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News Releases
CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets September 21 - 09/20/18

September 20, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets September 21

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, September 21, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E. Wilsonville. Join the meeting by webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523. Conference line: 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and updates; 2018-19 committee chair and vice-chair decisions; public testimony 9:25-9:35 a.m.; finalize 2019 benchmarks and improvement target floors; break; continue finalizing 2019 benchmarks and improvement target floors; health aspects of kindergarten readiness measure development update; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2DjrWvF

Report: Levels of metals in air, soil near Uroboros too low to harm health - 09/20/18

September 20, 2018

Report: Levels of metals in air, soil near Uroboros too low to harm health

OHA public health assessment applies to adults, children living near glass maker

Levels of metals measured in the air and soil around Uroboros Glass in north Portland are too low to harm the health of people living, working and playing near the facility, according to a new state public health assessment.

The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division today released the assessment for a 45-day public comment period. Uroboros was an art glass manufacturer that ended operations at its North Kerby Avenue location in September 2017. The Uroboros public health assessment concluded that concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium and other metals detected near the facility between March and July 2016 were below health-based concentration limits, and too low to harm human health. It also found that soil samples collected around Uroboros in February 2016 contained levels of metals that were below health risk values.

"The Uroboros public health assessment was important for determining just what level of health risk people in the area faced related to emissions from the glass factory prior to 2016 and going forward," said Todd Hudson, a toxicologist with the division's Environmental Health Assessment Program (EHAP). "What we found was that risk was, and has been, low."

The 2016 data comes from air samples collected by four Oregon Department of Environmental Quality air monitors deployed around Uroboros. The monitors operated 24 hours a day, with one air sample taken each day, resulting in more than 350 individual samples collected. DEQ also collected a total of 27 soil samples from Albina Park, Albina Community Gardens and a nearby daycare facility.

"It is safe to eat homegrown produce that was grown around the area of Uroboros Glass," Hudson said. "Most garden vegetables do not absorb metals."

The Public Health Division began work on the Uroboros assessment, along with similar assessments for Bullseye Glass Co. and Precision Castparts Corp. in southeast Portland, in spring 2016. The assessments were launched in response to significant community concerns about health risks from past, present and future exposures to heavy metals emitted from the facilities after a research project discovered elevated levels of metals in tree moss around Portland.

In its assessment, EHAP used the federal Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR) standard public health assessment process. The assessments examine health risks based on soil and air data collected near the facilities. Such assessments are not community health studies and do not determine whether existing health issues are caused by environmental exposures.

In addition to 2016 data, the Uroboros assessment looked at past exposures to metals emitted from the facility. Examining air sampling results from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency studies at Harriet Tubman Middle School, located northeast of Uroboros, in 2009 and 2011, OHA toxicologists found that cadmium levels were above "cancer-based" health values in 2009 and chromium levels were above those values in 2011. However, the increased risk of getting cancer after exposure to the measured levels of cadmium, chromium and arsenic in the air—one additional cancer case for every 10,000 people exposed—did not meet the threshold for health risk as defined by ATSDR.

"The 2009 and 2011 data show us that there may have been some risk from past exposure, although that risk was low. Unfortunately, that data is extremely limited," Hudson said. EPA took only 13 air samples over 13 weeks in 2009 and 46 samples over eight weeks in 2011. These small numbers increase uncertainty about health risk in those years. However, the extensive 2016 monitoring allows OHA to state with confidence that risk of harm to health remained extremely low.

Hudson noted that Uroboros had not used arsenic for many years and agreed in early 2016 to stop using trivalent chromium, a less-toxic form of the metal. He also said that proposed new rules made through Cleaner Air Oregon, the state initiative to strengthen Oregon’s regulation of industrial sources of air toxics, would apply emission limits on any new industrial facility that moves into the building where Uroboros once operated.

To read a summary of the report and the full report findings and recommendations, visit the OHA Uroboros webpage at https://healthoregon.org/uroborospha. Copies of the report can also be reviewed during regular library hours at the Multnomah County Library, 3605 NE 15th Ave., Portland.

OHA is accepting public comment on the draft Uroboros public health assessment until Nov. 5 at 4 p.m. Comments can be emailed to ehap.info@state.or.us or sent to: Attn: EHAP, 800 NE Oregon Street Suite 640, Portland, OR 97232.

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http://bit.ly/2xqw088

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets September 26 - 09/19/18

September 19, 2018

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets September 26

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC)

Agenda: Discuss how Oregon health care facilities use National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) data for performance benchmarking; review Legacy Health’s development of its role as an Ebola Assessment Center; summarize 2016-17 Oregon health care worker influenza vaccination data; revisit travel screening activities in Oregon health care facilities; report data and discuss future opportunities for Targeted Assessment for Prevention (TAP) assessment work; brainstorm topics to address at future meetings and for future reports; public comment.

When: Wednesday, Sept. 26, 1-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is at 2:55 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. A conference call line is available at 877-873-8018, access code 7872333.

OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of healthcare-associated infections in Oregon via the Healthcare-Associated Infections Program. The program convenes its advisory board on a quarterly basis; the purpose of the board is to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities.

Program contact: Roza Tammer, 971-673-1074, oza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Diane Roy at 971-673-1093, 711 TTY or oy@dhsoha.state.or.us">diane.m.roy@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at Twin Rocks Beach lifted September 18 - 09/18/18

September 18, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at Twin Rocks Beach lifted September 18

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a recreational use health advisory for contact with marine water at Twin Rocks Beach, located in Tillamook County. The health authority issued the advisory September 11 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2xv7GB3

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at D River Beach lifted September 18 - 09/18/18

September 18, 2018

 

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at D River Beach lifted September 18

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a recreational use health advisory for contact with marine water at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisory September 11 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2NUgxXl

Recreational use health advisory lifted for Willow Creek Reservoir - 09/17/18

September 17, 2018

Recreational use health advisory lifted for Willow Creek Reservoir

Testing confirms reduced cyanotoxins in Morrow County lake

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued July 26 for Willow Creek Reservoir, located just east of the town of Heppner in Morrow County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the lake is below recreational guideline values for human exposure.

