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REVISED NEWS RELEASE: Stewardship Coordinating Committee will meet Nov. 9 - 11/07/17

REVISED NEWS RELEASE
The news release below has been revised to indicate the meeting date is Nov. 9 (not Nov. 7). Sorry for the confusion.


***************************************************

The Oregon Department of Forestry issued the following news release today.

*******************

Date: Nov. 7, 2017

Contact:
Nick Hennemann, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-910-4311
Ryan Gordon, Private Forests Division, Salem, 503-779-5278

Stewardship Coordinating Committee will meet Nov. 9

SALEM, Ore.--The State Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee will meet Thursday, Nov. 9, from 10 a.m. to noon, in the Tillamook Room, Building C, Oregon Department of Forestry Salem Headquarters, 2600 State Street.

The committee will discuss the following topics:
* Updates from the 2017 Forest Stewardship Program National Meeting
* Landowner assistance following wildfire
* The Committee's work plan and schedule for 2018
* The Oregon Forest Landowner Database
* Overview of the Oregon Technical Advisory Committee - Note: The OTAC -- co-convened by the Oregon Natural Resources Conservation Service and Farm Service Agency -- will meet in the same location from 12:30 -- 4:30 p.m. More information: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/or/technical/stc/?cid=nrcs142p2_045923.

This is a public meeting, everyone is welcome. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The State Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee advises the State Forester on policy and procedures for the U.S. Forest Service State and Private Forestry Programs, such as Forest Legacy and Forest Stewardship. The committee consists of representatives from state and federal natural resource agencies, private forest landowners, consulting foresters, and forest industry and conservation organizations. You can find more information at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SCC.aspx.

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Tough as nails, red oaks make big shade trees with attractive fall color from red to yellow.
Tough as nails, red oaks make big shade trees with attractive fall color from red to yellow.
Now is a great time for central Oregonians to select trees for fall color (Photo) - 10/31/17

PRINEVILLE, Ore -- When people think of trees to plant for fall color, they are no doubt influenced by countless calendars whose October page features the blazing colors of New England's sugar and red maples (Acer saccharum and rubra). Oregon Department of Forestry officials want people to know there are good reasons to not be swayed to plant maples or any other tree that is found abundantly in town. Many less common trees have brilliant autumn color and work equally well as yard or street trees. Planting these can reduce a community's vulnerability to catastrophic tree loss.

In many Oregon cities and towns a few tree species are being planted at levels considered risky. In fact, the consensus among urban foresters is that communities need to avoid having an urban forest with more than one in ten trees belonging to the same genus, whether it be a maple, an ash, an elm, or a birch. In other words, to have a healthy, long-living urban forest, it should be made up of a wide collection of tree species.

Having a mixture of different trees lessons the risk from introduced pests finding an abundant food supply in a neighborhood's streets and yards, according to according to ODF Community Assistance Forester Katie Lompa.

"The Asian longhorned beetle is one reason over-reliance on one genus of tree is so risky," said Lompa. "This beetle, while not found in Oregon yet, has entered the U.S. and attacks and kills a variety of trees, including maple, elm and birch. It threatens to change the landscape we all know and love because once a tree is infested there is no cure."
Yet another invasive pest, the emerald ash borer, has rapidly spread throughout parts of the U.S. since it was found in Michigan in 2002. Lompa said ash (Fraxinus spp.), with amazing reddish-purple fall color, used to be a recommended alternative for maples as well as for American elms (Ulmus americana) wiped out by Dutch elm disease. But with this borer fatal to all ash growing in the U.S., the continued planting of this tree needs to be considered carefully.

Lompa said it is especially important for central and eastern Oregonians to consider if their soil is alkaline, neutral or acid and choose a tree that tolerates that type. Soil pH can greatly affect tree health, as well as fall color. Early frosts and drought stress during the growing season can also destroy fall color. "Know that all newly planted trees will require at least some irrigation," said Lompa.

