Oregon Dept. of Forestry
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News Releases
Salem tree advocate Kasia Quillinan is honored with an Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Award - 04/28/17

SALEM, Ore.--Oregon Community Trees and the Oregon Department of Forestry have honored Salem resident Kasia Quillinan for her work on behalf of Salem's trees. The two organizations each April recognize individuals and organizations anywhere in the state who are promoting healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness or advocacy. Quillinan received her award before the Salem City Council earlier this month.

"Kasia Quillinan has been an ardent advocate for trees in Salem over many years," said Patricia Farrell an Oregon Community Trees board member. "She has worked tirelessly to support city staff in planting trees, promoting tree-friendly policies and educating the public about proper care for trees. She has also organized tree plantings in her Salem neighborhood."

Since 2012 Quillinan has served on Salem Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. An attorney and retired judge, Quillinan has chaired the volunteer board for the past three years. The board oversees parks and hears appeals to removals of city-owned trees.

Kristin Ramstad, acting manager with ODF's Urban and Community Forestry Program,
said Quillinan played a major role on an advisory committee in 2013-14 that recommended updates to Salem's tree ordinance. "Those updates strengthened protections for city-owned trees. They reflected Kasia's belief that trees are vital for a healthy city."

In addition to its awards program, Oregon Community Trees and the Oregon Department of Forestry host an annual Urban and Community Forestry Conference. It is being held June 1 this year in Portland at the World Forestry Center. For more information and to register go to www.oregoncommunitytrees.org/
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016

Effective July 1: Bigger buffers around cold water streams supporting salmon, steelhead or bull trout - 04/26/17

News Release

Date: April 26, 2017

Contact: Nick Hennemann, Public Affairs Specialist, 503-945-7248

Effective July 1: Bigger buffers around cold water streams supporting salmon, steelhead or bull trout

SALEM, Ore.--Today the Oregon Board of Forestry unanimously adopted new rules to protect cold water streams that support salmon, steelhead or bull trout. The rules apply to forest management around small and medium streams in western Oregon north of the Siskiyous. The effective date is July 1, 2017.

"This was a difficult journey. But, in true Oregon fashion, people of diverse interests and backgrounds worked together and crafted a thoughtful solution. I'm proud of everyone who joined the conversation. We found a way to protect cold water and allow private landowners to responsibly manage their property," said Board Chair Tom Imeson.

The rules will help reduce or eliminate gaps in the tree canopy along streams. The rules will do this by requiring landowners harvesting trees to leave wider streamside buffers on small and medium streams, keep more trees in the buffers after harvest, and better distribute the remaining buffer trees for wildlife shade and habitat.

State Forester Peter Daugherty said, "The practical result of these rules is not just keeping water cold, the wider stream buffers will also provide other streamside benefits, such as improved habitat. The rule changes build on what Oregon's forests are already doing well, providing the state's cleanest water."

In 2015, the board decided to update and refine rules for harvesting timber to meet the cold water standards set by the state for salmon, steelhead, or bull trout streams. To ensure broad public representation the board convened an advisory committee of members from the conservation, forestry, fishing, and landowner communities to recommend technical changes to the draft rules to meet the board's policy intent. Forestry held nine public meetings throughout western Oregon to bring the public into the conversation.

Video File: State Forester Peter Daugherty talks about the new riparian rules - https://youtu.be/IQt6FGWTdW8

Video File: Board of Forestry Chair Tim Imeson talks about the new riparian rules - Tom - https://youtu.be/vw62tqR0g2c

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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Landowners are invited to May 11 meeting to learn about classifying of forestland in Yamhill County - 04/26/17

MCMINNVILLE, Ore.-- The Oregon Department of Forestry is inviting landowners in western Yamhill County and interested members of the public to an informational meeting May 11 to explain the process by which land outside cities can be classified as forestland. Owners of land designated as forested in Oregon are assessed a fee for forest fire prevention and suppression services. The meeting will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at:
McMinnville Fire Department
175 SE First St.
McMinnville, OR 97128

At the informational meeting, landowners and the public can learn about the history, process and current status of the project. Upon completing its work, the committee will present a list of lands it classified as forestland so those properties can be assessed for wildland fire protection by ODF.

The Oregon Department of Forestry provides wildland fire protection services to forestlands in Yamhill County, funded by a Forest Patrol Assessment on protected lands. This spring, a local committee will begin reviewing which lands in the western half of Yamhill County are to be considered forestland and require wildland fire protection services from ODF.

The committee will look at lands in Yamhill County west of Highway 47 and Highway 18, classifying them either as "forestland" or "not forestland" according to:
* fire-risk potential
* vegetation type (fire fuel)
* community structure
* closeness to other forestland

Classification changes don't increase ODF's fire budget. Rather, the classification review helps ensure that protection costs are fairly distributed. In most cases, a review results in some lands being removed from forest classification and others being added.

