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Oregon Scenic Bikeway Committee Accepting Applications for New Routes - 10/24/14
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's Scenic Bikeway Program will accept applications in the spring of 2015 for new bikeway designations.

Designated Scenic Bikeways are selected from locally proposed routes and represent the "best of the best" road bicycle riding in Oregon. Currently, there are 12 designated bikeways totaling nearly 800 miles. Oregon is the only state with an official Scenic Bikeway program.

Completed applications consist of a proposed scenic route, a local proponent group, and letters of support from all governing bodies of road jurisdictions. The applications must be submitted from March 17-31, 2015 to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

Bikeway proponent groups consist of local volunteers, cyclists and tourism professionals. If the purposed route submitted via that application is officially recommended for designation by the Oregon Bikeway Committee, the proponent group must then complete a comprehensive Bikeway Plan including a series of goals, sign locations, promotions and future engagement.

The Oregon Scenic Bikeway Committee evaluates proposed routes using criteria which examine human made, natural scenic and sensory values and road conditions on the route.

In the past, only half of the applications scored high enough on the criteria to be recommended for designation.

Applications, a list of important features for a bikeway and the criteria are available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BIKE/Pages/info.aspx

For more information on the application process or the Bikeway Program contact Alex Phillips at 503-986-0631 or alex.phillips@oregon.gov .
Attached Media Files: News release
Aloha Farmhouse
Aloha Farmhouse
The Aloha Farmhouse in Washington County is among Oregon's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 10/23/14
The Aloha Farmhouse, a modest Craftsman-inspired residence built about 1915, was remodeled by Pietro Belluschi, Oregon's most renowned 20th century architect, for his own use in 1944 and again about 1946. The period of time in which Belluschi and his family lived in the farmhouse, which was located on a rural, six-acre site with an orchard at that time, was one of the most important and prolific of Belluschi's career. It was the period preceding his acceptance of the position of Dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in which he established the reputation that would lead to the next phase of his long and successful career.

Belluschi bought the farmhouse when his boys were small and needed room to grow. He remodeled the house, using the design vocabulary that he had been experimenting with in such Northwest Regional-style houses as his previous Council Crest home, the Philip Joss house, and the Dr. and Mrs. Burkes house, all in Portland. Today the house is little changed from when Belluschi returned to Portland with his family in 1948. It still retains its rustic character, which Belluschi admired when he purchased the house and was careful to preserve in the renovation.

Belluschi and his family left Portland for the east coast in early 1951. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he began a successful architectural consulting practice there, on some of the highest profile projects in the country, including the Juilliard School in New York and St. Mary's Cathedral in San Francisco. He returned to Portland in 1973, taking up residence in the Burkes house that he had designed in the mid-1940s. Belluschi died in 1994, at the age of 94. His wife Marjorie lived in the house until 2009. It is now the home of Marti and Anthony Belluschi, Pietro Belluschi's son, who is also an architect.

The Aloha Farmhouse is the last remaining residence that Belluschi designed for himself in the Portland area that also retains its historic character. Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the property's nomination in their June 2014 meeting. It is a unique property that joins the recently listed Oak Hills National Register Historic District to celebrate Oregon's mid-century architectural heritage in Washington County. The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
Water B. & Myrtle E. Honeyman House
Water B. & Myrtle E. Honeyman House
The Walter and Myrtle Honeyman House in Portland, Oregon is among the state's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places. (Photo) - 10/20/14
The Honeyman House was designed by Portland architect David C. Lewis in the Tudor Revival style and constructed on Northwest Cornell Road, west of downtown Portland, in 1911. Walter Honeyman was a member of the second generation of the Honeyman family, which was associated with Honeyman Hardware Company for three generations. He worked for the company beginning after graduation from high school, and served as its secretary from 1917 until about 1939.

The architect, David C. Lewis, who studied architecture in New York and Paris, is best known for his Foreign Exhibits building for Portland's 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition and the Oregon State building for Seattle's 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. He was admired in architectural circles for his 1907 Board of Trade Building in Portland, which was widely published. His residences were also admired however. The Honeyman residence was published in Pacific Coast Architect in 1913.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination in their June 2014 meeting. It is one of nearly 600 historic properties in Portland that are individually listed in the National Register, a list which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
Hanthorn Apartments
Hanthorn Apartments
The Hanthorn Apartments in Portland, Oregon is among state's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places. (Photo) - 10/20/14
The Hanthorn Apartments was constructed in 1910 in downtown Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. The six-story apartment building represents one of a collection of 'modern' apartment and office buildings that redefined downtown Portland in the construction boom following Portland's 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition. It is an attractive, brick-clad building, purpose-built for apartments, which was a new building type for Portland at that time. Apartment buildings constructed through the 1920s were designed with many amenities to increase the attractiveness of urban, apartment living to the middle class.

