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News Releases
Oregon CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to hold meeting and webinar July 20 - 07/17/18

July 17, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-559-2216, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to hold meeting and webinar July 20

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority's CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, July 20, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 111/112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E., Wilsonville

Attendees can also join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523 and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, participant code 1277166

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and updates; public testimony; extended CCO 2.0 update; 2018 incentive measure program changes; 2019 measure set: information for consideration; break; finalize 2019 measure set; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-559-2216, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup meets July 30 - 07/16/18

July 16, 2018

Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup meets July 30

What: The Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup is holding a public meeting to develop detailed recommendations for acute opioid prescribing that will be included as an amendment to Oregon’s existing Statewide Opioid Prescribing Guidelines.

Agenda:

  • Agenda overview and introductions.
  • Presentation: background and Oregon opioid overview.
  • Presentation: Acute Opioid Prescribing Guideline overview.
  • Discussion of draft.
  • Meeting summary and next steps.

When: Monday, July 30, 1-3 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1B, Portland. No conference call option is available for the public.

Background: The purpose of Oregon Acute Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Workgroup is to set a standard of care in Oregon around safe opioid prescribing for acute pain. The workgroup will develop detailed recommendations for acute opioid prescribing that will be included as an amendment to Oregon’s existing Statewide Opioid Prescribing Guidelines, and will address acute opioid prescribing in primary care, emergency departments, dentistry, and after surgical procedures.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Drew Simpson at 971-673-1033, 711 TTY or ew.r.simpson@state.or.us">drew.r.simpson@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets July 26 in Portland - 07/16/18

July 16, 2018

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee meets July 26 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee

When: Thursday, July 26, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor and comprised of private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.

Agenda: Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP) budget; implementation update; legislative efforts check-in; Place Matters Conference update; communications update: Central Oregon Prevention Campaign; youth survey update.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Barnard at 971-673-1347, 711 TTY or ah.barnard@state.or.us">sarah.barnard@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets July 23 in Portland - 07/13/18

July 13, 2018

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets July 23 in Portland

What: The bi-monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission

Agenda: Smoke free environment; assessment; GovSpace documents; report and legislative concepts from subcommittees; next steps to finalizing legislative concepts for September 24 meeting; listening tour; future meeting dates for commission; OMMP governance; public comment

When: Monday, July 23, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (first floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, it advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information on the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

OHA report: OMMP needs fixes in reporting, tracking, inspections to protect patients - 07/12/18

July 12, 2018

OHA report: OMMP needs fixes in reporting, tracking, inspections to protect patients

State medical marijuana program taking action to improve regulation

SALEM, Ore.—An internal review of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) has identified administrative shortcomings that enabled growers, dispensaries and laboratories to operate without effective oversight. It also found that statutory restrictions have limited OMMP's ability to answer information requests from local law enforcement officials, even as the program protects patient confidentiality.

The issues have heightened the risk for medical marijuana to be diverted from patients, who rely on cannabis to treat medical conditions, into the black market. The report can be viewed on the OHA website at http://healthoregon.org/ommp.

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen requested the study in response to changing demands on OMMP in the wake of voter approval of legalized recreational marijuana sales. The agency also has heard concerns from local officials who have been frustrated as they sought information about grow operations in their communities. The report will be presented to the Oregon Cannabis Commission July 23.

"More than 40,000 Oregonians depend on medical marijuana to treat their qualifying medical conditions," Allen said. "We are taking steps to maintain the integrity of Oregon's medical marijuana program and make sure medical products reach the patients who need them. The actions we're taking include better tracking of growers, better enforcement, and making sure product that fails testing has been destroyed."

The study identifies several challenges OMMP has encountered since it was established in 1999. Some of these administrative problems existed before voters approved recreational sales in 2014. Other issues were compounded by a changing market and regulatory landscape for OMMP and medical marijuana patients once marijuana was legalized. These issues include:

  • Reporting and tracking: OMMP's reporting and tracking of growers and cannabis have been inadequate and inaccurate, and monthly compliance has been historically low, ranging between 26 percent and 42 percent during 2017.
  • Grow site validation: OMMP lacks reliable, independent tools to validate grow site addresses and relies on inconsistent county databases.
  • Grow site inspections: As of January 2018 there were more than 20,000 grow sites across the state. However, in 2017 OMMP completed only 58 inspections. OMMP does not have sufficient staff to conduct the number of inspections that would deter grower non-compliance with program requirements.
  • Laboratory testing and product destruction: While OMMP has protocols that require the destruction of products for the medical market that fail laboratory tests for pesticides and other chemicals, the program had difficulties with ensuring the appropriate and verified destruction of those products.

OMMP is taking action to improve its regulation of medical marijuana. The program is requiring dispensaries, processors and certain growers to use the Oregon Liquor Control Commission's Cannabis Tracking System (CTS). The program is ensuring that applicable growers meet new tracking requirements. In addition, OMMP will require patients to provide proof of address when processing applications, which will help validate grow site locations. As part of implementing SB 1057 (2017), OMMP will take enforcement action against participants who don't comply with reporting requirements by July 1, 2018, whether reporting in CTS or in OMMP's internal monthly reporting system. Finally, the OMMP's compliance program has finalized and started using a viable destruction protocol.

