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Public invited to comment on federal preservation grant award in Dayton - 04/23/19

The City of Dayton will receive a grant through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation project.

 

Brookside Cemetery

$10,000.00 grant funds

Repair approximately 91 monuments. Complete remote sensing, to determine evidence of burials in an undocumented area of the cemetery. There will be no ground disturbance.

 

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit www.oregonheritage.org and follow the federal grant public comment page link or contact Tracy Schwartz at acy.Schwartz@oregon.gov">Tracy.Schwartz@oregon.gov or 503-986-0661.

 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

May events at Champoeg include Founders' Day, lecture about historic flood - 04/23/19

The annual Founders’ Day celebration and a lecture about the infamous 1861 Champoeg flood are set to kick off the summer season at Champoeg State Heritage Area.

Founders’ Day, celebrating the 1843 vote held in Champoeg that established the first provisional government west of the Mississippi River, will be 1 – 2:30 p.m. May 4 at the park. The annual event is free and will feature living history actors, a fur trapper rifle volley salute and a ceremony to honor the men who participated in the 1843 vote.

The flood lecture, delivered by Willamette University Visiting Professor Cayla Hill, will be 1 p.m. May 18 at the park’s visitor center. Hill will expand on the history and current archeological evidence of the 1861 flood, which decimated the modest river town.

Founders’ Day celebrates a vote held in Champoeg by local settlers on May 2, 1843. A large group gathered that day to decide the future of the Oregon territory. After a spirited debate, a slim majority voted “aye” to form Oregon’s first provisional government, laying the groundwork for Oregon’s statehood in 1859. Founders’ Day has been held annually at Champoeg since 1901.

Cayla Hill has been a visiting professor with Willamette University since 2016. She is an Applied Anthropology doctorate candidate with Oregon State University (OSU), and holds a master’s in Applied Anthropology from OSU.

For more information about the events, contact ranger Dan Klug at 503-678-1251. Information about the park, including maps, is on oregonstateparks.org.

Star Party visitor and telescope
Star Party visitor and telescope
Prineville Reservoir Star Party event celebrates 20th anniversary with special activities and stargazing May 4 (Photo) - 04/23/19

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – The annual Star Party event at Prineville Reservoir State Park turns 20 this year and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is celebrating with a full day of space-related events on May 4. The event is free and will feature kayak tours, astronomy exhibits, scientist-led presentations, model rocket building and launching, and stargazing with provided telescopes.

“It’s an important milestone and we’re excited to celebrate the stars with the community again this year,” said Paul Patton, OPRD resource specialist. “Prineville Reservoir is one of the best spots in Oregon for stargazing and the event is a great start-of-summer activity for everyone to enjoy.”

List of activities:

  • 9 – 11:30 a.m. Kayak tours of the reservoir, led by park staff. Space is limited; reserve your seats online at the state parks event page.
  • 1 p.m. “Solar System Stroll” presentation. Learn about each planet in our cosmic neighborhood from Oregon Observatory volunteers.
  • 1 – 4 p.m. Visit each star party exhibit: safe solar viewing station; meteorite display; virtual reality experience station; telescope displays; space photos and artwork from renowned artist John Foster; various children’s activities focused on astronomical science; information on stars and planets; and more.
  • 2 and 3 p.m. Join Oregon Observatory speakers to learn about the proposed first human missions to Mars and how astronauts will survive on the Red Planet.
  • 4 p.m. Young rocket scientists can design, build and safely launch their own rockets.
  • 7 p.m. Bob Grossfeld, Oregon Observatory director and NASA representative, will present an update on current space exploration missions.
  • 9:30 p.m. Join other stargazers at the permanent observatory housing to peer through various telescopes generously provided by professional and amateur astronomers. The largest telescope, nicknamed “Big Doug,” is 16-inches in diameter.

OPRD partners with the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver for the event.

Prineville Reservoir State Park is 16 miles southeast of Prineville, off Highway 26. More information about the park, including overnight stay details, is on oregonstateparks.org.

Public invited to comment on federal preservation grant award in Aurora - 04/18/19

The City of Aurora will receive a grant through the federal Historic Preservation Fund, administered by Oregon State Historic Preservation Office to fund the following local preservation projects.

