Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept.
Emergency Messages as of 9:44 pm, Sun. May. 20
No information currently posted. Operating as usual.
Subscribe to receive FlashAlert messages from Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. Please use any browser other than Internet Explorer.
Primary email address for a new account:

Emergency Alerts News Releases  


Manage my existing Subscription

News Releases
Oregon Heritage Commission to meet June 4 - 05/18/18

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via teleconference at 1 p.m. on June 4. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Museum Grants and other heritage topics.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org

Portland Midsummer Festival Designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition - 05/17/18

The Portland Midsummer Festival marks its upcoming 90th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission.

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana, and University of Oregon’s Mother’s Day Powwow.

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the state,” said Todd Kepple, the commission’s chair. “We are particularly pleased to honor a tradition that has existed for 90 years.” 

The Portland Midsummer Festival began in 1928 by the League of Swedish Societies to celebrate the summer solstice and the traditions of Portland’s immigrants from Nordic countries. During WWII gasoline rationing caused the festival to locate at Oaks Park where attendees could access the event by Portland Street car. Today, the event remains at Oaks Park Amusement Park and is coordinated by Nordic Northwest and a committee of participating Scandinavian organizations.

Over 2,500 people attend the one-day festival annually. Participants are greeted by the Oregon Lucia Court. Activities include raising the Midsummer Pole, floral wreath making, lawn games, a kids craft area, traditional costume, folk music and dancing, and educational opportunities. Attendees can wander through booth of Scandinavian organizations selling locally prepared Nordic foods, crafts, clothing, and household goods. Everyone is invited to participate in traditional dances.

Elsie Lovgren Norby, a long-time attendee of the festival notes, "It was and still is about family, friends and the traditions brought here from Sweden.  I now enjoy seeing the younger generations participating in their heritage as I have done and knowing it will continue on." Elsie was crowned Midsummer Queen in 1941, helped organize the Midsummer Festival in the 80s, received the Scandinavian of the Year award in 2001.

The Portland Midsummer Festival will be held June 9, 2018. More information can be found at: https://www.nordicnorthwest.org/midsummer-festival

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/pages/oht.aspx .

Wallowa Lake State Park
Wallowa Lake State Park
Celebrate State Parks Day June 2 with free camping, day-use and special events (Photo) - 05/16/18

Free camping, free parking and special events highlight State Parks Day Saturday June 2.

More than a dozen state parks are holding free events that day, and camping is free at all tent, RV and horse campsites. Day-use parking will be free June 2 and 3 at the 26 parks that charge a day-use fee.

Fishing is also free June 2 and 3, courtesy of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Several free fishing events will be held that weekend by ODFW and partners. Find out more at https://myodfw.com/articles/2018-free-fishing-days-and-events .

“State Parks Day is our way of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks,” said Lisa Sumption, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director. “We invite people to discover a new park or revisit an old favorite.” 

State Parks Day is organized by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and has been held annually since 1997. This year, OPRD partnered with Oregon Lottery to sponsor events at Milo McIver State Park, The Cove Palisades State Park and Wallowa Lake State Park.

Eighteen state parks will host free events Saturday June 2:

WILLAMETTE VALLEY
—Champoeg State Heritage Area
—Silver Falls State Park
—State Capitol State Park
—Willamette Mission State Park

COAST
—Fort Stevens State Park
—Humbug Mountain State Park
—Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park

CASCADE RANGE AND CENTRAL OREGON
—Detroit Lake State Recreation Area
—LaPine State Park
—Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint
—The Cove Palisades State Park

PORTLAND AND COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE
—Crown Point State Scenic Corridor
—Milo McIver State Park
—Tryon Creek State Natural Area

SOUTHERN AND EASTERN OREGON
—Goose Lake State Recreation Area
—Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area
—OC&E Woods Line State Trail
—Wallowa Lake State Park

Events include barbecue picnics, a family safety fair, outdoor concerts, ranger-led hikes and more. Full details about events at each park can be found here: https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_featureArticle&articleId=229

To guarantee a campsite for State Parks Day, reserve online at oregonstateparks.org or call (800) 452-5687 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday.  While campsite rental is free, an $8 non-refundable transaction fee is required at the time of the reservation. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance of your stay. Approximately half of state park campgrounds accept reservations.

Heritage tourism workshop slated for Newberg - 05/15/18

A half-day workshop custom-designed to help area organizations and businesses succeed in heritage tourism will take place June 14 in Newberg.

The workshop will give you information, examples, working tools, new contacts and networking opportunities to strengthen your own attraction as a draw and build collaborations that create uniquely satisfying visitor experiences. The workshop is titled “Succeeding with Heritage Tourism: Market Information, Resources and Ideas for Attracting More Visitors through Creative Collaboration.”