OMMP currently verifies grow site locations for local authorities and has a hotline to field grow site address inquiries. The confidentiality of grow site addresses is protected in statute and these limitations can pose a barrier to the program's ability to respond to some local law enforcement requests. In addition, the program is exploring ways to more closely work with local law enforcement to ensure compliance at medical marijuana grow sites.

The study acknowledges that OMMP successfully established and administered a program that provides more than 40,000 patients dependable access to medical cannabis and regulates more than 20,000 grow sites. In addition, frequent legislative changes have affected OMMP's ability to consistently regulate and monitor the medical marijuana market. Chronic underfunding and understaffing has affected OMMP's ability to meet the demands of robust regulation, particularly in the years immediately following the legalization of recreational sales in Oregon.

Information about the Oregon Cannabis Commission meeting is on the commission's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx.

# # #

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 19 in Junction City - 07/12/18

July 12, 2018

Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board meets July 19 in Junction City

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, July 19, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Hospital Junction City Campus, Room A1012, 29398 Recovery Way, Junction City. The public can also attend via toll-free conference line at 888-278-0296, participant code 4294893.

Agenda: After the public comment period, topics will include patient engagement, staff training on Trauma Informed Care, Intimate Interactions Charter, veterans update, family feedback and orientation, gambling addiction, medication and discharge, medical evaluation/forensic assessment, a diversity/cultural affairs update, update from the Patient Advisory Council, access to the electronic hospital policy/procedure manual and Pow Wows.

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, Oregon Health Authority Director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

For more information, see the board’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jacee Vangestel at 503-945-2852, 711 TTY or jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets July 20 in Portland - 07/12/18

July 12, 2018

Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee meets July 20 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission Training Subcommittee

Agenda: The agenda will include discussion of the following topics: review minutes from May 18, 2018; Review legislative fixes; review legislative report draft 2.

When: Friday, July 20, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (first floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public also may attend by conference call line at 877-848-7030, access code 753428.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, it advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information on the commission's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Recreational use health advisory for Lake Billy Chinook expanded to include entire lake - 07/11/18

July 11, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for Lake Billy Chinook expanded to include entire lake

The Oregon Health Authority has updated a recreational use health advisory issued June 22 for Lake Billy Chinook.

The original advisory extended from the cove at Perry South Campground to the southern tip of Chinook Island due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom and the toxins they can produce. Based on the most recent data available to the Oregon Health Authority from other areas of the lake, the advisory is being expanded to include all three arms of Lake Billy Chinook. The lake is located about 12 miles west of Madras in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in the Metolius, Deschutes and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities such as water skiing or power boating in areas of the lake where cyanotoxins are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

There are no public systems that use water from Lake Billy Chinook for drinking water; however, anyone who may be drawing in-home water directly from the lake is advised to use an alternate water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing cyanotoxins. Individuals on a domestic well should not be affected by the bloom or toxins. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds and parks, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to cyanotoxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Lake Billy Chinook for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid exposure to affected water, people are encouraged to visit this area of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

Oregon health officials caution people about high temperatures - 07/10/18

Editors: Tom Jeanne, MD, will be available for interviews from 2 to 4 p.m. today. Contact Delia Hernandez at 503-422-7179 to schedule.

July 10, 2018

Oregon health officials caution people about high temperatures

Stay hydrated, limit sun exposure as forecast calls for upper 90s

Oregon health officials are recommending people prevent heat-related illnesses that can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke as summer temperatures climb into at least the mid-90s in the coming days.

"We love our Oregon summers and the warm temperatures they bring, but people need to take precautions when temperatures get to the level where they can cause health problems," said Tom Jeanne, MD, deputy state health officer at the OHA Public Health Division. "Extreme heat conditions can even be deadly for some people."

According to the National Weather Service, temperatures are expected to reach the mid- to upper 90s Thursday in the Portland metro area and central Oregon, and above 100 in parts of eastern and southern Oregon.

The Oregon Public Health Division offers the following tips for staying safe and healthy during extreme heat conditions:

1. Stay cool

  • Stay in air-conditioned places when temperatures are high, if possible.
  • Limit exposure to the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when UV rays are strongest. Try to schedule activities in the morning and evening.
  • Open windows to allow fresh air to circulate, especially during morning and evening hours, and close shades on west-facing windows during the afternoon hours.
  • Use portable electric fans to exhaust hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothing to keep cool and protect your skin from the sun.
  • Use cool compresses, misting, and cool showers and baths.
  • Avoid hot foods and heavy meals; they add heat to the body.
  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. Nor should pets be left in parked cars—they can suffer heat-related illness, too.
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 when going outside.

2. Stay hydrated

  • Regardless of your level of activity, drink plenty of fluids, even if you are not thirsty and especially when working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.

3. Stay informed

  • Keep up-to-date on the temperature and heat index when planning your activities so you can find ways to stay cool and hydrated. The heat index measures how hot it feels outside when factoring in humidity with the actual air temperature.
  • Learn how to prevent, recognize, and treat heat-related illnesses. Know the warning signs of heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, sunburn and heat rash, and how to treat and prevent them.

People with a chronic medical condition such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer or kidney disease may be less likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature. Also, they may be taking medications that can worsen the impact of extreme heat. People in this category should be closely monitored to make sure they’re drinking enough water, have access to air conditioning and know how to keep cool.

Those who exercise in extreme heat or work outdoors are more likely to become dehydrated and get heat-related illness and should pay particular attention to staying as cool and hydrated as possible.