The Hanthorn Apartments, also known as the Lexington Apartments, was closed for building code violations in the 1980s. It was then sold and modernized as affordable housing. The property was recently upgraded again, and once again serves as affordable housing.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination in their June 2014 meeting. It is one of nearly 600 historic properties in Portland that are individually listed in the National Register, which is a list maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).
The Heathman Hotel
The Heathman Hotel
The old Heathman Hotel in Portland is among state's latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places. (Photo) - 10/20/14
The old Heathman Hotel, 723 SW Salmon, was constructed in 1926 in downtown Portland for hotelier George Heathman. The eleven-story hotel, located at the north end of the South Park Blocks, was constructed as a luxury hotel.

(It was joined by a New Heathman Hotel, 1101 SW Broadway, in 1927. This latter hotel, added to the National Register in 1984, is the luxury hotel known today as the Heathman Hotel.)

Designed by the prominent Portland architecture firm of Claussen and Claussen, the old Heathman Hotel is clad in tapestry brick and finished in terra cotta trim. The two Heathman Hotels were among 184 new buildings, 38 of which were hotels, constructed in downtown Portland between 1915 and 1931. Four of these were "first class" hotels. Today less than half of the 184 buildings remain.

The old Heathman Hotel continued to be used for that purpose through the 1980s, when it was closed for building code violations. It was then sold and modernized as affordable housing. The property was recently upgraded again, and once again serves as affordable housing.
Art in the Park event comes to Honeyman State Park - 10/16/14
Florence, OR - Artwork celebrating the beauty of the central Oregon coast will be displayed at the annual Art in the Park festival at Jessie M. Honeyman State Park Oct. 24-25.

All styles of artwork and photography from local artists and student artists will be represented. Local artists will also lead workshops and demonstrations.

The weekend event will feature live music, including by flutist Bruce Jarvis who carves wooden flutes. Free food and door prizes are also on tap. Festivities are scheduled from 4-8 p.m. Oct. 24 and noon-8 p.m. Oct. 25 in the Historic Cleawox Lodge.
Learn to forage for mushrooms at Fort Stevens State Park - 10/16/14
Astoria, OR - Fort Stevens State Park will offer several sessions of two different mushroom programs this fall.

One-mile mushroom identification hikes led by Park Ranger Dane Osis begin at Battery Russell at 1 p.m. on Oct. 20 and Nov. 10 and 30. Participants should wear weather-appropriate clothing and bring a basket, pocket knife and optional mushroom identification book. Hikers are also welcome to bring mushrooms for identification.

Osis will also present "Mysterious Mushrooms of Fort Stevens" about wild mushroom regulations, uses and the role mushrooms play in the health of the forest. Following the program, he will lead a short hike around the park to look for and identify mushrooms. The programs will be at the picnic shelter at Coffenbury Lake at 1 p.m. on Oct. 18 and Nov. 9, 22 and 29.

No registration is required for the free programs; parking is $5 at Coffenbury Lake. For more information, call Dane Osis at Fort Stevens at 503-861-3170 or email dane.osis@oregon.gov.
Tradition logo for Potato Festival
Tradition logo for Potato Festival
Klamath Basin Potato Festival designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition (Photo) - 10/16/14
A 77-year-old festival that brings together several communities to celebrate the importance of the potato is the newest Oregon Heritage Tradition designated by the Oregon Heritage Commission.

The Klamath Basin Potato Festival is the 11th event designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition. The others include the Oregon State Fair, the Pendleton Round-Up, the Cannon Beach Sandcastle Contest and the Linn County Pioneer Picnic.

The festival takes place this Friday and Saturday in Merrill, a town of 900 people. Thousands of people are expected to attend.

"The Heritage Commission wants to recognize those traditions that have helped define the state," said David Lewis, the commission's chair and historian for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde. "They are distinguished events that are part of our heritage as Oregonians."

"The involvement from different communities sets the Potato Festival apart," said this year's festival director Greg Matthews, noting the participation of Bonanza, Chiloquin, Klamath Falls, Malin, Merrill and Tulelake, Calif. "To have these communities come together for a weekend of celebration is awe-inspiring. The Oregon Heritage Tradition designation honors every one who has helped with or participated in the Potato Festival."

The first Klamath Basin Potato Festival took place in 1937 to celebrate the completion of the annual potato harvest. It has taken place annually, although during World War II the Merrill Service Club down-sized it to only a late harvest dance with proceeds to charity.

