agencies that make up the DCCRT.

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  One of the most common questions that we receive from our residents is about testing.  We wanted to take a moment and respond specifically to the types of testing that are currently available in Douglas County.  Our team consulted with our local experts at Douglas Public Health Network for the answer.  As of today, May 1, there are two types of COVID-19 tests available to our residents, the nasal swab and the antibody test.

The nasal swab or PCR test looks for RNA of the virus living in the body, and is currently the only way to identify and diagnose a confirmed active case of COVID-19. The nasal swab test is what DPHN and the testing team have been using in the drive-through clinics, and what health care providers have been ordering and doing to confirm a case of COVID-19. If somebody wants to be tested for COVID-19, then DPHN suggests you ask your health care provider to order the test. If you don’t have a health care provider, you can seek care and an order for a test at your local Urgent Care Clinic.

The second test, the antibody or serology test is a blood test to identify if somebody has any antibodies to Coronavirus in their blood. A positive antibody test does not confirm an active infection and can show antibodies from other corona viruses (not just COVID-19). A positive antibody does not guarantee that you are immune and won’t get COVID-19. There is not enough known about immunity to COVID-19.  There is antibody testing being done in research and commercial labs.  Several of the antibody tests have shown some issues with sensitivity, as well as specificity of the tests. If somebody wants an antibody test they can request one from their provider. Quest Labs is currently performing those tests locally, with either a provider order or without if you wish to pay out of pocket.

In the rapidly changing landscape of testing technologies, access to other types of testing is occurring on an accelerated basis all across the globe. DPHN is working diligently with the DCCRT, state, federal and medical partners to increase access to additional types of testing for our residents.  At this time, as the local authority on health, DPHN encourages people to be tested with the nasal swab test if you wish to be tested.   

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, May 1, 2020, there is one new case of COVID-19 in Douglas County.    The new case bumps the total number of Douglas County residents who have tested positive to twenty-four*.  However, the newest case, since testing and awaiting the results has been placed on the recovered list.  Of the twenty-four cases, eighteen have recovered.  One of the individuals that tested positive remains hospitalized.  There have been zero deaths and 1058 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be today, May 1, 2020.  There will also be another drive-through clinic in Reedsport on Saturday, May 2.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 395 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Lower Umpqua Hospital District

Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport is an important part of Douglas County’s COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT) and has been heading up efforts in the western part of the county during the pandemic.   Hospital officials have been in frequent communication with fellow team members in Roseburg to ensure a consistent countywide approach to COVID-19 and accurate messaging to the public.  LUH representatives on the DCCRT include Chief Administrative Officer Ryan Fowler, Public Relations Director Rosa Solano and Nursing and Infection Control Director Sandy Teeter.

As a part of the DCCRT outreach efforts, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County’s Public Health Officer; Commissioner Tim Freeman and Douglas County Public Works staff, have been traveling to the coast nearly every Saturdays for the past month to administer COVID-19 testing in Reedsport. The hospital is very appreciative of Dr. Bob, Commissioner Freeman and the team for coordinating the testing clinics.  And to Dr. Bob for his guidance on the public health protocols. LUH also conducts some tests on its own. 

Even before joining the countywide team, LUH had adopted a host of safety measures to protect patients and staff safe from COVID-19. Volunteers, many of whom are seniors, were sent home early on in the pandemic due to the increased risk related to their age. All staff members, patients and visitors to its hospital and two clinics were screened for fever and symptoms. Some appointments were done virtually through Telehealth. LUH set up two disaster tents to prepare for a potential surge in COVID-19 cases, but so far those haven’t been needed and one is being used instead for screenings.

If there were a surge, LUH’s primary acute-care unit would become a COVID-19 unit and the hospital’s west wing would house non-COVID patients. The disaster tents outside would be available to handle any overflow. So far though, things have been slow at the hospital due to the governor’s order restricting elective surgeries and a reluctance of patients to seek non-urgent care due to the state’s stay-at-home guidelines and other factors. Elective surgeries can restart in Oregon beginning Friday, and LUH is planning to resume such procedures gradually.

We want to make sure that patients know that it’s safe to come to the hospital,” Solano said.

LUH is closely monitoring its supply of personal protective equipment (PPE), especially N95 masks and isolation gowns, which are in short supply nationwide. Solano and Fowler said coastal residents have banded together to provide PPE for the hospital. Many are sewing masks; a dress maker has been testing out different fabrics to make gowns for LUH that can be sanitized and re-worn; a local teen has been 3-D printing face shields; and a family-run hobby company has worked on ways to alter masks so that the ear bands don’t chafe wearers’ ears.

The community’s been awesome,” Fowler said. “They’ve stepped up, they’ve made masks. We’ve had community members buy food for our staff and send it over. We’ve had people making reusable gowns and face shields. That’s always the great thing about times of crisis – you really see people come together.”

LUH is a not-for-profit Critical Access Hospital that provides full health care services to coastal residents. The hospital opened in 1964 to address a gap in health services in the coastal communities, which are geographically isolated from the rest of Douglas County. The facility was remodeled and expanded in 1998.

Solano said the community’s help has made a big difference. “We’re just very thankful to our community for all your support,” she said.

Press Conference Today: Expanded Testing, Contact Tracing Will Guide Timeline for Reopening

In a press conference held earlier today, Friday, May 1, Governor Brown laid out a plan for expanding COVID-19 testing in Oregon – a key step she says needs to happen before the state can reopen. At the press conference, she listed three goals that need to be met before restrictions are lifted:

  • Testing should be available for any Oregonian showing symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Testing must be accessible to vulnerable populations in group settings such as nursing homes, long-term care facilities, prisons, and farmworker housing facilities.
  • There must be ongoing, randomized, widespread testing throughout the state to show “where the virus may be hiding.”

The first two goals will be achieved through a collaborative effort between the state and major health care providers including Kaiser, Asante, Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU), Providence and others. The third goal will be met through a new program headed up by OHSU; starting the week of May 11, letters will be mailed to 100,000 randomly selected Oregonians inviting them to participate in a COVID-19 testing program. Participation will be voluntary. Testing a random sampling of Oregon residents will help give leaders a better idea of how prevalent the virus is in various communities. OHSU’s website contains more information on the program.

The state is also launching a new effort to increase contract tracing, which is the process of reaching out to people who may have come in contact with a person who has COVID-19. About 600 people all over Oregon, including community health workers, will be trained on how to properly conduct contact tracing. The statewide tracing team will have bilingual and bicultural members.

With this overarching strategy of testing and tracing in place, we’ll be able to begin the process of opening Oregon,” the Governor said.  

While the Governor did not specify a timeline for the reopening, rural counties, including Douglas County, have pushed to begin reopening soon.  She mentioned that she will be in dialogue with leaders from those counties. Although, to date, the Governor has not responded to the letter sent on Friday, April 24, 2020 by the five SW Oregon County Commissioners, including our Douglas County Board of Commissioners, that suggested a regional approach to reopening some lower risk counties.  And, Douglas County Government has also not received an invitation or a request to set up a meeting with the Governor about a reopening plan.  The Governor said some counties that have almost zero cases and few hospitalizations may be able to start reopening by May 15. Again, as a reminder the order and process established to reopen Oregon can only come from the Governor. 

State Health Officer Dr. Dean Sidelinger said they expect to see an increase in COVID-19 infections statewide once Oregon begins its gradual reopening.

