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Sunset Beach day-use parking, portion of Fort-to-Sea Trail closed Oct. 14 - 21 to facilitate controlled burn in park - 10/11/19

WARRENTON, Ore. – The Sunset Beach State Recreation Site day-use parking lot and the portion of Fort-to-Sea Trail between the Camp Rilea bridge and the beach will be closed to visitor access Oct. 14 - 21 to facilitate a controlled burn in the park.

Beach access for pedestrians and vehicles via Sunset Beach Road will remain open during the closure.

Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is partnering with Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) to set the controlled burn next week; the precise day will be based on weather conditions. As of this writing, ODF is targeting Oct. 14 or 15 for the one-day burn.

The controlled burn will target brush piles in the park north of Sunset Beach Road. Several brush piles were left over from a recent forest thinning project in the area and are prime fuel for wildfires.

Local residents and park visitors may see smoke from the fires next week, however all fires will be closely monitored by state officials.

Celeste Lebo, natural resource specialist with OPRD, says the extended day-use parking and trail closure is necessary for visitor safety.

“We’ll be monitoring the controlled burn areas and checking for hot spots for several days after the project concludes,” says Lebo. “We’re asking park visitors and hikers to be patient while we ensure the area is safe.”

Learn more about Sunset Beach State Recreation Site on oregonstateparks.org. More info about the Fort-to-Sea Trail, including maps, is on nps.gov/lewi/planyourvisit/forttosea.htm

State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation meets October 17 and 18 in Salem - 10/09/19

SALEM, Ore. – The State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) will meet October 17 at the Oregon Department of Energy Building for a tour and to consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places and October 18 at the North Mall Office Building to consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. Both the meetings and the tour are open to the public.

 

Thursday, October 17: SACHP will meet at 9 a.m. at the Oregon Department of Energy Building in the Meitner Room, 550 Capitol Street NE, Salem to consider nominations to the National Register. Following, a tour will depart at 2 p.m. from the Oregon Department of Energy Building for a tour of the Salem Pioneer Cemetery. The tour is expected to conclude by 5 p.m.

 

Friday, October 18: SACHP will meet at 9 a.m. at the North Mall Office Building, in Room 124A, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem, for a joint meeting with the Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, and the Historic Assessment Review Committee. At 1:15 p.m. the SACHP will resume consideration of nominations to the National Register.

 

Thursday’s meeting agenda: hearings of four proposed nominations. Friday’s meeting agenda: hearings of three proposed nominations. For specific hearing times, refer to the online agenda: www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/Pages/nrhp_sachphome.aspx

 

The committee will review seven proposed nominations: Multnomah School, Portland; Wheeldon Annex, Portland; Supreme Court Building, Salem; Elmer and Linnie Miller House, Portland; Britt Gardens Site, Jacksonville; John A. and Hattie Keating Residence, Portland; Portland Zoo Railway Historic District, Portland.

 

Nominations recommended by the SACHP go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

The SACHP is a nine-member governor-appointed citizen commission with credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

 

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting may be made with at least three days of advance notice by calling (503) 986-0690.

 

More information about the National Register of Historic Places process is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Attached Media Files: Agenda , Press Release
Month-long paving project begins this week at Fort Stevens State Park - 10/09/19

WARRENTON, Ore. – Local construction crews will be paving sections of Fort Stevens State Park’s South Jetty Road beginning this week. All areas of the park will remain open during the four-week paving project; park visitors are asked to be careful when driving near work crews and may experience short delays due to construction traffic control.

Justin Parker, manager at the park, says the paving work is part of preparations for the larger South Jetty Major Rehabilitation Project, led by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

“South Jetty Road will see heavy use during the rehabilitation project, so USACE contractors are improving road conditions now,” said Parker. “Plus, park visitors will reap the long-term benefits from the freshly paved road.”

The rehabilitation project is slated to begin Nov. 1.

Local Seaside company Bayview Asphalt has been contracted to complete the paving work.

More information about the park is on oregonstateparks.org. Learn more about the rehabilitation project on the USACE webpage: nwp.usace.army.mil/jetties/

Recreational Trails Program Advisory Committee meets Oct. 22-24 in Bend - 10/08/19

BEND, Ore. - The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee will meet 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Oct. 22-24 at the Comfort Inn and Suites, 62065 SE 27th St, Bend. The meeting is open to the public.