To help central and eastern Oregon communities develop a wider collection of trees, she offers residents the following tree species as options for fall color:

American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)

Native to eastern North America, fall color varies on American hornbeam from a ho-hum yellow to brilliant orange and red. For reliable reddish or orange fall color, pick one of the new cultivars, such as 'Native Flame', 'Firespire' or 'Palisade' (although 'Palisade' often has some gold, too). Besides the autumn fireworks, homeowners will enjoy improved form, strong wood, few pests or diseases and manageable size (usually 20-35 feet tall). Hardy down to USDA zone 3 or 4, American hornbeam prefers acid soil but is moderately tolerant of alkaline conditions, according to the Morton Arboretum.

Chinese pistache (Pistacia chinensis)

For residents of warmer parts of eastern Oregon, such as the Columbia Gorge, this USDA Zone 6 tree might be worth experimenting with. Heat and drought tolerant, Chinese pistache takes full sun and poor soils in stride, accepting both alkaline and acid conditions. The tallest pistache can reach 60 feet tall, but the trees are usually closer to 30-40 feet. Their compound leaves turn a respectable gold-orange to scarlet in fall. Female trees have pea-sized nutlets that ripen from red to blue and attract birds. If nutlets aren't wanted, select a male clone, such as 'Keith Davey'.

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Fossils of ginkgo leaves are abundant in eastern Oregon, proving the trees grew here millions of years ago. Ginkgo trees are hardy to USDA zone 4. Somewhat gawky when young, they mature into fuller, rounder trees. Fall color is a bright, butter yellow. Unfussy as to soil, they will survive in acidic or alkaline conditions. Give them ample water their first decade to help them become well established. Virtually free of pests and diseases, ginkgo trees can live for hundreds of years. Choose male clones to avoid the fruit, which has an unpleasant smell.

Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica)

Can't decide on a favorite fall color? Have them all by planting a Persian ironwood. These tough, drought-tolerant trees can sport yellow, orange, red and purple all at once. One color or two colors may dominant in a particular tree, so select in autumn to ensure getting the desired color mix. The cultivar 'Vanessa' has more uniform orange to reddish-orange fall color. Years after planting this strong-wooded tree, the flaking cream-and-gray bark becomes an added ornamental feature. Few pests or diseases bother this native of Iran. Able to survive Chicago's Zone 5 winters, Persian ironwood prefers acid soils but reportedly tolerates mildly alkaline conditions. Mature size is 20 to 40 feet.
Oaks (various species)

Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) has dominated oak planting in Oregon since the early 20th century. But fall color varies dramatically in that species. Despite the name, red oaks can turn a dull yellow to yellow-brown. More reliable for fall color is scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea). This species genuinely lives up to its name, turning a gratifying deep red in fall before the leaves fade to brown. They may hold on like that until the end of winter. Hardy to USDA zone 5, a scarlet oak will not be happy in alkaline soil, preferring acid conditions. These long-lived trees can grow 40 to 75 feet tall and provide welcome shade under their broad-spreading branches. Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii) is similar in appearance and hardiness to scarlet oak (being hardy to USDA zone 5B), and also has good red to reddish-orange fall color. These stately trees grow 50 to 80 feet tall with a 40 to 60 foot spread, making them good shade providers. They also prefer acid soil.
# # #

The Persian ironwood cultivar 'Vanessa' sports reliably red-orange hues each autumn.
The Persian ironwood cultivar 'Vanessa' sports reliably red-orange hues each autumn.
Now is a great time for Columbia Gorge residents to select trees for fall color (Photo) - 10/31/17

PRINEVILLE, Ore -- When people think of trees to plant for fall color, they are no doubt influenced by countless calendars whose October page features the blazing colors of New England's sugar and red maples (Acer saccharum and rubra). Oregon Department of Forestry officials want people to know there are good reasons to not be swayed to plant maples or any other tree that is found abundantly in town. Many less common trees have brilliant autumn color and work equally well as yard or street trees. Planting these can reduce a community's vulnerability to catastrophic tree loss.

In many Oregon cities and towns a few tree species are being planted at levels considered risky. In fact, the consensus among urban foresters is that communities need to avoid having an urban forest with more than one in ten trees belonging to the same genus, whether it be a maple, an ash, an elm, or a birch. In other words, to have a healthy, long-living urban forest, it should be made up of a wide collection of tree species.