The reason I say infections are going to go up is that people are going to have more contact with others,” Sidelinger said. “With that contact comes infections, and with those infections are the possibility for serious infections that require hospitalization. So that’s why you’ll see, as recommendations come out, that we are still going to be recommending people stay 6 feet apart in most settings, and that we cover our faces when we’re in settings where we can’t do that. Those tools are really going to help us slow down the spread of the disease on our community.”

He said the actions taken by Oregonians so far, including staying at home, have prevented an estimated 70,000 infections and 1,500 hospitalizations.  The guidelines on testing are evolving, and the list of high-risk groups that should be prioritized for testing has expanded to include grocery workers, bus drivers, delivery drivers and others, in addition to medical workers. The state is nearing its goal of conducting 15,000 tests per week, Sidelinger said about 2,000 tests are being done daily and plans to expand that number in the coming weeks.  Governor said precautions such as physical distancing, wearing masks and sneezing/coughing into your elbow or a Kleenex are expected to be in place for some time, even after many restrictions are lifted. And the customary ‘hand-shake’ will be a no-no for a while.

It is just going to be a different type of normal,” she said. “Until we have a vaccine, or have medicine (for COVID-19), we are going to have to be extremely careful regarding the virus.

Daily Tips: Dinner-and-a-Movie Friday

Tonight’s meal recommendation: Mexican food….as a nod to the upcoming Cinco de Mayo celebration on May 5. It’s hard to go wrong with this delicious cuisine, and there are plenty of local takeout options to choose from if you don’t feel like cooking on your own. You could pair it with the 2001 PG-13 film “Tortilla Soup,” about a Mexican-American chef in Los Angeles, his three daughters, and their family dynamics – the food scenes are mouth-watering. Or if you’re eating a burrito, you could watch “Anchorman,” also rated PG-13 and starring Will Ferrell as Ron Burgundy, who tosses a burrito out his car window in one scene, accidentally hitting a biker. Your movie doesn’t have to feature Mexican food, of course. If you have young kids at home, we recommend revisiting a classic such as “Toy Story” or “The Incredibles.”   If you decide to cook, here’s a recipe for chicken fajitas. Or you could try this Food Network site with 50 taco recipes. For delivery options, there’s DoorDash and Grubhub, or you could call your favorite restaurant and ask if they deliver or are open for pick up!

Restaurants Still Making Healthy Choices Easier - #FoodieFriday

There are a growing number of restaurants in the Umpqua Valley that have committed to providing their customers and our community with an abundance of healthy choices on their menu to choose from. Seven restaurants have earned the distinction of becoming Blue Zones Approved Restaurants and five more are working towards becoming approved next.

Many of these restaurants have acted quickly in making adjustments that allow them to stay open for delivery and/or take out during COVID-19. These restaurants have stepped up for us to make the healthy choice the easy choice. They need us more than ever during these difficult times and this is our chance to step up for them. Click here for a list of Blue Zones Project Approved Restaurants. Feel free to ask for a Blue Zones inspired dish for a tasty, fresh option!  Check out the Blue Zones Project-Umpqua Facebook Page to see live interviews with these restaurants every Friday for the #FoodieFriday Campaign.

Be A Hero, Give Blood!

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

5/01/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/01/2020         10:30 am - 4:00 pm      Sutherlin Community Center, Sutherlin

5/04/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/05/2020         12:00 pm – 5:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/08/2020         11:00 am – 4:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Special Local Update - May 1, 2020 (Photo) - 05/01/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - SPECIAL LOCAL UPDATE – NEW COVID-19 CASE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 1, 2020

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) As of 12:00 pm, May 1, 2020, there is one new case of COVID-19 in Douglas County.    The new case bumps the total number of Douglas County residents who have tested positive to twenty-four*.  However, the newest case, since testing and awaiting the results has been placed on the recovered list.  Of the twenty-four cases, eighteen have recovered.  One of the individuals that tested positive remains hospitalized.  There have been zero deaths and 1058 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. The majority of the individuals who have tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be today, May 1, 2020.  There will also be another drive-through clinic in Reedsport on Saturday, May 2.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

 

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 395 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.

 

Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

DCCRT
DCCRT
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - April 30, 2020 (Photo) - 04/30/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 30, 2020

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Every day brings with it more concerns about public safety with the COIVD-19 pandemic.  The Oregon Office of Emergency Management released information today stating that there is, “No known transmission of COVID-19 through food or food packaging.”  The assertion was backed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) who want to assure Oregonians that there is no evidence that human or animal food—or food packaging is directly related to the transmission of COVID-19.  There have been a number of national and regional food processing facilities that have closed due to COVID-19, but at this time, they do not believe that those products will need to be withdrawn or recalled from the market, should someone related to the growing or processing of the food test positive.

 

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person to person, such as between people who are in close contact with one another, or through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes,” said Paul Cieslak, M.D., senior health adviser for OHA’s COVID-19 response. ODA and OHA, in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are working together to offer guidance to employers as they initiate programs to protect the health and safety of their employees, the food and the food sources so they can keep the food supply chain going. The workers are the backbone of this critical industry.  Click here to read the rest of the story and for a list of food, employer, processing and distribution recommendations.

 

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, April 30, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County*. There remain 23 individuals who have tested positive, of those, seventeen have recovered.  There have been zero deaths and 1035 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. One of the twenty-three people that have tested positive is still hospitalized.  Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. Seventeen of the individuals who tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

 

Get Tested & Testing

The next drive through clinic in Roseburg will be on Friday, May 1, 2020.  There will also be another drive-through clinic in Reedsport on Saturday, May 2.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

 

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 395 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

 

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

Battelle System Coming to Eugene (Serving a 200 mile Radius):

The State of Oregon is working with the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) on behalf of the U.S Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) along with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  The federal government is using the Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System to meet this mission and are bringing a system to Oregon. A system will arrive next week in Eugene and will serve a large portion of the state thanks to a 200-mile service area around the hub.  There is a Battelle unit has been in place for a number of weeks in Tacoma and has been servicing healthcare organizations in the Portland metro area.  An additional system is expected to arrive in Idaho Falls, Idaho that will help serve locations in eastern Oregon.  If a remote site is not serviced by Cardinal Sustainable Technologies, Battelle will provide FedEx Labels for shipment to the decontamination site that makes the most sense. Soon, all of Oregon will be able to access this system to support their healthcare providers.

 

Will be there be a charge for the Battelle System?

There is no charge to use the Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System.  The system can be used by all healthcare personnel ("HCP") which refers to all paid and unpaid persons serving in healthcare settings who have the potential for direct or indirect exposure to patients or infectious materials, including body substances (e.g., blood, tissue, and specific body fluids); contaminated medical supplies, devices, and equipment; contaminated environmental surfaces; or contaminated air. which include, but are not limited to, emergency medical service personnel, nurses, nursing assistants, physicians, technicians, therapists, phlebotomists, pharmacists, dentists and dental hygienists, students and trainees, contractual staff not employed by the healthcare facility, and persons not directly involved in patient care, but who could be exposed to infectious agents that can be transmitted in the healthcare setting (e.g., clerical, dietary, environmental services, laundry, security, engineering and facilities management, administrative, billing, and volunteer personnel.

 

How can your healthcare organization access this resource?

Please go to www.battelle.org/decon and click on the enroll button and complete the necessary information.

 

Unemployment Benefits Now Available to Self Employed Individuals, Contractors

Contractors, self-employed workers and others who do not qualify for regular unemployment assistance are now able to apply for benefits thanks to the federal CARES Act Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) Program.   Starting this week, people in those categories can seek those newly available PUA benefits through the Oregon Employment Department (OED). Eligible applicants include Oregonians who do not qualify for or cannot collect benefits on a regular unemployment insurance claim, such as:

  • Self-employed individuals
  • Independent contractors
  • Agricultural workers or others whose work is not subject to unemployment insurance tax
  • Those who did not have enough wages or work hours to qualify for regular unemployment benefits and are not eligible for another extension.