Although the advisory has been lifted, conditions can change rapidly due to changes in weather and nutrients in the lake. People should always be aware that blooms can develop on any water body under the right environmental conditions, and can grow and disappear throughout the season.

People should always be aware of their surroundings before entering a water body, especially around shorelines, shallow water areas, coves and physical structures such as docks, as these are areas where blooms tend to develop, officials say. You are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People, and especially small children, and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It's possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For recreational health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms or cyanotoxins in recreational waters, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #

http://bit.ly/2xoABa1

Recreational use health advisory lifted for Cullaby Lake - 09/14/18

September 14, 2018

Recreational use health advisory lifted for Cullaby Lake

Testing confirms reduced cyanotoxins in Clatsop County lake

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued August 21 for Cullaby Lake. Cullaby Lake is located just off Highway 101 between Astoria and Seaside in Clatsop County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Cullaby Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, the cyanotoxin level in the lake remains well above the OHA guideline value for dogs, so health officials recommend keeping pets out of the lake.

Although the advisory has been lifted, conditions can change rapidly due to changes in weather and nutrients in the lake. People should always be aware that blooms can develop on any water body under the right environmental conditions and can grow and disappear throughout the season.

People should always be aware of their surroundings before entering a water body, especially around shorelines, shallow water areas, coves and physical structures such as docks, as these are areas where blooms tend to develop, officials say. You are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People, and especially small children, and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of cyanobacteria is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It's possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For recreational health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms or cyanotoxins in recreational waters, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #

http://bit.ly/2xjiPoF

Deadline extended for Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee applications - 09/14/18

September 14, 2018

Deadline extended for Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee applications

The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division has extended the deadline for applications for the Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee. The deadline has been extended to allow time for additional applications across all the recommended areas of expertise as outlined in HB 4133.

OHA invites applications from people who meet the criteria outlined in HB 4133, Section (3).

Board members are appointed by the Governor. Member terms are, in general, four years each. As this is a new committee, initial terms of office will be assigned by the Governor so that terms expire at staggered intervals.

To apply, submit the following to executive.appointments@oregon.gov by Oct. 15:

  1. A completed executive appointment interest form, available on the Governor’s Office website at http://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/How_To_Apply.aspx.
  2. A resume or brief biographical sketch.
  3. A brief statement of interest.

Information about the legislation is available on the Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HEALTHYPEOPLEFAMILIES/DATAREPORTS/Pages/Maternal-Mortality-Morbidity-Review-Committee.aspx.

For more information, contact Cate Wilcox, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-0299 or cate.s.wilcox@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Cannabis Commission's Product Integrity Subcommittee meets September 21 in Portland - 09/13/18

September 13, 2018

Cannabis Commission’s Product Integrity Subcommittee meets September 21 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Product Integrity Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: Friday, September 21, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.  For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2p5uoff

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 20 in Salem - 09/13/18

September 13, 2018

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets September 20 in Salem

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, September 20, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital, Callan Conference Room, 2600 Center Street NE, Salem. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, participant code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include an update on the National Association of Rehabilitation Providers and Agencies (NARA) Conference, update from the Social Work department on communicating with counties regarding .370 patients, report on discharge planning process for patients who are under the jurisdiction of the Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB), and more.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority Director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide include:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2xm3jZh

HERC Genetics Advisory Panel meets October 10 by conference call - 09/13/18

September 13, 2018

HERC Genetics Advisory Panel meets October 10 by conference call

What: A public meeting by conference call of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Genetics Advisory Panel

When: October 10, 9-11 a.m.

Where: The public may attend via a listen-only conference line by calling 888-204-5984, participant code 801373. People wishing to give public testimony may do so at the Lincoln Building OEI Conference Room, Ste. 750, 421 SW Oak Street, Portland.

Agenda includes:

  • 2019 CPT codes for genetic services.
  • Prenatal genetic testing guideline
    • Amniocentesis and CVS CPT codes.
  • Non-prenatal genetic testing guideline.
  • Microarray testing for developmental delay.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/CSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at C.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us.

http://bit.ly/2MtkzRu

OHA statement on FDA action against e-cigarette manufacturers - 09/12/18

September 12, 2018

OHA statement on FDA action against e-cigarette manufacturers

Today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced it would take action to reduce the accessibility of e-cigarettes and vape products, such as JUUL, to youth. In its press release, the FDA called e-cigarette use among youth an "epidemic" that requires "historic action."

Tobacco remains sweet, cheap and easy to get in Oregon. E-cigarettes are the most popular tobacco products used among Oregon youth, with 13 percent of Oregon 11th-graders reporting e-cigarette use in 2017. These products are available in thousands of flavors with kid-friendly names and packaging.

Even though youth younger than 21 can’t legally purchase tobacco in Oregon, retailers continue to sell tobacco products to underage buyers. In a report the Oregon Public Health Division released in July 2018, 22 percent of inspected retailers were found to have illegally sold e-cigarettes to youth inspectors younger than 21.

The Oregon Public Health Division is pleased to see FDA taking action against retailers and manufacturers that illegally market and sell addictive products to youth. This is the largest coordinated enforcement effort in FDA’s history and aligns with the seriousness of tobacco as a public health issue. We will continue to monitor FDA’s actions, support its efforts when we can, and continue our own initiatives to reduce the health and financial toll of tobacco in Oregon.

# # #

FDA announcement: https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm620184.htm

OHA tobacco report: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/TOBACCOPREVENTION/Documents/InspectionCoReport.PDF

http://bit.ly/2x9YzXb

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets September 13 in Portland - 09/12/18

September 12, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets September 13 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group

When: Thursday, September 13, 2- 4 p.m.