Having a mixture of different trees lessons the risk from introduced pests finding an abundant food supply in a neighborhood's streets and yards, according to according to ODF Community Assistance Forester Katie Lompa.

"The Asian longhorned beetle is one reason over-reliance on one genus of tree is so risky," said Lompa. "This beetle, while not found in Oregon yet, has entered the U.S. and attacks and kills a variety of trees, including maple, elm and birch. It threatens to change the landscape we all know and love because once a tree is infested there is no cure."

Yet another invasive pest, the emerald ash borer, has rapidly spread throughout parts of the U.S. since it was found in Michigan in 2002. Lompa said ash (Fraxinus spp.), with amazing reddish-purple fall color, used to be a recommended alternative for maples as well as for American elms (Ulmus americana) wiped out by Dutch elm disease. But with this borer fatal to all ash growing in the U.S., the continued planting of this tree needs to be considered carefully.

Lompa said it is especially important for central and eastern Oregonians to consider if their soil is alkaline, neutral or acid and choose a tree that tolerates that type. Soil pH can greatly affect tree health, as well as fall color. Early frosts and drought stress during the growing season can also destroy fall color. "Know that all newly planted trees will require at least some irrigation," said Lompa.

To help central and eastern Oregon communities develop a wider collection of trees, she offers residents the following tree species as options for fall color:

American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)

Native to eastern North America, fall color varies on American hornbeam from a ho-hum yellow to brilliant orange and red. For reliable reddish or orange fall color, pick one of the new cultivars, such as 'Native Flame', 'Firespire' or 'Palisade' (although 'Palisade' often has some gold, too). Besides the autumn fireworks, homeowners will enjoy improved form, strong wood, few pests or diseases and manageable size (usually 20-35 feet tall). Hardy down to USDA zone 3 or 4, American hornbeam prefers acid soil but is moderately tolerant of alkaline conditions, according to the Morton Arboretum.

Chinese pistache (Pistacia chinensis)

For residents of warmer parts of eastern Oregon, such as the Columbia Gorge, this USDA Zone 6 tree might be worth experimenting with. Heat and drought tolerant, Chinese pistache takes full sun and poor soils in stride, accepting both alkaline and acid conditions. The tallest pistache can reach 60 feet tall, but the trees are usually closer to 30-40 feet. Their compound leaves turn a respectable gold-orange to scarlet in fall. Female trees have pea-sized nutlets that ripen from red to blue and attract birds. If nutlets aren't wanted, select a male clone, such as 'Keith Davey'.

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Fossils of ginkgo leaves are abundant in eastern Oregon, proving the trees grew here millions of years ago. Ginkgo trees are hardy to USDA zone 4. Somewhat gawky when young, they mature into fuller, rounder trees. Fall color is a bright, butter yellow. Unfussy as to soil, they will survive in acidic or alkaline conditions. Give them ample water their first decade to help them become well established. Virtually free of pests and diseases, ginkgo trees can live for hundreds of years. Choose male clones to avoid the fruit, which has an unpleasant smell.

Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica)

Can't decide on a favorite fall color? Have them all by planting a Persian ironwood. These tough, drought-tolerant trees can sport yellow, orange, red and purple all at once. One color or two colors may dominant in a particular tree, so select in autumn to ensure getting the desired color mix. The cultivar 'Vanessa' has more uniform orange to reddish-orange fall color. Years after planting this strong-wooded tree, the flaking cream-and-gray bark becomes an added ornamental feature. Few pests or diseases bother this native of Iran. Able to survive Chicago's Zone 5 winters, Persian ironwood prefers acid soils but reportedly tolerates mildly alkaline conditions. Mature size is 20 to 40 feet.

