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ATV Advisory Committee and Grant Subcommittee meets February 8-9 in virtual meetings - 01/27/22

SALEM, Oregon--The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Advisory Committee will meet February 9 and the Grant Subcommittee will meet February 8. Both will be virtual meetings on Zoom Webinar, which is open to the public to attend as an “attendee”.

At the February 8 meeting, the ATV Grant Subcommittee will review 12 grant requests for projects related to ATV program funding throughout Oregon. 

February 8

  • ATV Grant Subcommittee meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. with grant presentations starting at 9:30 a.m. The subcommittee will finalize scores and make recommendations after the last presentation. The subcommittee will provide recommendations on grant funding to the OPRD director for referral to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

    Zoom Webinar – https://us06web.zoom.us/j/86817735019?pwd=Wk5QZllPYTdPa3MvTyt4NzVEOE1wdz09
    Webinar ID: 868 1773 5019
    Passcode: 572219
    Phone option (253) 215 8782

At the February 9 meeting, the ATV Advisory Committee will review legislative concepts and hear other ATV program updates. 

February 9

Zoom Webinar –https://us06web.zoom.us/j/89437193949?pwd=Y2VrZ0U2RE1nQkc2YnhjRkNFTWx1UT09 
Webinar ID: 894 3719 3949
Passcode: 353283
Phone option (253) 215 8782

The ATV Grant Program provides funding statewide for All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) recreation. Grant funds come from ATV user permit sales and a percentage of gasoline tax money.  

More information about the state ATV program is available at www.OregonOHV.org

Special accessibility accommodations may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance by emailing Ian Caldwell.

 

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Committee meets Feb. 9 and Feb. 25 to revise rules governing issuance of archaeological permits - 01/26/22

The State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), will hold two virtual Rule Advisory Committee meetings Feb. 9 and Feb. 25. The committee will review and discuss proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules that govern how the state issues archaeological permits.

The meetings start at 9 a.m. and will be live streamed on YouTube for the public at youtube.com/channel/UCkqL6iVPBrfCTO27cNmCTwg. Meeting agendas do not include time for public comment.

The committee will also discuss any financial or economic effects of the proposed rules on businesses, local governments or other stakeholders.

After the committee review, the proposed rules will open for public comment. Details will be posted on the Proposed OPRD Rules web page.

State law requires a permit for archaeological excavation or collection of archaeological objects on public land; permits are also required for archaeological excavation within an archaeological site on private land.

SHPO appointed members to the Rule Advisory Committee. Members comprise representatives of state and federal agencies, state universities with archaeology programs, county and city planning departments, Oregon archaeology associations and Tribes. 

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meetings should contact Jo Niehaus at least three days in advance of the meeting at 503-590-9210 or jo.niehaus@oprd.oregon.gov

Salmonberry Trail virtual meeting rescheduled for Jan. 28, 2022 - 01/25/22

The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet virtually to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor 10 a.m. – noon Jan. 28, 2022. This is a rescheduling of the Dec. 17, 2021 meeting. The public can view the proceedings via https://bit.ly/stiavideo.

On the agenda:

  • Planning work
  • STIA membership and structure
  • Roles and responsibilities between STIA and the Salmonberry Trail Foundation (STF)
  • Implementation strategies, including trail standards and construction priorities 
  • STF report, priorities and engagement 

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 87-mile corridor that follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and ends in Banks. The proposed route connects eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the Oregon Coast Range.  More information is at salmonberrytrail.org.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail. 

To submit public comment for board members to review during the meeting, send comments to jon-paul@salmonberrytrail.org at least three days prior to the meeting.

Grants available for historic cemetery projects - 01/24/22

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is offering grants for qualified historic cemeteries. The annual grants fund projects that preserve historic cemeteries. Projects funded in the past include marker repair workshops, fencing, signs, interpretive panels and brochures, security lighting, access improvements, records management, and more. 

Awards typically range between $1,000 and $8,000, but have been higher. Anyone may apply for a grant. Projects must be related to historic cemeteries listed with the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries. Recent projects include marker repair and workshops in several cemeteries, installations of signs and informational kiosks, a preservation plan, and a fence replacement. 

“Our goal is to preserve Oregon’s historic cemeteries and offer support throughout the application process,” said historic cemeteries program coordinator Kuri Gill. Last year’s awards included projects in in Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Jackson, Klamath, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Polk, Tillamook, Umatilla, and Yamhill Counties.

