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Grant writing workshops offered in Salem and online - 01/22/15
Two grant writing workshops will be conducted by Oregon Heritage of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The workshops are free and open to anyone. One will be from 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Feb. 3 at 725 Summer St. NE, Room 124A, Salem. The second will be online from 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m. Feb. 5.

Both free workshops will cover project planning and tips for successful grant applications. The last portion of the workshop will be training on the OPRDGrantsOnline application system. This training is highly recommended if you plan to apply for one of Oregon Heritage's many grants. These grants fund historic cemetery, museum, archaeology, historic property and other heritage projects.

For information on the grant programs please visit our website or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685. You will need to contact Gill to receive access information for the online workshop.


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Oregon Heritage Commission to meet Feb. 2 in Oregon City - 01/22/15
The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet at 12:30 p.m. Feb. 2 at the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, 1726 Washington St., Oregon City. Agenda items include issues related to Oregon heritage sites, organizations and activities, including the application to be designated the first Oregon State Heritage Area.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

The meeting will be preceded at 9 a.m. by a Commission tour of the proposed Willamette Falls State Heritage Area. No decisions will be made during the tour.

More information about the Heritage Commission and the meeting is available at www.oregonheritage.org or by contacting Commission coordinator Kyle Jansson at 503-986-0673.

The meetings are accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance by call 503-986-0655. People attending the meeting should report on arrival to the interpretive center's reception area for directions to the Wagon 3 meeting room.

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Local governments can apply for grants for parks and recreation projects - 01/13/15
Salem OR - The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) announces the opening of the 2015 Local Government Grant Program grant cycle for funding public parks and recreation projects.

Large, small and planning grants are available for cities, counties, metropolitan service districts, park and recreation districts, and port districts looking to fund the following types of projects: planning, development, rehabilitation, acquisition, and acquisition and development.

The Local Government Grant Program is designed to help local government agencies acquire property for park purposes and fund outdoor park and recreation areas and facilities. The grants are funded from voter-approved lottery money.

OPRD gives more than $4 million annually to Oregon communities for outdoor recreation projects and has awarded nearly $50 million in grants since 1999.

Applications, a grant manual, application deadlines and other information are online at oprdgrants.org.
Grants available for museum projects - 01/05/15
The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants for qualified museums to support museum collections, education and heritage tourism. Awards typically range between $1,000 and $8,000, and occasionally higher. Qualifying museums can apply for a variety of projects including archival boxes, records documentation, exhibits, brochures, school programs and more.

While the grant applications are online, they are simple and there is plenty of support.

"Our goal is to support museums of all sizes, all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process," notes Kuri Gill, the grants program coordinator.

Carla Burnside of the Harney County Historical Society recently noted the importance and ease of the grant for their quilt documentation and storage project. "The process of applying for the grant was very easy, she said. "It will help us preserve important textiles in our collection."

Oregon Heritage grants programs staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance. There will be grant workshops on project planning and grant writing. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on Feb. 3. A one-hour webinar will be available on Feb. 5.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission's mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

To learn more about the grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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Grants available for historic cemetery projects - 01/05/15
The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is offering grants for qualified historic cemeteries. The annual grants fund projects that preserve historic cemeteries. Projects funded in the past include marker repair workshops, fencing, signs, interpretive panels and brochures, security lighting, access improvements, records management and more.

Awards typically range between $1,000 and $4,000, but have been higher. Anyone can apply for a grant. While the grant applications are online, they are simple and commission staff can provide support.

"Our goal is to preserve Oregon's historic cemeteries, so we try to make it easy for people to access funds to do that while ensuring the funds are appropriately used," notes Kuri Gill, historic cemeteries program coordinator.

Patricia McCracken with Winchester Elementary School mentioned the assistance on her grant report. "We were new to filling out grants, staff was extremely helpful when we called," she said.

There will be grant workshops on project planning and grant writing. A two-hour workshop will be Feb. 3 in Salem. A one-hour webinar will be available on Feb. 5.

State law established the seven-member commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn more about the grants or visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

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Grants available for historic properties and archaeology projects - 01/05/15
The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for work on historic properties and for archaeology projects. The annual grants fund up to $20,000 in matching funds for preservation projects.

The Preserving Oregon Grant can fund preservation of historic buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Work may include non-maintenance preservation like window repair, roof work, foundation projects, and plumbing and electrical needs. It can also fund significant work contributing toward identifying, preserving and/or interpreting archaeological sites.

The Diamonds in the Rough grants help restore or reconstruct the facades of buildings that have been heavily altered over the years. The grant's purpose is to return the buildings to their historic appearance and potentially qualify them for historic register designation (local or national).

Preservation office staff is happy to talk with applicants about potential grant projects and review applications. There will be grant workshops on project planning and grant writing. A two-hour workshop will be in Salem on Feb. 3. A one-hour webinar will be available on Feb. 5. To learn more about the grants and workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.
Public meeting to be conducted about proposed Wild Rivers Scenic Bikeway - 01/05/15
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department will hold a public meeting for a proposed Oregon Scenic Bikeway at 5:30 pm. Jan. 27 at the Port Orford Public Library's Freedom of Speech room, located at 555 20th St., Port Orford.