For more information on the western Yamhill County forestland classification review, contact Stewardship Forester Nathan Agalzoff in ODF's Northwest Oregon District Office at 503-357-2191.
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Natural area restorers in North Clackamas are honored by Oregon Community Trees - 04/25/17

(CLACKAMAS, Ore.) -- The Natural Areas Division of the North Clackamas Parks & Recreation District has been honored by Oregon Community Trees and Oregon Department of Forestry for its work over the past eight years to restore 800 acres of local forests, wetlands and streams in northern Clackamas County. Oregon Community Trees and ODF are supported by the U.S. Forest Service to recognize organizations and individuals anywhere in the state who are promoting healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness or advocacy.

Samantha Wolf, an Oregon Community Trees board member who served on this year's Awards Committee, said the Natural Areas Division won this year because of the cumulative impact of their restoration work. "They're doing environmental restoration in fast-developing urban and suburban settings and doing a great job of involving the community in their work," said Wolf.

North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District partners with student groups, water council boards, Friends of Trees, SOLVE, Metro and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service among others to plant thousands of trees each year. The District also educates volunteers and the public, does park maintenance and engages the community in park clean-up days.

"Especially impressive is their restoration of Oregon white oak on Mt. Talbert and their recent work to restore habitat for fish and wildlife in Spring Park in Milwaukie," said Wolf.

Kristin Ramstad is acting manager of the Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program at the Oregon Department of Forestry, which promotes urban forestry. She said, "The Natural Areas Division of North Clackamas Parks & Recreation District is a great example of how local governments can engage residents to help build a healthy, thriving urban forest."
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Oregon Department of Forestry invites public comment on Western Lane 2018 Annual Operations Plan - 04/25/17

Release date: April 25, 2017
Contact: Sherron Lumley, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-945-7427


SALEM, Ore.--The Oregon Department of Forestry invites public comment on the Western Lane district's Annual Operations Plan (AOP), outlining the work plan for state forest activities for the upcoming fiscal year. Starting today, through 5 p.m. on June 8, public comments are invited for ODF's Western Lane district AOP for the 2018 fiscal year, which starts on July 1, 2017, and ends on June 30, 2018.

The plan describes specific activities such as timber sales, reforestation, road building, stream enhancement and recreation projects that accomplish the current Western Lane Implementation Plan objectives. These objectives are designed to reach the goals of the long-term Northwest Oregon Forest Management Plan.

Public comment details:
* The draft AOP for Western Lane is available for review online on ODF's State Forests Management page: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Working/Pages/StateForests.aspx.
* An online survey is provided for conveniently submitting comments for the Western Lane AOP: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GG7VN29
* Comments may also be submitted through ODF's online comment page: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/Comment.aspx
* Comments may be mailed to: ODF Public Affairs, 2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310.

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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Falls City is named a Tree City USA for the first time - 04/25/17

(FALLS CITY, Ore.) -- Falls City is joining for the first time 60 other Oregon cities in having earned the title of Tree City USA. The Oregon Department of Forestry bestows the Tree City USA designation on Oregon communities in partnership with Oregon Community Trees and with support from the U.S. Forest Service.

The Arbor Day Foundation, based in Nebraska, sets the national standards for communities to become Tree Cities USA, Falls City was honored with the designation for strongly supporting its urban forest in four key areas:
* Having a tree board or department
* Having a tree protection ordinance
* Spending $2 per resident annually on its trees
* Proclaiming and celebrating Arbor Day each year

Kristin Ramstad, acting manager of ODF's Urban and Community Forestry program, said Falls City was one of three Oregon cities earning a Tree City USA title for the first time this year. The other two are Milwaukie in Clackamas County and Roseburg in southern Oregon.

"Falls City attaining Tree City USA status shows what a small town can do when its residents decide to act," said Ramstad. "I was impressed with how quickly everyone pulled together to meet the certification standards."
Applications for Tree City USA certification were due Dec. 31, 2016. Working speedily, the city council on Dec. 8 assigned the city's Parks and Recreation Committee as the city's tree board, then sponsored an Arbor Day celebration on Dec. 10. The city budget for planting and maintaining trees already exceeded the per capita spending threshold for Tree City USA certification. Since the city code already had tree care provisions that counted toward the tree ordinance requirement, Falls City met the Arbor Day Foundation standards in almost record time.
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Milwaukie is named a Tree City USA for the first time - 04/24/17

(MILWAUKIE, Ore.) -- This month Milwaukie is joining for the first time 60 other Oregon cities in having earned the title of Tree City USA. The Oregon Department of Forestry bestows the Tree City USA designation on Oregon communities in partnership with Oregon Community Trees and with support from the U.S. Forest Service.

Milwaukie was honored with the Tree City USA designation for strongly supporting its urban forest in four key areas:
* Having a tree board or department
* Having a tree protection ordinance
* Spending $2 per resident annually on its trees
* Proclaiming and celebrating Arbor Day each year

Kristin Ramstad, acting manager of ODF's Urban and Community Forestry program, said Milwaukie was one of three Oregon cities earning a Tree City USA title for the first time this year. The other two are Roseburg in southern Oregon and Falls City in Polk County.

