Oregon Historical Society
Emergency Messages as of 7:16 am, Fri. Feb. 27
No information currently posted; operating as usual.
News Releases
WWI “Aviation, Fly With the US Marines” Howard Chandler Christy poster. (1920) Very possibly, this Howard Chandler Christy illustration for Marine aviation is the rarest of WWI era posters, with only a few copies known. The staff of the Marine Corps Museu
WWI “Aviation, Fly With the US Marines” Howard Chandler Christy poster. (1920) Very possibly, this Howard Chandler Christy illustration for Marine aviation is the rarest of WWI era posters, with only a few copies known. The staff of the Marine Corps Museu
Oregon Historical Society Explores the "Art of War" in New Exhibit (Photo) - 02/25/15
Portland, OR - Guns, bombs, planes, tanks, ships, and submarines were the major weapons of World Wars I and II, but the persuasive powers of words and images were critically important in gaining and galvanizing the support of the American public. During both World Wars, the United States Government ran aggressive public relations campaigns, which highlighted what was at stake and how each citizen could play a role in achieving victory.

A selection of such posters from this era will be on display at the Oregon Historical Society in The Art of War: Propaganda Posters of World Wars I & II, on exhibit from February 28 through December 7, 2015. These posters, from the Mark Family Collection, provide a unique glimpse into an era before television and internet, when artists and marketers were challenged to communicate to the general public in a way that would simply and powerfully convey important messages.

To add context to these jarring graphics, OHS will host First and Second World War scholars Dr. Kimberly Jensen and Dr. Dan Tichenor at its next Second Sunday program on March 8. All are welcome to this free in-gallery discussion of the ways wartime propagandists employed ideas about gender, race, religion, and national unity to produce powerful images with impacts far beyond military recruitment and bond purchasing. Kimberly Jensen's publications include Mobilizing Minerva: American Women in the First World War and Dan Tichenor's publications include Dividing Lines: The Politics of Immigration Control in America and the forthcoming Presidential Prerogatives: Liberty, Security, and Wartime Leadership.

The Art of War precludes the Oregon Historical Society's much anticipated summer exhibition, World War II: A World at War, A State Transformed. Opening on June 26, this original 6,000 square foot exhibit will employ letters, historic documents, and military uniforms to provide a sense of place and give visitors a lens into the many events of World War II, including prominent battles and critical political decisions. The exhibit will also focus on those events that dramatically changed Oregon, including the operation of the Kaiser shipyards, the internment of Japanese Americans, and the fact that the only World War II combat casualties that occurred in the continental U.S. were in Oregon as a result of the balloon bomb.

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About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.
March_Poster.jpg
March_Poster.jpg
Next "Oregon History 101" Talk Highlights the Impact of Economic Change on Oregon's Natural Resources (Photo) - 02/23/15
Portland, OR - February 23, 2015 - The Oregon Encyclopedia (The OE) announces its next Oregon History 101 event, a nine-month public program series that kicked off in 2014. A partnership between the Oregon Historical Society and McMenamins, the series is designed to provide a basic understanding of the state's significant people, places, and events.

Class is back in session on Monday, March 2, and the lesson is "Economic Change: Ships to Silicon Chips," presented by Dr. Daniel Pope. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the lecture begins at 7 p.m. in the McMenamins Kennedy School Theater (5736 NE 33rd Avenue, Portland). The event is free and open to the public; early arrival is recommended for seating.

As the Second World War came to an end, Oregonians looked to the future with both hope and fear. They shared the nation's anxiety that peacetime would bring a return to Great Depression conditions; yet the taming of the Columbia River and the wartime boom gave hope that the state would achieve wide-ranging economic prosperity. There was a broad consensus that electricity, notably hydropower, would transform the Northwest and that Oregon's well-being depended largely on its exploitation of land and water resources through fisheries, agriculture, and, above all, forestry.

In this Oregon History 101 presentation, Dr. Pope will present how the relationship of Oregon's natural resources and economic change, specifically through energy production, has transformed Oregon in ways not anticipated at the end of WWII. The legacy of this development poses benefits for the residents of Oregon, but also long-term economic challenges that have not been resolved.

Dr. Daniel Pope is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Oregon where he specialized in United States business and economic history. Additional background reading is available online to complement this talk on The Oregon Encyclopedia, and historical records from the Oregon History Project are also available.

The Oregon History 101 series kicked off in September 2014, and covers a range of historical themes including early exploration, western expansion, race, gender, and social justice. Each presentation features images from the Oregon Historical Society archives and is filmed and posted to the Oregon Historical Society's YouTube page.