This year's festival will include a parade, football games, a barbecue, musical performances, bed races, and exhibits. Among the exhibits are the biggest, the best-looking and the oddest potatoes.

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state, said commission coordinator Kyle Jansson. A list of previous Tradition designations is available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/pages/oht.aspx

The Oregon Heritage Commission coordinates efforts to solve statewide heritage issues through grants, education, and advocacy, and also promotes heritage tourism efforts.
Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council to meet in Lakeview on Oct. 17 - 10/15/14
Lakeview, OR - The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council will meet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday Oct. 17, 2014 at the Lakeview Town Hall, 525 N. 1st St.

The agenda includes updates from local agencies and trail advocate groups. The council invites public comments.

The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and to promote non-motorized trail recreation and development in Oregon. The council is made up of seven volunteer members appointed by the Oregon Park and Recreation Commission to represent the five Oregon congressional districts. The Council meets four times annually in different locations across the state.
Harris Beach campground closed to improve drainage and access - 10/14/14
Brookings, OR - The campground at Harris Beach State Park will be closed through Nov. 20 for projects to improve drainage and access. The day-use area will remain open, except for a 1-2 day closure for road repairs that has not yet been scheduled.

This preliminary phase of the project includes some paving work and replacement of several failing culverts in order to improve drainage in the parks. Improvements are scheduled to continue next fall and winter with projects to level parking pads and upgrade campsites utilities.

Tidewater Contractors, Inc. of Brookings was hired to do this portion of the project, which costs $200,700 and is funded by Oregon Lottery dollars dedicated to state parks.
Nominations sought for state trail designations - 10/14/14
The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) invites trail users to nominate additions to Oregon's network of non-motorized, state designated trails. Nominations will be accepted through November 30, 2014.

The process defines two trail designation categories: Scenic and Regional. Scenic Trails can be single routes as short as a mile, or trails that combine with others to give access to "outstanding scenery and lasting memories for trail users." They must be open to the public and be mostly complete.

Regional Trails must be longer than five miles and create close-to-home recreation opportunities. They also are defined as connectors linking communities, schools and recreation sites with significant scenic trails. Like Scenic Trails, they must lie on public land or public rights-of-way or easements.

"ORTAC's intent is to have a statewide system of trails that showcases Oregon's exceptional trail experiences in both rural and urban areas," said Nancy Ream Enabnit, the chair of ORTAC. "We're seeking nominations from all corners of the state to get the job done."

In 2010 ORTAC and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department streamlined the application process. Since that time the state has received seven new nominations, doubling the designated trail inventory since the program began in 1971. ORTAC's goal is to make the process simpler and more accessible to trail advocates and land managers.

The council was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and to promote non-motorized trail recreation and development in Oregon. The Council is made up of seven volunteer members appointed by the Oregon Park and Recreation Commission to represent the five Oregon congressional districts. The council meets four times annually in different locations across the state.

ORTAC's website has links to a nomination form and to the Oregon Recreation Trails Designation Program handbook, which includes criteria and timelines. Go to http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Pages/Trails-Designation-Programs.aspx

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Rest Area along Highway 18 to close temporarily for upgrades - 10/08/14
Lincoln City, OR - Rest Areas on Highway 18 in the H.B. Van Duzer Forest State Scenic Corridor near the junction with Highway 101 are set to close starting Oct. 13, 2014--weather permitting. Both North and South Rest Areas will close in order to complete a paving restoration project. The parking areas and restrooms will not be available during this closure.

Road and Driveway Company of Newport will repair and resurface degraded asphalt, replace concrete curbing, improve drainage systems, enhance ADA access and re-stripe the lots.

Funded by Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, the estimated $171,000 project is set to be completed by Nov. 2, 2014.
Oregon State Fair Council will meet in Salem October 8, 2014 - 10/06/14
Salem OR - The Oregon State Fair Council will meet at the Oregon State Fairgrounds and Exposition Center in Salem on Oct. 8, 2014 starting at 5 p.m.

The council will discuss and may take action on hiring a chief executive officer. The council interviewed candidates in an executive session on September 18.

Those needing special accommodations to attend should contact Brenda Schorr at 503-986-0788.

The council is charged with creating a new, sustainable business model for the Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center, and Council members have the authority to execute a business strategy.

The full agenda is online at http://oregonstatefaircouncil.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/state-fair-council-agenda-10-08-14-ceo-steering.pdf
University of Oregon students record data at the Paisley Five Mile Point Caves. Because the site, which is managed by the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, shows evidence of human occupation for more than 14,000 years, it recently w
University of Oregon students record data at the Paisley Five Mile Point Caves. Because the site, which is managed by the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, shows evidence of human occupation for more than 14,000 years, it recently w
Oregon site of earliest human occupation added to nation's list of important places (Photo) - 10/03/14
The National Park Service has added the Paisley Five Mile Point Caves to the United States' listing of the nation's most important archaeological and historic sites. Situated near the town of Paisley in south-central Oregon, archaeological excavations at the site has produced evidence of human occupation in Oregon beginning 14,300 years ago, nearly 1,000 years earlier than previously thought.