 

Additionally, to be eligible you must be unemployed, partially unemployed or unable/unavailable to work due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Examples of that include individuals who are directly caring for a household member who has COVID-19; those who have COVID-19 or are being tested for it; people who are unable to get to work due to quarantine; primary caregivers for school-age children who are unable to go to school because of the pandemic; and individuals who worked for a business that closed due to COVID-19.  PUA benefits are retroactive to the first week a worker was impacted by a qualifying COVID-19 reason. Processing applications can take from one to several weeks, depending on the complexity of your situation. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities by calling (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 

Applications can be accessed on the Employment Department’s website. There are three ways to submit your application:

  • Email – You can email OED_PUA_INFO@oregon.gov to request a secure email link, then attach your PUA application and weekly claim reports to the secure email.
  • Mail – Applications and weekly claim reports can be mailed to the Oregon Employment Department at P.O. Box 14165, Salem, OR, 97311
  • Fax – You can also fax your application/claim reports to (503) 371-2893.

 

Elections Update - Ballots Arriving Soon, Due by May 19

Ballots for the upcoming May 19 Primary Election will be arriving in the mail soon for registered voters in Douglas County.  In light of the current orders for the coronavirus pandemic, the Douglas County Clerk would like to encourage voters to stay home, stay safe, and use the new free postage option. Thanks to prepaid postage legislation passed in 2019 — a stamp is no longer needed to mail your ballot. Ballots must be returned no later than 8:00 pm on May 19, 2020. 

 

Douglas County voters have until approximately Wednesday, May 13, 2020 to safely mail back their ballot for the May Primary Election. After that date, voters should use one of the official Douglas County ballot drop sites to return ballots.  Postmarks do not qualify ballots, so as Election Day approaches, consider which delivery method will assure your ballot is counted.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some of our Douglas County ballot drop sites have changed.  To find out about these changes and to find a nearby official ballot drop site, visit Douglas County Ballot Drop Site Locations.

 

The Douglas County Clerk would like to remind voters;

  • If registered voters haven’t received their ballot by Friday, May 8, 2020, please contact or visit our office.
  • Before turning in a ballot, make sure you have reviewed and completed both sides of the ballot.
  • Make sure you sign your ballot envelope, where it lists your printed name and address.
  • Make sure you sign the ballot envelope in the same manner as your most current voter registration card.  For reference, see your signature on the back of your Oregon Driver License or ID.
  • If you must visit the Douglas County Clerk’s Office in-person, please make sure to follow the proper 6-foot physical distancing, hand washing, covering your coughs, wearing of masks and departmentally posted visitation guidelines.  We encourage you to call, email or visit the website first.
  • For the safety of our employees and the public, please stay home if you are sick.

 

For more information about the May 19 Primary Election, please visit the Douglas County Elections Webpage.  For Voter Education and Outreach support please contact Douglas County Elections Division* at (541) 440-4252 or email us at elections@co.douglas.or.us. Additional information can be found on the Oregon Secretary of State’s website at oregonvotes.gov or by calling 1.866.673.VOTE. *Our Voter Education and Outreach Program does not provide support at political events and is entirely nonpartisan. Douglas County Elections does not endorse or discuss any particular candidates or measures.

Mercy Express Expands Services

Mercy Medical Center is expanding its Mercy Express transportation service, which helps community members – especially seniors and those with disabilities - get to and from appointments and other destinations in the county.  

Mercy Express operates Monday through Friday and one Saturday a month. Mercy announced this week it is expanding the service in light of the fact that a number of “Dial a Rides” have temporarily closed.

“We are borrowing a bus to be able to add extra rides on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and possibly Saturdays, if we have enough interest and need,” Mercy said in a post on its Facebook page.

Cleaning efforts are also being ramped up to protect riders and drivers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and drivers have gloves, masks and sanitizer on board.

“Our Mercy Express drivers clean after every rider and have the experts at Squeaky Clean Express do regular extra sanitizing as well,” Mercy said in the Facebook post.

All rides are scheduled by appointment. Appointments can be made by calling (888) 232-8121. If no one answers, leave a message and your call will be returned as soon as a dispatcher is available. 

 

Daily Tips: Game Night Thursday

When it comes to virtual game nights, trivia is one of the easiest games to play with your friends and family via video. All you need is a group of players, a video conferencing platform – Zoom, Google Hangouts, Facetime, Houseparty or other – and some trivia questions. Designate one person to be the host and be in charge of the questions and keeping score. Agree on a scoring system and rules (such as “no Googling answers on your phone”). The host can either come up with their own questions or use a random trivia generator like this one. If you come up with your own questions, get creative with your categories! You can even have a local category like “Douglas County places.” If someone in your group has a Trivial Pursuit board, you can play Trivial Pursuit with your group – just have that person move your pieces for you when it’s your turn.

 

‘Shave It or Save It’ Competition Raises Awareness About COVID-19 Fund

Greater Douglas United Way has launched a friendly competition called “Shave It or Save It,” to raise awareness about a new COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund. The fund is intended to assist local nonprofits in meeting the basic needs of residents adversely affected by COVID-19.   The facial hair hanging in the balance is that of Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County’s Public Health Officer, who has been the face of the county’s COVID-19 response, including through his frequent Facebook Lives on the Douglas Public Health Network’s Facebook page.

 

True to his commitment to serve, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer has offered the fate of his beautiful, bristly ‘stache to the people of Douglas County and beyond,” GDUW officials said in a press release.

 

Depending on the votes received, Dr. Bob will either shave his thick mustache or “save it.” If you’d like to vote on whether it stays or goes, visit Greater Douglas United Way’s website and donate. A vote costs $5. When making your donation, be sure to note whether you want Dr. Bob to #ShaveIt or #SaveIt. Votes will be accepted through May 31. For more information, email gduway@gduway.org.

 

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

 

5/01/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/01/2020         10:30 am - 4:00 pm      Sutherlin Community Center, Sutherlin

5/04/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/05/2020         12:00 pm – 5:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/08/2020         11:00 am – 4:30 pm      Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

Attached Media Files: DCCRT
DC Clerk
DC Clerk
04-30-20 Douglas County Clerk - Ballots Arriving Soon, Due by May 19 (Photo) - 04/30/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 30, 2020

*** May Primary Election Update *** Ballots Arriving Soon, Due by May 19

            (Douglas County, Or.) Ballots for the upcoming May 19 Primary Election will be arriving in the mail soon for registered voters in Douglas County.  In light of the current orders for the coronavirus pandemic, the Douglas County Clerk would like to encourage voters to stay home, stay safe, and use the new free postage option. Thanks to prepaid postage legislation passed in 2019 — a stamp is no longer needed to mail your ballot.

            Ballots must be returned no later than 8:00 pm on May 19, 2020.  Douglas County voters have until approximately Wednesday, May 13, 2020 to safely mail back their ballot for the May Primary Election. After that date, voters should use one of the Official Douglas County ballot drop sites to return ballots.  Postmarks do not qualify ballots, so as Election Day approaches, consider which delivery method will assure your ballot is counted.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some of our Douglas County ballot drop sites have changed.  To find out about these changes and to find a nearby official ballot drop site, visit Douglas County Ballot Drop Site Locations.