Past Oregon History 101 events that are available online include:

"It's Not Just Portland: Cities and Towns... and Steamboats and Railroads"
Presented by Dr. Carl Abbott, Emeritus Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University

"Looks Like a Good Beginning: Immigration, Ethnicity, and Exclusion in Oregon, 1850-1910"
Presented by Dr. Jacqueline Peterson-Loomis, Emeritus Professor of History, Washington State University

"How the Donation Land Act Created the State of Oregon and Influenced its History"
Presented by David Johnson, Professor of History, Portland State University

"A Century by Sea and Land: Explorers and Traders in Oregon Country, 1741-1850"
Presented by William Lang, Emeritus Professor of History, Portland State University and Gregory Shine, Chief Ranger and Historian, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

"Two Hundred Years of Change to Native Peoples of Western Oregon"
Presented by David Lewis, Ph.D., Principal Consultant, Ethnohistory Research, LLC



About the Oregon Historical Society & Oregon Encyclopedia
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

The Oregon Encyclopedia (www.oregonencyclopedia.org) is an online resource for information on the state's significant people, places, events, institutions, and biota. Over 1,200 entries have been published online and new entries are added every day. The OE is part of the Oregon Historical Society's Digital History Projects and is supported by its project partners, Portland State University and the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. The OE has received support from a collaborative of the state's five cultural partners--the Oregon Arts Council, Oregon Council for the Humanities, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the State Historic Preservation Office--with funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust. The Oregon Council of Teachers of English, the Oregon Heritage Commission, the Oregon University System, Willamette University, and private donors have provided additional support.
Attached Media Files: March_Poster.jpg
C.E.S._Wood.jpg
C.E.S._Wood.jpg
Oregon Encyclopedia Presents History Night on C.E.S. Wood at McMenamins Edgefield (Photo) - 02/17/15
Portland, OR - February 17, 2015 - The Oregon Encyclopedia (The OE) continues its monthly series of History Nights at McMenamins Edgefield in Troutdale. At each History Night, The OE looks back at the people and events that have shaped our communities.

The next history night, "C.E.S. Wood: Frontier Humanist," will be presented by filmmaker Laurence Cotton and poet Tim Barnes next Tuesday, February 24. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the lecture begin at 6:30 p.m. in the McMenamins Edgefield Ballroom (2126 SW Halsey Street). The event is free and open to the public; early arrival is recommended for seating.

Cotton and Barnes will share observations and insights into one of Oregon's most colorful and significant citizens, Charles Erskine Scott (C.E.S.) Wood (1852-1944). Soldier, attorney, poet, essayist, artist and art patron, public speaker and raconteur, philosophical anarchist, and cultural figure, C.E.S. Wood left a profound, enlightening, and controversial legacy on Portland, Oregon, and the West Coast. A friend of Chief Joseph, Clarence Darrow, Emma Goldman, and Mark Twain, Wood's romance with freedom made him a passionate defender of civil liberties and a leading progressive voice of early 20th century America.

The program will include a screening of the Oregon Experience film, C.E.S. Wood, of which Laurence Cotton is co-writer and co-producer. Oregon Experience is an Oregon Public Broadcasting production and is presented in partnership with the Oregon Historical Society.

Tim Barnes taught literature, composition, and creative writing at Portland Community College for twenty-five years. He is the author of several books of poetry, most recently Definitions for a Lost Language, and co-editor of Woodworks: The Life and Writings of Charles Erskine Scott Wood. Barnes is also the author of the entry on C.E.S. Wood available on the Oregon Encyclopedia.


About the Oregon Historical Society & Oregon Encyclopedia
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

The Oregon Encyclopedia (www.oregonencyclopedia.org) is an online resource for information on the state's significant people, places, events, institutions, and biota. Over 1,200 entries have been published online and new entries are added every day. The OE is part of the Oregon Historical Society's Digital History Projects and is supported by its project partners, Portland State University and the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. The OE has received support from a collaborative of the state's five cultural partners--the Oregon Arts Council, Oregon Council for the Humanities, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Historical Society, and the State Historic Preservation Office--with funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust. The Oregon Council of Teachers of English, the Oregon Heritage Commission, the Oregon University System, Willamette University, and private donors have provided additional support.
Attached Media Files: C.E.S._Wood.jpg
Statehood_Day_8.JPG
Statehood_Day_8.JPG
UPDATE: Secretary of State Kate Brown & former Governors Barbara Roberts and Ted Kulongoski Help Celebrate Oregon's Birthday (Photo) - 02/13/15
Portland, OR - Secretary of State Kate Brown and former Oregon Governors Barbara Roberts and Ted Kulongoski will participate in the annual Statehood Day celebration at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland) at noon on Saturday, February 14. Brown, Roberts, and Kulongoski will also be joined by Mrs. Antoinette Hatfield in helping to mark the 156th anniversary of Oregon's admission into the union as the 33rd state.

The Oregon Historical Society opens at 10 a.m. on Saturday and admission is free all day. Brown, Roberts, and Kulongoski will speak at the cake cutting ceremony beginning at noon. Birthday cake from Gerry Frank's Konditorei will be served to visitors while supplies last!