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free, online workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application system will be offered February 9, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Registration is required. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

State law established the seven-member historic cemeteries commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. These grants support the goals of the Oregon Historic Preservation Plan and the Oregon Heritage Plan

To learn more about the grants or workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Statewide trails advisory committee seeks to fill vacancies - 01/21/22

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers for two positions on the Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Grants Advisory Committee. 

The committee is seeking a snowmobile representative and water trail representative to join the ten-member committee charged with evaluating grant proposals for statewide trail projects. It meets once or twice a year, virtually or at locations throughout the state. Time commitment varies and includes reviewing and evaluating 25-40 grant applications each annual funding cycle. Committee members serve three-year terms and are eligible to serve a second term.

Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon with experience in at least one of the following areas: land management, recreation planning, trail planning and recreation-related volunteerism. Trail enthusiasts qualified to evaluate project proposals are also encouraged to apply. Candidates should demonstrate an awareness of the needs and trends of the recreation type they represent and of broad statewide trail needs. 

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD grant advisory committee appointment interest form by Monday, Feb. 28. The form is available online at oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Pages/GRA-rtp.aspx#8

The competitive grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to non-profit organizations and governments for motorized and non-motorized trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and developing or improving trail facilities.

For more information about the advisory committee or application process, contact Jodi Bellefeuille, program coordinator, at ellefeuille@oprd.oregon.gov">Jodi.bellefeuille@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-856-6316.

Historic cemeteries commission meets February 4 - 01/21/22

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via online meeting on February 4 at 1:00 p.m. The agenda includes discussion of invasion species and future workplan items. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment. Meeting information is on the agenda or you can follow this link to register for contact. 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oprd.oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oprd.oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Learn about plans to improve the Oregon Coast Trail at virtual open house - 01/20/22

The public is invited to learn about plans to close gaps along the Oregon Coast Trail (OCT). Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is hosting an online open house and webinar for people to learn about the Oregon Coast Trail Action Plan that aims to improve safety, access and convenience for all trail users, with an emphasis on connecting trail gaps.

Visit the open house at bit.ly/OCTOpenHouse1 any time through Feb. 11 to view a presentation about the project and provide feedback.

The project team will also host a live webinar on Zoom from 12 – 1 p.m. Jan. 26 via bit.ly/OCT-Webinar1, or access the meeting by calling in:

Dial: (253) 215-8782 

Meeting: 992 0765 9206 

Password: 12622

The OCT stretches along the entire 362-mile coastline, from the border to border, offering hikers spectacular coastal vistas, lush forests and recreation opportunities for day hikers and long-distance hikers alike. Most of the trail is on sandy beaches, with sections of overland trail across headlands, forests, rivers and through some of the coast’s 28 cities. About 10 percent of the trail is disconnected, inconvenient, unsafe or inaccessible — mainly where the route requires people to hike on the shoulder of U.S. 101 or where it follows county roads and local streets. 

OPRD is leading the planning effort to close these gaps in partnership with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Association of Oregon Counties (AOC) and Oregon Solutions. The plan will identify gaps in the hiking experience and determine actions and funding needed to improve and maintain the trail over time.

The OCT was approved in 1971 by the Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council and developed and managed by OPRD as part of the state park system of Oregon. OPRD manages most of the trail; some sections are managed by the US Forest Service, Oregon Department of Transportation and cities through which the trail passes.

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the webinar or open house should contact Paul Reilly at eilly@oprd.oregon.gov">paul.reilly@oprd.oregon.gov or 541-272-7394.

Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee to meet Feb. 10 to evaluate grant applications - 01/20/22

The Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) will meet online to evaluate grant applications for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). Committee members will rank and establish a priority list of applications from around the state for projects to develop or rehabilitate public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) administers this federally funded grant program.

The meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Feb. 10, 2022. It is open to the public, but no public comment time is scheduled. View the agenda at oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Documents/LWCF-2022-OORC-Agenda.pdf for a list of project proposals and link to the online meeting.

Recommendations from the OORC will be submitted to the Oregon State Parks Commission for review and approval at their April meeting. OPRD will then forward approved project proposals to the National Park Service for final approval. 

The OORC is made up of nine members who represent a variety of interests and are appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director.