Where: Lincoln Building Abraham Room, Ste 850, 421 SW Oak St., Portland

The public can also join remotely through a webinar and listen-only telephone conference line. Join the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6730937893581997569 or call the conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates; future of Appendix G; ORS 413.161 collection of data on race, ethnicity, language and disability status (REAL+D); preview of APAC public report outlines; public comments.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2MoOr1v

PartnerSHIP meets September 18 in Portland - 09/12/18

September 12, 2018

PartnerSHIP meets September 18 in Portland

What: The first public meeting of the PartnerSHIP, tasked with developing the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP)

Agenda: Become oriented with members of the PartnerSHIP; understand history and landscape of health improvement plans; understand process for developing the SHIP; adopt vision, values and ground rules; determine criteria for identifying strategic issues

When: Tuesday, September 18, 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A 10-minute public comment period will be held at approximately 2 p.m.; comments are limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting also is available by webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/100429784217456641.

Background: Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The SHIP serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath in Oregon. The SHIP will be based on findings from the State Health Assessment (SHA), which may be viewed at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/HealthStatusIndicators.aspx.

  • Health departments are required to develop and implement a health improvement plan at least once every five years.
  • The Public Health Division will use the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) framework, widely used by coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and local health departments. The MAPP framework uses six phases. The SHA is developed over the first three phases, while the SHIP is developed and implemented over the second three phases.
  • Information about the PartnerSHIP can be found on the OHA website at https://healthoregon.org/2020ship.
  • The current State Health Improvement Plan, which is in effect through December 2019, identifies seven priorities related to tobacco use, obesity, oral health, immunizations, suicide, communicable disease, and substance use.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christy Hudson at 971-678-4347, 711 TTY or isty.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2QoGSuQ

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets September 13 in Wilsonville - 09/12/18

September 12, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee meets September 13 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee

When: Thursday, September 13, 1-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E., Wilsonville

Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar and listen-only telephone conference line. Join the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/1703536419076343809. Conference line: 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome, updates, approve minutes; public comment from 1:15 to 1:25 p.m.; HPQMC 2018-2019: Planning What’s Ahead; update: September 7 OHA Health Measurement Committee Summit; discussion: 2018-2019 Workplan; wrap-up/adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2x8QQbO

 

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet September 12 in Wilsonville - 09/11/18

September 11, 2018
Contact:Melisa Otrugman, 503-689-5238, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet September 12 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, September 12, 9:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Public testimony will be heard at 12:15-12:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by telephone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8499259353843350019. Conference line: 877-411-9748, access code 730407.

Agenda: Approval of July meeting summary; OHPB and OHA updates; Updates on Health Care Workforce Reporting Program and Healthcare Workforce Needs Assessment; update, discussion and action on Health Care Provider Incentive Program and Evaluation Report; update on recommendations on promising strategies to improve the diversity of the workforce, discussion of follow-up on ideas from July meeting; Workforce Supply and Demand; Connections, Oregon Promise Program; public comment

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #
Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Melisa Otrugman at 503-689-5238, 711 TTY, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2N3czfg

Oregon Health Plan members satisfied with OHP and coordinated care organizations, support proposals to improve CCOs - 09/11/18

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 11, 2018

Oregon Health Plan members satisfied with OHP and coordinated care organizations, support proposals to improve CCOs

Portland, Ore. -- Members of the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) are highly satisfied with the care they receive and trust the state’s Medicaid program for information about their health, according to a new survey conducted by the public opinion research firm DHM Research.

Members also expressed strong support for policy changes the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is considering when it issues new contracts for coordinated care organizations (CCOs) in 2020. These proposals are referred to as "CCO 2.0."

However, proposals that could limit the number of providers who see OHP members were less popular.

The survey was based on telephone interviews with 401 OHP members that were conducted Aug. 22-27. Interviewers spoke to OHP members whose primary languages were English, Spanish, Russian and Vietnamese. The survey has a margin of error of plus/minus 4.9 percent.

According to the DHM survey results:

  • Satisfaction with OHP: 90 percent of Oregon Health Plan members were satisfied with OHP and the care they receive through the plan. (Sixty-three percent were very satisfied.)
  • Satisfaction with CCOs: 78 percent of OHP members who were familiar with coordinated care organizations were satisfied with CCOs. (Fifty-five percent were very satisfied.) However, 35 percent of OHP members were unfamiliar with CCOs.
  • Ways to improve care: When asked what they would change, one-third of OHP members would not change OHP. However, for those who offered responses, the top changes were: expand coverage (23 percent), reduce wait times for care and customer service (12 percent) and improve access to and choice of providers (10 percent).

OHP members showed support for the major proposals to change CCO contracts:

  • Improve access to behavioral health services: 76 percent of OHP members supported proposals that would do "more to get doctors and other providers to work together to help members who need mental health care and addiction services," even if these proposals could "be expensive and the changes may take a long time to improve care." Only 16 percent opposed.
  • Address social factors that affect health: 83 percent of OHP members supported proposals to "help members with other parts of their life, like housing, food, and other services, because having a home, food, and transportation helps people be healthy." Twelve percent opposed.
  • Contain costs: 50 percent of OHP members supported the proposal to "Find ways to save money on health care. This could ensure OHP members continue to have health coverage and benefits, but it may mean providers get paid less, and some OHP members have fewer providers to choose from." Thirty-four percent opposed.
  • Pay providers to improve member health: 48 percent supported proposals to "pay providers based on how well your doctors take care of you, instead of how many times you visit them," even if that may mean "there will be fewer providers for OHP members to choose from." Forty-two percent opposed this idea.
  • Transparency and representation: 63 percent of OHP members agreed "having more members help make decisions about OHP would improve your health care experience."