"Milwaukie has worked for a few years now toward becoming a Tree City USA," said Ramstad. "This honor reflects tremendous commitment and teamwork to supporting a healthy, thriving urban forest."

Ramstad said Milwaukie has adopted a number of best practices for urban forestry. "For example, to help residents avoid damage to sewers, sidewalks and powerlines the city has an approved list of street trees whose mature size will be appropriate for the planting site," she noted.

The city celebrated on April 22 with a ceremonial planting of an Oregon white oak at Water Tower Park and the giving away of 200 free native tree seedlings.

"Trees are a critical component of a survivable future," said Milwaukie Mayor Mark Gamba. "In cities they provide food, reduce heat-island effects, sequester carbon dioxide and produce the oxygen we breathe. Economists have proven that trees increase individual property values. Well-treed neighborhoods have lower crime rates and healthier human birth outcomes. For those and many other reasons, we are very proud to become a Tree City USA and will work to increase the livability of our city through a robust tree-planting and stewardship program."

"Becoming a Tree City USA is a big step for Milwaukie and honors the livability our community enjoys," said Mitch Nieman, staff liaison to the Parks and Recreation Board. "We couldn't have achieved this recognition without Milwaukie's appreciation for its tree canopy and the tireless efforts of our volunteers, especially Lynn Sharp, who advocated for green spaces and recently passed away."

Milwaukie has a long tradition of appreciating trees. The mayor's gavel is made from the wood of one of pioneer Seth Lewelling's original peach trees, which arrived as a seedling from China in 1869 and grew on the same block as Milwaukie City Hall until it was removed in the 1980s due to disease and rot.

Dozens of long-lived giant sequoias from California were planted in the area of Oatfield Road starting as early as the 1890s. The imposing conifers were designated as heritage trees in 2008 by the Oregon Heritage Tree Commission. McLoughlin Boulevard near downtown is also lined with giant sequoias.

In 1962 the City Council christened Milwaukie "The Dogwood City of the West." At the same time, council members named the dogwood flower as Milwaukie's official floral emblem.
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Committee for Family Forestlands meets May 1 in Baker City - 04/21/17

News Release

Release date: April 20, 2017

Contact:
Nick Hennemann, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-910-4311
Kyle Abraham, Deputy Chief Private Forests Division, Salem, 503-945-7473


The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Monday, May 1 from 1 to 5 p.m. The meeting will be at the Sunridge Inn, 1 Sunridge Lane, Baker City. The committee will receive updates about:

* The Ritter Land Management Team
* Northeast Oregon's collaborative forest restoration work
* Northeast Oregon's post-fire restoration effort and seedling availability
* The Private Landowner Collaborative Workshop
* The Private Forests Division

This is a public meeting, everyone is welcome. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resource and forestry benefits. The committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and State Forester based on its findings. You can find more information at:
www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx.

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The Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam, and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The department's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

La Grande tree advocate Lia Spiegel is honored with an Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Award - 04/21/17

(LA GRANDE, Ore.) -- Oregon Community Trees has honored La Grande resident Lia Spiegel for her work on behalf of the city's trees. The non-profit partners with the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service to recognize individuals and organizations anywhere in the state who are promoting healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness or advocacy. Spiegel will receive her award during La Grande's Arbor Day celebrations in Riverside Park at noon on Friday, April 28.

Spiegel is an entomologist for the USDA Blue Mountains Forest Insect and Disease Service in La Grande.
For over 10 years she has served on the city of La Grande Community Landscape and Forestry Commission, acting as chair and vice chair. As a commissioner, she was instrumental in drafting the current Landscape and Forestry Master Plan for the city of La Grande in 2008. She also worked with the local utility company (OTECC) and its pruning contractor to ensure proper pruning of trees around powerlines. Currently she is helping review and update La Grande's tree protection ordinance.

In addition to her work on urban forest policy, Spiegel participates in "Get Your Hands Dirty" programs sponsored by the city of La Grande. She helps deliver trees and leads volunteer planting groups for the biannual street tree planting days each spring and fall. With her involvement and that of other volunteers, the city of La Grande has planted over 1,200 shade trees during the past 10 years, helping La Grande keep its designation as one of more than 60 Tree Cities USA in Oregon.

Spiegel promotes awareness of La Grande's community forest through her participation in the Community Landscape and Forestry Beautification Awards program, the Urban Forestry Volunteer Awards and the annual Arbor Day poster contest for fourth- and fifth-graders.

"La Grande can be proud to have such avid promoters of trees as Lia Spiegel," said Teresa Gustafson, the city arborist coordinating La Grande's urban forestry program and a board member with Oregon Community Trees. "The efforts of dedicated advocates like Lia help ensure healthy urban forests for the benefit of the whole community."