 

21690 Main Street NE

$5750.00 grant funds

Masonry wall repair.

 

21631 Main Street NE

$5750.00

Replace the roof.

 

This notice serves to make the public aware of the projects and solicit comments pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The comment period is open for 30 days from the date of this announcement. To provide comments or learn more information about this project visit www.oregonheritage.org and follow the federal grant public comment page link or contact Tracy Schwartz at acy.Schwartz@oregon.gov">Tracy.Schwartz@oregon.gov or 503-986-0661.

 

The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 authorizes a program of federal matching grants, known as the Historic Preservation Fund, to assist the various states in carrying out historic preservation activities. The Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, and in Oregon, is administered through the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.

2019 Oregon Heritage Fellows to present on April 25 - 04/17/19

Three Oregon university students will present their research findings on April 25 at the Oregon Heritage Summit in Medford. The presentations will begin at 4:00 p.m. at the Inn at the Commons, 200 N Riverside Ave, Medford OR, and are free and open to the public.

The emerging scholars will present on the public interpretation of the “Pioneer Father” statue at the University of Oregon, an analysis of War Code housing permits issued in Portland, and research on the practices of charitable medicine in Oregon.

The three students have been named Oregon Heritage Fellows by Oregon Heritage, a division of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, based on the strength of both their scholastic achievement and their research topics. The fellowships encourage the thoughtful inquiry of Oregon's heritage by emerging scholars.

"The Fellows conduct original research into the diverse history of Oregon, often on topics that have drawn less attention from more-experienced historians," explains Chrissy Curran, Oregon’s deputy state historic preservation officer.  "We believe it is important that their research is presented to the public."

The Fellows, their schools, and topics are:

--Marc Carpenter, University of Oregon graduate student in History: “Reconsidering the ‘Pioneer Statue,’ 100 Years Later”

--Kerrie Franey, University of Oregon graduate student in Historic Preservation: “America’s Adventure in Hospitality: Portland, Oregon and War Code Housing”

--Isaiah Silvers, Reed College undergraduate student in History: “From Dispensary to Hospital: Charitable Medicine in Oregon, 1900-1929”

Laura Ferguson, curator of Western History at High Desert Museum, will moderate the session.

The Oregon Heritage Summit April 25-26 brings together staff and volunteers from historical societies, historic landmark commissions, schools and universities, humanities groups, local and state agencies, museums, tourism and economic development organizations, federal agencies and tribal governments.

To find more information and register for the Heritage Summit, visit www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Conference.aspx.

Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council calls for nominations for Doug Newman Memorial Award - 04/11/19

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) is calling for nominations for the annual Doug Newman Memorial Award. The award honors an individual or organization whose hard work, integrity and social responsibility have made significant contributions to non-motorized trails within Oregon. All nominations are due by June 30, 2019. 

Nomination details for the 2019 award can be found online at http://bit.ly/ORTAC.

The award pays tribute to Doug Newman, an Oregonian and ORTAC member whose efforts inspired and benefited the trails and trail users of Oregon. Diagnosed with polio as a child, he was an avid outdoorsman, author and writer for the Eugene Register-Guard. He also worked extensively with the University of Oregon Outdoors Program. Newman died in 1992.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 as part of the Oregon Recreation Trails System Act. Its mission is to advise the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and to promote non-motorized trail recreation and development in Oregon. ORTAC also oversees Oregon's regional and scenic trail designation program. Its members are involved in numerous trail endeavors in their local communities and throughout the state. 

For more information about the award, the trail designation program or ORTAC, contact Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-986-0716 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov

Kiernan House
Kiernan House
Kiernan House listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 04/11/19

The Kiernan House in Portland is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building’s nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination March 6, 2019.

 

The Kiernan House was nominated as a rare survivor of Portland’s Pioneer past and is one of only three Italianate single-family houses built before 1870 that remain in Portland. When the house was built on the southwestern edge of Portland, the area was relatively rural and surrounded by the wooded hillsides to the south and west. As the downtown grew, that area became home to many of the city’s working class and the homes constructed around the Kiernan House were single and multi-family houses large and small.