The occupation of Paisley Five Mile Point Caves predates the appearance of "Clovis" sites by more than 1,000 years. Clovis sites characterized by a distinctive projectile point have been documented throughout many regions of the U.S. and for many years been widely accepted as evidence for the first human settlement of the Americas.

Led by Dr. Dennis Jenkins of the University of Oregon (UO), a team of researchers conducted archaeological excavations and extensive laboratory analyses to amass information challenging the "Clovis First" hypothesis. Intriguingly, along with stemmed projectile points, grinding stones (for grinding plant materials), modified animal bone and woven plant fiber cordage, Jenkins' team recovered coprolites (feces) containing human DNA involving testing by multiple independent laboratories. Over 200 coprolites were radiocarbon dated to pre-Clovis times. The discovery by UO researchers of 14,300-year-old human feces demonstrates the presence of an ancient human population in America's FarWest at the end of the last Ice Age.

"Archaeologists have worked at the site since 1938," said Jenkins who is a research associate at the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History and director of the UO Archaeology Field School in the northern Great Basin. "As we have used increasingly sophisticated scientific techniques in recent years, our understanding of the cultural and megafaunal remains at the site has grown dramatically. Analyses by our research team provides significant new information regarding the timing and spread of the first settlers in the Americas."

The site is located on land managed by the U.S. Department of Interior-- Bureau of Land Management.

"BLM is indeed pleased to see the Paisley Five Mile Points officially listed in the National Register of Historic Places," said Stan McDonald, state archaeologist for Oregon and Washington for the BLM." The site's listing underscores the importance of Oregon's archaeological heritage to understanding the full breadth of the human experience. We extend our thanks to our partner the University of Oregon and associated research team for their dedication and commitment to outstanding research."

Now a sagebrush steppe vegetation community, the Paisley site once was grassy plains surrounding a lake, marsh and river. Camel, bison, horse and waterfowl bones have been found in the area. The people living there 14,300 years ago were gathering and consuming aromatic roots, for which they would have needed special knowledge that would have developed over time.

The National Register is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. More information about the National Register and recent Oregon listings is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).

Other information:

Research at the Paisley Caves
http://pages.uoregon.edu/ftrock/paisley_caves_description.php

Oregon Archaeology Celebration of October 2014 poster showing the coprolite
http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/docs/ArchyPoster2014.pdf
Cassie Sollars
Cassie Sollars
McMinnville's Sollars wins manager's award at state Downtown Revitalization Awards event (Photo) - 10/01/14
Cassie Sollars received the "Main Street Manager of the Year" Award at the Excellence in Downtown Revitalization celebration from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Street Annual Conference in McMinnville. This award is given to a Main Street Manager from a Performing Main Street or Transforming Downtown community for the overall impact he or she has had on the local downtown revitalization program.

When hearing she had received the award, Cassie in her typical understated way said, "It's a cliché but really, I feel so honored to have received this award. The fact that I even get to do this job is amazing - I feel like I'm playing downtown every day. What a gift!"

In nominating Cassie, the McMinnville Board of Directors noted McMinnville's downtown has flourished under the leadership of Cassie throughout her time as manager, and has been especially successful from July 2013 through June 2014.

The nomination included statements from several current board members and former board members who supported the nomination of Cassie as the Main Street Manager of the Year. Comments included:

"If someone was forced to pick just three words to summarize Cassie Sollars, they would be integrity, commitment, and excellence. Her dedication to the community as a whole, and more specifically Downtown McMinnville, is phenomenal." Kyle Faulk, MDA President, Citizens Bank

"Cassie has infused her calm yet effective style as manager throughout the board and merchants alike to guide the program to an explosion of goodwill, popularity, and success in every facet, both tangible and intangible, throughout our downtown." Zack Geary, MDA Board Member, Cellar Ridge Construction

"Cassie has championed the downtown before the City, community organizations and the outside world. She personifies our working downtown and its continuing struggle to find its way in today's economy." Sam Justice, Past President, current committee member, Haugeberg, Rueter, Gowell, Fredricks & Higgins, PC.