In addition to the recognition awards, Oregon Community Trees, ODF and the U.S. Forest Service jointly host an annual Urban and Community Forestry Conference. This year's event is June 1 in Portland.
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Tillamook County forestland classification meeting for fire protection set for April 26 in Tillamook - 04/21/17

(TILLAMOOK, Ore.) -- The Forestland Classification Committee for Tillamook County will meet April 26 in Tillamook from 9 a.m. to noon to continue classifying land in the southern part of the county for the purpose of protection from forest fires. The Nestucca Rural Fire Protection District is assisting the committee. The meeting will be held at:
Oregon Department of Forestry's Tillamook District Office
5005 Third St.
Tillamook, OR 97141

The Oregon Department of Forestry's Tillamook District provides wildland fire protection services to forestlands in the county, funded by a Forest Patrol Assessment on protected lands.

Classifying which lands require wildland fire protection services from ODF occurs at the county level. Classification changes don't increase ODF's fire budget. Rather, the classification review helps ensure that protection costs are fairly distributed. In most cases, a review typically results in some lands being removed from forest classification and others being added.

The committee is examining all lands within the county, classifying them either as "forestland" or "not forestland" according to:
* fire risk potential
* vegetation type (fire fuel)
* community structure
* proximity to other forestland

The committee's efforts will help resolve issues pertaining to ODF's fire suppression role on forestlands and adjacent properties, and will be the basis for assessing lands for the costs of wildland fire protection.

At the April 26 meeting, landowners and the public can learn about the history, process and current status of the project. Upon completing its work, the committee will present a list of lands in the county it classified as forestland so those properties can be assessed for fire protection by ODF.

For more information on the Tillamook County forestland classification review, contact Ed Wallmark, ODF Forest Manager, Tillamook District, 503-815-7050, Edward.h.wallmark@oregon.gov.
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Portland celebrates 40 years as a Tree City USA - 04/21/17

(PORTLAND, Ore.) -- April 22 marks the 40th year that Portland has been recognized with the title of Tree City USA for supporting its urban forest. A free, public celebration marking the milestone and embracing Portland's trees will be held that day at Portland Parks & Recreation's Mt. Scott Park in southeast Portland. The event will feature music and storytelling, free tree seedlings and family-friendly activities as well as the Bill Naito Community Trees Awards. Portland will also be recognized by the Oregon Department of Forestry for Portland's leadership in urban forestry and 40 years as a Tree City USA.

What: Portland's Arbor Day 2017 Celebration
When: Saturday April 22, 2017 (Earth Day), 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Where: Mt Scott Park, at SE 72nd Ave. between Harold St. and Knight St. (accessible via the #10, #14 and #72 TriMet buses as well as car, bike or by foot)

Find more information about the event at www.portlandoregon.gov/parks/arbor

"Back in 1975, Portland became the second city in Oregon after Salem to earn the designation of Tree City USA," said Kristin Ramstad, acting manager of the Oregon Department of Forestry's Urban and Community Forestry program, which is supported by the U.S. Forest Service. "Today, more than 60 Oregon communities qualify for this national program, sponsored by the Arbor Day Foundation."

"Trees are an essential component of Portland's livability," said Portland Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz. "They help enhance the environment, provide shade and wildlife habitat, filter storm water runoff and improve air quality. Arbor Day 2017 is a chance to come together and celebrate the special contributions that trees make to our quality of life."
ODF verifies that cities and towns meet the national Arbor Day Foundation standards for being named a Tree City USA. Ramstad said those criteria are:
* Having a tree board or department
* Having a tree care ordinance
* Spending $2 per resident annually on its trees
* Proclaiming and celebrating Arbor Day each year

"Portland goes well beyond these basic requirements, educating the public about good tree choices and taking a scientific approach to monitoring tree health, performance and planting," said Ramstad. "For example, Portland just completed the most comprehensive street tree inventory in the city's history."

Ramstad said the city's Urban Forestry program, based in the Parks and Recreation Bureau, engaged more than 1,300 volunteers to help identify, measure and enter data on 220,000 street trees.
"This was the second largest volunteer-assisted inventory of its kind in the nation, exceeded only by New York City," said Ramstad. "The leadership shown in the inventory effort together with the city's new tree ordinance is why Portland is receiving a Tree City USA Growth Award this year."

And Portland is not resting on its laurels. Later this year the city plans to begin inventorying trees in some of the city's neighborhood parks. Ramstad said the city in recent years has also diversified its approved street tree lists, allowing more evergreen trees and trees more resilient to climate change.

Much of the canvassing for street tree plantings is handled through Portland's Bureau of Environmental Services, which contracts with the non-profit Friends of Trees. Residents in neighborhoods with low tree canopy can obtain trees at a reduced or no cost.

"One result is that average tree canopy has actually increased in Portland, which is very important to preserving the city's quality of life and human health," said Ramstad.