 

The Kiernan House was also nominated for its architectural significance as a representation of Italian Villa architecture. The house is a one-story building with flush tongue-and-groove board siding, segmental-arched windows, and porch and eave details. The earliest image of this house comes from an 1879 map of Portland that shows a similar representation of the current house now.

 

Located in the Terwilliger Heights neighborhood in southwest Portland, the circa 1865 Kiernan House was moved from downtown Portland to its present location in 1964. The house was in the path of the “new” Stadium Freeway (I-405) construction and so it was slated for demolition.  For $350, James and Ruth Powers purchased the building and found a location to move the building, which is where the building remains. At the time, the location James and Ruth Powers found was a site used by the city to dump dirt while digging a nearby reservoir.

The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Laurelhurst Historic District
Laurelhurst Historic District
National Park Service Lists Laurelhurst Historic District in Portland, Multnomah County, in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 04/11/19

PORTLAND, Ore. –Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) recommended the historic district’s nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service – which maintains the National Register of Historic Places – accepted the nomination on March 18, 2019.

 

The Laurelhurst Historic District encompasses approximately 392 acres and is generally bounded on the north by NE Multnomah and NE Senate streets; the east by NE 44th Avenue and SE 44th Avenue; on the south by SE Stark Street; and on the west by SE 32nd Avenue and NE 33rd Avenue.

 

The Laurelhurst Historic District is significant as Portland's only residential subdivision that captures the planning principles of the “City Beautiful” era and is notable for its examples of early 20th century American domestic architecture. The architecture in Laurelhurst includes styles such as Minimal Traditional cottages, WWII-era cottages, and early Ranch designs of the 1930s and 1940s.

 

The “City Beautiful” era was an American planning movement during the 1890s and 1920s that emerged from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The movement attempted to design places that visually encouraged civic pride and engagement in the urban landscape through architecture. Advocates hoped that the design of beautiful places could increase the quality of life.

 

Laurelhurst also represents an example of a cohesive development by Paul C. Murphy, a notable “community builder” who designed, installed infrastructure and amenities, and determined the main stylistic character of a development.
 

Properties listed in the National Register are:

  • Recognized as significant to the nation, state, or community;
  • Considered in the planning of federal or federally assisted projects;
  • Eligible for federal and state tax benefits;
  • Qualify for historic preservation grants when funds are available;
  • Eligible for leniency in meeting certain building code requirements;
  • Subject to local laws pertaining to the conservation and protection of historic resources.
     
    National Register listing does not place any restrictions on a property at the state or federal level, unless property owners choose to participate in tax benefit or grant programs.
     
    LOCAL GOVERNMENT PROTECTION OF HISTORIC AND PREHISTORIC PROPERTIES
     
    Oregon State law requires local governments to review the demolition and relocation of properties listed in the National Register. Local governments may also add additional protections for listed properties or create local historic districts and landmarks. Contact Brandon Spencer-Hartle at (503) 823-4641 or randon.spencer@portlandoregon.gov">brandon.spencer@portlandoregon.gov, for information on Portland’s local historic preservation programs.

2019 Oregon Heritage Excellence Awards announced - 04/11/19

Individuals, organizations, and projects that have made outstanding contributions to preserving Oregon heritage will receive Oregon Heritage Excellence Awards on April 25 in Medford. The public is invited to attend the presentation with pre-ticketing required.

“The award recipients represent the extraordinary efforts to preserve Oregon’s heritage,” said Beth Dehn, coordinator for the Oregon Heritage Commission. “They also serve as models for others on how to develop new ideas, approaches, and innovations.”

The recipients will be:

-- Building a Better Community: The Canby Women’s Heritage Trail, the first heritage trail in the state to focus on accomplishments of women, with a multi-layered approach to community engagement.

-- Cultural Resources Department of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, for 30 years of dedicated work as a department to preserve and celebrate the Tribe’s cultural history, recently culminating in the Rise of the Collectors exhibit.

-- David Dittman, for reporting an archaeological find on private land going above and beyond expectations to engage the public with the find. 

-- Ann & Owen Nicholson, for their critical role in providing Nehalem Valley Historical Society with a museum and archive.

-- Kylie Pine, for going above and beyond her professional capacity as curator at Willamette Heritage Center to impact the community through teaching, volunteer work, board service, and publications related to local history.  