For more information, visit:

# # #

Health Care Workforce Committee meet July 11 in Wilsonville - 07/10/18

July 10, 2018

Contact: Melisa Otrugman, 503-689-5238, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee meet July 11 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, July 11, 9:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Public testimony will be heard from 12:15 to 12:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by telephone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/13920203482029571. Conference line: 877-411-9748, access code 730407. The telephone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Approval of July Meeting Summary, OHPB and OHA updates, CCO 2.0 update and discussion, presentation on Oregon’s health care workforce labor market data, behavioral health updates, recommendations on promising strategies to improve the diversity of the workforce, Health Care Workforce Needs Assessment 2.0, Health Care Provider Incentive Program update, public comment

For more information, please visit the committee’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/HP-HCW/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Melisa Otrugman at 503-689-5238, 711 TTY, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #

Conference of Local Health Officials meets July 19 in Portland - 07/09/18

July 9, 2018 

Conference of Local Health Officials meets July 19 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO)

When: Thursday, July 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland

Agenda: Prevention and health promotion committee update; assessment of new CLHO committee structure; and Public Health Modernization Legislative Fiscal Office report.

Agenda is subject to change. The meeting agenda and related materials will be posted on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/about/clho-meetings/.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340).

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Cannabis Commission Product Integrity Subcommittee meets July 16 in Portland - 07/06/18

July 6, 2018

Cannabis Commission Product Integrity Subcommittee meets July 16 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission's Product Integrity Subcommittee

When: Monday, July 16, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1E (main floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The public can also attend remotely by telephone conference call line at 877-848-7030, access code 75-34-28.

Agenda: TBD

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established by HB 2198 (2017). The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. It also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission on statutes governing medical and retail cannabis.

More information is on the commission’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Public Health Advisory Board meets July 19 in Portland - 07/05/18

July 5, 2018

Public Health Advisory Board meets July 19 in Portland

What: The regular monthly public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board

When: July 19, 2-5 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Conference Room 1B, Portland. The public can also attend remotely by webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/4888122320415752707, or by telephone conference line at 1-877-873-8017, participant 76-70-68#.

Agenda: Receive subcommittee updates; receive updates on Cleaner Air Oregon; receive updates on the State Health Assessment and State Health Improvement Plan

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. For more information, see the board's webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/About/Pages/ophab.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•           Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•           Written materials in other languages

•           Braille

•           Large print

•           Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kati Moseley at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or ina.moseley@state.or.us">katarina.moseley@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

OHA report details insurance payments to hospitals for most common procedures - 07/05/18

July 5, 2018

OHA report details insurance payments to hospitals for most common procedures

Data show wide variations in amounts paid

Salem, Ore. — Insurance companies continue to pay hospitals widely varying amounts for the same procedures within hospitals, among hospitals, and across the state, according to a report from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). In its third year of publication, the Oregon Hospital Payment Report details the median amounts paid by commercial insurers for the most common inpatient and outpatient procedures performed in Oregon hospitals in 2016.

"The Oregon Hospital Payment report is another way to shine a light on the cost of health care in Oregon," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics. "For policymakers, it’s another tool to use as we look for ways to control the rising cost of health care."

The goal of the report is to provide transparency about hospital reimbursement. Hospital care accounts for as much as 32 percent of health care spending in the state, according to the National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA) survey. This annual report is based on data collected in Oregon’s All Payer All Claims (APAC) database.

In 2016 inpatient procedures increased by an average of 6.4 percent from 2015, the most of any category. No other procedure category increased by more than 2.6 percent and imaging and diagnostic procedures showed a slight average decrease in paid amount from 2015. Inpatient procedures already have the highest median paid amounts of any category, and are increasing at a faster rate.

Other highlights of the report include:

  • Most procedures show sizable variations in paid amounts, both within and among hospitals.
  • Among common outpatient procedures, studies of electrical activity in the heart were reported to have the highest median paid amount at $38,800.
  • Among common inpatient procedures, heart valve replacement surgeries were reported to have the highest median paid amount at $96,000.
  • Among common diagnostic and imaging services, nuclear medicine evaluations of the cardiovascular system were reported to have the highest median paid amount at $2,300.
  • The procedure with the largest dollar increase in median paid amount from 2015 was heart valve replacement surgeries, increasing by $11,200.
  • The procedure with the largest percent increase in median paid amount from 2015 was spinal decompression surgeries, increasing 32 percent.

Reimbursement for a procedure in a hospital depends on many factors. These factors should be considered when comparing charges among facilities. Some reasons that account for variations include:

  • Rate negotiation: Each hospital negotiates with each insurance provider they accept for each procedure's reimbursement rate. This paid amount will vary depending on the hospital and the insurance company.
  • Case complexity: An insurance company may reimburse a hospital within a range of amounts for a given procedure up to a predetermined maximum. This range is influenced by how sick the patient is and how many extra services were required to perform the procedure.
  • Geographic factors: The amount a hospital is paid depends on its location. Communities with higher costs of living have higher salary, lease, and utilities costs. These differences in hospital operating expenses should be considered when comparing paid amounts.
  • Economies of scale: Hospital volume influences how much they are paid. Hospitals that perform the procedure hundreds of times will often accept a lower paid amount for each case because they make the difference up in larger volumes.

For more details on the 2016 Oregon Hospital Payment Report, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Hospital-Reporting.aspx.