"The city of Portland is proud to receive the designation as a 'Tree City USA' for the 40th consecutive year," said Portland Parks & Recreation Director Mike Abbaté. "We understand and embrace the benefits that trees provide for all of us."
# # #

Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Roseburg is named a Tree City USA for the first time for supporting a healthy urban forest - 04/21/17

(ROSEBURG, Ore.) -- This month Roseburg joins for the first time 60 other Oregon cities in having earned the title of Tree City USA. The Oregon Department of Forestry bestows the Tree City USA title on Oregon communities in partnership with Oregon Community Trees and with support from the U.S. Forest Service.

The Arbor Day Foundation, based in Nebraska, sets the national standards for communities to become Tree Cities USA. Roseburg was honored with the designation for strongly supporting its urban forest in four key areas:
* Having a tree board or department
* Having a tree protection ordinance
* Spending $2 per resident annually on its trees
* Proclaiming and celebrating Arbor Day each year

Kristin Ramstad, acting manager of ODF's Urban and Community Forestry program, said Roseburg was one of three Oregon cities earning a Tree City USA title for the first time this year. The other two are Milwaukie in Clackamas County and Falls City in Polk County.

"Roseburg is noted as a timber town but the city also recognizes the value of trees for their environmental and human health benefits for their residents," said Ramstad. "Becoming a Tree City USA reflects real commitment and teamwork to supporting a healthy, thriving urban forest."

Roseburg City Manager Lance Colley said, "For the first time this year, our Mayor Larry Rich was honored to read our proclamation regarding Arbor Day as an official Tree City USA community! Participating in the program and receiving the Tree City USA designation was a 2015-17 City Council goal and we are committed to continued participation in the program. Our staff, organization and community continue to make efforts to enhance our livability through nationally recognized programs like Tree City USA."

Ramstad credited the city for their efforts to promote the virtues of trees and for obtaining certification as a Tree City USA. To celebrate Arbor Day in April and replace trees lost over the drought, Roseburg Parks and Recreation Division recently hosted high school students planting trees in Stewart Park. The division also gave away native conifer seedlings for residents to plant.
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

New handbook guides development of biomass utilization businesses; Biomass utilization can fund restoration, create jobs in rural communities - 04/19/17

Contacts: Eini Lowell, elowell@fs.fed.us, (503) 808-2072 (Pacific Northwest Research Station); Marcus Kauffman, marcus.kauffman@oregon.gov, (541) 580-7480 (Oregon Department of Forestry)
Media assistance: Yasmeen Sands, ysands@fs.fed.us, (503) 808-2137 (PNWRS); Bobbi Doan, (503) 945-7506 (ODF)


PORTLAND, Ore. April 19, 2017. In the Western United States, a small-diameter log and biomass utilization business can help fund active management and restoration efforts and provide rural communities with much-needed jobs. So what should businesses, forest managers, community groups, and others interested in turning the byproducts of forest management into a profitable enterprise consider?

A new online handbook published by the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station offers guidance. The publication, Community Biomass Handbook Volume 4: Enterprise Development for Integrated Wood Manufacturing, takes a collaborative approach to enterprise development and recognizes the important role of partnerships and land managers in developing sustainable wood products businesses. The guidance is particularly relevant to communities and businesses near public lands.

"Everyone involved in the biomass utilization process, from the forest to the final product, has something to contribute," said Eini Lowell, a research forest products technologist at the Pacific Northwest Research Station and lead author of the handbook. "The idea for our handbook is to share the unique information that each person may bring to the table and foster communication for a successful outcome. We've also included the Biomass Enterprise Economic Model, which allows rapid exploration of integrated manufacturing options and illustrates how a business can grow."

The guide is the latest volume in a series of handbooks to help communities and land managers better utilize wood energy. Volume 4 is divided into four sections:
- Creating Mutual Understanding -- Outlines the types of knowledge needed at each step of an integrated wood manufacturing process and which stakeholders can provide assistance;
- Integrated Approach to Biomass Utilization -- Helps users identify viable combinations of product manufacturing that make financial sense and helps structure projects to support existing and emerging markets;
- Biomass Enterprise Economic Model -- Matches conversion technologies to allow users to quickly and easily preview utilization scenarios. The model, developed by Oregon State University, can speed up the pace of development by helping to identify viable business models that align with forest restoration goals.
- Mobilizing to Create Action -- Identifies specific and realistic business options to sustain wood manufacturing projects.

"Rural communities are pioneering approaches that integrate forest resilience and local infrastructure development," said Marcus Kauffman, biomass resource specialist with the Oregon Department of Forestry and a co-author of the handbook. In addition, the Oregon Department of Forestry has produced a series of multimedia stories that showcase the synergy of forest restoration and local wood products development.

The Pacific Northwest Research Station--headquartered in Portland, Ore.--generates and communicates scientific knowledge that helps people make informed choices about natural resources and the environment. The station has 11 laboratories and centers located in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon and about 300 employees. Learn more online at http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw.


The Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam, and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The department's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

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Baker City named Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2017 - 04/18/17

(BAKER CITY, Ore.) -- Baker City is Oregon's Tree City of the Year for 2017. The non-profit Oregon Community Trees along with the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) selected the city for its support of its urban forest and its active tree board. The honor will be officially given at the Baker City Council meeting the evening of April 25. Oregon Community Trees and ODF are supported by the U.S. Forest Service to recognize communities and individuals anywhere in the state who are promoting healthy urban and community forests through leadership, education, awareness or advocacy.

Ruth Williams, president of Oregon Community Trees, says only six Oregon cities have been designated a Tree City USA as long as Baker City -- since 1985.

"Being a Tree City USA means a city has a tree care ordinance and a tree board or department, spends at least $2 per person on its urban forest, and proclaims and celebrates Arbor Day each year," Williams explains. "For 32 years, Baker City has done all that and much more."

City staff and the tree board revised their street tree guide in 2014. It is available to the public via City Hall, the City website and local nurseries. To increase program support, the City in 2015 increased the number of tree board members from five to seven.

Baker City has also established the Silvers Street Tree Grant Program. The program is funded by a bequest from Anthony Silvers, who left his entire estate to improve the city's stock of street trees. Grants assist property owners to purchase street trees from the revised guide and pay for nursery staff to plant the trees.

Since last year, the tree board has partnered with the local newspaper to publish tree-related information every quarter. Information on proper tree pruning and maintenance is also available to the public from the city's Water and Public Works departments, as well as on the city's website.

"Baker City is a shining example of how a committed community can empower residents to help build a healthy, thriving urban forest," says Katie Lompa, Community Assistance Forester with ODF, which administers the Tree City USA program in Oregon in partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation. "I hope all Oregonians will join me in applauding Baker City for the efforts that earned them this award."
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Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Board of Forestry meets in Salem April 26 - 04/18/17

News Release


Date: April 18, 2017


Contact: Ken Armstrong, Public Affairs Director, 503-945-7420


The Oregon Board of Forestry meets in Salem on April 26. Items on the agenda include:
* Specified Resource Sites Rulemaking for Marbled Murrelet -- ODF staff will present a checklist of anticipated steps that need to be completed for this project.
* Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee Testimony -- The FTLAC, a group of county commissioners representing the 15 Oregon counties that transferred lands to the state to become State Forests, will give testimony to the board on matters related to state forests managed by ODF.
* Inventory, Growth and Yield Update -- Presentation of final report on the State Forests Division's work to update and improve inventory and growth and yield estimates.
* 2016 Fire Program Review and Secretary of State Performance Audit Implementation Status -- ODF staff will provide the current status of the agency's implementation efforts addressing the recommendations from both the 2016 Fire Program Review Committee and the Secretary of State's Performance Audit completed during the summer of 2016
* Department of Forestry Fiscal Report -- ODF staff will present an update on the current financial status of the agency.
* Riparian Rules/Salmon-Steelhead-Bull Trout Rulemaking -- Final Rule Language -- ODF staff will present a summary of the public hearings on these draft rules, as well as input from the riparian rule advisory committee, and ask for Board adoption of final riparian rule language. Please note: This item is scheduled as a work session, requesting a decision from the board, therefore public testimony/comment on this item will not be accepted.
* Executive Session -- As the last item on the agenda, the board will meet in executive session to confer with legal counsel regarding the Board's rights and duties related to current litigation likely to be filed pursuant to Oregon Revised Statute 192.660(2)(h).

The meeting is open to the public and a public comment period is on the agenda. The public meeting will run from 9 a.m. to approximately 2:15 p.m., with the Executive Session following and scheduled to end at approximately 3:45 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. Agenda materials are available at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling the Department's Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance, at 503-945-7200.

The Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.

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The Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam, and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The department's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

State Forests Advisory Committee meets April 28 - 04/18/17

News Release

Date: April 18, 2017

Contact:
Andy White, Northwest Oregon Area Director, 503-359-7496
Sherron Lumley, 503-945-7427, Public Information Officer, Salem, 503-945-7427


An Oregon Department of Forestry state forests advisory group will meet April 28 in Forest Grove to discuss the 2018 Annual Operation Plans. The group will also receive updates on other issues related to state forests, including:
* Implementation Plans
* Growth and Yield estimates
* Habitat Conservation Plan grant
* State Forests Division budget
* 2017 Legislative Session

The State Forests Advisory Committee will meet from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Forest Grove Community Auditorium located at 1915 Main Street.

The committee is comprised of citizens and representatives including timber, environmental, and recreation groups, as well as tribal and academia representatives. SFAC provides a forum to discuss issues, opportunities, and concerns, and offer advice to ODF on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan. The plan provides guidance for managing 616,000 acres within the Tillamook, Clatsop, and Santiam state forests and several scattered state-owned forest tracts in Benton, Polk, Lincoln, and Lane counties through a balanced approach to generate revenue while prioritizing environmental and social benefits.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for special accommodation should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting; questions about accessibility and special accommodation can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-359-7426.