Oregon’s 15 coordinated care organizations are privately operated, locally governed entities responsible for managing physical, behavioral, and oral health care for their members. Since CCOs were established in 2012, they have slowed the growth of Medicaid costs, reduced the use of low-value care and improved a variety of health and quality measures, according to independent researchers at Oregon Health & Science University.

"We wanted to know what OHP members had to say about the future of CCOs because the changes we’re considering affect OHP members more than anyone else," said Patrick Allen, Director of the Oregon Health Authority. "I’m glad members expressed such strong levels for trust in OHP, satisfaction in their CCOs and support for the direction we’re going in to accelerate health transformation in our state."

The survey found few significant differences of opinion among respondents based on language, region or other demographic factors such as gender, age, race or ethnicity.

DHM researchers presented the findings to the Oregon Health Policy Board earlier today. The board heard a presentation of draft recommendations for the CCO 2.0 contracts and will approve final changes at its meeting October 15. The CCO 2.0 contracts will cover the years 2020-2025. They represent the largest procurement in state history.

# # #

CCO 2.0 webpage: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/CCO-2-0.aspx

OHSU CCO study: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Evaluation%20docs/Summative%20Medicaid%20Waiver%20Evaluation%20-%20Final%20Report.pdf

Oregon Health Policy Board meetings webpage: https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx

http://bit.ly/2x773hL

Recreational use health advisory issued September 11 for water contact at D River Beach - 09/11/18

September 11, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued September 11 for water contact at D River Beach

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2x20f59

Recreational use health advisory issued September 11 for water contact at Twin Rocks Beach - 09/11/18

September 11, 2018

 

Recreational use health advisory issued September 11 for water contact at Twin Rocks Beach

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Twin Rocks Beach, located in Tillamook County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Twin Rocks Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #

http://bit.ly/2NAHNtB

Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets September 17 in Portland - 09/10/18

September 10, 2018

Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets September 17 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Training Subcommittee

Agenda: TBD

When: Monday, September 17, 2-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.  For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2NDpHYg

Life expectancy in Oregon can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood - 09/10/18

September 10, 2018

Life expectancy in Oregon can vary from neighborhood to neighborhood

New national report shows where you live influences how long you live

PORTLAND, Ore.—A new national report on life expectancy at the census tract level reveals that how long you live can vary widely depending on the Oregon neighborhood you call home.

The report, released today as part of the United States Small-Area Life Expectancy Estimates Project (USALEEP), shows the highest life expectancy at birth in Oregon is 89.1 years, in a section of northwest Portland that hugs the southern border of Forest Park. The lowest life expectancy in the state—66.2 years—is in a part of central Medford running along the west side of Interstate 5.

Life expectancy at birth for the state as a whole is 79.6 years, according to officials with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Center for Health Statistics who analyzed the national data. The national life expectancy was 78.8 years as of midyear 2013.

"This is the first time we are able to look at differences in how long people are expected to live at the neighborhood level," said Jennifer Woodward, Ph.D., state registrar and manager of the Center for Health Statistics, based at the OHA Public Health Division.

About 5 percent of Oregon census tracts could not be calculated for longevity because the tracts had too few residents, too few deaths or their populations didn’t represent the entire age spectrum. Nationally, 11.3 percent of tracts could not be calculated.

The report demonstrates that opportunities for people to be healthy are not shared equally among neighborhoods, even when they’re just a few miles apart in the same county. For example, life expectancy in a swath of southeast Eugene is 87.9 years, while it’s 70.2 years across town in a northwest section of the city.

"This report tells us we have a lot of work to do to ensure everyone in Oregon has a chance to achieve optimal health no matter where they live, work, play, learn and age," said Katrina Hedberg, M.D., M.P.H., state health officer and epidemiologist at the Public Health Division. "In Oregon, as in other parts of the country, that’s not happening."

USALEEP is a joint effort of the National Association for Public Health Statistics and Information Systems, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The report represents the first time that nationwide census tract-level life expectancy estimates, based on state death records and population estimates from the U.S. Bureau of the Census, have been available.

Oregon has been working to improve opportunities for health across the state. As part of its effort, the state Public Health Division published an update of its State Health Assessment in July that provides a comprehensive, data-driven description of the health of people statewide.

The assessment is the first step toward updating Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan that will guide state and local public health interventions. It found that social factors such as housing affordability, food insecurity and educational outcomes are undermining improvements in health outcomes. This is despite strides in reducing opioid-related deaths, HIV infection, teen pregnancy rates and smoking rates.

"Where a person calls home should not influence longevity, but it does," said Hedberg, noting that health equity and cultural responsiveness are among the biggest opportunities to improve health. "We need to continue examining factors that affect neighborhood-by-neighborhood differences we see in these data."

Oregon’s census tract map and data file can be found on the Oregon Public Health Division’s website at  https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATHCERTIFICATES/VITALSTATISTICS/Pages/lifeexpectancy.aspx. The national report and data files are available on the NCHS website at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/usaleep/usaleep.html.

# # #

State health assessment: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/HealthStatusIndicators.aspx

State health improvement plan: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/About/Pages/HealthImprovement.aspx

 

 

Cannabis Commission Patient Access Subcommittee meets September 17 in Portland - 09/10/18

September 10, 2018

Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Cannabis Commission Patient Access Subcommittee meets September 17 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Access Subcommittee

Agenda: Introductions; updates; Patient Access Program: finalize report; public comment

When: Monday, September 17, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.  For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2x3X4d3

Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets September 11 - 09/10/18

September 10, 2018

Contact: Jon McElfresh, 503-385-3075, esh@dhsoha.state.or.us">jonathan.p.mcelfresh@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets September 11

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup

When: Tuesday, Sept. 11, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Lincoln Building Suite 775 Training room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. Attendees can also join remotely via webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9130458197246487042 and conference line at 877-848-7030, participant code 695684.