LWCF is a financial assistance program of the National Park Service. LWCF grants provide matching funds to state and local governments for acquiring and developing public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Since 1964, this national grant has awarded more than $60 million for Oregon recreational areas and facilities. Information is on the LWCF web page on the OPRD website

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meeting should contact Nohemi Enciso by Feb. 7 at 503-480-9092 or nohemi.enciso@oprd.oregon.gov

Grants available for historic properties and archaeology projects - 01/20/22

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for work on historic properties and for archaeology projects. The annual grants fund up to $20,000 in matching funds for preservation projects. Both grant programs support the goals of the Oregon Historic Preservation Plan. 

The Preserving Oregon Grants fund preservation of historic properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Work may include non-maintenance preservation like window repair, roof work, foundation projects, plumbing, and electrical needs. Recently funded projects include preservation of the following historic properties.

  • Aurora Colony Historical Society
  • Churchill Baker LLC, Baker City
  • Creswell Library Building
  • Mt. Angel Blacksmith Shop
  • Santiam Pass Ski Lodge
  • Sodhouse Ranch, Malheur County
  • Union High School, Union
  • Willamette Grange Hall, Benton County

Preserving Oregon Grants can also fund archaeology projects for significant work contributing toward identifying, preserving and/or interpreting archaeological sites. Archaeology projects by Southern Oregon University, Willamette University and the Vanport Placemarking Project were funded last year. 

The Diamonds in the Rough Grants help restore or reconstruct the facades of buildings that have been heavily altered over the years. These grants return buildings to their historic appearance and potentially qualify them for historic register designation (local or national). Recent façade projects have taken place in Lincoln City, Oregon City, Rhododendron, and Wallowa. 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free, online grant workshop specific to these grant programs and how to use the online grant application will be offered. Visit the Oregon Heritage grants webpage to register. 

  • March 9, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. for Diamonds in the Rough building façade projects.
  • March 8, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. for Preserving Oregon Grants archaeology projects. 
  • March 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. for Preserving Oregon Grants historic property projects.
     

Recorded trainings and tips are also online. To learn more about the grants and workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Grants available for Oregon museum projects - 01/19/22

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

Museums may apply for a variety of projects. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness, and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops, and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside of the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission. It is possible to enfold response to COVID-19 challenges into appropriate projects. 

“This program is quite broad and can be used to collect the full spectrum of Oregon’s history, preserve it and raise awareness of it. We hope to see both creative and practical proposals,” said Oregon Heritage Coordinator, Katie Henry. Past projects include:

  • Interpretation and education projects at the Albany Regional Museum, Elkton Community Education Center, Five Oaks Museum (Washington County), Willamette Heritage Center (Salem); 
  • Collections projects by Architectural Heritage Center, B-17 Alliance Foundation, Crater Rock Museum, Deschutes County Historical Society, Jordan Valley Owyhee Heritage Council, Keizer Heritage Foundation, Sheridan Museum of Historic, Willamette Heritage Center (Salem); and 
  • Tourism projects by the Hoover-Minthorn House (Newberg). 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free online workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application will be offered February 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Advance registration is required. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. The commission supports Oregon Heritage Plan goals that include: including more voices of Oregon’s history, access to Oregon’s historic resources, attaining best practices and promoting the value of heritage. 

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet January 31 - 01/18/22

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via zoom at 9:00 a.m. on January 31. Its agenda includes a presentation on the Value of Heritage Resources in Community Resilience messaging tool recently completed and added to the Oregon Heritage Value of Heritage Toolkit.  interested parties must register through Zoom to receive access information. You can access the agenda and the registration information here

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at (503) 877-8834 or katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

Local Government Grant Program now accepting applications for park and recreation projects - 01/13/22

The Local Government Grant Program (LGGP) is accepting applications for the 2022 grant cycle. The LGGP helps local government agencies fund outdoor park and recreation areas and facilities, and acquire property for park purposes. Approximately $14 million in reimbursement grant funds are available for the 2022 cycle. 

Eligible applicants are cities, counties, metropolitan service districts, park and recreation districts and port districts. 