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The Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam, and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The department's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Smoke signals start of controlled burning season in Oregon [RADIO PSA] - 04/18/17

Start date: 4-18-2017
Kill date: 6-23-2013

30-sec. Radio PSA
In spring, many forest landowners set small fires to prevent big fires later on. These controlled fires safely burn up woody debris. This helps prevent huge, out-of-control fires in summer and fall. And if a wildfire does occur, it will be less intense, preserving timber and wildlife habitat. And because these fires are planned, they are set when weather conditions are most likely to take smoke up and away from communities, keeping our air clean. To learn more about controlled forest burning, visit the Oregon Department of Forestry at www.oregon.gov/odf and click on "Fire."
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20-sec. Radio PSA
Smoke in the air - Could fire season be starting this early? In spring, many forest landowners set fires on purpose. These controlled burns remove excess woody debris. They also keep our air cleaner by helping prevent big summer wildfires. To learn more about controlled forest burning, visit the Oregon Department of Forestry at www.oregon.gov/odf and click on "Fire."
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Background:
Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

County advisory group to state forestry meets April 21 - 04/17/17

News Release


Release date: April 17, 2017

Contact:
Sherron Lumley, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-945-7427
Mike Totey, Acting State Forests Division Chief, Salem, 503-945-7351


The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee will meet April 21 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Headquarters, Santiam Room, Building D, 2600 State St., Salem. Items on the committee's agenda include reports on state forests annual operations planning for the upcoming fiscal year and growth and yield modeling. The meeting agenda is available on the department's web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

Members of the public may attend the meeting and an opportunity for public comment is scheduled. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7427.

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The Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic, and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam, and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The department's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Public hearings are set for how Oregon should protect bald eagles after their delisting as threatened - 04/14/17

(FOREST GROVE, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Forestry is holding a public hearing in Forest Grove on May 2 to get public input on proposed changes to rules protecting bald eagles. With its population having rebounded from steep declines in the 20th century, both the federal government and Oregon have delisted the bald eagle as a threatened species. Protections for bald eagles under federal laws will continue to be enforced by the federal government.

The hearing will be at the ODF Northwest District Office, 801 Gales Creek Rd. in Forest Grove starting at 4:30 p.m.

The proposed rule changes would rescind laws restricting timber harvests near bald eagle roosting and foraging sites. Rules protecting bald eagle nesting sites have also been modified and would be placed into existing rules protecting bird species sensitive to disturbance. The Department plans to submit the proposed rules and a summary of public comments received during the comment period to the Board of Forestry at the board's July meeting. Board members will use this information to decide whether to approve the proposed rulemaking package. If approved, the new rules would have an anticipated effective date of Sept. 1.

The public can access the proposed rules at the office of the state forester in Salem or online at www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/ProposedLawsRules.aspx

The public is invited to comment on whether other options should be considered for achieving the rule's substantive goals while reducing the negative economic impact of the rule on business.

ODF has also scheduled two other hearings on this topic, April 19 in Klamath Falls and April 27 in Roseburg. Written comments must be received before 5 p.m. on May 15. Send them to:
Private Forest Bald Eagle Rulemaking
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State St.
Salem, OR 97310

Comments may also be emailed to privateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov or faxed to
(503) 945-7490.
# # #

Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Public hearings are set for how Oregon should protect bald eagles after their delisting as threatened - 04/14/17

(ROSEBURG, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Forestry is holding a public hearing in Roseburg on April 27 to get public input on proposed changes to rules protecting bald eagles. With its population having rebounded from steep declines in the 20th century, both the federal government and Oregon have delisted the bald eagle as a threatened species.

The hearing will be at the Douglas Forest Protection Association at 1758 NE Airport Rd. in Roseburg starting at 4:30 p.m.

The proposed rule changes would rescind laws restricting timber harvests near bald eagle roosting and foraging sites. Rules protecting bald eagle nesting sites have also been modified and would be placed into existing rules protecting bird species sensitive to disturbance. The Department plans to submit the proposed rules and a summary of public comments received during the comment period to the Board of Forestry at the board's July meeting. Board members will use this information to decide whether to approve the proposed rulemaking package. If approved, the new rules would have an anticipated effective date of Sept. 1.

The public can access the proposed rules at the office of the state forester in Salem or online at www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/ProposedLawsRules.aspx

The public is invited to comment on whether other options should be considered for achieving the rule's substantive goals while reducing the negative economic impact of the rule on business.