The bulk of the Oct. 22 and 23 agenda consists of RTP applicants presenting their proposed projects to the committee. Presentations will continue the morning of Oct. 24 and the committee will evaluate and score proposed projects into the afternoon. The committee will also create a priority ranking list of proposed projects for future consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.    

View the full meeting agenda online.

The RTP Advisory Committee consists of ten volunteer members who represent various user groups and land managers. Eligible RTP applicants include cities, counties, park and recreation districts, state agencies, federal land management agencies, Tribal governments, and nonprofits.

RTP is a federal aid assistance program of the United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. RTP grants help create and improve recreational trails in Oregon.

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend must contact Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP grant coordinator, at least three days in advance: 503-986-0716 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">Jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet October 17 & 18 in Salem - 10/04/19

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Salem October 17 and 18.

On October 17, Commissioners will gather at 3:00 p.m. to tour Salem Pioneer Cemetery.

On October 18, the Heritage Commission will gather at 9 a.m. at the North Mall Office Building, Room 124, 725 Summer St NE, Salem OR 97301 for a joint meeting with other committees of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s heritage division. The joint meeting will include a training provided by the Oregon Ethics Commission, updates from the Oregon Cultural Trust, and discussions about the division’s Preservation and Heritage Plans. The joint committee meeting will conclude at approximately 12:40 p.m.

At 1 p.m. on October 18, the Heritage Commission will convene at the Oregon State Archives Conference Room at 800 Summer St NE, Salem OR 97301 for a business meeting. The agenda includes updates about education and tourism, as well as an opportunity for public comment on the Commission’s proposed goals for the 2020-2025 Oregon Heritage Plan. The Heritage Commission is proposing four statewide goals and asking individuals and organizations to participate in working toward them. The public is invited to provide feedback on the new statewide focus of the plan, how these goals reflect current and future efforts of heritage organizations in Oregon, and how the Commission can support heritage efforts in meeting these goals.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov.

Committee to review Oregon Heritage grant applications - 10/04/19

On October 23, the Oregon Heritage Grant Review committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Oregon Heritage Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Heritage Commission for final review and approval on November 4, 2019. The meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, room 124A at 9:00 a.m. Interested parties may also call into to listen at 1-877-402-9757 access code:  4605348.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .

Reedsport Main Street Program wins state downtown revitalization award - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the awards event in Tillamook, Oregon. The awards event kicks off the Oregon Main Street Conference, Oct. 2-4. A total of twenty businesses, projects, and people were recognized, including Reedsport Main Street Program’s #TuesdaysOnTheTown social media campaign for Best Downtown Image Activity.   

Reedsport’s #TuesdaysOnTheTown was a Facebook campaign to promote the businesses on Main Street through interviewing business owners about their lives, their business and how it came to be, what it means to be a business owner on Main Street, and why they chose Reedsport. 

Reedsport Main Street assembled them in a narrative format that mimics the popular “humans of New York” Facebook page. Its target audiences are local residents and regional visitors. The pilot #TuesdaysOnTheTown post is the most interacted posted in the history of Reedsport Main Street plateauing at 1,625 engagements and reaching 3,900 organically. 

All of the businesses that have participated to date have reported receiving in-person positive feedback and visitation prompted by the post.

10 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Four Mid-Willamette Valley Towns Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the awards event in Tillamook, Oregon. A total of twenty awards were given with four mid-Willamette Valley towns receiving nine of the awards; three in Lebanon, three in Albany, one in Independence, and one in Dallas. This awards event kicks off the Oregon Main Street Conference taking place in Tillamook, Oct. 2-4. 