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Oregon awards $900,000 in student loan repayment assistance to health care providers - 07/05/18

July 5, 2018

Oregon awards $900,000 in student loan repayment assistance to health care providers

The first round of Health Care Provider Incentive Program loan repayment, totaling $900,000, was recently awarded to 17 medical, dental and behavioral health providers serving rural and underserved communities in Oregon.

The Health Care Provider Incentive Program was established by the Legislature in HB 3261 (2017) to help rural and underserved communities recruit and retain high quality health care providers who serve patients regardless of their source of coverage (Medicaid, Medicare, private, etc.) or ability to pay. Awardees receive funds to repay qualified student loan debt in exchange for a commitment to serve at qualified practice sites in rural or underserved areas of Oregon.

"In Oregon, more than half of our state is designated as having a health professional shortage, covering more than 40 percent of our population," said Marc Overbeck, OHA’s Primary Care Office director. "These incentives attract more providers to Oregon and help keep providers in the communities that need them the most."

The first cycle of awardees included: one naturopathic doctor, one doctor of osteopathic medicine, one physician, one licensed professional counselor, one clinical psychologist, two nurse practitioners, two physician assistants, two licensed clinical social workers and six dentists. Of those selected, eight are from the Portland metro area, four from Southwest Oregon, one from the Central Oregon Coast, two from Eastern Oregon and three from the Willamette Valley.

Awards are calculated based on the balance owed on qualifying loans when the professional joins the program. Full-time service providers must commit to a three-year minimum service obligation in exchange for a tax-free award of 50 percent of their qualifying educational loan debt balance, up to $35,000 per obligation year. Part-time service providers must commit to a three-year minimum service obligation in exchange for a tax-free award of 25 percent of their qualifying educational loan debt balance, up to $25,000 per obligation year.

The Health Care Provider Incentive Program is administered by the Oregon Office of Rural Health at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU). Loan repayment is one incentive the program offers.

The program will have four more award cycles between now and June 2019. The Office of Rural Health is accepting provider applications for the next review cycle, which closes August 3.

For more information about loan requirements, awards and how to apply for the program, visit the Oregon Office of Rural Health website at https://www.ohsu.edu/xd/outreach/oregon-rural-health/providers/loan-repayment/.

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Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets July 9 - 07/05/18

July 5, 2018

Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets July 9

What: A meeting of the rules advisory committee on dental pilot projects

When: July 9, 9-11 a.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 888-273-3658, participant code 76-64-09

Agenda: Review background information; brief overview of the rulemaking process; review draft amended rules; next steps.

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Oregon State Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is holding a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to dental pilot projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules.

Materials: Copies of materials are available online at healthoregon.org/dpp.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Oregon Health Policy Board meets July 10 in Portland - 07/03/18

July 3, 2018

Oregon Health Policy Board meets July 10 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: Tuesday, July 10. 8:30 a.m. to noon

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3rd floor Rm. 4, 3303 SW Bond Ave, Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; minutes approval; OHA report; public testimony; CCO 2.0: CCO 1.0 and health system transformation; CCO 2.0 procurement; CCO 2.0 input process and themes; CCO 2.0 analysis framework; CCO 2.0 impact and analysis; CCO 2.0 final report framework & reflections

For more information on the meeting, visit the board’s meeting page at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711, jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us, TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Health advisory for water contact at Nye Beach lifted June 29  - 06/29/18

June 29, 2018

Health advisory for water contact at Nye Beach lifted June 29 
Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Nye Beach, located in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisory June 26 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels at marine water sample locations. Contact with the marine water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter. 

Some of these inland water areas are considered fresh water locations and are not subject to health advisories, meaning these results may be elevated but OHA does not have authority to issue an advisory. Contact the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program (beach.health@state.or.us) to subscribe to the data distribution listserv and receive weekly updates of water quality results throughout the monitoring season. 

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. 

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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OHA files temporary rules for cyanotoxin testing by water suppliers - Updated with correct link - 06/29/18

June 29, 2018

OHA files temporary rules for cyanotoxin testing by water suppliers - Updated with correct link
Do-not-drink advisories to be issued when toxin levels above health values

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority has issued temporary rules requiring drinking water suppliers meeting certain criteria to test their water for toxins from cyanobacteria responsible for harmful algal blooms.

The rules, which take effect Sunday, July 1, also require water suppliers in Oregon to issue a “do-not-drink” advisory if routine and confirmation water samples test above any health advisory level, including those for either vulnerable or general populations. The temporary rules apply to the two cyanotoxins for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established health advisory levels—microcystins and cylindrospermopsin.

The maximum allowable level of total microcystins in treated water is 0.3 parts per billion (ppb) for vulnerable people and 1.6 ppb for those 6 and older and healthy adults. The maximum allowable level of cylindrospermopsin is 0.7 ppb for vulnerable populations and 3 ppb for those 6 and older and healthy adults. Vulnerable populations include children 5 and younger, the elderly, medically fragile individuals, and pregnant and nursing women.

The rules will remain in place through Dec. 27, 2018. In the meantime, OHA will establish a rules advisory committee to begin developing permanent cyanotoxin testing rules for drinking water through a public process during the fall. 

OHA is partnering with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to develop a plan for coordinating, receiving and analyzing water samples for cyanotoxins at DEQ’s environmental laboratory in Hillsboro at no cost to water suppliers subject to the rules. For communities that request support, DEQ is prepared to provide testing and analysis of water bodies.