-- Richard & Judith Wagner, for extraordinary research, writing, and community engagement related to Coos Bay area history.

-- Salem Depot, an excellent preservation project spearheaded by the Oregon Department of Transportation that overcame challenges, worked across agencies, and merged multiple modes of transportation to rehabilitate an historic building.

The Oregon Heritage Excellence Awards are a project of Oregon Heritage, part of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. This year’s awards are being presented in conjunction with the Oregon Heritage Summit.

The awards banquet will be held from 7:00- 9:00 p.m. at the Inn at the Commons (200 N Riverside Ave, Medford) on the evening of Thursday, April 25, preceded by a no-host reception at 6 p.m. Special guests include Gary Buck and Harold Hartman from the Siskiyou Smokejumper Base Museum, who will share a history moment about southern Oregon. Presenters include Oregon Heritage Commissioner Chelsea Rose and former KDRV news anchor Ron Brown.

Tickets are available by using the online registration system that is available through www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Conference.aspx. For more information, contact Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth. Dehn@oregon.gov

Central Oregon Canal Historic District
Central Oregon Canal Historic District
Central Oregon Canal Historic District listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 04/09/19

The Central Oregon Canal Historic District in Deschutes County is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended forwarding the historic district’s nomination to the National Park Service —which maintains the National Register— at their November 2018 meeting. The National Park Service accepted the nomination and listed the Central Oregon Canal Historic District in the National Register on March 18, 2019.

 

The Central Oregon Canal Historic District represents a portion of the Central Oregon Canal, which, along with the Pilot Butte Canal, forms the backbone of the Central Oregon Project, which provided irrigation to tens of thousands of acres of arid and semi-arid lands, transforming the desert into highly-productive agricultural land. Construction on the Central Oregon Canal began in 1904, reached the now-listed segment in 1905, and was completed to near the Crooked River in late 1911. The Central Oregon Canal Historic District comprises approximately 3.4 miles of the 47-mile long Central Oregon Canal, bounded by Ward Road on the west and Gosney Road on the east.

 

In addition to its significance to the history of agriculture in Oregon, the Central Oregon Canal Historic District is also historically significant for its demonstration of the extreme and varied efforts required to overcome the challenging volcanic terrain within a short period of time to satisfy contract obligations and successfully deliver irrigation to the lands beyond it, making possible the settlement and development of areas downstream.

The Central Oregon Canal Historic District is one of 43 individually listed historic properties in Deschutes County. The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Blakely House
Blakely House
Charles O. and Carie C. Blakely House listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 04/09/19

The Charles O. and Carie C. Blakely House in Portland is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building’s nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination March 6, 2019.

 

The Blakely House is locally notable as a distinctive and well-preserved example of Queen Anne architecture in an unusual “butterfly” arrangement, featuring a centered entrance with two symmetrical wings on either side that project toward each street on this corner home. The design is well-suited for corner lots, presenting a “front” to both streets. Decorative Stick style elements include vertical and horizontal trim boards and decorative panels surrounding the windows and doors. The Blakely house was built c. 1893 and is a notable example of the architecture of Portland’s growing streetcar suburbs in the 1890s. The property is named for its first residents, Charles O. and Carrie C. Blakely, who raised their family at the house between 1893 and 1909.

 

The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

McDonald House
McDonald House
Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 04/09/19

The Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House in Portland is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building’s nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination March 6, 2019.

 

The Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House is a locally-notable example of a builder-designed Queen Anne-style house with unique architectural features. Daniel McDonald was a carpenter and homebuilder in Portland who constructed the home in two phases beginning in 1893. The extensive applied decoration of the Queen Anne style allowed for this eclectic approach to home improvement. The McDonald House exhibits characteristic elements from both the earlier and later periods of the Queen Anne style that reflect the two building phases, approximately ten years apart.

 

The McDonalds’ increased economic status after the turn-of-the-century provided the family the opportunity to expand and update their home after its original construction, including new embellishments and interior spaces that reflected their success.  While it was commonplace for homebuilders to use pattern books for residential construction in middle-class neighborhoods during this time, the McDonald House is not a stock design. Instead, it strongly reflects the adaptability of stock plans, and how the increasing availability of building components and decorative millwork through local building suppliers could be used to create unique homes.