Lebanon

  • Lebanon’s Conversion Brewing won the much coveted award for Business of the Year. Owners Matt and Rachelle Cowart opened Lebanon’s first brewery in 2015 with help from family and friends to gut and remodel a vacant downtown building. Before Conversion Brewing, there was very little foot traffic after 5 pm. Conversion provided a place to go for residents they participated in or sponsored a number of events that draw people to downtown like The Gambler 500, Swift Summit, and Summer Bands and Brew, and they participated in a campaign to brew a specialty beer to raise funds for those affected by wildfire in California last year.
  • City of Lebanon won the award for Outstanding Partnership. The city and Lebanon Downtown Association (LDA) are listed as partners on 20 strategic action items in Lebanon’s 2040 Vision and Plan. This partnership has resulted in the restructuring of the city’s incentive program to allow both micro-grants and interest payment for larger projects, to increased and on-going funding of $25,000 for LDA’s main street manager, to LDA providing assistance to getting Urban Renewal passed without issue.
  • Lebanon’s Dala Johnson won the award for Board Member of the Year. Dala has been involved with the Lebanon Downtown Association for the past 12 years as either a board member or volunteer. She has helped the organizations create a more diverse funding base, including working with the city for support through the transient lodging tax. She has worked thousands of hours creating posters, doing marketing campaigns, approaching sponsors, working with businesses, gathering volunteers, and putting on events to keep the LDA a vibrant part of the community.
  • Lebanon’s T.W.E.R.K. Project won the award for Best Design Education Activity. Duck Buddies LLC, owner of a historic building in downtown, used their building as a model for using available resources and best practices in historic preservation. They did several things to create buzz about the restoration of the prism glass transom windows beneath sheets of plywood including a kick-off celebration the day the uncovering took place, a lighting celebration when the project was completed that included dancing behind the transoms, and they participated in local marketing efforts to promote awareness of available assistance from the Lebanon Downtown Association, the city’s incentive program, and Oregon Heritage’s  Diamonds in the Rough grant. Since this project happened, four more transom restoration projects are underway and Lebanon’s incentive program has 8 applications for their next round of funding and another successful application for the Diamonds in the Rough grant.

Albany

  • Albany’s Margin Coffee wins award for Best New Business. Gabe Anderson and his team at Margin Coffee have created a bright, airy, and welcoming “third space” for multi-generations in the short time it has been open, earning the nickname of “Albany’s Living Room.” They have become involved in the community by sharing information on neighbor businesses and community events and fundraisers, offering their meeting room space to nonprofits, and hosting “Coffee with a Cop” events at the Famers’ Market.
  • Albany’s 206 ½ Hotel wins award for Best Upper Floor Renovation. Ashlee Graybeal restored a historic boarding house to create a 7-unit boutique hotel, the first of its kind in downtown Albany. She focused on refurbishing the space with vintage and recycled pieces mostly sourced from Willamette Valley companies.
  • Albany’s Albany Civic Theater also received special recognition as a downtown nonprofit.  

Independence

  • Independence Downtown Association’s Walk of Hearts event won the award for Outstanding Fundraiser. Residents purchase the sides of a cut-out heart to write a message on and the hearts are displayed on light poles in downtown. In addition to serving as a fundraiser, the event is a great way to get people downtown during February which is typically a quiet month in Independence.

Dallas

  • Dallas’s Corby’s Public House won the award for Best Façade Renovation. The project included replacing the damaged concrete and bringing back several of the historic façade elements, as well as an interpretation of the historic neon sign.

Seven other towns in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Klamath Falls Downtown Association wins state downtown revitalization award - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the awards event in Tillamook, Oregon. The awards event kicks off the Oregon Main Street Conference, Oct. 2-4. A total of twenty businesses, projects, and people were recognized, including Klamath Falls Downtown Association’s Klamath Piano Project for Best Placemaking Project. 

In May of 2019, The Klamath Piano Project placed pianos at six locations throughout Downtown Klamath Falls and six artists transformed the pianos into visual arts pieces. The pianos were left in place with instructions for anyone who happened to walk by to sit down and play if the mood struck. 

This project was spearheaded by Klamath Falls Downtown Association volunteer Laty Xayavong and sponsored by local businesses. Since installation, many downtown visitors and residents have been observed playing the pianos or enjoying someone else playing them. Professional pianists have also been scheduled periodically. The project gives local artists a chance to show off their art in a new way and gives the community and visitors a creative outlet to express themselves in a public space. It brings joy and surprise to public spaces in downtown Klamath Falls by providing a space for people to gather, celebrate, and make spontaneous connections with each other.

