Oregon Dept. of Forestry
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Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee meets Aug. 23 at ODF headquarters in Salem - 08/16/19

SALEM, Ore. — The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee will meet Friday, Aug. 23 at 9:30 a.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters in Salem. Items on the committee’s agenda include:

  • Updates on the Forest Management Plan (FMP) and Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) processes
  • Introduce Workshops for FTLAC and the Public:
    • FMP Measurable Outcomes in September
    • Draft Forest Management Plan in December
  • Board of Forestry Topics:
    • Climate change and carbon sequestration
    • Nehalem River Scenic Waterway designation

The meeting agenda and materials will be posted on the department’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Building C, 2600 State St., Salem This meeting is open to the public. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

Mt. Pisgah park in Lane County evacuated due to wildfire - 08/15/19

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. – A fire started on the southeast side of Mt. Pisgah at approximately noon today.  The South Cascade District of the Oregon Department of Forestry responded to the fire and is currently overseeing operations. The park areas have been evacuated and closed to public access.

There are currently between 75-100 personnel working the fire, with 3 type 2 helicopters, 2 single seat aircraft, 1 air tanker and air attack.  There are also three 20 person hand crews and a 10-person inmate crew at the fire.

The Pisgah Fire is currently at approximately 50 acres.  The fire is burning in grasses, brush and timber.  No structures are threatened at this time.

Spokesperson Devon Ashbridge with Lane County Emergency Management stated that, “Howard Buford Recreation Area (Mt. Pisgah) will remain closed to all visitors throughout the weekend as fire crews continue to mop up after Thursday afternoon’s wildfire. No visitors will be allowed entry to the park. Entrances will remain barricaded until the closure is lifted.  Lane County Emergency Management asks residents to respect the closure of the park for their own safety and so that responders can focus on fire-fighting efforts.”

“We are aggressively attacking this fire and plan to have ground crews work throughout the night and as long as needed to contain the fire completely.”  said Michael Currin, Unit Forester of ODF South Cascade District.  “To maintain quick access to the fire and safety for all concerned, we ask that the public please avoid the area until further notice.” 

The Department of Forestry is working jointly with Lane County Parks, Lane County Emergency Management, Oregon State Police, local rural fire departments, Oregon Department of Transportation and multiple private contractors.  The Willamette National Forest is assisting with sending hand crews.

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Fire--Final Update Ward Fire 2019 - 08/15/19

Media Release

Final Update Ward Fire

Klamath Falls, Oregon - This will be the final daily update unless the situation changes significantly.

Fire managers are pleased with the progress so far. The fire is currently in mop up stage and containment has risen to 63%. This success shows that the hard work is paying off. Minimal fire activity is expected today and unburned islands of fuel in the interior will continue to smolder and produce light smoke periodically. Firefighters will continue to focus on mop up operations along the perimeter and will begin removing excess equipment and supplies from secure portions of the fireline. Air resources are available to assist with bucket drops, should that be necessary.

Warm and dry conditions will continue for the next several days, with a slight cooling on Thursday and Friday as an upper level trough passes nearby. As the front passes, northwest winds of 12-17 mph are expected with gusts as high as 25 mph Thursday evening. During his description of the weather forecast at the morning shift briefing, Fire Behavior Analyst Brian Reel told the firefighters that "Today is going to be a test of all of the work you have done for the past few days."

A local Type 3 organization will assume command of the Ward Fire on Friday August 16, at 6am. The Oregon Department of Forestry IMT 2 would like to thank its partner the Bureau of Land Management. The team would also like to express its gratitude to the community of Keno, Keno Elementary School, Keno Fire Department, and PacificCorp for sharing their town, their school, and their campground.

For future information about the Ward Fire, contact the Klamath-Lake ODF office at: (541) 883-5681.