According to past participant and Oregon Heritage Commissioner, Sarah LeCompte, heritage tourism workshops held in eastern Oregon in spring of 2016 paved the way for a stellar year of visitation, with many heritage and cultural sites reporting visitation increases up to 15-20%.

“Looking for opportunities to collaborate and cross market to build new audiences, they learned about the need to start connecting heritage attractions with other activities that might not seem compatible at first glance. Museum and brew pub? Historic sites and street fairs and bicycle rentals? Art gallery to museum to fishing spot?” notes LeCompte, “It’s easy to get focused on promoting our own area of interest, and forgetting that most humans generally have more than one favorite past-time, and want a travel and vacation experience to match their unique set of interests.”

The workshop will run from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thursday, June 14 at Chehalem Cultural Center in Museum, 415 E Sheridan St. in Newberg.

The workshop is free, but registration is required. Register online at www.oregonheritage.org.

For more information, contact Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.dehn@oregon.gov">beth.dehn@oregon.gov.

The workshop is sponsored by the Oregon Heritage Commission, part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department using statewide partner funds provided by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Heritage tourism workshop slated for Klamath Falls - 05/15/18

A half-day workshop custom-designed to help Southern Oregon area organizations and businesses succeed in heritage tourism will take place June 12 in Klamath Falls.

The workshop will give you information, examples, working tools, new contacts and networking opportunities to strengthen your own attraction as a draw and build collaborations that create uniquely satisfying visitor experiences. The workshop is titled “Succeeding with Heritage Tourism: Market Information, Resources and Ideas for Attracting More Visitors through Creative Collaboration.”

According to past participant and Oregon Heritage Commissioner, Sarah LeCompte, heritage tourism workshops held in eastern Oregon in spring of 2016 paved the way for a stellar year of visitation, with many heritage and cultural sites reporting visitation increases up to 15-20%.

“Looking for opportunities to collaborate and cross market to build new audiences, they learned about the need to start connecting heritage attractions with other activities that might not seem compatible at first glance. Museum and brew pub? Historic sites and street fairs and bicycle rentals? Art gallery to museum to fishing spot?” notes LeCompte, “It’s easy to get focused on promoting our own area of interest, and forgetting that most humans generally have more than one favorite past-time, and want a travel and vacation experience to match their unique set of interests.”

The workshop will run from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Tuesday June 12 at Klamath County Museum, 1451 Main Street in Klamath Falls.

The workshop is free, but registration is required. Register online at www.oregonheritage.org.

For more information, contact Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.dehn@oregon.gov">beth.dehn@oregon.gov.

The workshop is sponsored by the Oregon Heritage Commission, part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department using statewide partner funds provided by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Salmonberry Trail meeting set for June 1 in Banks - 05/15/18

BANKS, Ore. - Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. June 1 to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor. The meeting will be held in the Banks Fire District #13, 13430 NW Main St., Banks. The public is invited to attend.

The meeting agenda: an update on fundraising efforts; updates on Valley Segment planning; establishing a review process for right of way use agreements; and assessing a fiber optic lease renewal.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 84-mile corridor connecting eight cities and two counties. The proposed route follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and terminates in Banks.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov. Individuals needing special accommodations to attend should contact Dennis Wiley at least three days in advance.

Milo McIver State Park celebrates 50 years June 9 with a ceremony and free outdoor concert - 05/11/18

ESTACADA, Ore — Milo McIver State Park will host guest speakers, a historical photo display and an outdoor concert on June 9 in celebration of its 50-year anniversary as a state park. The festivities begin with a ceremony at 5:30 pm at the Milo McIver Memorial Viewpoint, the same spot where Governor Tom McCall and a host of dignitaries gathered June 7, 1968 to dedicate the park.

The event will include refreshments and an unveiling of the newly remodeled viewpoint. Guest speakers will include OPRD’s Deputy Director MG Devereux and Malcolm McIver, son of the park’s namesake. Historic photos documenting the park’s evolution will be on display.

A free outdoor concert will follow at 7:30 pm featuring Bend-based classical pianist Hunter Noack. The concert will kick off Noack’s summer concert series, titled In a Landscape: Classical Music in the Wild. For the annual concert series, Noack wheels his grand piano to beautiful outdoor spaces throughout the Northwest. Information at www.inalandscape.org. Concert-goers are encouraged to bring their own chairs or blankets.

Parking costs $5 for the day; parking permits are available onsite. For more information visit oregonstateparks.org or call 503-630-7150.

Public welcome to comment on federal preservation grant awards - 05/10/18

Several cities and one county have received grants through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation projects.

 

Brownsville, Linn County

Moyer House, 204 Main Street

$3,500 grant funds

To install replica wall paper in the Ladies Parlor of the Moyer House.

 

Jacksonville, Jackson County

Historic Jackson County Court House, 206 N 5th Street

$7,500 grant funds

To install an ADA ramp at the former Jackson County Court House.