A webinar workshop is scheduled from 9-11 a.m. Feb. 15 to help new and returning applicants navigate the application process and learn about the program. Register for the live workshop at https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_YAu5zdqwR0ecTR8H-jsaGw. The workshop recording will be available to view after Feb. 15 at oprdgrants.org

Program grants are split into large, small and planning categories. Application deadlines vary for each grant type:

  • Large grants deadline: April 1
  • Small grants deadline: May 1
  • Planning grants deadline: May 15

Access to the LGGP application is online at oprdgrants.org. The site also includes additional information about the LGGP, including the grant manual, application instructions and program schedule.

The Lottery-funded grant program is administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The program has awarded more than $70 million in reimbursement grant funds since 1999.

Virtual meeting set for Jan. 24 to discuss rules guiding take-off and landing of drones in state parks and the ocean shore - 01/11/22

SALEM, Oregon—The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) Rule Advisory Committee will meet virtually Jan. 24 to review and discuss proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules. The agency intends to create rules to provide the clarity needed for drone pilots, hobbyists and the general public to know where drone take-off and landing is allowed and prohibited within a state park and along the ocean shore.

The meeting starts at 10:30 a.m. and will be live streamed on YouTube for the public at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkqL6iVPBrfCTO27cNmCTwg. The meeting agenda does not include time for public comment.

The committee will also discuss any financial or economic effects of the proposed rules on businesses, local governments or other stakeholders. 

After the committee review, the proposed rules will open for public comment. Details will be posted on the Proposed OPRD Rules web page.

OPRD appointed members to the Rule Advisory Committee. Members comprise individuals who are drone pilots, agency representatives, conservationists, and active visitors to state parks. Additional RAC members have been added for this second meeting.The first meeting was held in November 2021. 

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meetings should contact Katie Gauthier at least three days in advance of the meeting at 503-510-9678 or katie.gauthier@oregon.gov.

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Public hearing set Feb. 3 to accept testimony on Manzanita foredune grading permit request - 01/07/22

MANZANITA, Oregon—A virtual public hearing will be held Feb. 3, at 6 p.m. to accept public testimony on foredune grading in Manzanita. The permit application is for 2.9 acres located west of the statutory vegetation line in front of properties at 8831 Spendrift Lane and 8822 Horizon Lane. The excess sand will be placed west of the project area on 1.5 acres.

Register at https://bit.ly/dunepermithearingregistration to attend the Zoom meeting or call Allison Mangini, 541-220-3786, to be added to the attendee list.

The permit application can be viewed at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/PRP/Pages/PER-ocean-shore.aspx., see 2998 Permit Application.

Contact Ocean Shore Specialist ic.crum@oprd.oregon.gov">Eric Crum,  503-801-3361, for questions about the permit application process. 

 

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Arch Cape trail reopens at Oswald West State Park; other north coast trails remain closed - 01/05/22

A section of the north coast trail system in Tillamook County is now open after a 15-month closure, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reports. The 1.4-mile Arch Cape section of the Arch Cape to Cape Falcon Trail at the north end of Oswald West State Park is open and safe for well-prepared hikers.

Park rangers worked with Trailkeepers of Oregon and Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) South Fork Forest Camp to clear fallen trees and debris and rebuild damaged sections.

At the south end of the park, the 1.6-mile section of North Neah-Kah-Nie Mountain Trail, from U.S. Highway 101 to the summit, remains closed. Crews are clearing trees and repairing the trail this winter and spring, and OPRD plans to open the trail by summer.

Two other trails on the North Coast also remain closed:

  • Saddle Mountain State Natural Area: The park and trail to the summit are closed indefinitely due to unsafe trail conditions and a major water and septic system failure. Cox is working with Clatsop County to schedule repairs.
  • Cape Lookout State Park: The entire North Trail that connects the Day-use Area to the Cape Trail is closed. A contractor is working to clear downed trees from the trail so that staff can assess the extent of repairs needed. OPRD is working toward a summer 2022 opening.

“We know how much people love these trails, and we are working diligently on repairs to make them safe and enjoyable,” said North Coast District Manager Justin Parker. “Closed trails are dangerous and impassable, and we ask people to respect closure signs and explore open trails in the region.” 

OPRD closed the trail sections at Oswald West and Cape Lookout following an extreme windstorm on Labor Day 2020. They are part of the Oregon Coast Trail that stretches along the 362-mile coastline. Many other trails on the north coast are open — information on trails managed by OPRD is at stateparks.oregon.gov.