Ward Fire Update August 15, 2019 8:00am Oregon Department of Forestry IMT 2 Chris Cline, Incident Commander

 

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ODF_John_Day_Strike_Team.jpeg
ODF_John_Day_Strike_Team.jpeg
Oregon Department of Forestry uses specialty aircraft to detect fires after thunderstorms (Photo) - 08/14/19

SALEM, Ore. – With over 14,000 lightning strikes recorded as thunderstorms swept across Oregon between August 4 and 12, firefighters suppressed 88 lightning fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. As lightning fires often start in remote areas, ODF used specialty aircraft to aid in early detection efforts.  

After successful efforts in Oregon’s severe 2015 fire season, ODF again contracted with Colorado’s Division of Fire Prevention and Control to bring one of their Multi-Mission Aircraft (MMA) to Oregon to assist with finding difficult to detect fires. This specialty aircraft flew across much of eastern Oregon on Sunday and Monday. Early detection is critical to ODF’s mission keeping fires at the smallest possible size, which reduces the financial impact to landowners and Oregonians and limits impact to natural resources such as air, soil, and water quality, wildlife habitat, and aesthetic and recreation values.

Four fires were detected during Sunday’s flight in ODF’s Central Oregon District.  These fires were single-tree fires or small spots with little to no visible smoke.  Due to the remote location and heavy vegetation cover, it is highly likely these fires would have increased in intensity as temperatures warmed.  “Looking at the location and fuel types where those fires were detected, it’s not a good feeling to imagine what they could have been,” said Mike Shaw, Eastern Oregon Area Director. 

Equipped with cameras and software specially adapted for use in wildfire applications, the MMA system uses a sensor ball with an infrared camera and two color cameras (wide and narrow) to detect heat sources from several miles away.  While infrared technology is used to detect heat sources, the MMA is best utilized during the day where the color cameras can be used to collect information regarding terrain, fuels, and fire behavior.  This data, combined with information on fire locations and perimeters, is transmitted directly to resources on the ground. The MMA operates at approximately 20,000 feet—well above tactical aircraft fighting wildfires—so there is no impact to firefighting operations.

This specialty aircraft will be flying across southwest Oregon in the coming days. ODF’s Southwest Oregon District has already been using some of its assigned aircraft to look for fires resulting from the more than 1,600 lighting strikes that hit the area last week. In addition to detection, aircraft have greatly assisted crews on recent fires in the district by dropping retardant on steep, remote terrain and giving firefighters a broad, aerial view of what they’re fighting.

The MMA was contracted using severity funding from a Special Purpose Appropriation from the Oregon Legislature.  Severity funding supports fire suppression activities that are outside the normal ODF districts’ budgeting and activities. 

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Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-14 0800 - 08/14/19

Fire Summary:

Warmer and drier conditions continue to play a role in the Ward fire. Predicted flare up activity during the day kept firefighters busy on Tuesday. Crews achieved good successes on some sections, reinforcing control lines. As a result, several engines and crews will be reassigned today from more secure parts of the line to some of the more challenging areas. In the eastern section, there are still many islands of green, unburned areas inside the fire perimeter, which take longer to secure.

Today, crews will concentrate on meticulously checking for and extinguishing hot spots, flagging areas of concern, and meeting mop up standards, which vary from a minimum of 200 feet from the hard black (areas where there is no fuel) to 300 feet in incompletely burned and areas of higher fuel concentrations. With a front coming through Thursday morning, this work is critically important. “The biggest variable on fire behavior is weather,” says Chris Cline, Incident Commander. “The fuels and the slope stay constant.” Cline also noted the importance of continued vigilance on the fireline; “The job that we are doing today affects what happens on the fire tomorrow.”

The level of containment (currently at 47%) is a good measure of the Incident Commander’s assessment of the fire’s potential. Simply put, containment level is the percentage of the perimeter that has been determined controlled. In this case, there may be no smoke or flames in the other 53% of the perimeter, but firefighters cannot yet rule out the possibility that a light wind might ignite some of the unburned fuels near the line and result in spot fires.