 

Baker City, Baker County

Baker City Hall, 1655 1st Street

$8,000 grant funds

To remove two aluminum windows and replace them with double hung wood windows.

 

Benton County 

Independent School Building

31615 Fern

To replace a portion of the roof.

 

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit www.oregonheritage.org and follow the federal grant public comment page link or contact Jessica Gabriel at riel@oregon.gov">Jessica.Gabriel@oregon.gov or 503-986-0677.

 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

Committee to review historic cemetery grant applications - 05/10/18

On May 25 2018, the Oregon Historic Cemetery Grant committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Oregon Historic Cemetery Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries for final review and approval on June 8, 2018. The meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, room 124B at 9:00 a.m. Interested parties may also call into to listen at (631) 992-3221, access code 688-811-027.

 

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .

Saddle Mountain State Natural Area open May 11-13 - 05/09/18

Saddle Mountain State Natural Area will be open from 3 p.m., May 11  through dusk, May 13 so visitors can enjoy the park during expected sunny and warm weather. The road leading into the park was closed the last few weeks during hazard tree removal and asphalt patching. After this weekend, the road will remain closed through May 18 so maintenance work can be completed.

Recreational Trails Program Advisory Committee meets May 10 in Grants Pass - 05/09/18

GRANTS PASS, Ore. - The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee will meet 8-11:30 a.m. May 10 in the Oak Room 1 at the Lodge at Riverside, 955 SE Seventh St., Grants Pass. The public is invited to attend.

On the agenda: welcoming a new committee member; review of proposed committee bylaws; an update on the 2018 RTP grant cycle; overview of RTP scoring criteria; an update on the 2018 Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP); and preparation for the annual grant meeting scheduled for October 16-18, 2018. View the full agenda here.

The RTP Advisory Committee provides recommendations to Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) on RTP grants. Grants are awarded annually.

RTP is a federal aid assistance program of the United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. RTP grants provide, expand and improve recreational trails in Oregon.

For more information about the meeting or RTP, contact Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP Grant Coordinator, at 503-986-0716, or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">Jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov. Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Jodi Bellefeuille at least three days in advance.

Dallas Downtown Association Board receiving certificate from Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator.
Dallas Downtown Association Board receiving certificate from Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator.
Oregon Main Street Welcomes New Transforming Downtown Level Community (Photo) - 05/09/18

Salem — Oregon Main Street has accepted the Dallas Downtown Association at the Transforming Downtown level of Oregon Main Street. Communities participating at this level have a high degree of commitment to using the Main Street Approach® as a model for their downtown revitalization effort.

The Main Street Approach® is a comprehensive downtown revitalization program that uses historic preservation as one of its most important tools. It is a practical program that helps a community build on their district’s unique assets.

“The Dallas Downtown Association is excited to move into the Transforming Downtown Level of Oregon Main Street,” said Norah Owings, Program Manager, Dallas Downtown Association. “Although we are a young organization, we have already cemented our place in the community with fun events such as our Downtown Murder Mystery, Holiday Bazaar, and Art & Wine Walk. By becoming a Transforming Downtown Main Street, we will have the opportunity to expand our programs and events to make Downtown Dallas a destination.”

Over the past few years, Oregon Main Street has seen an increased interest in building a comprehensive downtown revitalization effort using the Main Street model and a renewed awareness of the link between local heritage and sustainable economic development across the state. Between 2010 and 2017, communities participating at the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the two highest levels in the OMS Network – saw an increase of 647 net new businesses, 3,367 net new jobs, and 1,258 private sector building improvement projects representing $97.2 million of private sector reinvestment.

“We are pleased to welcome the Dallas Downtown Association at the Transforming Downtown level of the Oregon Main Street Network,” stated Sheri Stuart, Coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We have been working with them to build their organizational capacity for a few years at the Exploring Downtown level. They have a dedicated core of volunteers working to revitalize downtown Dallas. We are especially happy with their efforts to build partnerships with the City of Dallas and community organizations.” 

Communities participating at the Transforming Downtown level must have a cohesive core of historic or older commercial and mixed-use buildings that represent the community’s architectural heritage and may include compatible in-fill. They must also have a sufficient mass of businesses, buildings, and density to be effective, as well as be a compact and pedestrian-oriented district.

The primary emphasis of the Transforming Downtown level is to provide technical assistance to program’s in their formative years.  Acceptance into this level allows communities to participate in training, community assessments, technical assistance, the Oregon Main Street network, and receive local capacity building support. There isn’t a fee to participate in the Oregon Main Street network.

The selection process included submitting an application that describes their community, downtown area, historical identity, goals, readiness, support, and funding commitments. 