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is administered by the State Historic Preservation Office, Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Attached Media Files: News release , Cassie Sollars
Dayton's series of Friday night events won the best special event series award during the Oregon Main Street Conference.
Dayton's series of Friday night events won the best special event series award during the Oregon Main Street Conference.
Dayton's downtown revitalization wins three state awards (Photo) - 10/01/14
Dayton's downtown revitalization efforts were a clear stand-out at the 2014 Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards given by Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Street Annual Conference in McMinnville. Awards were received for:

Best Special Event Series: Dayton Friday Nights
Best Façade Renovation: The Barlow Room
Outstanding Business: Archie's Ice Cream & Eatery

Dayton's "Friday Nights" events have been an amazing ride. This is a series of events, every Friday night from Memorial Day to Labor Day - one part economic development, one part downtown promotion, and a huge part community building! Born of a single suggestion, it has evolved into a collaborative event they are truly proud of.

The owners of the renowned Joel Palmer House fine-dining restaurant in Dayton decided to make another investment in town by renovating a building to house the new Barlow Room right in the heart of downtown. Originally constructed in the 1920's, this structure had seen a fire and major renovations over its life. The recent renovation of the building included the entire structure at a cost of $250,000 financed with private funds. This beautiful renovation has made a big improvement in the look and feel of Dayton's downtown. Local residents are excited to see the improvement and pride in the community is growing with each new completed project.

Scott, Michelle, Ashley and Lindsey Archibald are a shining example of an extremely creative home-grown success. They built a family business, Archie's Ice Cream & Eatery, from the ground up. After being willing to execute some suggested marketing and merchandising strategies, they've found a recipe for sustainable success in their business.

Kelly Haverkate, main street coordinator for the Dayton Community Development Association, said, "I'm truly proud of our community and businesses. They have come together this year and shown faith in Dayton with their level of commitment, investment and hard work. It's been a great year, full of business building, renovation, and collaboration between the Dayton Community Development Association, The City of Dayton, and community members. The Oregon Main Street Awards are a much appreciated recognition and honor."

"We are thrilled to present these awards to Dayton," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "The community has really come together to transform this tiny town in just a few short years through their downtown revitalization efforts."

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Children enjoyed participating in the Carlton Crush
Children enjoyed participating in the Carlton Crush
Carlton event wins state Downtown Revitalization award (Photo) - 10/01/14
The Carlton Crush received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for "Best Special Event" from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Street Annual Conference in McMinnville. This award recognizes excellence in a single, downtown special event, festival, or promotional series. Accepting the award was Rebecca Moore, president, Carlton Business Association and team members including Pat Swanick, Patty Williams and Shirley Ward-Mullen.

The Carlton Business Association created the Carlton Crush to celebrate the agricultural heritage of Carlton, with a focus on their growing wine industry. The event includes grape harvest appropriate competitions such as a Grape Stomp, Barrel Rolling, and Wine Thief races. These activities are designed to highlight the extraordinarily hard work that goes into a bottle of wine in an entertaining manner relatable to locals and tourists alike. The myriad of other activities are designed to highlight the retail and restaurant businesses of Carlton with booths populated by local artisans and purveyors of fair type cuisine. Carnival games are provided to entertain the kids, while live music and a wine/beer garden provide additional entertainment for the adults.

Visitors were also encouraged to stroll Main Street to see what their local businesses have to offer and enjoy the scenic beauty of our many historic brick structures. Attracting over 1,200 attendees from all over the Willamette Valley and Portland area, this event is helping to highlight the best of what Carlton has to offer from their charming retail district replete with historic brick buildings to our thriving agriculturally based community!

"We are thrilled to present this award to the Carlton Crush," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "This is great example of building an event around community assets."

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is administered by the State Historic Preservation Office, Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
The award-winning project in Amity.
The award-winning project in Amity.
Amity restoration project wins state Main Street award (Photo) - 10/01/14
The Samuel Robert Winery received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for the "Best Historic Restoration Project" from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Annual Conference in McMinnville. This award is given to an individual or business that has completed an outstanding historic restoration project in the historic downtown. Samuel and Bryn Coelho were on hand to accept the award.

The Samuel Robert Winery Historic Restoration project transformed a 1913 building, which had provided for various uses and received several historically inappropriate updates over the century, back to its original structural framework and building materials. This involved gutting the current building, exposing and emphasizing the original building image, and reusing existing materials wherever possible. The building now is used as a wine tasting room for two wineries and an exhibition hall featuring local artists' work on a rotating basis.

Eve Silverman, board member with the Amity Downtown Improvement Group, said the organization "is delighted to have another business owner invest in our town and understand the benefits of restoring a historic building while incorporating a new use."

"We are thrilled to present this award to the Samuel Robert Winery Building," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "This is an excellent example of how bringing back the historic character of a building can add to the vibrancy of downtown."