If conditions stay as predicted, it is likely that steady progress towards full containment will continue through the week.

Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-14 0800 - 08/14/19

Fire Summary:

Warmer and drier conditions continue to play a role in the Ward fire. Predicted flare up activity during the day kept firefighters busy on Tuesday. Crews achieved good successes on some sections, reinforcing control lines. As a result, several engines and crews will be reassigned today from more secure parts of the line to some of the more challenging areas. In the eastern section, there are still many islands of green, unburned areas inside the fire perimeter, which take longer to secure.

Today, crews will concentrate on meticulously checking for and extinguishing hot spots, flagging areas of concern, and meeting mop up standards, which vary from a minimum of 200 feet from the hard black (areas where there is no fuel) to 300 feet in incompletely burned and areas of higher fuel concentrations. With a front coming through Thursday morning, this work is critically important. “The biggest variable on fire behavior is weather,” says Chris Cline, Incident Commander. “The fuels and the slope stay constant.” Cline also noted the importance of continued vigilance on the fireline; “The job that we are doing today affects what happens on the fire tomorrow.”

The level of containment (currently at 47%) is a good measure of the Incident Commander’s assessment of the fire’s potential. Simply put, containment level is the percentage of the perimeter that has been determined controlled. In this case, there may be no smoke or flames in the other 53% of the perimeter, but firefighters cannot yet rule out the possibility that a light wind might ignite some of the unburned fuels near the line and result in spot fires.

If conditions stay as predicted, it is likely that steady progress towards full containment will continue through the week.

Fire--Ward Update 2019-13-08 0800 - 08/13/19

Fire Summary:

With the warmer, drier weather yesterday, there were several flare-ups during the day and overnight inside of the perimeter of the Ward Fire, where residual hot spots ignited drying grass and brush. Flare-ups such as these are common with the current weather conditions and are a vivid reminder that work on this fire is not yet finished. “We are still dealing with a fire,” said Mitch Williams, Field Night Operations.

Conditions also gave rise to a couple of new fires ignited by the last storm in areas close to the Ward fire yesterday. These fires were quickly controlled by Initial Attack crews.

Firefighters spent much of the last 24 hours continuing to secure firelines and mop up along the perimeter of the burned area. During mop up operations, firefighters extinguish any smoking or burning materials with soil or water, helping to ensure that there are no remaining embers that could reignite a fire. They also remove standing dead trees (snags), dig up and smother smoldering stumps, or move logs that might roll downhill.

For much of the perimeter, there now exists a 30-50 foot wide mop up zone that should help prevent remaining hot spots from igniting anything outside of the burned area in that section. This zone will continue to be secured and expanded in width during the coming days.

Infrared mapping of the fire by aircraft on Sunday night showed that the fire still had significant heat, despite the recent rain. Monday’s night shift crews began using palm infrared cameras to locate areas of heat closest to the perimeter of the fire that may pose an immediate threat.

Today, crews continue systematic searching along gridlines for potential spot fires in the areas of most concern outside of the fire margins. Along the south perimeter of the fire, concentration is developing hand line through the rocky rim of the Klamath River Canyon.

Safety considerations include steep terrain, snags in and around the fires, rattlesnakes, power lines in the area, and areas of unburned fuels.

Cooperators assisting partner agencies ODF and BLM on the fire include: Green Diamond Resource Company and the Klamath County Fire Chief.

 

Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-12 0800 - 08/12/19

Favorable weather conditions helped crews continue to make solid progress on the Ward fire, increasing containment to 24% as of yesterday evening. John Pellissier, Operations Section Chief, summed it up during the briefing as night-shift firefighters prepared to go out. “Today we had a good day of work, building off good work last night”. The fire size was updated to 1301 acres (down from 1329 acres), based on added GPS reference points.