Currently, there are 82 communities in Oregon participating in one of the four levels of the Oregon Main Street Network: Performing Main Street, Transforming Downtown, Exploring Main Street, and Associate.  While not a pre-requisite for acceptance at the Transforming Downtown level, the Dallas Downtown Association was already participating in the Oregon Main Street Network at the Exploring Downtown level.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs in Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, and is a designated coordinating program member of the National Main Street Center. Oregon Main Street provides assistance to all communities whether they are just beginning to explore options for their downtown or are seeking recognition as an accredited Main Street® town.

Committee to review museum grant applications - 05/09/18

On May 23 2018, the Oregon Museum Grant committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Oregon Museum Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Heritage Commission for final review and approval on June 4, 2017. The meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, room 124A. at 9:00 a.m. Interested parties may also call into to listen at1 (415) 655-0052 Access Code: 867-743-511.

 

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Harrison Cemetery (Corrected) - 05/08/18

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 12!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities.

 

There are over a dozen sites in as many counties to choose from. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org/Oregon-historic-cemetery-cleanups or call 503-844-9571.

 

The Harrison Cemetery in Cornelius was established in 1856 and it includes the burials of many of the earliest emigrants to the area. Though part of the statewide cleanup with SOLVE, the Harrison Cemetery event will be May 26.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize this statewide day of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

###

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Rock Point Cemetery (CORRECTED) - 05/08/18

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 12!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities.

 

There are over a dozen sites in as many counties to choose from. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org/Oregon-historic-cemetery-cleanups or call 503-844-9571.

 

The earliest burial in Rock Point Cemetery in Gold Hill was in 1863 and it includes the burials of many of the earliest emigrants to the area. Though part of the statewide cleanup with SOLVE, the Rock Point Cemetery event will be May 19.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize this statewide day of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

###

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Zion Memorial Park in Canby - 05/08/18

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 12!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities.

 

There are over a dozen sites in as many counties to choose from. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org/Oregon-historic-cemetery-cleanups or call 503-844-9571.

 

Zion Memorial Park in Canby was established in 1897. The first burial was Christain Wintermatel, who had proposed the cemetery. This cemetery is still in need of volunteers on May 12.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize this statewide day of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

###

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Nehalem American Legion Cemetery - 05/08/18

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 12!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities.

 

There are over a dozen sites in as many counties to choose from. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org/Oregon-historic-cemetery-cleanups or call 503-844-9571.

 

The Nehalem American Legion Cemetery was established in 1901. An active group of volunteers including recent Sally Donovan Award for Historic Cemetery Preservation winner Valerie Vines Magee, has been making a series of improvements to the cemetery. This dedicated group is still in need of volunteers on May 12.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize this statewide day of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and

Volunteers Are Invited to Preserve Oregon's History at Fernwood Pioneer Cemetery - 05/08/18

Oregon’s historic cemeteries are sites of great cultural value. Discover and preserve the state’s history by joining us on May 12!  Volunteers will be removing invasive weeds, planting native flowers, removing litter, cleaning headstones, and more depending on the event location. No experience is necessary; all training will be provided. May is a big month for our historic cemeteries. Take this opportunity to learn more about your local cemetery’s history, help maintain it, and join in Memorial Day activities.

 

There are over a dozen sites in as many counties to choose from. To choose from a list of events, go to solveoregon.org/Oregon-historic-cemetery-cleanups or call 503-844-9571.

 

The Fernwood Pioneer Cemetery in Newberg was established in 1882 and includes the burials of many of the earliest emigrants to the area. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The active volunteer group of caretakers can still use more volunteers for May 12.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries and SOLVE are partnering to organize this statewide day of service to improve our historic cemeteries.

 

About the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries: Established in 1999, the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) consists of seven citizens with broad knowledge of the issues relating to the preservation, restoration, upkeep and advocacy for historic burial sites and their importance in Oregon history. The OCHC coordinates the restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

 

About SOLVE:  SOLVE is a statewide, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to bring Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. We are dedicated to developing relationships among different groups, individuals, and businesses in pursuit of a common goal: to protect and preserve the places that make up our uniquely beautiful home. SOLVE mobilizes one of Oregon’s largest volunteer networks to clean up our beaches, parks, neighborhoods, and other natural spaces through litter cleanups, invasive plant removal, planting native trees and shrubs, and other environmental projects. We annually support nearly 30,000 volunteers in 900 projects throughout the state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information.

Joseph Stewart State Park day-use hours to change - 05/04/18

TRAIL, Ore — Effective May 15, 2018 the hours of operation for Joseph Stewart State Park will be limited to daylight hours, dawn to dusk. Entrances to the campground and Lost Creek Marina from Hwy 62 will be gated overnight and opened daily, as posted.

Park Manager Nathan Seable noted that for years, park staff left the gate open for early and late users. Security issues involving theft and unauthorized use have prompted him to enforce a strict closure at dusk.