The Awards Presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Many helped with the winning project from St. Helens
Many helped with the winning project from St. Helens
St. Helens event wins state Downtown Revitalization award (Photo) - 10/01/14
The St. Helens Fireworks Parade Fundraising project received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for the "Best Creative Fundraiser" from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Street Annual Conference in McMinnville.

For as long as the residents of St Helens can remember there has been a 4th of July celebration complete with a fantastic fireworks show traditionally funded by some of the area's largest employers. When those employers ceased to operate in St. Helens, it left a large void for community events. Both funding and planning time were especially tight this year due to a change in leadership and faced with the need to raise $10,000 in less than four months.

In light of the challenge, The St. Helens Economic Development Corporation (SHEDCO) decided to quickly put together an effort to collect money while marching in a parade. On June 21, it had a group of 16 people gather together to don costumes and prepare the donation barrels. The firework donation barrel itself was quite a bit of ingenuity from some SHEDCO members, who had strapped a five-foot- tall tall firework donation barrel into a wheelchair. After about an hour of donning their garb and face paint, they hit the streets for the approximate mile-long parade route.

In addition to raising funds for the fireworks, Judy Thompson of SHEDCO said "success also included raising community awareness of the fact it takes many people and businesses to have a fireworks display."

"We are thrilled to present this award to SHEDCO for the Fireworks Parade Fundraising" says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "It demonstrates the creativity needed to support local events."

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Award-winning project in downtown Hillsboro
Award-winning project in downtown Hillsboro
Downtown Hillsboro project wins state Main Street award (Photo) - 10/01/14
The 4th Main project received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for the "Best New Building" from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Annual Conference in McMinnville. This award is granted to the individual, business or organization that has constructed the best new building or building addition in a downtown area.

4th/Main is a new mixed use, transit-supportive project in the heart of downtown Hillsboro's historic Main Street. The 1.1 acre project entails several components - 71 market rate apartment units (including eight loft type units); approximately 3,860 square feet of ground floor retail; and will include the renovation of the vintage, mid-century bank building to incorporate a use supportive of the City's ongoing efforts to bring more evening and weekend activity to Main Street. This project was the result of the City of Hillsboro and Metro initiating an RFQ process in 2010 after the site languished for years.

With unanimous support from a community-based selection advisory committee, Tokola Properties was selected to develop the project. The parties negotiated the deal terms which reflect a complex public-private partnership. The impact of this project is enormous. It is the first mixed use development in Downtown Hillsboro, and it is the first residential project of comparable size in decades.

According to Mayor Jerry Willey, "The 4th Main project is a game-changer for us in our efforts to continue the revitalization of Downtown Hillsboro. As part of our city's 2020 Vision and Action Plan, we prioritized bringing more residents to Downtown Hillsboro, and thanks to the efforts of City leaders, Metro, the Federal Transit Administration, and - most importantly - Dwight Unti's $15 million investment, we are welcoming as many as 125 new residents at 4th Main."

"We are thrilled to present this award to the 4th/Main project," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "The project will bring residents and customers to downtown Hillsboro and contribute to a stronger downtown economy."

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Street 14 Coffee
Street 14 Coffee
Astoria a big winner at state Downtown Revitalization awards presentation (Photo) - 10/01/14
Astoria received the highest number of awards for their downtown revitalization efforts at the 2014 Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards given by Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Street Annual Conference in McMinnville. Awards were received for:

Volunteer of the Year: Tiffany Estes
Outstanding Business: Street 14 Coffee
Best Adaptive Reuse: Buoy Beer Co.
Best Downtown Improvement Project: Garden of Surging Waves

Tiffany moved to Astoria in the late 2000s. Upon her arrival, the Astoria Downtown Historic District Association was experiencing volunteer burnout. The Board of nine had dwindled down to three, and the monthly meetings were attracting a handful of people. Tiffany helped breathe new life back into the organization. She wasn't just active with ADHDA; while serving as ADHDA President, she was simultaneously serving as President of Astoria Rotary. Her community involvement spirit was contagious, and helped bridge gaps with organizations. With community support and partnerships being reestablished, ADHDA had found its energy again. Tiffany has an innate ability to get people involved. She also uses her talents and design expertise for the greater benefit of the organization. Tiffany continues to serve on the ADHDA Board of Directors as Secretary. According to Dulcye Taylor, President, ADHDA, "Tiffany is so integral to the success of the downtown association - it is immeasurable - but this award speaks volumes!"

