Oregon Historical Society
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Play Ball! The Original Rules of Baseball on Exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society July 1 -- October 9 (Photo) - 06/28/16

Portland, OR -- June 28, 2016 -- Documents that the Official Historian of Major League Baseball declared "the Magna Carta of America's national pastime" will be on exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland (1200 SW Park Avenue) beginning this Friday, July 1, through October 9, 2016. The exhibit will be the first public display of these nineteenth century papers, which only recently came to light at an auction in California.

The hand-written documents were drafted by Daniel "Doc" Adams and presented at an unprecedented special meeting of all New York area baseball clubs in 1857. The documents, entitled "Laws of Base Ball," conclusively set the game's rules, among which included establishing ninety-foot base paths, assigning nine players to a side, and fixing the duration of the game at nine innings. A full transcription of the documents is available upon request; please email rachel.randles@ohs.org for a copy.

*****MEDIA PREVIEW*****
Media are invited to an exclusive preview of the exhibit with OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk on Thursday, June 30 at 11am. Please email rachel.randles@ohs.org if you plan to attend.

Baseball fans will also want to mark their calendars for Tuesday, August 2, as OHS will host John Thorn, Official Historian of Major League Baseball, for a lecture on the history of America's favorite game. The lecture begins at 7pm at the First Congregational Church (1126 SW Park Avenue). Tickets are $25 and are available online at johnthorn.brownpapertickets.com.

John Thorn is the author of Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game and co-author of The Hidden Game of Baseball, which established alternative statistics later recognized and adopted as official by Major League Baseball. A sought-after consultant for exhibits and documentaries on America's game, Thorn also talks baseball with fans on his MLB blog, Our Game.

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. The museum and exhibit will also be open on Independence Day, Monday, July 4, from 10am -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the recent renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

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Travel Back in Time This Independence Day with a Ride on the Oregon Historical Society's Shay Locomotive (Photo) - 06/22/16

Portland, OR -- June 22, 2016 -- ALL ABOARD for an old-fashioned, all American 4th of July in Prineville, Oregon! This Independence Day, the Oregon Historical Society and the City of Prineville (COP) will run the Mt. Emily Shay #1 on a series of excursion trips beginning at 8am, with runs occurring every hour on the hour until the last train departs at 3pm. The Mt. Emily is a Shay steam locomotive built in 1923 which was designed to haul logs to the mill. It is one of only a handful of operable Shay locomotives left in the world, and it was donated to the Oregon Historical Society collection in the 1950s and has been lovingly cared for by the COP.

Boarding will be at the COP Team Track located at 1521 NW Lamonta Road. These historic rides are FREE and open to the public and each run can accommodate 90-100 people. Following your train ride through Prineville, you and your family are welcome to join the 4th of July festivities taking place throughout town. Visit http://www.mountemilyshay.com to learn more about Mt. Emily and her history.

Directions to the COP Team Track: Enter Prineville from HWY 126 Eastbound, and then turn left at the first light onto Harwood Street. Go North from Harwood to Lamonta Road, then turn left and continue ?1/4 mile. The Team Track will be on your left.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

Attached Media Files: MountEmily#12006.25.jpg
Chas. Jacobs and Paul Egger, Baseball School, April 1946, Oregon Historical Society Library, OrHi 99077
Chas. Jacobs and Paul Egger, Baseball School, April 1946, Oregon Historical Society Library, OrHi 99077
Oregon Historical Society to Host First Public Exhibit of "The Magna Carta of Baseball" (Photo) - 06/01/16

Portland, OR -- Documents that the official historian of Major League Baseball declared "the Magna Carta of America's national pastime" will be on exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland (1200 SW Park Avenue) from July 1 -- October 9, 2016. The exhibit will be the first public display of these 1857 papers, which only recently came to light at an auction in California. More, the content of the documents thoroughly change the early history of baseball by naming Daniel "Doc" Adams the proper father of the modern game, not the often mis-credited Abner Doubleday.

The hand-written documents were drafted by Adams for presentation to an unprecedented special meeting of all New York area baseball clubs in 1857, and include his notations of the meeting's proceedings. Up until this meeting, games were played under a variety of rules, including teams that ranged from eight to eleven players, games that ended when a team scored twenty-one runs, and no set base path distances. Among other rules, the document entitled "Laws of Base Ball" established the base paths at ninety feet, conclusively set the number of men to a side at nine, and fixed the duration of the game at nine innings.

"Few states are more passionate about sports than Oregon," said Kerry Tymchuk, Executive Director of the Oregon Historical Society. "Baseball has been part of Oregon's history since the early days of statehood. In fact, the Pioneer Baseball Club of East Portland--the first organized baseball team in the Pacific Northwest--was founded on May 28, 1866, 150 years ago last week. We are honored that an anonymous friend of the Oregon Historical Society has chosen us to host the first public exhibition of these priceless documents, and we invite baseball fans from across the country to make a road trip to Portland this summer."

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. The museum and exhibit will also be open on Independence Day, Monday, July 4, from 10am -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and, thanks to the recent renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy, Multnomah County residents also receive free admission every day.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.