10 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Beaverton and Hillsboro Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the awards event in Tillamook, Oregon. A total of twenty businesses, projects, and people were recognized. Five of those recognized were from Beaverton and Hillsboro. This awards event kicks off the Oregon Main Street Conference taking place in Tillamook, Oct. 2-4. 

Beaverton

  • Big’s Chicken won the award for Best Adaptive Reuse. Big’s Chicken, a popular new restaurant, adapted a Mid-Century Modern building that was previously used as a retail space and dental office. This was the first new restaurant to open on Watson Avenue since the City launched its restaurant strategy initiative. Significant design changes were made including removing multiple interior walls and bringing back the full transparency of the storefront more in keeping with the building’s original architecture. The project was the first to include significant outdoor dining which is drawing attention to the area when activated.
  • Beaverton Downtown Association’s Old Town Passport won the award for Best Retail Event. The Passport to Old Town, designed to look like real passports, was created to expose people to 20 unique businesses in downtown Beaverton. After visiting at least 15 businesses, the passports were turned in to one of the businesses to be entered in a grand prize pool consisting of gift cards. 2,000 passports were printed resulting in hundreds of people visiting new businesses.
  • Beaverton’s Ex Novo Brewing won the award for Best Interior Renovation. Portland-based Ex Novo Brewing opened their brewpub in the heart of downtown in the location of a former mattress store. Their extensive renovation included building out a kitchen, bar, and dining room in the former retail space, in addition to addressing some structural challenges like a sloping floor that needed leveling. The brewery’s original plans called for adding an interior brick wall behind the bar. During demolition, workers revealed an existing brick wall which they were able to incorporate in the design. The project has had a significant impact by bringing the first brewery to downtown, creating 13 new jobs, and activating an important corner location.
  • Beaverton Downtown Association’s Michelle Barnett won the award for Volunteer of the Year.

Hillsboro

  • Hillsboro’s Temporium won the award for Best Economic Vitality Activity. Temporium was a temporary storefront in downtown Hillsboro created to bring entrepreneurs without a storefront together to create shopping opportunities over the holidays.

9 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Baker City Downtown wins state downtown revitalization award - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the awards event in Tillamook, Oregon. This awards event kicks off the 2019 Oregon Main Street Conference, Oct. 2-4. A total of twenty businesses, projects, and people were recognized, including Baker City Downtown’s Taste of Baker event for Best Special Event.  

The Taste of Baker event highlights the amazing and diverse cuisine in downtown Baker City. Dining businesses are invited to set up a booth outside their establishment to either showcase their offerings or try new items. This event was very successful selling over 13,000 tokens for a total of $19,300 for local restaurants. Response from the community was very positive and restaurants are starting to plan for next year. 

10 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

Two North Coast Towns Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the awards event in Tillamook, Oregon. A total of twenty businesses, projects, and people were recognized. Three of those recognized were from Astoria and Warrenton. This awards event kicks off the Oregon Main Street Conference taking place in Tillamook, Oct. 2-4. 

Astoria

  • Astoria Downtown Historic District Association’s Executive Director, Sarah Lu Heath, won the award for Main Street Manager of the Year. In the three years Sarah Lu has served as executive director of the Astoria Downtown Historic District Association, she has had a palpable impact on ADHDA and downtown Astoria. Her achievements include Bringing a developer in to rehab a derelict and long abandoned hotel into much needed workforce housing, tackling parking management, partnering with property owners to make much needed building improvements and helping them find funding, creation of the Love Your Streets clean-up program, and spearheading the 13th Street Alley clean-up and mural project.
  • Astoria’s M&N Building won the award for Best Historic Preservation Project. Marcus and Michelle Liotta purchased the M&N building in 2016 after the building sat vacant for over 20 years. The building was stabilized by setting over 20 galvanized steel anchors, some requiring depths of over 60 feet. The original brick veneer was removed and restored and when reapplied camouflaged a lot of the settling but some remain as a reminder of the history this building has endured. This project is an example of thoughtful preservation and problem-solving engineering and has given this building new life.

Warrenton

  • Downtown Warrenton Revitalization was recognized as the Won to Watch. Since embarking on their downtown revitalization efforts in 2018 they have cleaned up ten downtown properties, cleaned up weeds and added planters and flowers downtown, increased participation in 4th of July activities, created a successful Thursday Farmers Market, created a new dog park, and have conducted outreach to property owners resulting in three new businesses and increased foot traffic.