Micha and Jennifer Cameron-Lattek moved to Astoria from Berlin to take over Street 14 Coffee. Under the new ownership, Street 14 Coffee has transformed, inside and out, into the popular coffee spot it is today. With its brick exterior offset by the bright red, outdoor seating, and the neon sign glowing from the inside, Street 14 Coffee is intriguing and inviting. Jennifer and Micha are always dreaming up new, cooperative business ideas such as partnering with Cocommercial to do coffee tutorials and other training sessions. Their enthusiasm for the community, and generosity and support for downtown is contagious. They have supported community events like the Pacific Northwest Brew Cup, the downtown cleanup, and the Business Development Committee's Downtown Walking Tour. With a staff of five, and continually growing, the next year for Street 14 Coffee, will only get better.

"These kids have turned a diamond in the rough into a diamond," said Taylor. "We are so happy to have them in our community."

Buoy Beer Company was the idea of local entrepreneur Luke Colvin, who was seeking to have a bigger impact in the community beyond his successful arbor business. Luke began tossing around the ambitious idea of opening a brewery. One of his friends suggested his family's 90+ year old cannery building that had been sitting vacant as a potential location. The building was in such a state of disrepair that Luke doubted it would be feasible. But the uniqueness, the history, and the views couldn't be beat. Luke and the founders of Buoy Beer Co. raised funds through local investors to help turn the idea into reality. In less than a year, Buoy Beer Co. was transformed from an old, vacant fish cannery to a stylish and delicious brewery. As Taylor stated, "renovating an old cannery into a brewery/fine dining establishment has its challenges and benefits. The owners and designers of Buoy have met and surpassed all expectations."

Often, there are seemingly chance happenings that lead to great things. A few years ago, Mayor Willis Van Dusen invited Oregon State University professor Duncan Law to a meeting at an Astoria museum. Professor Law noted that the information regarding the Chinese community was in large part absent from Astoria's documented history. The Garden of Surging Waves is a stunning 5,000 sq. ft. interpretive park that pays homage to the pioneering Chinese who immigrated to the United States and worked in Astoria's local canneries and on major infrastructure projects. Since first conceiving the idea for the park, plans evolved through a collaborative design process, and included moving the park from the originally conceived location in the heart of Chinatown to a more visible location. Completion of The Garden of Surging Waves was the first phase in creating Heritage Square which will pay respect to the many other immigrant communities that shaped Astoria. Once fully executed, Heritage Square will serve as a vibrant and historical landmark in the center of town, blending the past, present, and future of Astoria.

"For a tiny town of 10,000 to embrace an urban downtown park is remarkable," said Taylor. "I walk through the park almost every day and marvel at the beauty."

"We congratulate Astoria on the successes to date," said Sheri Stuart, coordinator, Oregon Main Street." The sustained efforts and commitment to downtown revitalization serves as a model and inspiration for other communities."

The Awards Presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Lakeview heritage project wins state Main Street award - 10/01/14
The MC Chuck Wagon & Heritage Exhibit in Lakeview received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for "Outstanding Partner" from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Annual Conference in McMinnville. This award is given to a community which demonstrates how two or more organizations have effectively collaborated on a specific downtown preservation project or on-going downtown revitalization effort. Accepting the award was Ray Simms, the Lakeview town manager.

Like many formerly prosperous lumber and agricultural towns, Lakeview has had its share of economic struggles in recent decades. It was out of dedication to this small community, and the preservation of its ranching history, that D.L. "Jack" Nicol developed the MC Chuck Wagon & Western Heritage Exhibit on a blighted property along the town's main artery. Though other locations and other parcels would have been a far easier and much less expensive fit for the project, Jack and the Town of Lakeview worked together to tackle a problematic parcel at the entrance to town, in an effort to have the most impact on the community. Upon completion, the land and building were gifted to the Town of Lakeview, along with a fund to maintain the project into the future. The Town of Lakeview is successfully maintaining the building, contents, and grounds. Now standing on the once contaminated and troubled site is a handsome structure, beautiful green-space, valuable historic record, and source of regional pride-- a true landmark, welcoming visitors and locals alike, to learn about the ranching heritage of Lake County.

Upon hearing of the award, Nicol stated, "We greatly appreciate this award and we are honored we could help revitalize a section of Lakeview. The MC Chuck Wagon Exhibit project is a win for everyone. The town of Lakeview gets a beautiful building and park, and we get to record the history of one of the greatest chuck wagon outfits in the West."

"We are thrilled to present this award to the "MC Chuck Wagon & Heritage Exhibit" project," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "This project was an innovative approach to celebrating an important part of the area's rich heritage. And, the gift to the City of the property along with funding for its maintenance and upkeep will ensure this is a resource the community and visitors will enjoy for years."