Park hours are posted on signs around the park. Visitors can also check the state park website at www.oregonstateparks.org.

Spring Valley School
Spring Valley School
Spring Valley School Listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 05/03/18

The Spring Valley School in Zena is one of Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

Built in 1907, the Spring Valley School is a rectangular, one-story building of wood frame construction that is located at the foot of the Eola Hills, approximately 9 miles NW of Salem, Oregon. One-room school houses were often one of the first public buildings constructed in pioneer settlements. They were treasured by the local residents not only for their educational value but many times also for providing a gathering place for the entire community, children and adults. The Spring Valley School/Community Center has served both of these historic needs for over 100 years, from the original source of education beginning in 1907 to 1952 and then as a neighborhood gathering location up to the current time. Very few alterations have occurred since it ceased being used as a school house. The building is still largely a showcase of the original purpose and for the architectural style that was common at the time it was built.

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building’s nomination in October 2017. The Spring Valley School is among the 29 properties in Polk  County that are individually listed in the National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Cover of the plan
Cover of the plan
Oregon State Historic Preservation Office announces the release of the 2018-2023 Statewide Historic Preservation Plan (Photo) - 05/01/18

Every five years the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) prepares an update to its comprehensive, statewide historic preservation plan to guide preservation activities in the state for the coming years. While the plan is a requirement of the National Park Service, which provides a substantial portion of the SHPO’s funding, it is also a valuable tool for the SHPO and for preservation constituents throughout Oregon. The release of this plan coincides with National Historic Preservation Month.

The 2018-2023 Plan spotlights overarching issues, sets goals for the state and its preservation partners, and details a series of objectives we can collectively work to meet over the next five years. Inside the Plan you will find an emphasis on:

  • A more thematically diverse National Register of Historic Places and state survey
  • expanded and improved digital services
  • proactive preservation planning
  • heritage partnerships, advocacy, and networking
  • identification, designation, and preservation of significant historic properties

Writing the Plan began in Fall 2016 when staff met with key state commissions and work groups with interest or expertise in cultural or heritage resources to gather input on the direction for Oregon’s preservation community. Through the fall and spring of 2017, more than 170 Oregonians participated in a series of six public workshops held in Portland, Eugene, Medford, Astoria, Redmond, and La Grande. Another 348 completed an online survey. The Plan includes the many diverse ideas of these participants.

Grab Oregon’s updated historic preservation plan and learn more about how preservation efforts across the state are faring, how we can better leverage each other’s work, what preservation products get the best results, and how best to promote excellent stewardship of this state’s irreplaceable cultural resources. The plan can be accessed online at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/docs/2018_2023_shpo_plan.pdf. For those that would like a physical copy of the plan, you can pick one up at the 10th Annual Historic Preservation Month Fair at the Oregon State Capitol Grounds on May 31, 11am-1pm, or contact the SHPO office at (503) 986-0690 to receive a copy by mail.

Oregon Heritage, a Division of Oregon State Parks, includes the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). The Oregon SHPO locally administers National Park Service (NPS) programs created by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, including the identification and designation of historic properties and archaeological sites; tax and grant programs; and the Certified Local Government Program (CLG), a partnership program between local jurisdictions and the state and federal government. The SHPO also coordinates closely with Oregon Heritage programs, including the Heritage Commission and Main Street, Cemetery Commission, Oregon Historic Trails Advisory Commission, and various grant and technical assistance programs. The SHPO office is funded in part through a grant from NPS. To learn more about the Oregon SHPO and Oregon Heritage programs, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Please contact Ian Johnson, Associate Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer, at (503) 986-0678 or ian.johnson@oregon.gov with any additional questions or comments.

Attached Media Files: Press Release , Cover of the plan
Prineville Reservoir Star Party set for May 12 - 05/01/18

Prineville, OR -- Jupiter, also known as the King of Planets, will dominate the night sky at the May 12 Star Party at Prineville Reservoir State Park. Everyone is invited to see the King of Planets, colorful star clusters, nebulae (interstellar clouds of dust and gases) and distant galaxies.

“Remote central Oregon skies are typically clear and generally free of light pollution, the optimum mix for unforgettable views of night sky objects,” said Paul Patton, resource specialist with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). “Because of its location and amenities, the Prineville Reservoir is an incredible stargazing location. The annual star party is a great early-summer activity for everyone to enjoy.”

Saturday will kick off at 1 p.m. with a guided stroll through the solar system.  Presentations at 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. will focus on Night Sky Wonders and the Sun, respectively. Young rocketeers can design, build and then safely launch their rockets at 4 p.m.  Renowned space artist and photographer John Foster will lead an audience-driven space art presentation at 7 p.m. Foster will tap into the creativity and imagination of the audience to create a unique work of art, which will be given to a lucky participant.  At 9:30 p.m., “partygoers” will gather at a permanent observatory housing “Big Doug,” a 16-inch telescope. Visitors can peer through it and other telescopes provided by professional and amateur astronomers.