The Douglas County Clerk would like to remind voters;

  • If registered voters haven’t received their ballot by Friday, May 8, 2020, please contact or visit our office.
  • Before turning in a ballot, make sure you have reviewed and completed both sides of the ballot.
  • Make sure you sign your ballot envelope, where it lists your printed name and address.
  • Make sure you sign the ballot envelope in the same manner as your most current voter registration card.  For reference, see your signature on the back of your Oregon Driver License or ID.
  • If you must visit the Douglas County Clerk’s Office in-person, please make sure to follow the proper 6-foot physical distancing, hand washing, covering your coughs, wearing of masks and departmentally posted visitation guidelines.  We encourage you to call, email or visit the website first.
  • For the safety of our employees and the public, please stay home if you are sick.

            For more information about the May 19 Primary Election, please visit the Douglas County Elections Webpage.  For Voter Education and Outreach support please contact Douglas County Elections Division* at (541) 440-4252 or email us at elections@co.douglas.or.us. Additional information can be found on the Oregon Secretary of State’s website at oregonvotes.gov or by calling 1.866.673.VOTE.

*Our Voter Education and Outreach Program does not provide support at political events and is entirely nonpartisan. Douglas County Elections does not endorse or discuss any particular candidates or measures.

Attached Media Files: DC Clerk
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - April 29, 2020 (Photo) - 04/29/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 29, 2020

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  There are a lot of people working the front lines of the pandemic.  But, sometimes we forget to give credit to those that are working in necessary and support roles in our community.  Today, we want to send out kudos to all mail and package carriers with the United States Postal Service, United Parcel Service, Federal Express, DHL and other local delivery companies for continuing to provide these crucial services.  Also, we would like to extend appreciation to all the food and material delivery workers who are helping to keep local businesses open during the crisis by delivering meals, groceries, medical supplies and building materials.  Thank you for all you do to keep our communities going.  We encourage you to continue to support local businesses.       

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, April 29, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  For the thirteenth day in a row, the total number of positives in Douglas County remains at twenty-three.* Of the twenty-three, fifteen have recovered.  There have been zero deaths and 1023 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. One of the twenty-three people that have tested positive is still hospitalized.  Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. Fifteen of the individuals who tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Get Tested & Testing

DPHN led another through clinic on Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in Roseburg in which 26 residents were tested. The next drive through clinic will be on Friday, May 1, 2020.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 395 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

 

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Umpqua Health Alliance

Umpqua Health Alliance (UHA) works on behalf of Douglas County’s roughly 26,000 Oregon Health Plan members, connecting them to medical care, behavioral health services, and oral and dental care through local providers.   UHA, a subsidiary of Umpqua Health, is one of Oregon’s 15 Coordinated Care Organizations, or CCOs, which represent networks of local health care providers who collaborate to ensure that OHP members get the care they need. CCOs operate under contract with the state, and among other priorities, focus on prevention and helping people manage chronic conditions to reduce emergency department visits.  The core values of UHA are accessibility, compassion, trust, community and professionalism. UHA has about 160 employees in Douglas County.

UHA was a natural addition to the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, and joined the team in March. Dr. Tanveer Bokhari, UHA’s Vice President of Quality and Health Equity, is part of the team and worked to develop internal models to take stock of local hospital capacity and plan for a potential surge in COVID-19 cases. He also helped plan for alternative care sites to create bed capacity outside of Mercy, and figure out a transportation plan between Mercy, the VA, the alternative care sites and other locations. At the time UHA joined the DCCRT, it was already working internally to adjust its own protocols in response to COVID-19. Bokhari developed a task force within the organization that included members of UHA’s executive team. Many employees began working remotely. UHA also began assisting its network of clinics in their COVID-19 responses. In addition to taking internal precautions and working with the DCCRT, UHA was also looking outward to see how it could help the community. It provided about $150,000 in assistance to nonprofits and other entities in Douglas County for the month of April, and will continue this giving in future months.

Bokhari said the formation of the DCCRT ensured that all of the key players were working together to provide a unified response to COVID-19 and consistent messaging to the public. “The team is very energized because they had great leadership,” he said, including Commissioner Tim Freeman and KC Bolton of Aviva Health.  He said the extensive behind-the-scenes collaboration that occurred through the DCCRT paves the way for continued collaboration in the future.

“We should be a changed community for the better after this experience of working together,” Bokhari said.

Use the ‘Stay Home” Time to Prepare Your Home for Wildfire Season

Dry conditions abound in Douglas County, and this stay-at-home time is an excellent opportunity to prepare your home for wildfire season. And you may even want to start this weekend; Saturday is the National Fire Protection Association’s Community Wildfire Preparedness Day.  Here are some things you and your family can do to protect your home, family and community:

  • Remove any debris and dry leaves within 3 to 5 feet of your home’s foundation – or, better yet, within 30 feet or your home if possible to create even more defensible space. Make sure there are no wood piles close to the home.
  • Keep your roof and gutters free of downed tree limbs, broken branches and leaves.
  • Sweep porches, and rake under decks, sheds and play structures. Remove any items stored under decks. Gasoline cans and portable propane tanks should never be stored indoors, and should be kept away from your home.
  • Mow grasses to a height of 4 inches or less.
  • Pool resources with neighbors to pay for a chipper service, or a large debris bin to remove slash.
  • Share wildfire safety information with your neighbors – perhaps via email in order to maintain social distancing. You can find some information here.
  • Create an emergency evacuation plan for you and your family. How will you communicate with each other? What items do you need to bring with you (medications, etc.)? Where will you meet if you are separated? How will you evacuate pets or livestock? If you already have a plan, consider whether it may need to be adjusted due to COVID-19.
  • Update your emergency preparedness kit.

In light of COVID-19, the National Wildfire Protection Association warns against getting together with your neighbors to plan for preparedness. Instead, work on your own home and postpone any neighborhood gatherings until social distancing restrictions have been lifted and it is safe to meet. In the meantime, you can communicate with your neighbors online, and share information on your activities through email, Facebook or other electronic means.

“COVID-19 has changed community dynamics and created more time at home for many Oregon residents – time that can be used to clear brush from around homes and other preparedness activities,” said Jenna Trentadue, National Fire Plan Coordinator with ODF. “Even with physical distancing requirements in place, we can all still do our part on May 2 to be more prepared for wildfire.”

Safe + Strong Site Offers Resources in 12 Languages

Do you have questions about health care, unemployment, transportation or food assistance in the time of COVID-19? Are you looking for educational resources, or ideas on how to talk to your kids about the virus?  Oregon has set up a one-stop-shop that offers links to resources in 12 languages. The “Safe + Strong” website has information on everything from SNAP benefits to resources for immigrants and information on how to sign up for Oregon Health Plan. 

“Information is changing fast. Our goal is to give you the clearest, most up-to-date news and resources you need to help you make the best decisions for you and your family,” the site states. “Share with your friends and family.”

The Safe + Strong site also offers downloadable fliers for community organizations to distribute on topics including the use of face masks and how to spot symptoms of COVID-19. The resources are available in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Russian, Arabic, Korean, simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, Somali, Hmong, Marshallese and Chuukese.

Marine Board Urges Boaters: Be Safe, Practice Physical Distancing During COVID-19

The Oregon Marine Board understands that boaters are anxious and wanting to gear up to hit the water this Spring and Summer.  They wanted to remind boaters to keep safety in mind with regard to cold water temperatures, as well as their responsibility for staying close to home and practicing physical distancing under the State’s Home, Save Lives” executive orders.