 

The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Keeping Historic Cemeteries Alive! Talk at 4 Daughters - 04/09/19

Join the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries at 4 Daughters, 126 West Main Street, Medford, for Keeping Historic Cemeteries Alive! The free event will be April 24 at 7:00 p.m. The presentation explores events in historic cemeteries to connect people with their local history. Cemeteries have a purpose for mourning and memorialization. They also hold the continuous history of the community, the cultural trends over decades and preserved natural space. The presentation will include a historic portrayal, descriptions of music and other events found in cemeteries in Oregon and beyond. Presenters include commissioners Mike Leamy from Astoria, Mark Petrie with Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians from North Bend, and Milo Reed, on the board of Oregon Black Pioneers from Portland. Joining the commissioners will be Dirk Siedlecki with the Friends of Jacksonville Pioneer Cemetery.

OCHC maintains a list of all historic cemeteries in the state. A cemetery must include the burial of at least one person who died before Feb. 14, 1909 to qualify as historic. The seven-member appointed commission helps people and organizations document, preserve and promote designated historic cemeteries statewide.

For more information about the grant program or the OCHC, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Oregon Scenic Bikeways Program celebrates 10-year anniversary May 3 - 04/08/19

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Scenic Bikeways Program is celebrating 10 years of beautiful bike routes 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. May 3 at the Capitol Galleria. The free event is open to the public and will feature cake, gifts, guest speakers and the unveiling of the brand-new scenic bikeways map.

“It’s been a fantastic first 10 years for the program,” said Lisa Sumption, director, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). “We are proud of the work we’ve done and look forward to collaborating with our partners to promote more routes that inspire people to experience Oregon’s natural and cultural beauty by bicycle.”

Sumption is among the guest speakers for the event; remarks will begin at noon.

The Scenic Bikeways Program launched in 2009 and is a partnership between OPRD, Oregon Department of Transportation, Travel Oregon and Cycle Oregon. It is the first and only program of its kind in the United States.

Since 2009, OPRD has designated 17 Scenic Bikeways throughout Oregon, covering 1,253 miles. The newest route, Crooked River Canyon Scenic Bikeway, was designated in 2018.

Scenic Bikeways are nominated by local communities and designated based on scenic quality, road conditions and general riding enjoyment. Route difficulties vary—some are beginner friendly while others will challenge veteran riders—and each passes a through a distinct Oregon landscape.

Over the last decade, Scenic Bikeways have proven to be a boon for local communities: a study published by Travel Oregon found that in 2014, Scenic Bikeway cyclists spent $6.9 million on accommodations and food services and $5.3 million on retail, supporting over 150 local community jobs with earnings of approximately $3.4 million.

Explore the various routes and learn more about the program on the Travel Oregon Scenic Bikeways webpage. 

Hiker at Cape Lookout State Park
Hiker at Cape Lookout State Park
Parking lot closure at Cape Lookout State Park April 9 -- 12 (Photo) - 04/08/19

TILLAMOOK, Ore. – The Cape Trail parking lot at Cape Lookout State Park will be closed April 9 – 12 for repairs and repaving. Cape Trail, a 2.3 mile hike along the cape to a scenic viewpoint, will remain open for the duration of the lot closure.

“Cape Trail is a popular hike and the lot has seen a lot of use over the years,” said Kirk Barham, park manager. “The repairs and repaving will ensure visitors have better access to the trail moving forward.”

Two ways to access Cape Trail during the closure:

  • Park in the day-use parking lot near the park’s campground, and hike the 2.3 mile North Trail south to where it connects with Cape Trail. A $5 day-use parking fee applies.
  • Park along the shoulder of Cape Lookout Road, near the Cape Trail trailhead. Parking is limited.

View more info about Cape Lookout State Park, including a map of the trail system, on the state parks website: https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=parkPage.dsp_parkPage&parkId=134

Attached Media Files: Hiker at Cape Lookout State Park
Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets April 19 in Pendleton - 04/05/19

PENDLETON, Ore. – The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. at the Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, 47106 Wildhorse Blvd, Pendleton. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes presentations from local trail advocates and land managers about regional trail projects, plans, and initiatives.