During night shift crews finished laying hose along the west, north, and east flanks of the fireline. Today, crews will improve the firelines and continue mop up deeper into the burned area. Mop up along much of the lines has reached 30 to 50 feet into the burned area.

The southern flank of the fire is perched atop the steep canyon rim, overlooking the Klamath River. Fire managers seized an opportunity yesterday to have crews scratch in some basic hand line, which is the first step toward securing the extremely steep slopes below the canyon rim. Night crews avoided the steep terrain in observance of safety, and crews today will begin improving the line along the southern edge of the fire.

Today’s weather forecast calls for warmer and dryer conditions with winds from the west with gusts of 4-10 mph. Firefighters expect that the increasing temperature and wind will allow smoldering areas of the fire to flame up.

Safety considerations continue to be snags, rattlesnakes, power lines, and rolling debris on the steep slopes on the southern edge of the fire.

Cooperators assisting partner agencies ODF and BLM on the fire include: Green Diamond Resource Company and the Klamath County Fire Chief.

Click here for fire perimeter map.  Click here for infrared map.

Oregon Department of Forestry IMT 2, Chris Cline, Incident Commander

Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-11 0800 - 08/11/19

The Ward Fire started early afternoon August 9th, 2019 when a lightning storm came through the area. The fire instantly started running and spotting, aided by topography and winds. Crews from ODF and BLM along with Green Diamond timber company responded rapidly.

At  fire has had minimal growth since yesterday due to the moist and cool conditions and effective dozer lines built directly against the burning perimeter on the northern flank of the fire. Last night, firefighters worked to mop up 30 feet in on the fireline in the northwest flank of the fire. Crews also worked to install hose lays along the completed dozer line on the northeast portion.

The plan for today is the continue to secure, improve, and hold constructed fireline along the northern areas of the fire. The southern flank of the fire has burned up the rocky and steep ridge overlooking the Klamath River. Fire managers are scouting and looking for opportunities to hold and secure this southern perimeter. Firefighters continue to patrol for and extinguish spot fires in heavy fuels in the forested area of the fire.

The forecast calls for warmer and dryer conditions today and a return to normal temperatures in the coming week, with gusty winds possible over the fire on Tuesday.

Safety considerations will continue to be snags, rattlesnakes, power lines, and rolling debris on the steep slopes on the southern edge of the fire.

Cooperators assisting partner agencies ODF and BLM include Green Diamond Resource Company and the Klamath County Fire Chief.

Oregon Department of Forestry IMT 2 Chris Cline, Incident Commander

Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-10 - 08/10/19

The Ward Fire started early afternoon August 9th, 2019 when a lightning storm came through the area. The fire instantly started running and spotting, aided by topography and winds. Crews from ODF and BLM along with Green Diamond timber company rapidly responded.

The fire has burned 1329 acres and is 17% contained.  As of this evening dozer-constructed firelines have been completed directly along the burning perimeter on the west, north, and east flanks of the fire. Crews will begin mopping up and securing these areas, while patrolling for spot fires.

Last night and this morning the fire received approximately 1/2 inch of rain which greatly moderated fire behavior. We expect mostly cloudy conditions tonight with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Thunderstorm activity should diminish overnight. With warmer and dryer weather returning Sunday hot spots burning inside the fire have the potential to increase fire behavior. A dry front is possible at mid-week with slight cooling and stronger afternoon breezes.

Safety considerations for this fire include snags, rattle snakes, and power lines. Narrow, wet roads are hazardous for the public and fire traffic.

Cooperators assisting partner agencies ODF, Klamath Falls Resource Area Lakeview District BLM, Green Diamond Resource Company and the Klamath County Fire Chief.

Oregon Department of Forestry IMT 2 Chris Cline, Incident Commander

ODF stewardship foresters provide technical assistance to forest landowners in Oregon.
ODF stewardship foresters provide technical assistance to forest landowners in Oregon.
Stewardship Coordinating Committee meets Aug. 12 in Salem (Photo) - 08/07/19

SALEM, Ore. – The Stewardship Coordinating Committee will meet Monday, Aug.12, from 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. in the Santiam Room, Building D on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Salem headquarters campus, 2600 State Street.