“For many of us, we have a natural urge to get outside this time of year -the water calls to us,” said Larry Warren, Director for the Marine Board. “We aim to consistently remind people about ways they can stay safe while they’re on the water, and in light of COVID-19, we also ask this year that you take additional steps to protect yourself, your family, and the people around you. Use your good judgment and if you venture out to go boating, be fluid and adaptable to rapidly changing situations.”  Click here to read the rest of the story about safe boater guidelines and regulations during the COVID-19 crisis.

Daily Tips: Workout Wednesday

Are you a fan of Madonna, Beyoncé or Bon Jovi? Feel like dancing? Check out the “Move With Colour” YouTube Channel, which has dozens of free 10- to 45-minute instructional dance videos from low key to masters. They’re short and fun and designed to get you moving, sweating and smiling. One video has an ‘80s theme; others are focused on funk, disco or cardio jazz. Video titles include “Ugly Zumba,” “It’s Not Hip Hop,” “I’m a Belieber,” and “Boy Band.” Dancing is a great way to get exercise while sprinkling some joy into your day!

Funding Available Through Umpqua Health Alliance, Douglas County’s Coordinated Care Organization

Umpqua Health Alliance, Douglas County’s Coordinated Care Organization, is looking for opportunities to come alongside our community partners in this challenging time. If your agency has a project or program that is experiencing a specific need relating to COVID-19, please contact us for information on how to apply for funding. We're in this together, and UHA is here to help! Please contact Heidi Larson at hlarson@umpquahealth.com for more information.

Surround Yourself with Healthier, Easier Choices

Blue Zones Project works with communities and individuals to make healthy choices easier by transforming the environments around us to support and encourage well-being. Strategies around well-being grow from research into the original blue zones areas, where residents reach age 100 more often than in other places. During this time of social distancing, we could all use some inspiration on how to reshape our home environment with “healthy and easy” always in mind.

Here’s what you’ll find on the new Healthier at Home website:

?oe" Simple actions with lasting impact

?oe" Engaging programs and activities

?oe" Feel-good resources and stories

?oe" Social newsfeeds for sharing

Check out the new Healthier at Home site to find ways to continue to live longer, better, even during COVID-19.

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

4/30/2020         9:00 am - 2:00 pm        North Bend High School, North Bend

5/01/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/01/2020         10:30 am - 04:00 pm     Sutherlin Community Center, Sutherlin

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

DC Parks
DC Parks
Updated: Douglas County Parks and RV Parks Will Reopen May 1 (Photo) - 04/29/20

Douglas County Parks and RV Parks Will Reopen May 1

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 29, 2020 - Updated

(Douglas County, Ore.)  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners announced today that effective May 1, 2020, Douglas County operated Parks and RV Parks will reopen to the public on a limited basis.  Despite the reopening, we continue encourage residents to stay home and follow the Governor’s Executive Order #20-12, ‘Stay Home, Save Lives.’  However, we do understand the role our outdoor recreational sites provide in keeping our residents mentally and physically healthy.  Our parks do have the capacity to allow you to get out and rejuvenate, while remaining dispersed.  But, be prepared, if the use restrictions are not followed, it could lead to the re-closing of our park facilities. 

Upon reopening the following use restrictions will be in place:

Douglas County Operated Day Use Parks:

  • Parking Fees will be in place.
  • Physical Distancing of 6 feet will be required at all times.
  • Wearing of masks is recommended.
  • No groups of users.  Individuals, couples or family units only.
  • Be Prepared.  Have your own soap, hand sanitizer or disinfectant wipes.
  • All pavilions, gazebos and playgrounds will remain closed.
  • All picnic tables and other park amenities will not be sanitized.
  • Restrooms will not be sanitized, except for the following*:
    • Ben Irving County Park (flush restrooms only)
    • Charles V. Stanton County Park
    • Chief Miwaleta County Park
    • Cooper Creek County Park (flush restroom only)
    • John P. Amacher County Park
    • Mildred Kanipe Memorial Park (flush restroom only)
    • Pass Creek County Park
    • River Forks County Park
    • Singleton County Park
    • Scottsburg County Park
    • Whistler’s Bend County Park (flush restrooms only)

*Sanitization will occur a minimum of (1) time per day.  All other restrooms will be cleaned on their regular schedule.

Douglas County Operated RV Parks:

  • Physical Distancing of 6 feet will be required at all times.
  • Wearing of masks is recommended.
  • Be Prepared.  Have your own soap, hand sanitizer or disinfectant wipes.
  • All picnic tables and other RV Park amenities will not be sanitized.
  • Self-contained RV units only.  No tents, etc. 
  • Group site will remain closed.
  • Cabins and Yurts will remain closed.
  • Restroom/Showers will be open from 8:00 am to 10:00 am & 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm only
  • RV Parks will be open only to Oregonians.

Reminder: A good portion of your safety relies on you, since any public facility is only as clean as the last person who touched it.  Please use all our facilities with caution and at your own risk.  And make sure you are following the physical distancing and limited use guidelines, so we can continue to keep our parks open.   

We have also opened up our park reservation lines, so patrons can start making future reservations. Call the Douglas County Parks Office and Reservation Line (541) 957-7001 for more information.

Attached Media Files: DC Parks , DC BOC
04-29-20 Reminder Third Trimester Taxes Due by May 15 - 04/29/20

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  - April 29, 2020

** Reminder **  Third Trimester Taxes Due by May 15

(Douglas County, Ore.)  The Douglas County Tax Collection Office would like to remind residents that the deadline for the third trimester payment for the 2019/2020 Property Tax year is fast approaching.  The third trimester payment must be received or postmarked no later than May 15, 2020, to avoid interest and penalties. At this time, the State of Oregon has not extended the property tax due dates, and the County does not have the authority to extend the due dates.  The Tax Office plans to mail statements starting today, April 29.

Douglas County Courthouse now open:

As a reminder the Douglas County Board of Commissioners officially reopened the Douglas County Courthouse.  The reopening at the Douglas County Courthouse incorporates very strict social distancing procedures for county employees, as well as for the visiting public.  Your Commissioners continue to urge citizens to follow the Governor’s Executive Orders to ‘Stay Home, Save Lives.’  

We are asking that the visiting public:

  • Only visit the courthouse if necessary and stay home if you are sick
  • Continue to utilize our online, email and phone systems first
  • Follow posted guidelines for entering offices and standing in lines
  • Maintain at least 6-feet physical distance, wash your hands, wear a mask and use hand-sanitizer
  • Masks and hand sanitizer will be available upon request

Payments can be made in person at:

Douglas County Tax Collection Office located in Room 205, at the Douglas County Courthouse, 1036 SE Douglas Avenue, Roseburg, Oregon.  There is also a “Tax Drop Box” located in the hall-way outside the Douglas County Tax Collection Office.  And a tax payment drop box is located outside at the bottom of the Courthouse steps.

Payments can be made via U.S. Mail:

You can mail your tax payment using the provided payment envelope and appropriate postage.  Please note that due to recent changes with the US Postal Service, mail is often transported out-of-town for processing and postmark.  Be sure to mail your tax payment early or take your payment envelope into the Post Office to receive an official “hand stamped local postmark”, to avoid late penalties.

Payments can be made online at:  

Payments can be made on-line at www.co.douglas.or.us using a credit/debit card or e-check. If payment is made using the online method, there will be a 2.49% transaction fee for credit cards, a $3.95 transaction fee for debit cards and a $3.00 transaction fee for e-checks.  There is a public computer with internet access, located in the Douglas County Tax Collection Office lobby, allowing tax payers to make their online payment.