Agenda: Welcome, introductions, overview; public comment; progress update; measurement strategy; other key topics for report/recommendations; summary, next steps and stakeholder input update

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/KR-Health.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jon McElfresh at 503-385-3075, 711 TTY, esh@dhsoha.state.or.us">jonathan.p.mcelfresh@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2CG46dg

Conference of Local Health Officials meets September 13 in Hood River - 09/07/18

September 7, 2018    

Conference of Local Health Officials meets September 13 in Hood River

What: The Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO) is holding its monthly conference meeting. Members of the public may attend.

Agenda:  CLHO committee restructure update, public health modernization update, school based health center contracting work group update.

Agenda is subject to change. The meeting agenda and related materials will be posted at www.oregonclho.org/about/clho-meetings/ prior to the meeting date.

When: Thursday, September 13, 12:15-1:00 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. 

Where:  Best Western Plus Hood River Inn, 1108 E Marina Drive, Hood River, OR. No remote participation options are available for CLHO members or the public for this meeting.

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147.  (ORS 431.340)

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board meets September 20 in Portland - 09/07/18

September 7, 2018

Public Health Advisory Board meets September 20 in Portland

What: The Public Health Advisory Board is holding a public meeting.

Agenda: Receive subcommittee updates; receive updates on use of investment to modernize the public health system in Oregon; receive updates and review evaluation findings related to investment to modernize the public health system in Oregon; review and determine next steps on the PHAB’s health equity policy and procedure.


When: Thursday, Sept. 20, 2-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Conference Room 1B, Portland, OR 97232. Also available remotely by webinar: https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/4888122320415752707, or by phone: 1-877-873-8017; access code: 767068#.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
•    Sign language and spoken language interpreters
•    Written materials in other languages
•    Braille
•    Large print
•    Audio and other formats
If you need help or have questions, please contact Kati Moseley at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or katarina.moseley@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at Nye Beach lifted September 6 - 09/06/18

September 6, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at Nye Beach lifted September 6
Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a recreational use health advisory for contact with marine water at Nye Beach, located in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisory August 28 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup's final meeting September 7 *UPDATED* - 09/06/18

*Updated to include call-in information*

August 29, 2018

Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup's final meeting September 7

What: The final public meeting of the Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup to finalize detailed recommendations to amend Oregon’s Statewide Opioid Prescribing Guidelines

Agenda: Welcome, scope, introductions; discussion of draft; meeting summary and next steps; public comment period

When: Friday, September 7, 8-10 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. No conference call option is available for the public. A listen-only call-in option is available: 1-888-363-4735. Participant code: 932589.

Background: The purpose of this workgroup is to set a standard of care in Oregon around safe opioid prescribing for acute pain. The workgroup will develop detailed recommendations for acute opioid prescribing that will be included as an amendment to Oregon’s existing Statewide Opioid Prescribing Guidelines, and will address acute opioid prescribing in primary care, emergency departments, dentistry, and after surgical procedures. The workgroup will build on recommendations developed by the Oregon Health Leadership Council’s Evidence-based Best Practice Committee, as well as acute prescribing guidelines developed in other states.

These guidelines support ongoing efforts in Oregon to address the epidemic of opioid misuse, abuse, dependency, associated hospitalizations and overdose deaths.

Specific areas that the Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines workgroup will address:

  1. Acute pain patients presenting in settings including dental offices, emergency departments, primary care, urgent care, and post-surgical.
  2. Recommended treatments by medical condition (e.g., dental pain, post-surgical, acute injury).
  3. Alternative treatment options, weighing benefits and risks of opioid therapy.
  4. Starting patients on the lowest effective dose; establishing maximum number of pills and number of days prescribed.
  5. Use of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program to monitor prescribing and dispensing.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Drew Simpson at 971-673-1033, 711 TTY or ew.r.simpson@state.or.us">drew.r.simpson@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2N7SJPv

Quarterly Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets September 10 - 09/06/18

September 6, 2018
 
Quarterly Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets September 10

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its annual meeting; the meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Project sponsor requests; review post-meeting feedback survey; discuss scope-of-practice survey and methods. 

When: September 10, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1D, Portland. Conference line: 1-888-273-3658, participants code: 76-64-09

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

New report: Many Oregonians who lack health coverage are eligible for premium subsidies, Oregon Health Plan *Updated Links* - 09/06/18

*Resending with updated links*

Editors: Stacy Schubert, MPH, will be available for interviews from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. today. Contact Allyson Hagen at 503-449-6457 to schedule.
 

September 6, 2018

New report: Many Oregonians who lack health coverage are eligible for premium subsidies, Oregon Health Plan

Last year, Oregon’s uninsured rate stood at 6 percent, yet about 1 in 10 Oregonians experienced a gap in coverage during the year. For many, these gaps could be avoided. More than 8 in 10 children and adults under age 65 who lacked coverage were eligible for the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) or financial assistance to reduce commercial health insurance premium costs. The findings were part of newly released state data on health coverage in 2017, based on a survey conducted by OHA. Since Oregon implemented the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2014, more than 340,000 Oregonians have gained health insurance. Today, 94 percent (3.7 million Oregonians) have coverage. The current uninsured rate is almost two-thirds lower than the 15 percent who were uninsured in 2011 (before Oregon implemented the ACA and expanded Medicaid). 

Despite Oregon’s high rate of health coverage, more people could be covered. Most people who were uninsured when the study was conducted were eligible for the Oregon Health Plan or a subsidy to reduce the cost of commercial health coverage.

