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The Magna Carta, U.S. Constitution, Declaration of Independence, & More: On View at the Oregon Historical Society (Photo) - 07/25/16

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MEDIA PREVIEW:
Please join us for an exclusive exhibit preview and tour with OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk on Thursday, July 28 at 11am. Email rachel.randles@ohs.org if you plan to attend.

PRESS PHOTOS:
Downloadable document photos and captions available via http://bit.ly/2arJaFN
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Portland, OR -- July 25, 2016 -- The Magna Carta. The Declaration of Independence. The U.S. Constitution & Bill of Rights. The Monroe Doctrine. These bedrock documents laid the foundational "blueprints" of American democracy--and, some of the earliest printings and engravings of these iconic pieces will be on view at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Ave., Portland) from July 29, 2016 through February 1, 2017 in the original exhibition Democracy's Blueprints: The Documents that Built America.

"In this election year there is no better time to see and study the documents that built and continue to guide our democracy," said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "With the exception of the National Archives in Washington, D.C., I don't think there is any museum in the country where you can see so many priceless historic printings and engravings at one place at one time."

One extraordinary standout of this exhibition, on loan from the Mark Family Collection, is the 1733 engraving of the Magna Carta. Written in 1215, the Magna Carta was the first document to limit the power of a monarch, and it is regarded as the cornerstone of Western democracy. When the only surviving original copy affixed with the Great Seal of King John was damaged by a fire in 1731, a new copy was commissioned. This illuminated hand-engraved copy includes the original Latin text surrounded by the Coats of Arms of the council of Twenty-Five Barons. Other notable artifacts on view include handwritten letters from George Washington and original engravings of the inaugural addresses of Presidents John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and John Quincy Adams.

While the words of these iconic documents have remained unchanged for centuries, citizens and politicians have continuously debated their meaning and application--challenging each other on issues such as the balance of power in the branches and the purviews of state and federal governments. Please join us as we discuss the relevance of these bedrock documents from our past and consider how they continue to guide and impact present-day politics.

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the recent renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

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Play Ball! The Original Rules of Baseball on Exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society July 1 -- October 9 (Photo) - 06/28/16

Portland, OR -- June 28, 2016 -- Documents that the Official Historian of Major League Baseball declared "the Magna Carta of America's national pastime" will be on exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland (1200 SW Park Avenue) beginning this Friday, July 1, through October 9, 2016. The exhibit will be the first public display of these nineteenth century papers, which only recently came to light at an auction in California.

The hand-written documents were drafted by Daniel "Doc" Adams and presented at an unprecedented special meeting of all New York area baseball clubs in 1857. The documents, entitled "Laws of Base Ball," conclusively set the game's rules, among which included establishing ninety-foot base paths, assigning nine players to a side, and fixing the duration of the game at nine innings. A full transcription of the documents is available upon request; please email rachel.randles@ohs.org for a copy.

*****MEDIA PREVIEW*****
Media are invited to an exclusive preview of the exhibit with OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk on Thursday, June 30 at 11am. Please email rachel.randles@ohs.org if you plan to attend.

Baseball fans will also want to mark their calendars for Tuesday, August 2, as OHS will host John Thorn, Official Historian of Major League Baseball, for a lecture on the history of America's favorite game. The lecture begins at 7pm at the First Congregational Church (1126 SW Park Avenue). Tickets are $25 and are available online at johnthorn.brownpapertickets.com.

John Thorn is the author of Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game and co-author of The Hidden Game of Baseball, which established alternative statistics later recognized and adopted as official by Major League Baseball. A sought-after consultant for exhibits and documentaries on America's game, Thorn also talks baseball with fans on his MLB blog, Our Game.

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. The museum and exhibit will also be open on Independence Day, Monday, July 4, from 10am -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the recent renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.