Coastal residents, please note:

Due to changes in their corporate guidelines, the Reedsport Branch of Umpqua Bank is no longer accepting property tax payments from Douglas County residents.  Property tax payments for all county residents will need to be made in-person at the Douglas County Tax Collection Office, by mail or online.  

The Douglas County Tax Collection Office hours are 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday thru Friday.  For more information, please contact the Douglas County Tax Collection Office at (541) 440-4253 or email tax@co.douglas.or.us.  Further, some inquiries may be answered by visiting the Tax Office website at http://www.co.douglas.or.us/finance/Tax_Collection.asp.

The Douglas County Tax Collection Office is located in Room 205 of the Douglas County Courthouse, 1036 SE Douglas Avenue, Roseburg, Oregon 97470.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - April 28, 2020 (Photo) - 04/28/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 28, 2020

(Douglas County, Ore.)  The Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, your Douglas County Commissioners and our local health professionals want to remind you that it is important to not delay needed health care and doctor visits.  While many of us are worried about the COVID-19 crisis, other medical conditions such as appendicitis and heart attacks still happen, and they can be deadly if not treated appropriately.  If you have a serious health condition, do not hesitate to seek care at a hospital or urgent care.

  • Emergency care can and should still be sought – this includes, but is not limited to, possible strokes, heart attacks, bleeding that won’t stop, broken bones, etc.
  • If you have an emergency, do not hesitate to dial 9-1-1 for an ambulance response.
  • If you have medical concerns or questions, do not ignore them, contact your healthcare provider. If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact an urgent care clinic or hospital.
  • Some routine services such as preventive screening procedures were delayed. Call to see about rescheduling now that some elective procedures can resume. 
  • Some routine services can be provided by telehealth, so long as this type of visit is offered by your health care provider. Ask your health care provider about your appointments and if the telehealth option is available.

Please don’t delay needed care, doctor visits etc.  Soon our hospitals and clinics will start to schedule and perform some previously scheduled procedures.  Our local hospitals, as well as medical clinics and urgent care clinics have instituted additional safety and screening procedures to make access to needed care as safe and convenient as possible for people during this pandemic. 

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, April 28, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  For the twelfth day in a row, the total number of positives in Douglas County remains at twenty-three*.  Of the twenty-three, fifteen have recovered.  There have been zero deaths and 983 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Two of the twenty-three people that have tested positive are still hospitalized in different hospitals.  Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. Fifteen of the individuals who tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Get Tested

There is a drive through clinic today, Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in Roseburg.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

Given the growing availability of commercial labs and the improving availability of testing supplies and PPE DPHN has revised their guidelines to providers on testing. DPHN has sent out communications to the local health care community alerting them of the increased availability of testing for their patients.  DPHN also announced Wednesday that Quest labs is now offering the IgG antibody test for COVID-19 locally. Both tests must be ordered by a health care provider and currently, testing without a provider order is not yet available.  

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 370 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

DCCRT Partner Spotlight: Mercy Medical Center

Mercy Medical Center has been at the core of Douglas County’s COVID-19 response from the beginning, with Mercy officials and partners working hard to ensure the hospital is prepared to manage a surge of coronavirus patients, should that need arise.  The hospital has set up a 36-bed COVID-19 unit, but has not yet used it, it as the number of local patients requiring hospitalization has remained very low. Collaborating with Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Commissioners and other partners through the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT) has enabled Mercy to keep the community informed while focusing on its core mission of providing high-quality care to its patients. Mercy representation on the DCCRT includes CEO Kelly Morgan and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jason Gray. Even before joining DCCRT, Mercy began having internal meetings about COVID-19 in early February.

At the time, there were projections that Mercy would need up to 150 medical beds and 38 critical care beds, so the hospital began working to set up its COVID unit.  Early on in the COVID-19 crisis, Mercy also started screening all hospital visitors. The number of visitors per patient was restricted, and later no visitors were allowed at all, with few exceptions. Staff are also screened on a daily basis, and the hospital has implemented a universal masking policy, following CDC recommendations.   There was a big need for personal protective equipment (PPE), which is in short supply nationwide. With already-established strong community ties, Mercy Foundation launched an extensive outreach campaign seeking donations of masks, gloves, gowns and other equipment – and people stepped up in a big way, from individuals to businesses and government agencies.

“Our community has just been amazingly responsive in the way it always is here,” Mercy Communications Director Kathleen Nickel said. “People in Douglas County are so supportive and generous.”  

Mercy has also worked with locally companies to create a local supply chain of reusable PPE. For instance, Oregon Serigraphics and their team of “Sewing Warriors” have made thousands of homemade masks; FCC Commercial Furniture has sourced specialized fabric and is cutting fabric for 500 reusable gowns; and 15 local seamstresses and tailors have stepped up to sew the gowns. Additionally, the Roseburg VA has begun sanitizing Mercy’s N95 masks using an ultraviolet-light disinfecting process, allowing each mask to be used up to four times, which expands the PPE supply.  With the Governor lifting restrictions on non-urgent medical procedures and elective surgeries starting this Friday, Mercy is planning to gradually resume procedures and surgeries, making sure the hospital maintains an adequate PPE supply and the capacity to care for any additional COVID-19 patients.  “Through a partnership with the Cow Creek Tribe and with Providence, we can prescreen everyone who is set for surgery to ensure that they have a negative COVID test prior to surgery,” Nickel said.

This isn’t Mercy’s first pandemic; the Sisters of Mercy opened the hospital in 1909, nearly a decade before the Spanish Flu hit. Mercy was Roseburg’s first hospital, located at the corner of Harvard Avenue and Madrone Street, with 25 beds. Mercy is one of two hospitals in the county with an Emergency Department; the other is Lower Umpqua Hospital in Reedsport.

Residents of Douglas County have helped ensure that the local health care system could handle a surge in COVID patients by following the Governor’s #stayhomesavelives efforts, and now it’s time to take care of themselves.  Nickel wants residents to be aware that Mercy has put in place a number of safeguards to ensure patient and staff safety, and that the organization is ready to serve our community’s health care needs.

“From our outpatient services, lab, imaging, heart center and therapy to the ED and inpatient care units, we want the community to know that we are safe and ready to care for them.  Patients who have had to delay needed care due to COVID, should speak with their health provider about rescheduling exams and surgeries.”

Douglas County Parks and RV Parks Will Reopen May 1

The Douglas County Board of Commissioners announced today that effective May 1, 2020, Douglas County operated Parks and RV Parks will reopen to the public on a limited basis.  Despite the reopening, they continue to encourage residents to stay home and follow the Governor’s Executive Order #20-12, ‘Stay Home, Save Lives.’  However, we do understand the role our outdoor recreational sites provide in keeping our residents mentally and physically healthy.  Our parks do have the capacity to allow you to get out and rejuvenate, while remaining dispersed.  But, be prepared, if the use restrictions are not followed, it could lead to the re-closing of our park facilities.  Click here for the complete story and limited use guidelines.   Reminder: A good portion of your safety relies on you, since any public facility is only as clean as the last person who touched it.  Please use all our facilities with caution and at your own risk.  And make sure you are following the physical distancing and limited use guidelines, so we can continue to keep our parks open.   

What Would Restaurants Reopening Look Like?

There was an Oregon Restaurant Sector sub-committee last week to assess what a Phase One reopening would look like for food service establishments.  As a result of that meeting, several draft public health recommendations were issued.  At this time, there is no clear timeline for a Phase One reopening, and the decision to reopen ultimately is in the hands of the Oregon Governor.  The state is still working on:

Gating criteria: Symptoms – declining numbers; cases – declining numbers and Hospital capacity –regular             procedures and adequate testing.