Returning this year is the popular Virtual Reality Experience Station—goggles provided.  Other activities include a solar viewing station; a telescope technology display; various children’s activities focused on astronomical science; and an exhibit of John Foster’s space art and photography.  

Prineville Reservoir State Park offers nearly 70 campsites—both RV and tent sites—and five deluxe cabins in the main campground. All are reservable online at www.oregonstateparks.org or by phone at 1-800-452-5687. Another 26 electrical hookup sites in the park’s Jasper Point campground are available first-come, first-serve.

The Oregon Observatory at Sunriver and OPRD are co-organizers of the 19th annual Star Party. Prineville Reservoir State Park is located 16 miles southeast of Prineville on Southeast Juniper Canyon Road. More information and directions are available at www.oregonstateparks.org.

University of Oregon Mother's Day Powwow designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition - 04/30/18

The University of Oregon Mother’s Day Powwow, a Native American Student Union event, marks its upcoming 50th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission.

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include the Oregon State Fair, Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, and the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana.

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the state,” said Todd Kepple, the commission’s chair. “This event celebrates Oregon’s deep roots.”  

The Mother’s Day Powwow started in 1969 as a way for the Native American Student Union (NASU) to help indigenous students strengthen cultural values while at the university and to support educational success of the Native American community. The emergence of the powwow closely paralleled actions of Oregon tribes to work towards restoration from being terminated in 1954. Many of the original NASU members in the late 1960s went on to become the leaders who worked toward restoration, and the powwow continues to serve the purpose of inspiring Native Students at the U of O to work on behalf of Native people.

The University of Oregon Mother’s Day Powwow holds the distinction of being the oldest off-reservation powwow in the state of Oregon. Over the years NASU members decided that the UO’s powwow should honor the contributions of all mothers and set the annual date for Mother’s Day weekend. Today the powwow brings dancers, singers and audiences together from across Oregon and the United States. It attracts over 10 drum groups and approximately 75 dancers from local and regional tribes each year. Over 8,000 participants attend the three day, family-friendly event, including Native American alumni who gather to honor the graduating students.

Gordon Bettles, former steward of the Many Nations Longhouse at University of Oregon, noted: “As a Native cultural event, the powwow offers a unique cultural space for Native students, faculty and staff members, and parents to recognize the traditions and accomplishments of their own people.”

The University of Oregon Mother’s Day Powwow wouldn’t be possible without countless hours from the Native American Student Union. A group of students plans and runs the powwow each year with help from faculty members, vendors and community volunteers.

The Mother’s Day Powwow will be held May 11- 13, 2018. It is free and open to the public. Regular dances are included that allow everyone to take part. A schedule can be found at: https://calendar.uoregon.edu/event/50th_annual_mothers_day_powwow#.Wuc9rn-QyUk

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/pages/oht.aspx .

The Oregon Heritage Commission coordinates efforts to solve statewide heritage issues through grants, education, and advocacy, and also promotes heritage tourism efforts.  

Advisory committee meets May 24 to develop plan for Nehalem River Scenic Waterway - 04/30/18

NEHALEM, Ore. - The Nehalem River Scenic Waterway advisory committee will meet 5:30-7:30 p.m. May 24 to develop a draft management plan for a 17.5 mile segment of the Nehalem River. The meeting will be held at the Nehalem Bay State Park meeting hall, 34600 Garey St., Nehalem.

The public is invited to attend; however, no public comments will be accepted during the meeting. A public comment period for the draft plan will be opened later in the year.

On the meeting agenda: an overview of the Scenic Waterway Program and development of the draft management plan.  

A 17.5 mile segment of the Nehalem River is being considered for designation as a State Scenic Waterway. The proposed segment begins at Henry Rierson Spruce Run campground, and ends at the confluence of Cook Creek, near Cougar Valley State Park. A map of the proposed segment can be viewed online: www.oregon.gov/oprd/NATRES/scenicwaterways/Documents/NehalemProposed_Sept2017.pdf.

The draft management plan will help the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission analyze the merits of the proposed designation.

The State Scenic Waterways program protects the existing scenic, natural and recreation values of 22 designated waterways throughout the state. The program is administered by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). Oregon State Statute directs OPRD to periodically study new waterways for potential inclusion in the program.

For more information about the meeting or State Scenic Waterways, contact Alexandra Phillips at 503-986-0631 or Alex.phillips@oregon.gov. Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Alexandra Phillips at least three days in advance.