“As harmful algal blooms become the norm in Oregon, as they are around the country, we must address this emerging threat to our drinking water supplies,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “These temporary rules close a gap in regulations and will help us protect our drinking water systems so everyone in Oregon is kept safe from exposure to cyanotoxins.”

“DEQ is committed to helping Oregon communities address harmful algal blooms by providing monitoring and analytical expertise,” said DEQ Director Richard Whitman. “The impacts of climate change will continue to exacerbate conditions that lead to algal blooms and having better data will help us understand the threat posed to our water systems and how we can reduce harm.”

And though not required in the temporary rules, OHA also is encouraging water suppliers to notify the public within 24 hours if routine and confirmation samples detect cyanotoxins in treated drinking water, even if the toxins are below health advisory levels.

The rules apply to water suppliers that meet any of the following criteria:

  • Use a surface water source that has had harmful algal blooms or cyanotoxin detections.
  • Use a surface water source downstream from a water body with past harmful algal blooms or cyanotoxin detections.
  • Use a surface water source determined to be susceptible to cyanotoxins based on water quality characteristics that can promote growth of algae, such as the presence of algae and aquatic weeds and water chemistry that includes high levels of chlorophyll-a, phosphorus and pH, and low dissolved oxygen levels.
  • Purchase and supply water from any of these water systems.

OHA Drinking Water Services estimates the new rules affect between 150 and 200 water suppliers with surface water sources and water systems that purchase water from these suppliers. These systems will be required to collect raw water samples every two weeks—beginning July 15 under the temporary rules—each year between May 1 and Oct. 31, which is when cyanobacteria are most common in surface water sources.

If cyanotoxins are detected in raw water in the water source at or above 0.3 ppb for either microcystin or cylindrospermopsin, the water supplier must sample raw and treated water weekly. If cyanotoxins are detected at any level in treated water, daily sampling must occur. Treated water monitoring can return to weekly after two consecutive “non-detects” of cyanotoxins at the entry point for the distribution system.

If treated water results are above any advisory level, the water system must collect a confirmation sample as soon as practical within 24 hours. A do-not-drink advisory must be issued if cyanotoxins are still found above the health advisory level in the confirmation sample of treated water. Water systems that purchase water from a water supplier with a surface water source must collect water samples daily from their distribution systems when a cyanotoxin is found above a health advisory level in the seller’s treated water.

The temporary rules can be found at www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HEALTHYENVIRONMENTS/DRINKINGWATER/RULES/Pages/index.aspx. 

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Recreational use health advisory issued June 28 for Detroit Lake  - 06/28/18

June 28, 2018

Recreational use health advisory issued June 28 for Detroit Lake 
High toxin levels found in Linn-Marion county water body

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational health advisory today for Detroit Lake, located 46 miles southeast of Salem. The lake spans both Linn and Marion counties.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanotoxins at levels above Oregon Health Authority recreational guideline values. Cyanotoxins can be produced by colonies of cyanobacteria commonly referred to as harmful algae blooms. At measured levels cyanotoxins can be harmful to humans and animals. Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of cyanobacteria (harmful algae) and avoid areas with visible scum that looks foamy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish-red, or where small bright-green clumps are floating in the water.

According to new protocol announced June 25, a recreational use health advisory at Detroit Lake can be lifted when test results show cyanotoxin levels in water samples taken from the lake on three consecutive days are below recreational guideline levels, and that City of Salem visual assessments near sampling locations find the algae bloom has subsided.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area. 

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing cyanotoxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce these toxins through proper filtration, disinfection and other treatment. The Santiam River downstream of Detroit Lake is the source of drinking water for several cities, including the City of Salem. The City of Salem’s drinking water advisory is still in place for vulnerable populations. For more information about the city’s water advisory, visit www.cityofsalem.net

Exposure to cyanotoxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Detroit Lake for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

Drinking water directly from Detroit Lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA Public Health Division officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that cyanotoxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacterial blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as cyanotoxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Detroit Lake and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

With proper precautions to avoid activities during which water can be ingested, people are encouraged to visit Detroit Lake and enjoy activities such as canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Although inhalation risk is much lower than ingestion, it can present a risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0400. For campground or lake information, call the local management agency.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.
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Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup to meet June 29  - 06/28/18

June 28, 2018

What: The Oregon Health Authority’s Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup will meet in Wilsonville on Friday, June 29, 2018

When: Friday, June 29, 1 – 4 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College, Wilsonville Training Center (29353 SW Town Center Loop E. Wilsonville, OR) Room #111

Attendees can also join remotely through a webinar and conference line.
Register for the webinar at  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3156056157212297217. Conference line: 1-877-810-9415, Participant Code: 1773452

Agenda: Welcome and introductions, refresher on conceptual framework, review and adopt criteria, applying the conceptual framework, lunch, review potential measures for phase 1, public comment, summary and next steps.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jon McElfresh at 503-385-3075, 711 TTY, jonathan.p.mcelfresh@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Recreational use health advisory issued June 26 for water contact at Nye Beach - 06/26/18

June 26, 2018

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Nye Beach, located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Nye Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

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CCOs continue to show gains in quality and access to care - 06/26/18

June 26, 2018

Oregon CCOs continue to advance health system transformation by focusing on better care and better health outcomes while controlling health care costs. 

“What we’ve seen over the past five years is that incentives work,” said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics. “They are driving improvement in the care that Oregonians receive and helping to improve the health of our communities.” 