Plans around core state preparedness: robust testing and contact tracing; healthcare system capacity, including PPE and surge capacity and plans for health and safety.

We know that there is still a sense of uncertainty and fear amongst our workforce as we move forward. We are continuing to work on supporting the supply chain for PPE/face covering/gloves so workers can stay safe.

Stores Given OK to Decline Bottle Returns Through May 31

Many grocery stores have chosen to temporarily stop accepting bottle returns during the COVID-19 crisis to help protect the health and safety of their staff and customers. Stores have permission from the state to decline returns, and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) has just extended this permission until May 31. “The temporary period of non-enforcement began March 15, at a time when grocers and supermarkets were overwhelmed with an unprecedented volume of customers,” the OLCC said in a press release. The surge in shoppers sparked concern about stores having sufficient staffing and cleaning supplies to properly disinfect items and maintain appropriate social distancing. If your local store is not accepting beverage-container returns, local officials recommend keeping your containers until stores resume accepting them. Eligible beverage containers will still be worth 10 cents each when bottle drops reopen. The Roseburg BottleDrop Redemption Center at 740 NE Garden Valley Blvd. currently remains open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

How to Check the Status of your Stimulus Check

Many people have already had their federal Economic Impact Payments deposited into their bank accounts. These direct deposits have been made for eligible 2019 or 2018 federal tax return filers who received their past refunds through direct deposit.  If you didn’t receive a refund for 2019 or 2018 via direct deposit, you can visit the IRS’s “Get My Payment” page, which allows you to provide your banking information on your return so you can receive payments right away. You can also use this site to track the status of your payment. The first wave of paper checks has already been mailed.

For those who didn’t file a federal return in 2018 or 2019, you can visit the “Non-Filers” IRS site and get set up for direct deposit. This site also contains information on eligibility for stimulus payments.

More information on Economic Impact Payments is available on the IRS website.

Declining Social Invitations in the Time of COVID-19

Despite official guidance to stay at home to stop the spread of COVID-19, you may encounter a friend or family member who invites you to hang out in person. It can be awkward to decline such invites; we want our loved ones to know we care about them, but we also want to protect ourselves, our friends and the community at large. Don’t feel bad for saying “no”; you are doing the right thing by setting boundaries in order to protect others’ health and your own.  Here are some tips from Oregon Health Authority on how to say “no” to a social invitation:

  • “I believe it’s important to stay home and keep the virus from spreading.”
  • “In our household, we’re keeping a healthy distance from others to help reduce the spread of coronavirus.”
  • “I look forward to seeing you when we can all safely get together again.”
  • “We would love to visit with you online or over the phone.”

Daily Tips: Outreach Tuesday

Today is a good day to check on a friend or family member you think may be struggling or feeling isolated due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you have kids at home, or a busy household, you may be craving quiet time – but for others, the down time can be lonely. Give your loved one a call and see how they’re doing. Send them a text message, or email them a link to a funny video. Chat with them by video and get them to smile. Even small amounts of contact can brighten someone’s day. An added bonus: Focusing on making others feel good helps reduce your own stress!

Local Mask Efforts

If you would like a homemade mask please contact Douglas County Helpers via their Facebook page or email at s@gmail.com">douglascountyhelpers@gmail.com.The Umpqua Sewing Warriors is also making homemade masks and may reached on their Facebook page. The group The Timber Faller’s Daughter is working in Reedsport on this effort. You can also find them on Facebook. If you would like to make your own mask, the pattern that many organizations locally have been using can be found here.

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

4/29/2020         10:00 pm - 03:00 pm    Glendale High School, Glendale (Sponsored by Special People's Depot)

4/29/2020         10:30 am - 03:30 pm     South River Community Health Center, Winston

4/30/2020         9:00 am - 2:00 pm        North Bend High School, North Bend

5/01/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/01/2020         10:30 am - 04:00 pm     Sutherlin Community Center, Sutherlin

 

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.

DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_Logo_40320.jpg
Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Local Update - April 27, 2020 (Photo) - 04/27/20

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY LOCAL UPDATE

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 27, 2020

(Douglas County, Ore.)  The Douglas County Board of Commissioners officially reopened the Douglas County Courthouse today.  This is not to be confused with the letter sent to Oregon’s Governor last week from the five SW Oregon Counties requesting a Phase One Regional reopening. At this time, only County Government offices have been reopened.  The order to reopen Douglas County and the rest of Oregon can only come from the Oregon Governor.

The reopening at the Douglas County Courthouse incorporates very strict social distancing procedures for county employees, as well as for the visiting public.  Your Commissioners continue to urge citizens to follow the Governor’s Executive Orders to ‘Stay Home, Save Lives.’  Click here to read the Courthouse Reopening press release from April 25. For County Employees the following procedures have been put into place: daily temperature and cough screenings; minimize contact with public and fellow employees; maintain physical distancing measures, 6 feet apart; frequently hand washing and use hand sanitizer; staggered work, break and lunch schedules; wear masks when possible; stay home if you are sick; and perform frequent cleaning and disinfecting of touched surfaces.

As a reminder we ask that the visiting public: only visit the courthouse if necessary; stay home if you are sick; continue to use of our online, email and phone systems first; call the Department beforehand to schedule an appointment; departmental contact information is listed on the county’s website; follow posted guidelines for department and building use in regards to entering offices, standing in line, gathering and keeping your distance from others; maintain at least 6-feet physical distance, wash your hands, wear a mask and use hand-sanitizer; plexi-glass sneeze guards are being installed in departments that work with the public; and hand sanitizer and masks will be available for the public.  

Local COVID-19 Test Results

As of 12:00 pm, April 27, 2020, there are no new cases of COVID-19 in Douglas County.  For the eleventh day in a row, the total number of positives in Douglas County remains at twenty-three.* Of the twenty-three, fourteen have recovered.  There have been zero deaths and 920 negative tests for COVID-19 in the county. Two of the twenty-three people that have tested positive are still hospitalized in different hospitals.  Douglas Public Health Network continues their epidemiologic investigations, identifying individuals who may have had close contact with individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19 and advising quarantine. Fourteen of the individuals who tested positive earlier have now recovered. DPHN defines recovery as an end to all symptoms after a positive test for COVID-19.

Get Tested

The next drive through clinic will be held tomorrow, Tuesday, April 28, 2020, in Roseburg.  If you are having symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, shortness of breath, muscle aches and pains, diarrhea, sore throat or decreased sense of smell and taste, talk to your health care provider about being tested for COVID-19.

Given the growing availability of commercial labs and the improving availability of testing supplies and PPE DPHN has revised their guidelines to providers on testing. DPHN has sent out communications to the local health care community alerting them of the increased availability of testing for their patients.  DPHN also announced Wednesday that Quest labs is now offering the IgG antibody test for COVID-19 locally. Both tests must be ordered by a health care provider and currently, testing without a provider order is not yet available.  

The first drive thru testing site was piloted in the county on March 17, 2020, there have been 370 people tested in the drive through clinics alone, additional testing continues in hospitals, urgent cares and clinics simultaneously.  The drive through clinics are led by DPHN, in conjunction with partner agencies including; Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Douglas County Public Works, local volunteers and local health professionals.

Oregon COVID-19 Case Update

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  The Oregon Health Authority is also releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak within the state and the response across government agencies. Read more here about the daily situation status report.

Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer

Join us tonight, Monday, April 27, 2020 for the next virtual town hall Q&A with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, your Douglas County Public Health Officer at 6:00 pm, hosted by DPHN and found on the DPHN Facebook page.

