Oregon City Police Dept.
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News Releases
Oregon City Police Participating in Safety Belt Blitz - 08/21/15
Oregon City, Oregon (August 21, 2015, 2:00 pm): The Oregon City Police Department along with several Oregon sheriff's offices, local police departments and OSP are participating in the OREGON SAFETY BELT OVERTIME CAMPAIGN BLITZ. The Blitz starts August 24, 2015 and continues through September 6, 2015. The Oregon City Police Department wants to remind you to "BUCKLE UP" before operating your vehicle.


The following information is provided by O.D.O.T. and the US Department of Transportation.

OSP, sheriffs and local police will be working to increase proper safety belt and child car seat use during a statewide traffic enforcement "blitz" from August 24 through September 6. Officers will also be on the alert for persons exceeding the posted speed limit or violating the "hands-free" cellphone law. This enhanced enforcement is paid from dedicated funding through USDOT's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Statewide observation surveys in 2015 found 98% percent of Oregon travelers use safety belts or child car seats. Not surprisingly, belt use was lower among persons killed in crashes --- 75% among all crash fatalities and only 50% among persons killed in night time crashes, according to ODOT reports.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children ages one through twelve years old. Child car seats increase crash survival by 71 percent for infants under 1 year old and by up to 59 percent for toddlers aged 1 to 4. Booster seats reduce the chance of nonfatal injury among four to eight year olds by 45 percent compared to safety belts used alone.

Safety belts reduce the chance of fatal injury to adults by 45 to 65 percent.

Properly using safety belts and child restraints holds a person safely in place and inside the car to prevent injury from occurring during sudden stops, swerves or a crash. Without a safety belt or child car seat, occupants can be thrown against each other, the interior of the car or completely out of the vehicle which greatly increases chances of serious injury.

Oregon law requires children less than forty pounds be restrained in a child seat. Children under one year or weighing less than twenty pounds must be restrained in a rear-facing child seat. A child over forty pounds must be restrained in either a child seat or a booster seat appropriate for their size until they reach age eight or 4' 9" tall AND the adult belt system fits them correctly.

For help with child seats, refer to the seat manufacturer's instructions, vehicle owner's manual, or your local child seat fitting station. A list of fitting stations can be found at: http://www.nhtsa.gov/apps/cps/index.htm or at http://oregonimpact.org/car-seat-resources/
Kerry_Davis_photo.jpg
Kerry_Davis_photo.jpg
Little League VP Arrested in Oregon City (Photo) - 08/07/15
Oregon City, Oregon (August 7, 2015, 8:30 am): 33 year old Kerry Edward Davis from Happy Valley was arrested for Theft I yesterday after he was charged with stealing several high end baseball fielding gloves from Oregon City Sporting Goods.

On August 5, 2015 Oregon City Sporting Goods called police to report a theft from their store which occurred the previous day, August 4th around 3:22 pm. Oregon City Police responded and found the theft was captured on the store's video surveillance. Oregon City Sporting Good's reported a man had entered their store and stole three high end Wilson baseball fielding gloves valued at over $1000. The store reported they were able to identify the suspect in the theft from a credit card he used after the theft was committed. The suspect was identified as 33 year old Kerry Edward Davis. Oregon City Sporting Goods reported they found out Mr. Davis was a Vice President for Clackamas Little League.

Oregon City Police continued the investigation and Mr. Davis turned himself into police at the Oregon City Police Department on August 6, 2015. Kerry Edward Davis was lodged at the Clackamas County Jail on one count of Theft I with a bail set at $15,000.
Attached Media Files: Kerry_Davis_photo.jpg
Oregon City Police Targeting Distracted Drivers - 08/06/15
Oregon City, Oregon (August 6, 2015, 1:30 pm): The Oregon City Police Department will be conducting distracted driving enforcement in various locations throughout the city on Monday, August 31, 2015, between 11:00am and 3:00pm. Distracted Driving has quickly become one of the biggest key factors in crashes across the United States, according to NHTSA, including teen driver deaths. In Oregon, a driver may not use their cell phone to make calls, send text messages or use any other feature while it's being manipulated by their hands and while they are in control of a vehicle. Adult drivers may use hands free accessories as long as they are not using their hands. Drivers under the age of 18 may not use a phone at all, including hands free devices. The first conviction of using a cell phone while driving is a Class D Violation and carries a $160 fine. A second conviction is an enhanced violation and could carry a fine of $500.

This grant is provided by Clackamas County Safe Communities.