Committee to review Veterans and War Memorials grant applications - 04/27/18

On May 9, 2018, a committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Veterans and War Memorials Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director and the Oregon State Parks Commission for final review and approval on June 12 & 13, 2018. The meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, room 124A. at 10:00 a.m. Interested parties may also call into to listen at (562) 247-8422 Access Code: 562-412-464.

 

The Veterans and War Memorials Grant Program was created and established to provide funding assistance to local governments for the construction and restoration of veterans’ and war memorials.  The program will help honor Oregon’s soldiers and veterans by commemorating their service to the country. 

 

For information about the grants, visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/FINASST/Pages/grants.aspx , or contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

Columbia Gorge visitors reminded that closed areas remain dangerous - 04/26/18

Joint news release // U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept, Oregon Dept of Transportation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 26, 2018

 

Contacts:
Chris Havel, OPRD, 503-931-2590
Rachel Pawlitz, USFS, 541-308-1744
Don Hamilton, ODOT, 503-704-7452

 

Gorge visitors reminded that closed areas remain dangerous

Columbia Gorge, OR -- Clear skies and warm weather bring bigger crowds to the Columbia River Gorge but visitors must honor closure points marking where conditions remain dangerous.

Trails, parks and roads operated by the U.S. Forest Service, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the Oregon Department of Transportation remain closed by the impact of the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire. These areas are still dangerous and will not open to the public until they are safe.

These emergency closures are important for two reasons: to permit areas to recover their health, and to protect public safety. Rocks, limbs, and trees continue to fall. Work crews are helping the recovery along, so in addition to natural hazards, the closed areas are active work zones. Unlawful entry into closures could cause work delays and the potential for accidental injuries.

More than 1,000 cubic yards of debris have fallen on the closed section of the Historic Columbia River Highway in the last four weeks alone. Hikers, bikers or motorists violating these closure points put themselves in danger and may be subject to fines.

The following areas are open for public recreation:

Many other recreation sites east of Bridal Veil and west of Starvation Creek State Park  on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge remain closed, including the Historic Columbia River Highway between Ainsworth and Bridal Veil. Rocks continue to fall in the area and there is no timeline yet for re-opening. Contractors and public agency staff are working to open trail segments and will issue public announcements as these areas open.

Law enforcement officials -- Multnomah County Sheriff and the Oregon State Police – may very well cite people with criminal trespass when they choose to enter a closed area. The penalty could be up to a $1,000 fine and being lodged in jail. Since September, the Forest Service has issued 65 trespass citations, not counting written or verbal warnings. Each citation carries a $280 fine.

Visit alternative destinations on the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge and other options within 75 miles of Portland to help relieve the pressure on the Gorge and give it time to heal. To explore other destinations, visit Travel Oregon (http://traveloregon.com), the U.S. Forest Service (www.fs.usda.gov/crgnsa), Friends of the Columbia Gorge (http://gorgefriends.org), or other partner websites.

For the areas that are open, the U.S. Forest Service and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department remind visitors that crowding will be heavier than normal. Park only when there's room and it's safe to do so. Respect private property near public lands. More tips on how to have a safe and responsible visit to the Gorge can be found at http://ReadySetGorge.com.

# # #

Neighbors object to the proposed Eastmoreland Historic District in Portland - 04/25/18

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Ian Johnson, Associate Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer // ian.johnson@oregon.gov // Desk: (503) 986-0678
Chris Havel, Associate Director // chris.havel@oregon.gov // Desk: (503) 986-0722 Cell: (503) 931-2590

 

Salem OR – The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) has determined that the opponents of the proposed Eastmoreland Historic District (District) in Portland submitted enough objections to prevent listing the District in the National Register of Historic Places. According to federal rules for the program, if the majority of the private property owners within a district object to the listing the district cannot be listed in the National Register. Following federal guidelines, the SHPO resubmitted the nomination to the National Park Service (NPS) on April 25, 2018 for an official Determination of Eligibility. The official decision to list or not list rests with the NPS. 

The nomination document is online at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/Pages/Eastmoreland-Historic-District.aspx .

The SHPO counted a total of 7,188 private property owners. Nearly 5,000 of these were recently-formed trusts that submitted objections. Federal rules provide that individuals and legal entities that submit notarized statements declaring their ownership of private property within the district are added to the list of property owners, and qualify to object. A total of 5,952 objections were received, or 82.8% of the total number of owners. According to federal rules, if more than 50% of the owners in a district submit objections, the property cannot be listed.

The original nomination for the District was received in February 2017 and was reviewed by the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation, a volunteer group of people with interest and skill in Oregon history. The committee recommended listing Eastmoreland in the National Register based on its historic qualities. Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer Christine Curran agreed and the nomination was submitted to the NPS in May 2017, but Curran asked that the nomination be returned to the office due to unresolved problems determining the number of owners in the proposed district boundary. Without an accurate count of owners, the SHPO was unable to calculate the percentage of objections. The nomination was returned in June 2017. Federal rules did not clearly answer how to resolve complications arising from deceased owners and trusts, among other circumstances, so Oregon SHPO staff requested guidance from federal and state officials. The SHPO received guidance from the NPS in November 2017 and advice from the Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ) in January 2018.