The committee will discuss the following topics:

  • Forest Legacy Program updates
  • Updates from the Private Forests Division
  • Forest Action Plan updates
  • Stewardship Program updates

This is a public meeting, everyone is welcome. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The State Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee advises the State Forester on policy and procedures for the U.S. Forest Service State and Private Forestry Programs, such as Forest Legacy and Forest Stewardship. The committee consists of representatives from state and federal natural resource agencies, private forest landowners, consulting foresters, and forest industry and conservation organizations. You can find more information at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SCC.aspx.

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Final fire update for the Milepost 97 Fire - 08/06/19

Media advisory: This will be the final formal fire update for the Milepost 97 Fire unless significant change occurs. We will continue to post information at https://www.facebook.com/milepost97fire and https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6461. The fire remains 13,119 acres and is now 65 percent contained, a 10 percent increase in the last 24 hours.

The Milepost 97 Fire started the evening of July 24 at 10:00 p.m. as the result of an abandoned, and illegal, campfire. While firefighters from the Douglas Forest Protective Association and local rural fire districts con-verged on the fire within 15 to 30 minutes, the fire had established itself in an unmanaged forested area covered with overgrown brush and snags; leftovers from the 1987 Canyon Mountain fire that was part of the first Douglas Complex.

The fire would bring with it many complexities: multiple land ownerships including private, state, federal and tribal trust lands; a major power line and natural gas pipeline dissecting the middle of the fire area; a major interstate freeway (I-5) lining the eastern edge of the fire; and three communities directly in the path of the fire.

This was the first large fire of Oregon’s young fire season. It attracted attention from major media markets from Los Angeles to Portland. Three homes within the fire area were evacuated, but survived. More than 550 structures and homes were threatened and within level 1 and 2 evacuation notifications. After 10 days of intense firefighting with crews, aircraft and equipment, fire officials declared that the fire was completely sur-rounded by hand and equipment constructed line. A few minor burnout operations followed, leaving us where we are today; securing lines, falling hazard trees and mopping up to prevent any further spread. Fires like

Milepost 97, that push firefighting resources to their limit early in the summer, are known for burning for months. Not so in this case. Operations tactics, where firefighters took advantage of opportunities, like breaks in the weather, made for a great stop and the savings of thousands of acres of timberland, millions in fire suppression costs, and hundreds of homes and lives.

ODF’s incident management team and its partner, BLM, wish to thank the Canyonville, Azalea and Glendale communities for their support during the fire suppression effort. We would also like to thank the many cooperators that, without their support, the mission would not have been successful.

Finally, the nation will join in unison this week to wish a very special bear happy birthday. To honor Smokey Bear on his 75th, August 9th, let’s all do our part to prevent the next Milepost 97 fire from starting. Fire danger is currently high to extreme across the state. Many activities that could potentially start a fire are either prohibited entirely or restricted. One less spark, whether it be from a campfire, debris burn pile, lawn mower striking a rock, power saw, cigarette, or vehicle idling over dry grass, will make all the difference when protecting forestlands and communities.

Size: 13,119 Acres
Containment: 65%
Start Date: July 24, 2019, 10:00pm
Location: One mile south of Canyonville, Oregon
Cause: Human Caused
Est. Cost: $19.1 million
Personnel: 1,187

Resources:   
50 hand crews
35 Engines
12 Dozers
28 Water Tenders

Aircraft:         
2 Type 1 Helo
2 Type 2 Helo
2 Type 3 Helo

Evacuations: None
Structures Threatened: 586
Structures Damaged: 0
Structures Destroyed: 0
Closures: None

Containment on the Milepost 97 Fire has reached 50 percent - 08/04/19

Containment on the Milepost 97 Fire has reached 50 percent. But saying that firefighters have reached the halfway point of putting the fire out is an understatement. Hand line, dug by fire crews, and bull dozer construct-ed line completely surround the 13,119 acre fire.