View the agenda online: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Documents/ORTAC%20Meeting%20Agenda%20April%202019.pdf

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise OPRD and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members representing the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The council holds quarterly meetings in different locations across the state.

For more information about ORTAC, visit https://www.oregon.gov/OPRD/Trail_Programs_Services/Pages/Advisory-Committees.aspx

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals that need special accommodations to attend should contact Holly Emery, Administrative Support Specialist, at 503-986-0803 or Y@oregon.gov">Holly.EMERY@oregon.gov, at least three days in advance.

Natural Area Program Rules Advisory Committee meets April 8 in Salem - 04/04/19

SALEM, Ore. - The Natural Areas Program Rules Advisory Committee will meet at 10 a.m. – noon April 8 in the second floor meeting room at the Oregon State Archives Building, 800 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open the public.

Agenda items include discussing proposed amendments to rules guiding the Oregon State Natural Areas Program. The proposed rule amendments would:

  • Allow for provisional registrations of natural areas under active restoration.
  • Clarify language related to technology changes.
  • Improve alignment of program operation directions with current goals.

No public comments will be accepted during the meeting; a comment period for the draft rules will be opened later this year.

The advisory committee is administrated by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). Its eight volunteer members belong to various state agencies and nonprofit groups.

Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Katie Gauthier, legislative and policy coordinator with OPRD, at least three days in advance: 503-947-8625 or Katie.Gauthier@oregon.gov.

Recreational Trails Program now accepting grant applications for motorized and non-motorized trail projects - 04/01/19

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) has opened the grant cycle for the 2019 Recreational Trails Program (RTP). More than $2 million in federally-funded grants is available to construct, expand and improve public trails for motorized and non-motorized use.

Eligible applicants include local governments, park districts, state and federal agencies, Tribal governments, nonprofits and other government entities that manage public recreation trails. Nonprofits must demonstrate partnership with a land manager and be registered as a nonprofit in Oregon for at least three years prior to the application date.

Grant funds are available for construction, heavy restoration, trailhead facilities, land or easement acquisitions, safety and education, trail assessment for accessibility or maintenance, and water trails.

How to apply
To start the application process, navigate to the OPRD online grant application system: oprdgrants.org. Returning applicants should log in with their email address. New applicants must request an account via the online application system.

Interested applicants must first submit a letter of intent via oprdgrants.org by April 30. The deadline for completed grant applications is June 15.

Upcoming webinar
A grant workshop webinar that outlines the application process will be held 10 a.m. – noon April 11. To register for the webinar, email Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP grant coordinator, at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov.

Materials from the webinar will be available online a few days after the session: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/trails_apply.aspx  

More info
RTP is a federal aid assistance program under the Federal Highway Administration. It’s administered in Oregon by OPRD.

Additional information, including the RTP grant manual, application worksheet, and application instructions can be found online: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/trails_more.aspx.

Additional questions can be directed to Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP grant coordinator, at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.

Charles O. Sigglin Flats listed in National Register of Historic Places (Photo) - 03/28/19

The Charles O. Sigglin Flats in Portland is among Oregon’s latest entries in the National Register of Historic Places.

Oregon’s State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building’s nomination at their October 2018 meeting. The National Park Service—which maintains the National Register—accepted the nomination on March 7, 2019.

Designed by architect Emil Schacht and built for real estate investor Charles O. Sigglin in 1908, the Sigglin Flats is notable as one of the best examples of the fourplex building type in the Craftsman Style in the Buckman neighborhood area. Schacht is one of the most influential local architects whose designs introduced Portland to the emerging Craftsman style. The Sigglin Flats shows Schacht’s ability to add Shingle and Colonial Revival style elements to the Craftsman building, and his use of his own signature design elements that makes his buildings unique and identifiable. Smaller than traditional apartment buildings, the duplex and fourplex types were designed to blend in with their neighboring single-family residences. Population growth and streetcar development spurred the growth of residential neighborhoods in the area, prompting landlords and developers to invest in revenue-generating multi-family buildings like the Sigglin Flats.  

The National Register of Historic Places was established as part of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).