Small Business Resource Navigator and Latest CARES Act Information

Although there is no allocation being sent to support Douglas County Government services, there are some direct services available to small businesses.  At the direction of the State, Business Oregon has established a Small Business Resource Navigator to assist with business questions and provide help accessing existing resources. They have staff available to respond to emails and calls Monday through Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm via the resource hotline at (833) 604-0880 or emailing iz.covid19@oregon.gov">biz.covid19@oregon.gov.   The newest CARES Act was passed by Congress last Thursday and signed by President Trump on Friday, March 24. According to the Small Business Association (SBA) they anticipate that, “Lenders will resume accepting Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan applications on Monday, April 27 at 10:30 am (EDT) from approved lenders on behalf of any eligible borrower. This will ensure that SBA has properly coded the system to account for changes made by the legislation.” If you are a business owner, or know of a business owner, or run a nonprofit, the time is now to apply for the PPP with a 7(a) Lender. These funds will be gone very quickly, so the sooner you are able to get things completed the better. If you need assistance with the PPP please reach out to the Small Business Resource Navigator listed above or contact a lender directly.  For the most up to date information relating to the second round of CARES funding, click here. You might also find some helpful advice in this article from USA Today

$32 Million State Funding Package Approved to Support Oregon’s COVID-19 Response

Although there is no allocation being sent to support Douglas County Government services, there are some direct services available to the public.  The Oregon Legislature’s Emergency Board has approved a $32 million funding package to support the state’s COVID-19 response. The assistance includes:

  • $12 million for rental assistance and motel vouchers for those who have lost income due to COVID-19 and those at risk of infection or health problems due to inadequate housing.
  • $5 million for small businesses. This amount, along with a matching $5 million from the Oregon Business Development Department, will create a $10 million assistance program for small businesses with up to 25 employees that have been impacted by COVID-19 and have not received support from the federal CARES Act.
  • $2 million for emergency housing for survivors of domestic and sexual violence.
  • $10 million to create a wage-replacement fund for newly unemployed workers who are unable to receive unemployment assistance due to their immigration status.
  • $3.35 million to help workers at long-term care facilities pay for COVID-19 testing, and provide caregiver training on infectious disease prevention.

COVID-19 Information for Those Experiencing Homelessness

Douglas Public Health Network has created an infographic flyer to distribute to those experiencing homelessness in Douglas County.  Please feel free to print, post and distribute widely.  Also, the HIV Alliance received funding to provide gift cards for hygiene products and food boxes for those who are unhoused or homeless.  These can be accessed by stopping by the HIV office located at 647 West Luellen Drive in Roseburg. 

Chit-Chat line set up for those in quarantine

Compass Behavioral Health is scheduling friendly chit-chat calls to help older adults in Douglas County who are feeling isolated as a result of COVID-19.  The virtual visits are available to free for older adults who are quarantined in Douglas County.  If you have access to an internet connection, a computer or a tablet with a working camera and microphone then a video chat can be provided.  For an appointment please call (541) 900-6020.  Reminder, this is not telehealth counseling. Residents who are in crisis should call 911 or if you have behavioral health needs call Compass Behavioral Health. 

Watching for Signs of Stress in Young Children

Children are perceptive, and may be experiencing anxiety related to the COVID-19 pandemic, even if they don’t express it in words. Here are some examples from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) of signs that your child may be experiencing stress:

Preschool-age children:      

  • Crying or screaming
  • Afraid to separate from parents or caregivers
  • Not eating, or losing weight
  • Having nightmares

Elementary school-age children:

  • Feeling guilt or shame
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Not sleeping well

The OHA recommends that parents and caregivers talk to children about current events in a way they can understand; be calm and reassuring; and encourage children to share their fears or concerns. The CDC has a page on how to help children cope. Parents can also visit the national Child Traumatic Stress Network’s website.

Daily Tips: Self-Care Monday

Journaling can help you process your thoughts, feelings and experiences during COVID-19. There’s something powerful about writing things down; sometimes, once a fear or concern is on paper in front of you, it doesn’t seem as overwhelming. Try taking a few minutes each day to jot down something you did or experienced that day. It can be something as simple as cooking a meal, a conversation you had with a family member, or a trip to the grocery store (although shopping can be a major event these days!). How did you feel about the event you wrote about? How do you feel overall? Afterward, read what you’ve written. Consider finishing each journal entry with a list of small things you’re grateful for – sunshine, fresh air, your cat – you name it. Focusing on the positive can help alleviate some stress.

As an added benefit, if you keep a journal you’ll have a record of your experiences during this historic time. Cornell University has launched a project called “Telling Our Stories in the Age of COVID-19” to collect journal entries from individuals who are willing to share their writing.

Make a Difference during Covid-19 – Tell us how you’re doing!
While you're at home, Blue Zones Project – Umpqua has something that will fill up only 5 minutes of your day and more importantly, help to make a meaningful difference in the lives of many. Blue Zones Project’s parent company, Sharecare, has developed a survey in partnership with Dr. Sandro Galea, Dean of the School of Public Health at Boston University, to understand our communities’ well-being and behavior change during the COVID-19 pandemic. The more data, the more accurate the insights, the better we can help #flattenthecurve. To-date, more than over 110k people completed our “Flatten the Curve” survey, representing all ages, and all 50 states.
Early insights include: 

  • Over 90% indicate they are worried about the novel coronavirus, including 47% indicating they are either “panicked” or “very worried”
  • 92% indicate they are physically distancing or socially isolating
  • 65% indicate they are worried about their retirement funds and the financial market overall
  • 35% indicate they likely will not be able to pay their bills
  • 22% indicate they are still going into work
  • 33% indicate they are sleeping more

Blue Zones Project is sharing this survey with our community as we believe that survey responses could allow our partners visibility into community sentiment and well-being needs that could inform strategic response plans to this crisis.  To take the survey, visit https://www.sharecare.com/covid19/survey. Upon completion, you will be shown a summary of your responses alongside real-time cumulative survey results to see how your behaviors and feelings compare to others across the nation. Thank you in advance for taking the time to help flatten the curve.

Give Blood and Help Your Community

Blood supplies are seriously low and leaving home to donate blood is considered a lifesaving need.  If you are healthy and feeling well, then giving blood is a safe and great way to help your community. The Red Cross has implemented sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while making a lifesaving donation. Anyone interested in donating must make an appointment by visiting www.redcrossblood.org or calling (800) 733-2767. 

4/28/2020         10:00 am - 03:30 pm     Roseburg YMCA of Douglas County (Sponsored by UCC)

4/29/2020         10:00 pm - 03:00 pm    Glendale High School, Glendale (Sponsored by Special People's Depot)

4/29/2020         10:30 am - 03:30 pm     South River Community Health Center, Winston

4/30/2020         9:00 am - 2:00 pm        North Bend High School, North Bend

5/01/2020         1:00 pm – 6:30 pm       Roseburg Blood Donation Ctr, 1176 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg

5/01/2020         10:30 am - 04:00 pm     Sutherlin Community Center, Sutherlin

Stay Informed with the Accurate Information

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer and the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information and a response to Douglas County residents. If you have questions about resources available, call the COVID-19 hotline, staffed by local volunteers at (541) 464-6550.  Stay up to date on COVID-19 in Douglas County on the DPHN website at www.douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Find additional information on state, federal and international COVID-19 response from the following websites: Oregon Health Authority, Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and by calling or logging onto 211Info.

*Local case data includes all tests done in the county, and are not exclusive to DPHN testing. Further, reporting numbers are accurate as of time listed on this release.  These numbers may not match other organizations, who report at different times of the day.