The majority of the work that lies before them is mopping up, or pre-venting hot spots from flaring up and crossing established containment lines.

A high pressure weather system will remain over the fire today that will produce high temperatures and low humidity. The public may see areas of smoke rising from well within the interior of the fire where unburned pockets of fuel exist.
A level one evacuation notification remains in effect for public safety. Level one means that residents should be “ready” to evacuate if conditions war-rant. Fire officials say that many areas of Oregon should consider them-selves in level one when fire season is in effect.

Cooperators assisting partner agencies ODF, DFPA and BLM on the fire in-clude the U.S. Forest Service, Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, Roseburg Resources, Silver Butte Resources, Lone Rock Timber, Williams Pipeline, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police and Oregon Department of Transportation.

Size: 13,119 Acres
Containment: 50%
Start Date: July 24, 2019, 10:00pm
Expected Containment Date: Unknown
Location: One mile south of Canyonville, Oregon
Cause: Human Caused
Est. Cost: $14.9 million
Personnel: 1,371

Resources:
58 hand crews
40 Engines
17 Dozers
32 Water Tenders

Aircraft:
2 Type 1 Helo
2 Type 2 Helo
2 Type 3 Helo

Evacuations: Level 1
Structures Threatened: 586
Structures Damaged: 0
Structures Destroyed: 0
Closures: None

No Additional Fire Growth on Milepost 97 Fire - 08/03/19

CANYONVILLE, Ore. - Firefighters assigned to the Milepost 97 Fire had another successful day on Friday, completing fire lines around the entire perimeter of the fire. No additional fire growth was reported on Friday and the fire remains at 13,085 acres and is 45% contained. Pre-identified initial attack resources on the Milepost 97 Fire, including both ground and aviation resources, were sent to the East Evans Fire, a new fire start Friday evening on the Or-egon Department of Forestry's Southwest Oregon District.


With containment lines in place, resources working on the Milepost 97 Fire will now focus their energy on mopping up hot spots around the perimeter of the fire to ensure that it doesn’t escape containment. Crews will start at the edge of the fire, extinguishing all smokes and smoldering material within the first 20 – 50 feet of containment lines before pushing farther into the black. Firefighters will utilize handheld infrared cameras to help pinpoint hotspots in these areas that need to be extinguished. With a burned footprint around 20 square miles, which is twice the size of the city of Roseburg, smoke from the interior of the fire may be visible for the coming days.


Cooperators assisting ODF, DFPA and BLM on the fire include the U.S. For-est Service, Cow Creek Tribe, Roseburg Resources, Silver Butte Resources, Lone Rock Timber, Williams Pipeline, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Ore-gon State Police, ODOT.

Size: 13,085 Acres
Containment: 45%
Start Date: July 24, 2019, 10:00pm

Expected Containment Date: Unknown
Location: One mile south of Canyonville, Oregon
Cause: Human Caused
Est. Cost: $13,000,000
Personnel: 1,514


Resources:
60 hand crews
47 Engines
26 Dozers
32 Water Tenders


Aircraft:
8 Type 1 Helo
6 Type 2 Helo
4 Type 3 Helo
2 SEATs


Evacuations: Level 1
Structures Threatened: 586
Structures Damaged: 0
Structures Destroyed: 0
Closures: None

Helicopter drops retardant on a hotspot on the Milepost 97 Fire in southern Oregon's Douglas County.
Helicopter drops retardant on a hotspot on the Milepost 97 Fire in southern Oregon's Douglas County.
Firefighters continue improving fire lines on Milepost 97 Fire in southern Douglas County (Photo) - 08/02/19

CANYONVILLE, Ore. - Firefighters continued to improve fire line on Friday with the majority of the perimeter of the fire in mop up. The northwest corner of the fire remained active with a burnout operation planned today to improve the line with firefighters focusing on locating unburned pockets within the interior and felling hazard trees.