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

Oregon Main Street is administered by the State Historic Preservation Office, Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Port Orford project wins state Main Street award - 10/01/14
The Port Orford Temporary Mural Project received an Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Award for "Outstanding Beautification Project" from Oregon Main Street on Oct. 1 during the Oregon Main Street Annual Conference in McMinnville. This award is given to the municipality or Main Street organization that has designed and implemented an attractive stand-alone beautification project in the downtown. Accepting the award was Karen Auborn of the Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association.

In many of our communities we have watched buildings suffer from years of neglect for a variety of reasons. The Port Orford Main Street Association wanted to mitigate this issue on their "main street" until funds are available to make necessary repairs on a few prominent buildings. Inspired by murals by British graffiti artist Banksy who created several impromptu murals on abandoned buildings to commemorate the third anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the Association decided to create temporary murals to change the appearance of the buildings until resolution occurs - creating bright spots of color where formerly there was blight. Project funding came from the Oregon Arts Commission and Coquille Tribal Community Fund. Project and supporters included the Port Orford Arts Council, the City of Port Orford, the Chamber of Commerce and the Curry County Commissioners.

While these murals provided a temporary solution to problem buildings, they are having a great impact on the town. According to Karen, "a greater community effort was inspired. Additional murals, works-in progress, are going up all over downtown, including the elementary school, additional buildings, on a derelict fishing boat, the library, and way finder signage. The murals may be temporary, but the increase in community spirit is precious. Further work on Port Orford murals will be presented in a panel on Oct 3."

"We are thrilled to present this award to the "The Temporary Mural Project," says Sheri Stuart, Oregon Main Street Coordinator. "This is a great example of how a community can transform a blighted space on a limited budget by building partnerships and bringing together volunteers."

The awards presentation was a highlight of the Oregon Main Street Conference, a popular annual conference that brings together people with an interest in downtown revitalization.

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Oregon Main Street is administered by the State Historic Preservation Office, Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For more information about Oregon Main Street, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Sheri Stuart at 503-986-0679 or sheri.stuart@oregon.gov.
Sgt. Alfred Franklin
Sgt. Alfred Franklin
African American history project seeks additional sites (Photo) - 10/01/14
A crowd-sourced project to identify Oregon's African American historic sites and places has uncovered additional locations in Eugene, La Grande, Corvallis, Portland and other communities. Project leaders are asking the public to continue submitting information about potential sites.

"These places can be buildings anywhere in Oregon where African Americans worked, sites where important events happened, or objects created, installed, or inspired by African Americans," said project manager Kim S. Moreland.

The Oregon Black Pioneers, in partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office, launched the property survey project "Preserving Oregon's African American Historic Places" in May. Working with community partners and volunteers, the organizations want to protect and preserve Oregon's African American historic sites and places from 1844 to 1984.

Committee partner Gwendolyn Trice, founder of Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, commented that "rural counties have significant undocumented structures, places and cemeteries. Conversations are taking place in Eastern Oregon that are providing data that translates rich African American community architectures into historic record."

Preserving Oregon African American Historic Places project is a crowd-sourced project that encourages the public to contribute information online that pertains to existing structures with any African American association in their histories and cemeteries with African American burials. "It is important to note that the data submission can include properties associated with the post-war period from the 1950 to the early 80s," said SHPO outreach and grants coordinator Kuri Gill.

Recent documentations include the historic St. Mark CME Church in Eugene and the 1915 Portland home of retired buffalo soldier Sgt. Alfred J. Franklin and his wife, Cora. Additional data was received on the office building located at 2337 N. William Ave., which was formerly occupied by Dr. John Marshall, one of Portland's early Black medical doctors. The building later served as the original office of The Skanner News, one of Portland's most long-lived Black newspapers.

The deadline for submissions has been extended to Dec. 31. You may submit your information online at www.makeoregonhistory.com or at www.oregonblackpioneers.org. Provide as much information as you can, but it is OK to leave blanks if you do not know the particular information requested. Go to www.makeoregonhistory.com to submit online. The information will be added to the collections of the Oregon Black Pioneers and the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

"Our ultimate goal is to create a multiple property document that identifies sites for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places," said Moreland.

If you have any questions about the survey project you may email Moreland at historic_places@qwestoffice.net or Kuri Gill, Oregon Heritage, Grants and Outreach Coordinator at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.
Scenic Bikeway Committee to Meet Oct. 16 in Salem - 10/01/14
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department's Scenic Bikeway Committee will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 pm, Oct. 16 at the department's office in the North Mall Office building, 725 Summer St. NE, Suite C, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The committee is an as advisory group for the management and designation of routes nominated by the public for state scenic bikeway designation. Its 11 members include representatives of bicycle advocacy organizations, tourism organizations, local governments, and state agencies involved in bicycling recreation or transportation.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance by calling 503-986-0631