  • Children: 9 out of 10 children who lack health coverage are eligible under OHP or a premium-reduction subsidy through the health insurance marketplace. 
  • Adults: Similarly, nearly 9 in 10 young adults and 8 in 10 older adults (ages 35-64) qualify for OHP or a subsidy for commercial health coverage. 
  • Reasons for lack of OHP coverage: A large portion of the uninsured were eligible for OHP. The top three reasons Oregonians cited for not being covered by OHP were: concerned about high costs of coverage (44 percent); not eligible, make too much money (36 percent); and concerned about quality of care (21 percent).

There are no premiums costs or deductibles for OHP benefits. OHP offers a comprehensive benefit package of medical, behavioral health and oral health care. Children and adults who qualify for coverage under the Oregon Health Plan can apply any time during the year. Oregonians can find coverage at OregonHealthCare.gov.

There are currently about 243,000 uninsured people in Oregon. If 80 percent of those who lack health coverage made use of OHP or the subsidies available through the marketplace, the number of Oregonians who are uninsured would drop to 34,000. 

That would boost Oregon’s health coverage rate to 99 percent (excluding adult Oregon residents who would be ineligible for OHP or marketplace coverage due to undocumented immigration status).

Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Health Authority, said, “Health coverage is the key to good health. Oregon has dramatically reduced the uninsured rate, but too many people remain confused about their coverage options. We want all Oregonians to know you can have quality, affordable health coverage in Oregon, no matter what your income.”

“The survey reveals positive progress, but more work is needed to address issues like the number of people who are underinsured,” said Andrew Stolfi, insurance commissioner. “Before seeking short-term plans or choosing the lowest premium option, we encourage all Oregonians who purchase their own coverage to apply for financial assistance through Healthcare.gov. Oregonians who receive help with the costs of their health insurance pay on average $138 a month.”

Studies have shown health coverage is linked to more access to health care, better health and reduced mortality. When individuals and families lack health coverage, they can be exposed to medical debt and bankruptcy, forced to rely on hospital emergency departments for health care, and unable to obtain regular treatment for chronic conditions and serious illness (such as cancer). 

According to state data, the demographic groups with the highest and lowest proportion of uninsured in 2017 were:

  • Age: Nearly 12 percent of young adults (aged 19-34) were uninsured, the highest among any age group. Children (eighteen and under) had the lowest percent of uninsured at 3 percent.
  • Ethnicity: Hispanic Oregonians constituted the racial/ethnic group with the highest rate of uninsurance (15 percent). Asians had the lowest percentage of uninsured (2 percent).
  • Gender: Men had a higher rate of uninsurance (7.3 percent) than women (5 percent).

The data were reported in the Oregon Health Authority’s Uninsurance Fact Sheet, which is based on data from the Oregon Health Insurance Survey (OHIS). OHIS provides detailed information about many of the impacts of Oregon’s health system reform to achieve better health, better care and lower costs. This fact sheet is part of a series exploring health insurance coverage using data from the 2017 survey and presents information about gaps of time when people did not have health insurance coverage. 

Other fact sheets include:

Video: https://youtu.be/yD3dAGHSCfg

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Nuevo reporte: Latinos son el grupo étnico que más carece de cobertura de salud en Oregon - 09/06/18

6 de septiembre

Nuevo reporte: Latinos son el grupo étnico que más carece de cobertura de salud en Oregon

Aunque pueden ser elegibles para el Plan de Salud de Oregon o reducciones substanciales hacia un plan de seguro médico

El año pasado, la tasa de personas sin cobertura de salud era de 6 por ciento, sin embargo, alrededor de 1 de cada 10 Oregonianos experimentaron una interrupción en su cobertura durante el año. Para la gran mayoría, estas interrupciones eran prevenibles. 

Más de 8 de cada 10 niños y adultos menores de 65 años, que no contaban con cobertura de salud, eran elegibles para el Plan de Salud de Oregon (OHP) o asistencia financiera para reducir el costo de un plan de seguro médico comercial. Los hallazgos son parte de datos estatales de 2017 recién emitidos, que se basan en una encuesta realizada por Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

De acuerdo con estos datos estatales, los grupos demográficos con la proporción más alta y baja de personas no aseguradas en 2017 eran:

  • Edad: Casi 12 por ciento de adultos jóvenes (entre 19-34) no contaban con seguro médico, la cifra más alta en un grupo de edad. El porcentaje más bajo fue en niños (18 años y menores) con solo el 3 por ciento que no tienen cobertura de salud.
  • Etnia: Oregonianos Latinos constituyeron el grupo étnico/racial con la tasa más alta de los que carecen seguro (15 por ciento). Asiáticos mantuvieron el porcentaje más bajo (2 por ciento). 
  • Género: Hombres carentes de seguro mantuvieron la tasa más alta (7.3 por ciento) comparado con mujeres (5 por ciento).

Desde que Oregon implementó la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible (ACA) en 2014, más de 340,000 Oregonianos han conseguido seguro médico. Hoy, 94 por ciento (3.7 millones de Oregonianos) tienen cobertura médica. La tasa actual de personas no aseguradas es casi dos tercios menos que 15 por ciento de Oregonianos que no contaban con seguro en 2011 (antes que Oregon implementará ACA y expandiera Medicaid).

A pesar de las altas tasas de personas con cobertura de salud en Oregon, aún más personas pueden conseguir cobertura. La mayoría de los que carecían seguro cuando se realizó el estudio, eran elegibles para OHP o ayuda para reducir el costo de un seguro médico comercial.

  • Niños: 9 de cada 10 niños que carecen de cobertura de salud son elegibles para OHP o una reducción considerable para un plan en el mercado de seguros médicos.
  • Adultos: Asimismo, casi 9 de cada 10 adultos jóvenes y 8 de cada 10 adultos mayores (edades 35-64) cumplen los requisitos para OHP o asistencia financiera para un seguro médico comercial. 
  • Razones por las que Oregonianos no obtienen cobertura de OHP: Una gran parte de personas que carecen seguro eran elegibles para OHP. Las tres razones principales citadas por no solicitar cobertura de OHP fueron: preocupaciones por altos costos de cobertura (44 por ciento); no cumplen los requisitos, ingresos son muy altos (36 por ciento); y preocupaciones por la calidad del cuidado (21 por ciento).