9 other towns in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

State Recognizes Twenty Individuals, Businesses, & Projects for Excellence in Downtown Revitalization - 10/02/19

TILLAMOOK — Oregon Main Street announced its 2019 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners this evening at the Awards Celebration in Tillamook. The Awards Ceremony is the opening event for the Oregon Main Street Conference, Oct. 2-4, 2019.

The twenty projects, businesses, & individuals honored are:

  • Best New Business – Margin Coffee, Albany
  • Business of the Year – Conversion Brewing, Lebanon
  • Honorable Mention for Business of the year – Albany Civic Theater, Albany
  • Best Adaptive Reuse – Big’s Chicken, Beaverton
  • Best Economic Vitality Activity – Temporium, Hillsboro
  • Best Downtown Retail Event – Beaverton Downtown Association’s Old Town Passport, Beaverton
  • Best Special Event – Baker City Downtown’s Taste of Baker, Baker City
  • Best Image Activity – Reedsport Main Street Program’s #TuesdaysOnTheTown, Reedsport
  • Best Placemaking Project – Klamath Falls Downtown Association’s Klamath Piano Project, Klamath Falls
  • Best Design Education Activity – T.W.E.R.K. Project, Lebanon
  • Best Façade Renovation – Corby’s Public House, Dallas
  • Best Interior Renovation – Ex Novo Brewing, Beaverton
  • Best Upper Floor Renovation – 206 ½ Historic Hotel, Albany
  • Best Historic Preservation – M&N Building, Astoria
  • One to Watch – City of Warrenton
  • Outstanding Partnership – City of Lebanon
  • Outstanding Fundraiser – Independence Downtown Association’s Walk of Hearts, Independence
  • Volunteer of the Year – Beaverton Downtown Association’s Michelle Barnett, Beaverton
  • Board Member of the Year – Lebanon Downtown Association’s Dala Johnson, Lebanon
  • Main Street Manager of the Year – Astoria Downtown Historic District Association’s Sarah Lu Heath, Astoria

“The award winners serve as inspiration to communities across our Network and reflect some of the highest level of revitalization success,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “We are so inspired to see how our historic downtowns across Oregon are coming to life through the creativity, passion, and plain hard work of community members.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2018, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,901,913 in private building improvement projects, $104,225,575 in public projects, 1,106 private rehab projects, 650 net new businesses, and 3,226 net new jobs. In addition, over 207,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonmainstreet.org.

[Update] Sunset Beach day-use parking, portion of Fort-to-Sea Trail closed Oct. 2 - 9 to facilitate controlled burn in park - 10/02/19

UPDATE 10-2-19: The controlled burn has been canceled, due to high winds in the area. State officials will attempt the burn next week, weather permitting. All day-use park facilities and the Fort-to-Sea trail are open. Precise dates of the new burn and closure will be sent next week.

ORIGINAL RELEASE TEXT

WARRENTON, Ore. – The Sunset Beach State Recreation Site day-use parking area and the portion of Fort-to-Sea Trail between the Camp Rilea bridge and the beach will be closed to visitor access Oct. 2 – 9 to facilitate a controlled burn in the park.

Officials from Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) will set the controlled burn in the park north of Sunset Beach Road Oct. 2 - 3. The burn will target brush piles that were left over from a recent forest thinning project in the area.

Local residents may see smoke from the fires Oct. 2 - 3, however all fires will be closely monitored by state officials.

Celeste Lebo, natural resource specialist with OPRD, says the extended day-use parking and trail closure is necessary for visitor safety.

“We’ll be monitoring the controlled burn areas and checking for hot spots for a week after the project concludes,” says Lebo. “We’re asking park visitors and hikers to be patient while we ensure the area is safe.”

Beach access for pedestrians and vehicles via Sunset Beach Road will remain open during the project work and extended closure.

Learn more about Sunset Beach State Recreation Site on oregonstateparks.org. More info about the Fort-to-Sea Trail, including maps, is on https://www.nps.gov/lewi/planyourvisit/forttosea.htm.