The 2017 CCO Metrics Report details Oregon’s pay-for-performance program where OHA created a quality pool from a percentage of monthly CCO payments to reward performance. To earn their full incentive payment, CCOs have to meet benchmarks or improvement targets on at least 12 of the 16 measures and have at least 60 percent of their members enrolled in a patient-centered primary care home.

The quality pool model rewards CCOs for the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This model increasingly rewards CCOs for outcomes, rather than utilization of services, and is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s vision for better health, better care, and lower costs.

Highlights of the 2017 report include continued improvement in adolescent well-care visits, health assessments for children in DHS custody, colorectal cancer screenings, developmental screening in the first three years of life, and effective contraceptive use. Areas that stood out for improvement included postpartum care, initiation and engagement of alcohol or other drug treatment, and hospital stays due to congestive heart failure or short-term diabetes complications. 

The quality pool amount was 4.25 percent of monthly payments in 2017, for a total of more than $178 million. While all CCOs showed improvement on a majority of measures, 14 out of 16 earned 100 percent of their quality pool dollars, which left $2.3 million for the challenge pool. It was distributed to CCOs that met the benchmark or improvement target on three measures: Developmental screenings in the first 36 months of life, effective contraceptive use among adult women, and depression screening and follow-up. PacificSource – Central Oregon met the highest number of measures.

For a detailed report of the CCO metrics and how much each CCO earned through the pay-for-performance program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website.  

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OHA updates protocol for Detroit Lake recreational use advisories, lifts June 13 health alert - 06/25/18

June 25, 2018

Procedure calls for 3 days of cyanotoxin levels below recreational advisory guidelines, visual confirmation that bloom subsided

As the Oregon Health Authority today lifts a recreational use health advisory for Detroit Lake, it is launching a new protocol for lifting advisories at the water body to ensure health officials and the public that a harmful algae bloom has dissipated.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanobacterial toxins in Detroit Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. OHA issued its recreational advisory for the lake—located 46 miles southeast of Salem, and spanning Linn and Marion counties—on June 13.

In ending the Detroit Lake advisory, OHA is following a new protocol that calls for lifting a recreational advisory when test results show cyanotoxin levels in water samples taken from Detroit Lake on three consecutive days are below recreational guideline levels, and that City of Salem visual assessments near sampling locations find the algae bloom has subsided.

OHA received below-guideline test results June 20, 21 and 22. The city completed its visual assessment of the lake June 24.

Current OHA guidelines require an advisory to be issued whenever cyanotoxin levels surpass the OHA recreational guideline levels, and then lifted when they drop below those levels. Typically, OHA’s Harmful Algae Bloom Surveillance Program receives cyanotoxin results for recreational water bodies on a bi-weekly basis, but since May 29, OHA has received daily samples for Detroit Lake from the City of Salem.

“The higher-than-usual sampling frequency on Detroit Lake is a reason recreational advisories have been issued and lifted so often, along with changes in toxin levels measured in the daily sampling from the lake,” said David Farrer, Ph.D., toxicologist with the Environmental Public Health Section at the OHA Public Health Division.

Fluctuating test results have made it difficult for community members to keep track of when the advisory is on and when it’s lifted. “We hope this new protocol for Detroit Lake will help reduce some of the confusion among the public about whether a recreational advisory is in place at the lake,” Farrer said. 

To protect the public’s health, OHA will continue to issue recreational use advisories at any point cyanotoxin levels surpass OHA recreational guideline levels in Detroit Lake. The new protocol only affects Detroit Lake since it is the only water body currently being tested daily for cyanotoxins.

Although OHA is lifting the recreational advisory for Detroit Lake, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of cyanobacteria in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, so people are encouraged to be their own best advocate when it comes to keeping themselves and their families safe while recreating.

Detroit Lake is upstream of the source of drinking water for some public water systems. Data provided by the City of Salem for Detroit Lake and the Santiam River has confirmed that toxins are below OHA advisory values for recreational water, and drinking water. While the recreational advisory for Detroit Lake is being lifted, the drinking water advisory for vulnerable populations for the City of Salem will remain in place, until the city is assured that toxins remain below OHA drinking water advisory values. 

The drinking water advisory levels for vulnerable populations are different for recreational use than for drinking water. The amount of water people incidentally swallow while recreating (swimming, water skiing, etc.) is much lower than when people use it as a primary drinking water source. For drinking water concerns, visit the City of Salem’s drinking water advisory or the Oregon Health Authority’s Drinking Water Services website at http://healthoregon.org/dws. You can also dial 211 for information on the drinking water advisory.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For recreational health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms or cyanotoxins in recreational waters, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0440. For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.” 

# # #

Recreational use health advisory re-issued for Upper Klamath Lake - 06/25/18

June 25, 2018

High levels of cyanobacteria toxins found in the Klamath County water body

The Oregon Health Authority re-issued a recreational use health advisory today for Upper Klamath Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom. The lake is located off Oregon Route 140, 15 miles west of Klamath Falls in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in Upper Klamath Lake. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

The advisory was originally issued on June 15 and lifted on Friday, June 22. OHA updates an advisory when new sampling data is received. Sampling data received on June 15 showed toxin levels above recreational guideline values and sampling data received June 22 showed toxin levels below guidelines. The most recent sampling data again show toxin levels above recreational guideline values prompting OHA to re-issue the recreational use health advisory. 