OHA quiere aclarar que no hay costos para obtener los beneficios de OHP (Medicaid). OHP ofrece un plan de beneficios completo que incluye atención médica, salud de comportamiento (mental) y cuidado de salud oral. Niños y adultos que cumplen los requisitos para obtener cobertura bajo el Plan de Salud de Oregon pueden llenar una solicitud en cualquier momento del año. Oregonianos pueden solicitar cobertura visitando OregonHealthCare.gov.

Actualmente hay alrededor de 243,000 personas carentes de seguro médico en Oregon. Sí 80 por ciento de aquellos que no cuentan con cobertura de salud utilizarán OHP o las reducciones en los costos en el mercado de seguros médicos, la cifra de Oregonianos carentes de seguro bajaría a 34,000.

El resultado sería que la tasa de cobertura de salud en Oregon ascendería a 99 por ciento (excluyendo residentes que no cumplen requisitos para OHP o cobertura bajo el mercado seguros médicos debido a su estatus migratorio de indocumentado).

Patrick Allen, director de Oregon Health Authority, dijo, “Cobertura de salud es clave para la buena salud. Oregon redujo dramáticamente la tasa de los que carecen seguro médico, pero demasiadas personas permanecen confundidas sobre sus opciones de cobertura. Nosotros queremos que todo Oregoniano sea consciente que puede contar con cobertura de salud de calidad y asequible en Oregon, sin importar su ingreso”.

“La encuesta revela avances, pero más trabajo es necesario para resolver problemas como el número de personas que no están debidamente aseguradas”, dijo Andrew Stolfi, comisionado de seguros. “Antes de escoger planes de corto plazo o la opción más barata, nosotros animamos a Oregonianos que compran su propia cobertura, que soliciten asistencia financiera por medio Healthcare.gov. Oregonianos que reciben asistencia con los costos de su seguro médico pagan en por medio $138 cada mes”.

Investigaciones han demostrado que el tener cobertura de salud está vinculado a más acceso a atención médica, mejor salud y una reducción en la mortalidad. Cuando individuos y familias carecen de cobertura de salud, pueden ser expuestos a deudas médicas y bancarrota, obligados a depender en salas de emergencia de hospitales para obtener atención médica, y no tienen acceso a tratamiento habitual para condiciones crónicas y enfermedades graves (como cáncer).

La información sobre la carencia de salud en nuestro estado fue reportada en la Uninsurance Fact Sheet (Hoja Informativa de No Asegurados) de Oregon Health Authority, basándose en datos de la Encuesta de Seguro Médico de Oregon (OHIS). OHIS provee información detallada sobre los impactos de la reforma del sistema de salud en Oregon que cuya meta es mejor salud, mejor cuidado y una reducción en costos. Esta hoja informativa es parte de una serie de reportes, que examinan la cobertura de salud, usando datos adquiridos de la encuesta de 2017 y presentan información sobre interrupciones a dicha cobertura de salud.

Otras hojas informativas incluyen:

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Oregon Health Policy Board meets September 11 in Portland - 09/05/18

Sept. 5, 2018

Oregon Health Policy Board meets September 11 in Portland

What: The monthly meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: September 11, 8:30 a.m. to noon

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, third floor Rm. 4, 3303 SW Bond Ave., Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; minutes approval; public testimony; CCO 2.0: communications update; CCO 2.0 development update and report framework; CCO 2.0: panel & report review

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY, jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2oQtZxr

Oregon Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee meets September 27 in Wilsonville - 09/05/18

 

Sept. 5, 2018

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee meets September 27 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Health Technology Assessment Subcommittee

When: September 27, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Rooms 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. The public also may attend remotely by signing up for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/150653270482471427, or via a listen-only conference line by calling 888-204-5984, participant code 801373.

Agenda includes:

  • Review of public comments on FDA-approved next generation sequencing tests for tumors of diverse histology.
  • Review new draft coverage guidance on newer interventional procedures for GERD.
  • Orientation for new guideline report, Extended Stay Centers: Patient characteristics and appropriate procedures.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/CSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at C.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us.

http://bit.ly/2wOyoEm

Recreational use health advisories for water contact at Agate Beach and Harris Beach State Park lifted August 31 - 08/31/18

August 31, 2018

Recreational use health advisories for water contact at Agate Beach and Harris Beach State Park lifted August 31

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted recreational use health advisories for contact with marine water at Agate Beach, located in Lincoln County and Harris Beach State Park, located in Curry County. The health authority issued the advisories for Agate Beach August 28 and Harris Beach State Park August 9 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beaches that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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http://bit.ly/2ooV1LM

Recreational use health advisory issued August 30 for Keno Dam Reservoir - 08/30/18

August 30, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued August 30 for Keno Dam Reservoir

High levels of cyanobacteria toxins found in the Klamath County water body

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for Keno Dam Reservoir due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom and the toxins they produce. Keno Dam Reservoir is located approximately 12 miles southwest of Klamath Falls on Oregon Highway 66W in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in Keno Dam Reservoir. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities such as water skiing or power boating in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from Keno Dam Reservoir at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from Keno Dam Reservoir are advised to use an alternate water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

OHA public health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacteria blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Keno Dam Reservoir and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Keno Dam Reservoir for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the water body.