Public comment period opens for changes to administrative rules regarding new Nehalem Scenic Waterway - 10/01/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on changes to Oregon Administrative Rule language regarding the newly designated Nehalem River Scenic Waterway. The proposed change would adopt management rules for the land adjacent to the waterway.

Specifically, the proposed rules would guide future development within 1/4 mile of the riverbank along the 17.5-mile section of river designated as the waterway.

The Nehalem River Scenic Waterway was designed by Gov. Brown in June. It begins at Henry Rierson Spruce Run campground and ends at the confluence of Cook Creek, near Cougar Valley State Park.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Nov 4. Comments can be made online, in writing, via email or in-person at an upcoming public meeting:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its November 2019 or February 2020 business meeting.

Full text of the proposed change is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/Rules/pages/index.aspx.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the Oct. 28 meeting should contact Katie Gauthier, OPRD legislative and policy lead, at least three days in advance: Katie.Gauthier@oregon.gov or 503-947-8625.

Public comment period opens for changes to administrative rules for heritage grant programs - 10/01/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on changes to Oregon Administrative Rule language regarding the agency’s Certified Local Government and Preserving Oregon grant programs. The proposed changes would adopt several new rules to establish procedures and criteria for application processes, eligibility determination, and grant fund distribution.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Oct. 31. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its November 2019 or February 2020 business meeting.

Full text of the proposed change is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/Rules/pages/index.aspx.

Public comment period opens for changes to administrative rules regarding statewide anniversary designations - 10/01/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on changes to Oregon Administrative Rule language regarding statewide anniversary designations. The proposed changes include a rule amendment and a rule adoption, with the former necessary to reflect a law enacted during the 2019 legislative session.

The proposed amendment would update the responsibility of the Oregon Heritage Commission from designating statewide anniversary “celebrations” to statewide anniversary “commemorations.” The proposed adoption adds a rule to clarify the application process for events seeking designation.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed changes through 5 p.m. Oct. 31. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its November 2019 or February 2020 business meeting.

The full text of the proposed change is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/Rules/pages/index.aspx.

Public comment period opens for updates to administrative rules defining ATV classes - 10/01/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on a proposed change to Oregon Administrative Rule language defining class IV ATV’s. During the 2019 legislative session, state lawmakers voted to change the definition to increase the width and weight of vehicles classified as class IV ATV’s. An administrative rule change is necessary to reflect the change in state law.

Under the new law and proposed rule, class IV ATV’s are defined as weighing 2,500 pounds or less and measuring 80 inches wide or less.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Oct. 31. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its November 2019 or February 2020 business meeting.

The full text of the proposed change is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/Rules/pages/index.aspx.

Manson Barn and heritage garden at Champoeg
Manson Barn and heritage garden at Champoeg
Celebrate the fall season at Champoeg's Harvest Day Oct. 5 (Photo) - 10/01/19

Champoeg State Heritage Area is celebrating the return of cooler temperatures and changing leaves this fall with the annual Harvest Day event at the park 1 - 4 p.m. Oct. 5. Park staff and volunteers will celebrate the history of fall in the Willamette Valley with pioneer-era activities all afternoon. The event is free and family-friendly.

“Fall harvest was an important time for Oregon-country settlers,” says Dan Klug, interpretive ranger at Champoeg. “Harvest celebrations afforded farmers the opportunity to socialize, play games, tell stories and enjoy the fruits of their hard summer work.”

The afternoon’s activities will include: children’s games from the 1800’s; wheat threshing; quilting, lace making, spinning and sewing; demonstrations of blacksmithing, tinsmithing and carpentry; the “Apple Snap Challenge”; fresh produce from the park’s Heritage Garden; live music and live plowing demonstrations.

Champoeg State Heritage Area charges a $5 day-use parking fee. More information about the park, including maps and driving directions, is on oregonstateparks.org.

Public comment period opens for changes to administrative rules governing grant funding for bicycle and pedestrian projects - 10/01/19

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on changes to Oregon Administrative Rule language that governs grant funding for bicycle and pedestrian recreation and transportation projects in the department.

The proposed rule changes are in reaction to a law enacted during the 2019 legislative session. The new law directs OPRD to work in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to allocate up to $4 million per biennium for bicycle and pedestrian projects that meet recreation and transportation needs.