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people connected to public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

OHA public health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Upper Klamath Lake and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Eagle Ridge County Park for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Upper Klamath Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #

Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22 - 06/22/18

June 22, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22 
Reduced cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County, due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the reservoir are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.” 

Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets June 25 - 06/22/18

What: The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is convening a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to Dental Pilot Projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules.

Agenda: Review background information; brief overview of the rulemaking process; review draft amended rules; next steps.

When: June 25, 9 am-11am. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 1-888-273-3658, participants code: 76-64-09

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Oregon State Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Materials: Copies of materials are available online at healthoregon.org/dpp

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

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Recreational use advisory issued for Lake Billy Chinook due to cyanotoxins - 06/22/18

High levels of cyanobacteria toxins found in Jefferson County water body

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for areas of Lake Billy Chinook due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom. The lake is located about 12 miles west of Madras, in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in Perry South Cove on the Metolious Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

The advisory extends from the cove at Perry South Campground to the southern tip of Three Rivers Island located downstream in the Metolious Arm.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

Anyone drawing in-home water directly from the affected area is advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing cyanotoxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce cyanotoxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people are connected to public water systems or are on wells in the area, that water is not affected by the bloom in the lake. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to cyanotoxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to this area of Lake Billy Chinook for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in this area of the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid exposure to affected water, people are encouraged to visit this area of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

###

Recreational use health advisory lifted June 22 for Upper Klamath Lake - 06/22/18

Reduced cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 15 for Upper Klamath Lake—located off Oregon Route 140, 15 miles west of Klamath Falls in Klamath County—due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom and the toxins they produced.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of cyanobacteria (harmful algae) is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.”

###

Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22 - 06/22/18

Reduced cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County, due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the reservoir are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.”

###

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 27 - 06/20/18

June 20, 2018

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 27

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC)

When: June 27, 1-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:50 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-873-8018, access code 7872333.

Agenda: Outbreaks update; infection control infection and response (ICAR) tools; nursing home prevalence study; injection practice and needle use project update; TAP assessment progress; discussion; public comment.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of health care-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI program. The board meets on a quarterly basis to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities. More information is available on the program's webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Prevention/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Roza Tammer at 971-673-1074, 711 TTY, or oza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

Correction: Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup to meet June 20 in Portland - 06/20/18

June 13, 2018

What: A public meeting of the Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup.

When: Wednesday, June 20, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

The public also may attend by conference call at 888-278-0296, participant code 843163.*

Agenda: Welcome, introductions and process overview; background and workgroup scope and goal; current process for out-of-hospital births prior authorization; challenges with and reflections on PA process; public comment; summary and next steps.

Background: The Out of Hospital Births Workgroup met in 2016-2017 to discuss the Oregon Health Plan's coverage of childbirth in settings other than hospitals. The workgroup presented recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority in summer 2017. OHA is convening this small group to undertake the workgroup's third recommendation, "Prior Authorization Process Review," with the goal of optimizing safety while improving the efficiency of the process. Questions and public comments may be submitted to OOHB.Workgroup@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY or heather.n.johnson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

* This news release was updated June 20, 2018, at 10:44 a.m., to correct the telephone number.

OHA anuncia reuniones comunitarias a lo largo del estado para definir el futuro del Plan de Salud de Oregon  - 06/18/18

18 de junio, 2018: Este comunicado de prensa se actualizó para reflejar un cambio en la ubicación de la reunión de Bend

14 de junio, 2018 

El director de Oregon Health Authority (OHA), Patrick Allen, emprenderá una gira este verano para conversar con residentes de Oregon sobre el futuro del Plan de Salud de Oregon. Allen viajará por 10 comunidades (Astoria, Bend, Coos Bay, Corvallis, Hermiston, Hood River, Klamath Falls, Ontario, Portland y Springfield) para hablar sobre lo que se ha logrado con la transformación del sistema de salud en Oregon y lo que se busca mejorar. Además, Allen quiere escuchar opiniones sobre las opciones propuestas para mejorar el sistema de salud coordinada del estado.

La conclusión de los primeros contratos de cinco años con las Organizaciones de Atención de Salud Coordinada (CCOs por sus siglas en inglés) señalan una oportunidad para que el Consejo de Política de Salud de Oregon trabaje con todas las partes interesadas para mejorar los servicios que un millón de personas reciben por medio del Plan de Salud de Oregon.  CCOs son organizaciones gobernadas por la comunidad que ayudan a reunir proveedores de salud física, mental, y dental para coordinar la atención médica de beneficiarios del Plan de Salud de Oregon (Medicaid).

Desde el 2012, el modelo de salud coordinada de Oregon ha ahorrado a los contribuyentes alrededor de $2.2 mil millones, mientras reduce las visitas innecesarias a las salas de emergencias y mejora el cuidado de salud preventivo para niños y adultos.

El 5 de junio, OHA presentó propuestas y estrategias al Consejo de Política de Salud de Oregon para mejorar la atención de salud que proveerá el Plan de Salud de Oregon en los próximos cinco años. Las propuestas se formaron tras consultar al público por medio de sondeos, foros comunitarios, reuniones en persona y por internet, al igual que correos electrónicos.

Las propuestas se enfocan en mejorar cuatro áreas de prioridad identificadas por la Gobernadora Kate Brown.

  • Mantener un crecimiento sostenible de los gastos.
  • Incrementar remuneración basada en acciones—paga según el rendimiento.
  • Enfocarse en los determinantes sociales de la salud y equidad.
  • Mejorar el sistema de salud mental.