It's possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface. OHA relies on laboratory tests of water samples to determine when cyanotoxins are no longer present to lift health advisories.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Keno Dam Reservoir and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all recreational use health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Recreational use health advisory for water contact at Cannon Beach lifted August 30 - 08/30/18

August 30, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for water contact at Cannon Beach lifted August 30

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a recreational use health advisory for contact with marine water at Cannon Beach, located in Clatsop County. The health authority issued the advisory August 29 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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http://bit.ly/2PTH9WK

Oregon Place Matters Conference focuses on 'building a movement' to support health, optimal quality of life - 08/30/18

August 30, 2018

Oregon Place Matters Conference focuses on 'building a movement' to support health, optimal quality of life

Biennial event in October features nationally recognized speakers, sessions on making healthy options accessible

Place Matters, a biennial conference aimed at addressing the leading drivers of chronic disease and health care costs, returns this year with a full program of speakers offering ideas for reducing tobacco and excessive alcohol use, obesity, poor nutrition and physical inactivity.

The theme of the Oct. 29-30 conference at the Oregon Convention Center is "Leading Together: Building a movement for all people in Oregon to live, work, play, learn and age in communities that support health and optimal quality of life." Its purpose is to convene a diverse group of individuals and organizations to engage, collaborate, learn and challenge each other, their organizations, and the state to work toward a common goal: implement policies to create systems and places where healthy options are accessible to all.

The event is sponsored by the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division's Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention section.

The conference was first held in 2010 and has since been hosted every other year. It attracts more than 500 attendees from across health care, city and county governments, tribes, early childhood and K-12 education, colleges and universities, business groups, community-based organizations, the Oregon Public Health Division and other state agencies.

Nationally and locally recognized speakers will touch on key strategies Oregon can use to make good health accessible to all people in our state. Keynote speakers include:

Charles Brown, MPA, urban planner, Rutgers University, a researcher with expertise in transportation planning, policy and research. He is considered a national leader in encouraging social policies that equitably deliver active transportation services for all.

David Toland, MPA, chief executive officer of Thrive Allen County, a non-profit coalition that works to improve quality of life and economic conditions in Allen County, Kan.

Debra Furr-Holden, Ph.D., Michigan State University, an epidemiologist with expertise in drug and alcohol dependence epidemiology, prevention science, and environmental strategies and structural intervention for violence, alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.

Breakout speakers will discuss the importance of cross-sector leadership, defining and aligning shared goals, and implementing sustainable system changes to ensure health for people in Oregon. In one session, attendees will learn how to counteract tactics to block progress on health interventions and explore ways local efforts can mitigate the harmful effects of industry practices in their communities. In another session, attendees will learn about a Native American community that engaged community leaders and decision-makers and began healing conversations to improve the health of community members.

The Oregon Place Matters Conference is open to anyone who wants to help build a statewide movement that supports health for all Oregonians. It is a place to get engaged, gain new skills and be inspired. For more information and to register for the conference, visit the conference website at https://beattygroup.cvent.com/2018OregonPlaceMatters.

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http://bit.ly/2PnzyyB

Recreational use health advisory issued August 29 for water contact at Cannon Beach - 08/29/18

August 29, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued August 29 for water contact at Cannon Beach

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Cannon Beach, located in Clatsop County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Cannon Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

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http://bit.ly/2N2Oswo

Recreational use health advisory issued August 28 for water contact at Agate Beach and Nye Beach - 08/28/18

August 28, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued August 28 for water contact at Agate Beach and Nye Beach

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Agate Beach and Nye Beach, both located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Agate Beach and Nye Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on these beaches because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

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http://bit.ly/2wwyq3P

Oregon Chronic Pain Task Force meets September 20 in Wilsonville - 08/28/18

August 28, 2018

Oregon Chronic Pain Task Force meets September 20 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Chronic Pain Task Force

When: September 20, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Public comment will be accepted starting about 10:45 a.m.

Where: Wilsonville Holiday Inn Candlewood Room, 25425 SW 95th Ave, Wilsonville. The public also may attend via a listen-only conference line by calling 888-204-5984, participant code 801373.

Agenda includes:

  • Review written and verbal comments received during the Aug. 9, 2018, Value-based Benefits Subcommittee meeting regarding the Task Force proposal on coverage of treatments for certain chronic pain conditions.
  • Discuss parameters of an evidence evaluation to be conducted by Oregon Health & Science University’s Center for Evidence-based Policy.
  • Public comment.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/CSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•     Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•     Written materials in other languages

•     Braille

•     Large print

•     Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY, or C.Info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us as soon as possible but at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at C.info@state.or.us">herc.info@state.or.us.

 

http://bit.ly/2C2wTrY

Community partnership bears fruit - 08/27/18

August 27, 2018

Community partnership bears fruit

Food for Lane County, Oregon State Hospital team up for apple harvest

Junction City — A beautiful partnership will come to fruition when Oregon State Hospital patients join Food for Lane County volunteers to celebrate the first harvest of apples on the Junction City campus.

The apple trees were purchased by Food for Lane County supporters and planted on the Junction City hospital site in March 2015.

Several hospital patients volunteer at Food for Lane County as part of their service work, which is a step in the treatment program they follow while recovering from mental illness and preparing to transition back into the community. Volunteering gives many patients a healing sense of purpose, bringing meaning to their lives while they learn skills that will help them find employment when they leave the hospital.

Because many hospital patients have been recipients of Food for Lane County food boxes, the collaboration is even more significant. Oregon State Hospital Deputy Superintendent Kerry Kelly says the apple harvest is "a great opportunity for the hospital to partner with our community and provide an opportunity for our clients and staff to contribute locally."

The harvested apples will be donated to Food for Lane County to fill food baskets for residents of Lane County.

"To be able to harvest fruit coming from a collaboration with community partners truly warms our hearts," said Brad Bassi, Food for Lane County food resource developer, who came to the Junction City campus Aug. 17 to test the apples for readiness.

The apple harvest will begin at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29, and last approximately two hours. Photo opportunities for media include hospital patients, staff and volunteers harvesting apples and filling baskets for Food for Lane County. For more information, please contact hospital relations director Rebeka Gipson-King at 503-756-0366.

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http://bit.ly/2MT5A82