In March and April 2018, the SHPO office reviewed previously-submitted objections using the guidance from the NPS and DOJ, providing owners an opportunity to correct errors. Objections received throughout the entire process were tallied and provided to the NPS for review. Federal rules allow for new objections any time until the NPS makes a final decision.

The National Park Service met its legal public notice requirements when the nomination was submitted in May 2017. Now that the State Historic Preservation Office has submitted the updated nomination, the NPS may take action at any time. NPS will accept additional public comment and new objections until the agency makes a final decision.

Send all correspondence to:

Attn: J. Paul Loether, Deputy Keeper
National Park Service National Register of Historic Places
1849 C St. NW, Mail Stop 7228
Washington, D.C. 20240

Send a copy to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office at SHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov">ORSHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov .

# # #

Oregon Main Street Welcomes New Performing Main Street Level Community - 04/24/18

Salem, Oregon, April 24, 2018 — Oregon Main Street just accepted the Downtown Estacada Commission at the Performing Main Street level  of the Oregon Main Street Network in recognition of their efforts to use the Main Street Approach® as a model for their downtown revitalization efforts. The Main Street Approach® is a comprehensive downtown revitalization program that uses historic preservation as one of its most important economic development tools. It is a practical program that helps a community build on their district’s unique assets.

When hearing the news, Nancy Hoffman, Main Street Manager, Downtown Estacada Commission, stated, “The Main Street program has helped the Estacada Development Association and now the Downtown Estacada Commission focus on revitalizing downtown Estacada. We are proud that every step has brought our downtown closer to our vision for a vibrant, thriving community.”

Estacada joins Albany, Alberta district in Portland, Astoria, Corvallis, La Grande, McMinnville, Oregon City, Roseburg, and The Dalles at the premier level of Oregon Main Street.

“We are very excited to have Estacada move to the Performing Main Street level. They are our first very small town to achieve this status,” said Sheri Stuart, coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It has been exciting to watch the progress they have made over the past few years to engage community partners in revitalizing their historic downtown.”

Over the past few years, Oregon Main Street has seen an increased interest in building a comprehensive downtown revitalization effort using the Main Street model and a renewed awareness of the link between local heritage and sustainable economic development across the state. Between 2010 and 2017, communities participating at the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the two highest levels in the OMS Network – saw an increase of 647 net new businesses, 3,367 net new jobs, 1,258 private sector building improvement projects representing $97.2 million of private sector reinvestment.

Communities participating at the Performing Main Street must have a cohesive core of historic or older commercial and mixed-use buildings that represent the community’s architectural heritage and may include compatible in-fill. They must also have a sufficient mass of businesses, buildings, and density to be effective in implementing a comprehensive revitalization effort, as well as be a compact and pedestrian-oriented district. 

Acceptance into these levels allows communities to participate in training, community assessments, technical assistance, and receive local capacity building support. There isn’t a fee to participate in the Oregon Main Street Network. Communities participating at the Performing Main Street level are also eligible for recognition as an accredited community by Main Street America™. 

Currently, there are over 80 communities participating in one of the four levels of the Oregon Main Street Network: Performing Main Street, Transforming Downtown, Exploring Main Street, and Associate.  While not a pre-requisite for acceptance at the Performing Main Street level, Estacada previously participated at the Transforming Downtown level.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs in Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, and is a designated coordinating program member of Main Street America™. Oregon Main Street provides assistance to all communities whether they are just beginning to explore options for their downtown or are seeking recognition as an accredited Main Street® town.

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department seeks candidates for Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council - 04/24/18

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting applications for a seat on the Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC). The ideal candidate will have experience in community engagement—especially to underserved groups or communities—and have an interest in trail planning and recreational trail opportunities on the Oregon coast.

Qualified candidates must submit an appointment interest form by June 1. The form is available online: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Documents/2017_ORTAC_Interest_Form.pdf

ORTAC advises OPRD and its allies on subjects related to the development and promotion of high quality, non-motorized recreational trail systems throughout Oregon. The council strives to create safe, sustainable trails for the well-being and enjoyment of Oregon’s residents and visitors.

Council members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission and serve four-year terms. The seven-member council has representation from each congressional district, with at least two members from separate counties bordering the coast. ORTAC conducts four public meetings per year.

In addition to advising OPRD, council members are responsible for reviewing applications for state trail designations, representing ORTAC on a variety of other trail-related committees and helping develop the 10-year statewide Trails Plan.

For more information about serving on ORTAC, contact David Stipe at 503-509-4752 or david.stipe@oregon.gov.