Other activities are planned throughout the day in partnership with the Oregon Black Pioneers. Learn about what life was like for blacks in Portland in the mid-twentieth century in guided tours of the A Community on the Move exhibition, led by members of the Oregon Black Pioneers between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Then, enjoy a performance by African American storyteller Chetter Galloway. A member of the National Storytelling Network, Galloway engages listeners through energetic, animated storytelling. Performances begin at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.

Can't make it to the museum this weekend? Celebrate your love of Oregon by brushing up on your state history - OHS has posted a section on the Oregon Encyclopedia all about the road to statehood: http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/oemonth/



About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.
Attached Media Files: Statehood_Day_8.JPG
Statehood_Day_3.JPG
Statehood_Day_3.JPG
Celebrate Oregon's Birthday with Cake & Free Admission to the Oregon Historical Society (Photo) - 02/09/15
Portland, OR - February 9, 2015 - Celebrate Oregon Statehood Day this Saturday, February 14, at the Oregon Historical Society. Take an exhibit tour, listen to a professional storyteller, and indulge in birthday cake during a special free day organized in partnership with the Oregon Black Pioneers.

Learn about what life was like for blacks in Portland in the mid-twentieth century in a guided tour of our newest exhibition, A Community on the Move. This interactive exhibit created by the Oregon Black Pioneers traces how the WWII shipyards, migration from the South, the Vanport flood, and urban renewal projects impacted Portland's black families and businesses. Tours will be led by members of the Oregon Black Pioneers from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Spend the afternoon enjoying performances with African American storyteller Chetter Galloway. A member of the National Storytelling Network, Galloway engages listeners through energetic, animated storytelling. Performances are 15 minutes long, and begin at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.

Don't forget to grab a slice of Oregon's birthday cake! We will be hosting a cake cutting ceremony at noon, featuring treats from the one and only Gerry Frank's Konditorei, served by former Governors Barbara Roberts and Ted Kulongoski!

Can't make it to the museum this weekend? Celebrate your love of Oregon by brushing up on your state history - OHS has posted a section on the Oregon Encyclopedia all about the road to statehood: http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/oemonth/



About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.
Attached Media Files: Statehood_Day_3.JPG
OHS digital image bd001402 - Oregon State Representative Margaret Carter leading the Black United Front's annual March Against Racist Violence, 4.4.92 - CREDIT JULIE KEEFE.jpg
OHS digital image bd001402 - Oregon State Representative Margaret Carter leading the Black United Front's annual March Against Racist Violence, 4.4.92 - CREDIT JULIE KEEFE.jpg
Oregon Historical Society Welcomes The Skanner Photograph Archive at Public Event with Bernie & Bobbie Foster (Photo) - 02/03/15
Portland, OR - The photograph archive of the largest African American newspaper in the Pacific Northwest, The Skanner, is now available for researchers to use at the Oregon Historical Society's Davies Family Research Library. A complete finding guide can be accessed through the Northwest Digital Archives database (https://nwda.orbiscascade.org/ark:/80444/xv36972/op=fstyle.aspx?t=k&q=the+skanner), showing the full breadth of this collection.

In honor of this occasion, the Oregon Historical Society will host The Skanner's publisher, Bernie Foster, and executive editor, Bobbie Dore Foster, for a public program as part of its Second Sunday series. OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk will lead a conversation and Q&A with the Fosters on Sunday, February 8 at 2 p.m. at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland). Admission is free & open to the public (regular museum admission required to view current exhibits).

The Oregon Historical Society is pleased to add The Skanner archive to its growing resources documenting Oregon's African American history. These include the archive of Portland's Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church and oral histories of residents of the Albina neighborhood. The Society recently acquired a rare photograph album with portraits of African American notables from the 1880s and 1890s.

The opening of the Skanner archive also coincides with the Society's newest exhibit, A Community on the Move, created by the Oregon Black Pioneers, which explores how the WWII shipyards, migration from the South, the Vanport flood, and urban renewal projects impacted Portland's black families and businesses.

Background on The Skanner & the Collection:

The Skanner began publication in 1975 and quickly became one of the strongest voices of Portland's African American communities. With the inauguration of its Seattle edition in 1990 its coverage expanded to encompass the entire region. The Skanner's long time publishers, Bobbie Dore Foster and Bernie Foster, have received numerous awards for their outstanding work in journalism.

Containing thousands of images, the archive provides an unusual visual record of African American life in the Pacific Northwest from the late 1970s to the 1990s. Subjects include civil rights and housing discrimination protests throughout the late 1970s and 1980s; efforts at community empowerment and political representation; educational initiatives; community groups and organizations; churches and religious issues; and the flourishing of African American culture in general.

Thanks to the generous support of the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, the collection has been professionally processed by archivists Jack Falk and Jeffrey Hayes, and over 1500 images have been digitized.

About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.