The proposed 61-mile-long Wild Rivers Coast Scenic Bikeway starts at Battle Rock Park and passes through the town of Port Orford, Cape Blanco State Park, Elk River Road, Port Orford Heads State Park and Paradise Point State Park. The proposed bikeway uses existing roads.

The meeting agenda will consist of a short presentation on the Oregon Scenic Bikeway Program and information on the proposed Wild Rivers Coast Scenic Bikeway followed by questions from the audience.

Public comment on the proposed bikeway will be taken at the meeting. Written public comment will be accepted both before and after the meeting until the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission acts on the proposed designation. Comments will be presented to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission before the commission votes on designation.

Comments about the proposed bikeway can be sent to Alex Phillips at alex.phillips@oregon.gov or to:
Oregon Parks and Rec. Dept.
ATTN: Alex Phillips
725 Summer St NE, Suite C
Salem OR 97301-1266
Attached Media Files: news release
Petition to reduce the boundary of the Irvington Historic District - 12/29/14
PUBLIC NOTICE
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

The State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) will consider a petition to reduce the boundary of the Irvington Historic District, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, at its regular meeting at 1:45 pm on Friday, February 20, 2015 at the Hilton Eugene & Conference Center, 66 East 6th Ave, Eugene, Oregon.

The Irvington Neighborhood Historic District was listed in the National Register in October 2010 and currently encompasses a square-shaped area approximately bounded by NE Fremont St. to the north; NE 27th Ave. to the east, including both sides of the street; NE Broadway to the south; and NE 7th Ave. to the west. The proposed boundary reduction would remove the northeast corner of the district, generally bounded by NE Fremont St. to the north; NE 27th Ave. to the east, including the properties on the east side of the street up to Alameda School; NE Knott St. to the south; and NE 21st Ave. to the west. Please contact the State Historic Preservation Office for a district map.

Properties removed from the Irvington Historic District will not be eligible for benefits reserved for properties listed in the Register, including:
Recognition as significant to the nation, state, or community;
Consideration in the planning of federal or federally-assisted projects;
Eligibility for federal and state tax benefits;
Access to preservation grants when funds are available;
Eligibility for leniency in meeting certain building code requirements.

National Register listing does not place any restrictions on a property at the state or federal level, unless property owners choose to participate in tax benefit or grant programs; however, state law in Oregon requires local governments to offer some level of protection to National Register properties. Contact the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability to determine the extent of those protections.

If you have any questions regarding the proposed reduction in the boundaries of the National Register-listed Irvington Historic District or the process, please contact the State Historic Preservation Office at (503) 986-0678, or by mail at 725 Summer Street N.E., Suite C, Salem, OR 97301. Further information is available at www.oregonheritage.org. The meeting location is accessible to persons of all abilities. Special accommodations for the hearing impaired can be provided with advance notification to the State Historic Preservation Office.
Attached Media Files: Public Notice
Lord and Schryver House & Garden
Lord and Schryver House & Garden
Home garden of landscape architecture pioneers given individual listing in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 12/29/14
The residence and personal garden of early landscape architects Elizabeth Lord and Edith Schryver have been individually listed in the National Register of Historic Places, according to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office.

The listing was made because the Salem place, named Gaiety Hollow by Lord and Schryver, was created by two women who founded the first woman-owned landscape architecture firm in the Pacific Northwest. It also was listed because of its significant landscape architecture and building architecture, said Diana Painter, the National Register coordinator for the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office.

"It is perhaps the best example of their life's work, a place where they could play out their design principles freely, unfettered by clients' wishes," said Bobbie Dolp, president of the Lord and Schryver Conservancy, which has spent 15 years reinvigorating the history and gardens of Lord and Schryver. "The garden draws on classical garden design traditions but also has a distinctive Pacific Northwest flair, showcasing plants suited to the region."

"The scale and quality of Lord and Schryver's work at Gaiety Hollow is of particular significance for today's garden visitors who are looking for garden design and plants suited to their lives," added Carlo Balistrieri, the Garden Conservancy's vice president of preservation. "The Garden Conservancy is pleased to be working with the Lord and Schryver Conservancy to develop Gaiety Hollow's potential as a resource for the region."

Lord and Schryver established the firm in 1929, a time when very few landscape architects in Oregon were able to sustain a private practice, which Lord and Schryver, nonetheless, did for 40 years. They established a varied practice, encompassing everything from gardens to large civic projects. In 1932, they moved to the site where architect Clarence Smith designed new offices and living quarters for them. Lord and Schryver designed the "home garden" itself, which enabled them to both showcase their work and experiment with new design ideas and planting schemes.

While the site was named a contributing resource to the Gaiety Hill/Bush's Pasture Park Historic District, considerable research during the past decade by the Lord and Schryver Conservancy added new importance to the site. The conservancy group is using the site as an educational center and is raising funds to purchase it.

The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Links:

National Register nomination link http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/pages/nrhp_recent_nominations.aspx

Lord and Schryver Conservancy website http://www.lord-schryverconservancy.org/

Garden Conservancy website www.gardenconservancy.org