OHA continuara recabando aportaciones del público sobre las propuestas a lo largo del verano, y el Consejo de Política de Salud adoptara las recomendaciones en el otoño. Contratos para la atención de salud coordinada para 2020-2025 se espera sean otorgados en el verano de 2019.

Programa de reuniones comunitarias de junio 2018

Lunes, 18 de junio
Hood River, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Hood River Inn 
1108 E Marina Drive 
 
Martes, 19 de junio
Hermiston, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 
Eastern Oregon Trade and Event Center 
1750 E Airport Road 

Ontario, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
Treasure Valley Community College, Weese Building, Room 110 
650 College Blvd 
 
Miércoles, 20 de junio 
Bend, 12-2 p.m. 
Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall *
2600 NW College Way 
 
Jueves, 21 de junio 
Portland, 6-8 p.m. 
Madison High School 
2735 NE 82nd Ave 
 
Martes, 26 de junio 
Corvallis, 12:30-2:30 p.m. 
Oregon State University LaSells Stewart Center 
875 SW 26th Street 
 
Springfield, 6-8 p.m. 
Holiday Inn 
919 Kruse Way 
 
Miércoles, 27 de junio 
Astoria, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 
Astoria Armory 
1636 Exchange Street 

Coos Bay, 7-9 p.m. 
Red Lion Inn 
1313 N Bayshore Drive 
 
Jueves, 28 de junio 
Klamath Falls, 12:30-2:30 p.m. 
Henley Elementary School 
8227 Highway 39 
 
Traductores en español estarán presentes en todas las reuniones.

# # #

Todos tienen el derecho de tener conocimiento y utilizar los programas y servicios de la Autoridad de Salud de Oregon (OHA, por sus siglas en inglés). OHA provee ayuda gratuita como, por ejemplo:

  • Traductores en diferentes lenguajes hablados y lenguaje de signos americano
  • Documentos escritos en otros lenguajes
  • Braille
  • Letra grande
  • Audio y otros formatos

Para asistencia o respuestas a preguntas, por favor llame a Lisa Bui al 971-673-3397, 711 TTY o Lisa.T.Bui@state.or.us al menos 48 horas antes del evento.

* Este comunicado de prensa se actualizó el 18 de junio de 2018 a las 3 p.m., para reflejar un cambio en la ubicación de la reunión de Bend.

OHA announces community meetings across state to shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan - 06/18/18

Updated June 18 to reflect new location of Bend meeting

June 7, 2018

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us

OHA announces community meetings across state to shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen is hitting the road this summer to engage Oregonians in a conversation about the future of the Oregon Health Plan. Allen is scheduled to travel to 10 communities (Astoria, Bend, Coos Bay, Corvallis, Hermiston, Hood River, Klamath Falls, Ontario, Portland and Springfield) to discuss how far Oregon’s health transformation has come and where it's going, and to get feedback on proposed policy options to improve the state’s coordinated care system.

The end of the first five-year contracts with coordinated care organizations (CCOs) marks an opportunity for the Oregon Health Policy Board to work with stakeholders to improve the services that 1 million Oregonians receive through the Oregon Health Plan. CCOs are community-governed organizations that bring together physical, mental health, addiction medicine, and dental health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid).

Since 2012 Oregon’s coordinated care model has saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, while also reducing unnecessary emergency department visits, and improving preventive care for children and adults.

On June 5 OHA presented policy options and strategies to the Oregon Health Policy Board to shape the next five years of health care coverage offered through the Oregon Health Plan. The policy options were informed by public input gathered this spring through surveys, community forums, in-person and online stakeholder meetings, and emails.

The policies focus on four priority improvement areas identified by Governor Kate Brown:

  • Maintain sustainable cost growth.
  • Increase value-based payments that pay for performance.
  • Focus on social determinants of health and equity.
  • Improve the behavioral health system.

OHA will continue to gather public input on the policy options throughout the summer, and the Oregon Health Policy Board will adopt final recommendations this fall. Coordinated care contracts for 2020-2025 are expected to be awarded in summer 2019.

For more information, visit the CCO 2.0 webpage.

June 2018 community meeting schedule

Monday, June 18

Hood River, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Hood River Inn

1108 E Marina Drive

 

Tuesday, June 19

Hermiston, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.*

Eastern Oregon Trade and Event Center

1750 E Airport Road

 

Ontario, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Treasure Valley Community College, Weese Building, Room 110

650 College Blvd

 

Wednesday, June 20

Bend, noon to 2 p.m.

Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall**

2600 NW College Way

 

Thursday, June 21

Portland, 6-8 p.m.

Madison High School

2735 NE 82nd Ave

 

Tuesday, June 26

Corvallis, 12:30-2:30 p.m.

Oregon State University LaSells Stewart Center

875 SW 26th Street

 

Springfield, 6-8 p.m.

Holiday Inn

919 Kruse Way

 

Wednesday, June 27

Astoria, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Astoria Armory

1636 Exchange Street

 

Coos Bay, 7-9 p.m.

Red Lion Inn

1313 N Bayshore Drive

 

Thursday, June 28

Klamath Falls, 12:30-2:30 p.m.

Henley Elementary School

8227 Highway 39

Spanish language interpretation services will be available at the meetings.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, or ui@state.or.us">Lisa.T.Bui@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.

*Time of meeting updated 6/12/18.

**Meeting place updated 6/18/18.