The proposed rule changes would amend and adopt language that provides additional guidance on the application process and selection criteria for local government grants and prioritization of department spending on signature, scenic or recreational trail projects until the statute sunsets on Jan. 2, 2025.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Nov. 4. Comments can be made online, in writing, via email or in-person at an upcoming public meeting:

  • Online: oregon.gov/oprd/RULES/Pages/Rulemaking
  • In writing: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, attn. Katie Gauthier, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301
  • Email: D.publiccomment@oregon.gov">OPRD.publiccomment@oregon.gov
  • In-person: 6 - 8 p.m. Oct. 29 in room 124 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Agenda includes an overview of the proposed rule changes and an opportunity for public comment. Please arrive before 6:30 p.m. to sign-up to comment.

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff plan to present a final recommended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its November 2019 or February 2020 business meeting.

The full text of the proposed change is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/Rules/pages/index.aspx.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the Oct. 29 meeting should contact Katie Gauthier, OPRD legislative and policy lead, at least three days in advance: Katie.Gauthier@oregon.gov or 503-947-8625.

Annual archaeology series returns to Smith Rock State Park in October - 09/26/19

TERREBONNE, Ore. - Smith Rock State Park will host its annual Oregon Archaeology Celebration lecture series in October. The Friday evening presentations will all take place 7 - 8:30 p.m. at the park’s welcome center, 10087 NE Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne. The free talks are open to the public and will include a question and answer period.

“We’re excited to continue the series again this year,” said Paul Patton, resource specialist with Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD.) “It’s an outstanding opportunity for people to discover the compelling, colorful history and heritage of our region.”

Smith Rock State Park charges a $5 day-use parking fee. View a PDF map of the park online.

Scheduled presentations:

Oct. 4: “Life and Art on the Columbia Plateau,” presented by Aurolyn Stwyer, Native Arts and Cultures Foundation mentor fellow and master beadwork artist. Learn more online.

Oct. 11: “The Rock Art of Washington State,” presented by Eric Iseman, rock art researcher and retired OPRD park ranger. Learn more online.

Oct. 18: “The Tribal History of the Oregon Paiutes, including the Story of Animal Village (Smith Rock area),” presented by Jim Gardner, author, historian and President Emeritus of Lewis & Clark College. Learn more online.

Oct. 25: “Obscure Oregon: The Columbia Southern Railroad,” presented by Paul M. Patton, OPRD resource specialist. Learn more online.

The Oregon Archaeology Celebration was established in 1993 when Gov. Barbara Roberts issued a proclamation that set aside one month each year to celebrate and promote Oregon’s archaeology, cultural heritage and history.

Smith Rock State Park is located off U.S. 97, three miles north of Redmond and three miles east of Terrebonne. The park’s welcome center is ADA accessible.

More information and directions are available at oregonstateparks.org or by calling 541-923-7551, ext. 21.

Historic cemetery commission to meet in Salem, October 17 & 18 - 09/26/19

Join the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) in Salem, on October 17 & 18 for a public meeting and tour. The tour will be at Salem Pioneer Cemetery and the meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street NE, rooms 124A & 124B.

The OCHC will kick of the schedule with the tour from 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. on October 17. We will learn about preservation efforts, archaeology projects, and recognition of African American and Chinese American history in Salem.

On October 18, beginning at 8:30 a.m., OCHC will have a joint meeting and training with other heritage commissions. The agenda includes training and exploration of the state heritage and preservation plans. The OCHC regular public meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. The agenda includes discussion of confederate flags in historic cemeteries, commissioner reports, and future meetings. Meetings are accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations and translation may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance of the meeting by calling 503-986-0690.

OCHC maintains a list of all historic cemeteries in the state. A cemetery must include the burial of at least one person who died before Feb. 14, 1909 to qualify as historic. The seven-member appointed commission helps people and organizations document, preserve and promote designated historic cemeteries statewide.

For more information about the grant program or the OCHC, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

View of Harris Beach day-use area from Harris Butte
View of Harris Beach day-use area from Harris Butte
Harris Beach day-use area closed Sept. 30 - Oct. 11 (Photo) - 09/26/19

BROOKINGS, Ore. – The day-use area at Harris Beach State Recreation Area will close weekdays Sept. 30 – Oct. 11 to facilitate a gorse removal project in the park. The day-use area will be open during the weekend, Oct. 5-6.