The fire had minimal growth since yesterday, adding only 15 acres to 13,085 acres total. Those added acres were due to burnout operations, expanding and improving containment lines along the northwest portion of the fire.

A community meeting was held at North Valley high school yesterday, evening, with agency representatives from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Douglas Forest Protective Association (DFPA) and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) providing background on the initial attack of the fire and the ongoing objectives to minimize impacts to BLM managed public O and C, state, tribal and private lands. To monitor and address smoke impacts to local communities, the BLM has provided an Air Resource Advisor, Wendy Wagner with the U.S. Forest Service Wildland Fire Air Quality Response program. Daily updates can be found at: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/

Cooperators assisting partner agencies ODF, DFPA and BLM on the fire include the U.S. Forest Service, Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, Roseburg Resources, Silver Butte Resources, Lone Rock Timber, Williams Pipeline, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police and Oregon Department of Transportation.

Fire Statistics:
Size - 13,085 acres
Containment - 35%
Start Date - 10 p.m. Wednesday, July 24, 2019
Expected Containment Date - Unknown
Location- One mile south of Canyonville, Oregon

Cause - Human Caused
Estimated Cost - $10,700,000
Personnel - 1,482
Resources - 49 hand crews
39 Engines
26 Dozers
31 Water Tenders
Aircraft - 8 Type 1 Helo
6 Type 2 Helo
4 Type 3 Helo
2 SEATs
Evacuations - Levels 2, 1

Structures - 586
Threatened structures - 0
Damaged Structures - 0
Destroyed Structures - 0
Closures - None

Firefighters cool a smoldering stump on the Milepost 97 Fire in southern Douglas County.
Firefighters cool a smoldering stump on the Milepost 97 Fire in southern Douglas County.
Firefighters continue to make progress containing the Milepost 97 Fire (Photo) - 08/01/19

Fire Summary

Firefighters continued to make progress today with fire containment up to 30%. Burnout operations along the northwest and south edge of the fire were successful. The southeast edge of the fire is currently 100% lined with fire hose with ongoing hazard tree removal and patrols monitoring for spot fires.

The fire increased 492 acres to 13,070 acres, mainly due to burnout operations to improve containment lines.

Firefighters have utilized 23 miles of fire hose to date, with that amount expected to grow to 36 miles by the end of the day.

Crews will continue to secure and improve lines around the perimeter throughout Thursday, while evaluating unburned pockets within the fire area before expected warmer, drier weather arrives this weekend. Patrols continue to monitor for spot fires while maintaining protection for structures and I-5.

A community meeting to provide information on the fire and regional smoke impacts will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019 at the North Valley High School, 6741 Monument Drive, Grants Pass, OR 97526.

Cooperators assisting partner agencies: Oregon Department of Forestry, Douglas Forest Protective Association and BLM on the fire include the U.S. Forest Service, Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, Roseburg Resources, Silver Butte Resources, Lone Rock Timber, Williams Pipeline, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, and Oregon Departmenty of Transportation.

Douglas County structure protection task forces were released yesterday, with structure protection responsibilities turned back to Glendale and Azalea rural fire departments.

Fire size - 13,070 acres

Containment - 30%

Start date - 10 p.m., Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Expected containment date - Unknown

Location - One mile south of Canyonville, Oregon

Cause - Human caused

Estimated costs - $8 million

Personnel - 1,505

Resources - 51 hand crews, 43 engines, 23 dozers, 29 water tenders

Aircraft - 8 Type 1 helicopters, 5 Type 2 helicopters, 4 Type 3 helicopters, 2 single-engine airtankers (SEATs)

Evacuations: Levels 2 and 1

Structures threatened - 586

Structures damaged - 0

Structures destroyed - 0

Closures - none