ODF has also scheduled two other hearings on this topic, April 19 in Klamath Falls and May 2 in Forest Grove. Written comments must be emailed by 5 p.m. on May 15. Send them to:
Private Forest Bald Eagle Rulemaking
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State St.
Salem, OR 97310

Comments may also be emailed to privateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov or faxed to
503-945-7490.
# # #
Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Public hearings are set for how Oregon should protect bald eagles after their delisting as threatened - 04/14/17

(SALEM, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Forestry is holding three public hearings in April in Forest Grove, Roseburg and Klamath Falls to get public input on proposed changes to rules protecting bald eagles. With its population having rebounded from steep declines in the 20th century, both the federal government and Oregon have delisted the bald eagle as a threatened species. Protections for bald eagles under federal laws will continue to be enforced by the federal government.

The hearings will start at 4:30 p.m. on the dates and locations below:

* April 19 -- 3200 Delap Rd. in Klamath Falls
* April 27 -- 1758 NE Airport Rd. in Roseburg
* May 2 -- 801 Gales Creek Rd. in Forest Grove

The proposed rule changes would rescind laws restricting timber harvests near bald eagle roosting and foraging sites. Rules protecting bald eagle nesting sites have also been modified and would be placed into existing rules protecting bird species sensitive to disturbance. The Department plans to submit the proposed rules and a summary of public comments received during the comment period to the Board of Forestry at the board's July meeting. Board members will use this information to decide whether to approve the proposed rulemaking package. If approved, the new rules would have an anticipated effective date of Sept. 1.

The public can access the proposed rules at the office of the state forester in Salem or online at www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/ProposedLawsRules.aspx

The public is invited to comment on whether other options should be considered for achieving the rule's substantive goals while reducing the negative economic impact of the rule on business. Written comments must be received by 5 p.m. on May 15. Send them to:
Private Forest Bald Eagle Rulemaking
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State St.
Salem, OR 97310

Comments may also be emailed to privateforests.publiccomments@oregon.gov or faxed to
503-945-7490.
# # #

Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Public hearings are set for how Oregon should protect bald eagles after their delisting as threatened - 04/14/17

(KLAMATH FALLS, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Forestry is holding a public hearing in Klamath Falls on April 19 to get public input on proposed changes to Forest Practices Act rules protecting bald eagles. With its population having rebounded from steep declines in the 20th century, both the federal government and Oregon have delisted the bald eagle as a threatened species. Protections for bald eagles under federal laws will continue to be enforced by the federal government.

The hearing will be at 3200 Delap Rd. in Klamath Falls starting at 4:30 p.m.

The proposed rule changes would rescind laws restricting timber harvests near bald eagle roosting and foraging sites. Rules protecting bald eagle nesting sites have also been modified and would be placed into existing rules protecting bird species sensitive to disturbance. The Department plans to submit the proposed rules and a summary of public comments received during the comment period to the Board of Forestry at the board's July meeting. Board members will use this information to decide whether to approve the proposed rulemaking package. If approved, the new rules would have an anticipated effective date of Sept. 1.

The public can access the proposed rules at the office of the state forester in Salem or online at www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/ProposedLawsRules.aspx

The public is invited to comment on whether other options should be considered for achieving the rule's substantive goals while reducing the negative economic impact of the rule on business.

ODF has also scheduled two other hearings on this topic, April 27 in Roseburg and May 2 in Forest Grove. Written comments must be received by 5 p.m. on May 15. Send them to:
Private Forest Bald Eagle Rulemaking
Oregon Department of Forestry
2600 State St.
Salem, OR 97310

Comments may also be emailed to privateforests.publiccomment@oregon.gov or faxed to
503-945-7490.
# # #

Oregon Department of Forestry was founded in 1911. Today, it serves Oregonians by protecting, managing, and promoting stewardship of Oregon's forests to enhance environmental, economic and community sustainability. ODF directly manages 800,000 acres of state-owned forestland, including the Clatsop, Santiam and Tillamook forests in northwest Oregon and the Gilchrist and Sun Pass State forests east of the Cascades. The Department of Forestry's top priority is to provide fire protection on 16.2 million acres of private and public land. The 13th State Forester is Peter Daugherty, selected by the Board of Forestry in 2016.

Tillamook Forest Center hosts Conversation Project May 7 - 04/11/17

TILLAMOOK, Ore.-- The Tillamook Forest Center will hold a free public event on Sunday, May 7, hosting Oregon Humanities' statewide Conversation Project. "What We Want from the Wild," is a conversation with Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis. This program is hosted by the Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust and sponsored by Oregon Humanities.

Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust. Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations. Oregon Humanities mission is "to connect Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities." The discussion will cover questions such as, "What do we want from nature?" and "What do we understand nature to be?"

The event will be held May 7, 1 p.m. at the Tillamook Forest Center, located at 45500 Wilson River Hwy, Tillamook. Registration is required for this free community discussion. For more information, please contact Luke Wahl at 503-815-6807 (Wed--Sun, 10 a.m.--4 p.m.) or luke.c.wahl@oregon.gov.

More information about Oregon Humanities' programs and publications, which include the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Idea Lab, Public Program Grants and Oregon Humanities magazine are available at oregonhumanities.org.

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