Trail access to the day-use area will be closed too, including the Butte Trail and Harris Beach Trail. Beach access will remain open for the duration of the closure; day visitors are encouraged to park in the park’s viewpoint lots and hike the Rock Beach Trail down to the ocean shore.

The closure will not affect the park’s campground, however campers may hear some project noise during the day. View a PDF map of the park online.

The gorse removal project will center on Harris Butte, a popular hiking spot near the park’s day-use area. Contracted work crews will rappel down the slopes of the butte with chainsaws and other equipment to remove the gorse and apply herbicide to the remaining stumps.

Dani Padilla, park manager, says the closure is for visitor safety.

“There will be falling rocks, shrubs and other debris from the work, so we’re asking visitors to steer clear of the area until the project is complete,” says Padilla.

Gorse, an invasive plant, was introduced to the southern coast in the 1890s. Learn more about removal efforts online: gorseactiongroup.org.

Learn more about Harris Beach State Park: oregonstateparks.org.

Salmonberry Trail meeting set for Oct. 11 in Tillamook - 09/25/19

TILLAMOOK, Ore. - The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Oct. 11 in the Officer’s Mess at the Port of Tillamook Bay, 6825 Officer’s Row, Tillamook. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: a discussion about Washington County becoming a member of the intergovernmental STIA agreement, updates on the newly-formed Salmonberry Trail Foundation and a report from the strategic plan implementation team.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 84-mile corridor that follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and terminates in Banks. The proposed route connects eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the Oregon Coast Range.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Dennis Wiley at least three days in advance.

Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors meets Oct. 2 in Newport - 09/24/19

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Governor’s Task Force on the Outdoors will hold their fourth meeting of the year 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Oct. 2 in the Gleason room of the Oregon Coast Aquarium, 2820 SE Ferry Slip Road, Newport. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: addressing the Oregon Conservation Strategy; an overview of some of the social, wildlife and environmental considerations of outdoor recreation; and time for public comments. View the full agenda online.

Task force members will gather Oct. 1 to tour Cape Perpetua, which is about 26 miles south of Newport.

The meeting is the fourth in a planned series; subsequent meetings will be held throughout Oregon. The group met for their inaugural meeting in May at Silver Falls State Park, near Silverton. 

Gov. Brown established the task force earlier this year, with the directive to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, to guide the task force.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and is chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. View the full membership list online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Maggie Riley, OPRD region administrative assistant, at 503-986-0733 or iley@oregon.gov">Maggie.Riley@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.

Historic cemetery and marker repair workshop in Corvallis - 09/19/19

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will offer a historic cemetery assessment and marker cleaning and repair workshop October 12.

 

The free workshop will be from 10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. at the Corvallis IOOF Pioneer Cemetery, 434 NW Witham Hill Drive. It will address marker assessment, cleaning, leveling and repair. The workshop is FREE, but registration is required.  Register online at the Oregon State Parks Store. https://store.oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_item&itemId=162&eventId=167

 

Participants should bring their lunch, snacks, water to drink, a stool or folding chair to sit on, gloves to wear, a hat, sunscreen, appropriate clothing as this is a hands on workshop, comfortable shoes, a pen and note pad and camera if they want to take photos during the workshop. The workshop will take place rain or shine.

 

The workshop is presented by Dave Pinyerd and Bernadette Niederer of Historic Preservation Northwest. The cemetery is providing the site and a portion of the materials.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. State law established the seven-member commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn about the workshop or to get more information on historic cemeteries visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets Oct. 2 in Roseburg - 09/18/19

ROSEBURG, Ore. – The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 1 - 4 p.m. Oct. 2 at the Roseburg Public Library, Deer Creek Room, 1409 NE Diamond Lake Blvd, Roseburg. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes program updates and recommendations to appoint new and returning members to the Council.

View a PDF of the full agenda online.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members: one representative from each of the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The council holds quarterly meetings in different locations across the state.

For more information about ORTAC, visit the council's website

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend should contact Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-986-0716 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.