Oaks (various species)

Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) has dominated oak planting in Oregon since the early 20th century. But fall color varies dramatically in that species. Despite the name, red oaks can turn a dull yellow to yellow-brown. More reliable for fall color is scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea). This species genuinely lives up to its name, turning a gratifying deep red in fall before the leaves fade to brown. They may hold on like that until the end of winter. Hardy to USDA zone 5, a scarlet oak will not be happy in alkaline soil, preferring acid conditions. These long-lived trees can grow 40 to 75 feet tall and provide welcome shade under their broad-spreading branches. Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii) is similar in appearance and hardiness to scarlet oak (being hardy to USDA zone 5B), and also has good red to reddish-orange fall color. These stately trees grow 50 to 80 feet tall with a 40 to 60 foot spread, making them good shade providers. They also prefer acid soil.
# # #

Now is a great time for eastern Oregonians to select trees for fall color - 10/31/17

PRINEVILLE, Ore -- When people think of trees to plant for fall color, they are no doubt influenced by countless calendars whose October page features the blazing colors of New England's sugar and red maples (Acer saccharum and rubra). Oregon Department of Forestry officials want people to know there are good reasons to not be swayed to plant maples or any other tree that is found abundantly in town. Many less common trees have brilliant autumn color and work equally well as yard or street trees. Planting these can reduce a community's vulnerability to catastrophic tree loss.
In many Oregon cities and towns a few tree species are being planted at levels considered risky. In fact, the consensus among urban foresters is that communities need to avoid having an urban forest with more than one in ten trees belonging to the same genus, whether it be a maple, an ash, an elm, or a birch. In other words, to have a healthy, long-living urban forest, it should be made up of a wide collection of tree species.
Having a mixture of different trees lessons the risk from introduced pests finding an abundant food supply in a neighborhood's streets and yards, according to according to ODF Community Assistance Forester Katie Lompa.
"The Asian longhorned beetle is one reason over-reliance on one genus of tree is so risky," said Lompa. "This beetle, while not found in Oregon yet, has entered the U.S. and attacks and kills a variety of trees, including maple, elm and birch. It threatens to change the landscape we all know and love because once a tree is infested there is no cure."
Yet another invasive pest, the emerald ash borer, has rapidly spread throughout parts of the U.S. since it was found in Michigan in 2002. Lompa said ash (Fraxinus spp.), with amazing reddish-purple fall color, used to be a recommended alternative for maples as well as for American elms (Ulmus americana) wiped out by Dutch elm disease. But with this borer fatal to all ash growing in the U.S., the continued planting of this tree needs to be considered carefully.
Lompa said it is especially important for central and eastern Oregonians to consider if their soil is alkaline, neutral or acid and choose a tree that tolerates that type. Soil pH can greatly affect tree health, as well as fall color. Early frosts and drought stress during the growing season can also destroy fall color. "Know that all newly planted trees will require at least some irrigation," said Lompa.
To help central and eastern Oregon communities develop a wider collection of trees, she offers residents the following tree species as options for fall color:

American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)

Native to eastern North America, fall color varies on American hornbeam from a ho-hum yellow to brilliant orange and red. For reliable reddish or orange fall color, pick one of the new cultivars, such as 'Native Flame', 'Firespire' or 'Palisade' (although 'Palisade' often has some gold, too). Besides the autumn fireworks, homeowners will enjoy improved form, strong wood, few pests or diseases and manageable size (usually 20-35 feet tall). Hardy down to USDA zone 3 or 4, American hornbeam prefers acid soil but is moderately tolerant of alkaline conditions, according to the Morton Arboretum.

Chinese pistache (Pistacia chinensis)

For residents of warmer parts of eastern Oregon, such as the Columbia Gorge, this USDA Zone 6 tree might be worth experimenting with. Heat and drought tolerant, Chinese pistache takes full sun and poor soils in stride, accepting both alkaline and acid conditions. The tallest pistache can reach 60 feet tall, but the trees are usually closer to 30-40 feet. Their compound leaves turn a respectable gold-orange to scarlet in fall. Female trees have pea-sized nutlets that ripen from red to blue and attract birds. If nutlets aren't wanted, select a male clone, such as 'Keith Davey'.

Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

Fossils of ginkgo leaves are abundant in eastern Oregon, proving the trees grew here millions of years ago. Ginkgo trees are hardy to USDA zone 4. Somewhat gawky when young, they mature into fuller, rounder trees. Fall color is a bright, butter yellow. Unfussy as to soil, they will survive in acidic or alkaline conditions. Give them ample water their first decade to help them become well established. Virtually free of pests and diseases, ginkgo trees can live for hundreds of years. Choose male clones to avoid the fruit, which has an unpleasant smell.

Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica)

Can't decide on a favorite fall color? Have them all by planting a Persian ironwood. These tough, drought-tolerant trees can sport yellow, orange, red and purple all at once. One color or two colors may dominant in a particular tree, so select in autumn to ensure getting the desired color mix. The cultivar 'Vanessa' has more uniform orange to reddish-orange fall color. Years after planting this strong-wooded tree, the flaking cream-and-gray bark becomes an added ornamental feature. Few pests or diseases bother this native of Iran. Able to survive Chicago's Zone 5 winters, Persian ironwood prefers acid soils but reportedly tolerates mildly alkaline conditions. Mature size is 20 to 40 feet.

Oaks (various species)

Northern red oak (Quercus rubra) has dominated oak planting in Oregon since the early 20th century. But fall color varies dramatically in that species. Despite the name, red oaks can turn a dull yellow to yellow-brown. More reliable for fall color is scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea). This species genuinely lives up to its name, turning a gratifying deep red in fall before the leaves fade to brown. They may hold on like that until the end of winter. Hardy to USDA zone 5, a scarlet oak will not be happy in alkaline soil, preferring acid conditions. These long-lived trees can grow 40 to 75 feet tall and provide welcome shade under their broad-spreading branches. Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii) is similar in appearance and hardiness to scarlet oak (being hardy to USDA zone 5B), and also has good red to reddish-orange fall color. These stately trees grow 50 to 80 feet tall with a 40 to 60 foot spread, making them good shade providers. They also prefer acid soil.
# # #

Wind rekindles slash burn fires in north Cascade foothills - 10/30/17

MOLALLA, Ore. -- At least nine slash burns on private land in the north Cascade foothills reignited over the weekend as windy conditions picked up, according to Oregon Department of Forestry officials in the North Cascade District. Seven of the fires are located in Clackamas County and one each in Marion and Linn counties. Smoke from the fires can be seen east of Molalla and areas south. Lyons is the community closest to the fires. The fires range in size from two to just over 100 acres.

Landowners have been engaging the fires since early Monday morning. Since early Monday afternoon ODF has had an aerial observer in a fixed-wing aircraft helping pinpoint and report on the fires. Currently only one fire, in Marion County near Lyons, has crossed property lines. ODF is actively engaged with the landowners fighting that fire, with fire engines and personnel. ODF personnel and engines along with a hand crew from Coffee Creek Correctional Institute are also assisting on fires in Clackamas County. On some fires, ODF staff are advising and monitoring the landowner's suppression efforts and are ready to call in support when requested or if conditions threaten spread beyond the property owner's land.

# # #

Public hearing in Burns for the expansion of the Lone Pine Rangeland Association boundary - 10/27/17

BURNS, Ore. -- A public hearing will be held Dec. 1 in Burns on a proposal to expand the Lone Pine Rangeland Association boundary within northern Harney County. Interested members of the public, including surrounding landowners, are invited to attend and comment.

WHEN: 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1, 2017.

WHERE: Harney County Court House meeting room
450 N. Buena Vista, Burns

MORE INFO: Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) staff will provide background on the proposal and answer questions. A report of the public testimony will then be provided to the Board for review prior to its consideration of the Lone Pine Rangeland Fire Protection Association proposal to expand at its next meeting.

If the proposal is ultimately approved by the Board, the enlarged rangeland would be directed and managed by local rangeland owners. Associations prepare annual budgets for review by the Board. Operating funds for Association activities typically are derived from annual dues assessed by the association on its members. Grants provided through ODF may provide supplemental funding.

Rangeland fire protection associations were authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 1963 to fill a gap in protection for portions of the state that do not lie within a rural fire protection district or a forest protection district. There are currently 22 active Rangeland Fire Protection Associations, six of them in Harney County.

To ensure the broadest range of services to individuals with disabilities, lead-time is needed to make necessary arrangements. If special materials, services or assistance is required, please contact Marvin Vetter at the Oregon Department of Forestry office in Prineville at least 48 hours in advance, (541) 447-5658 extension 244,text telephone (TTY) (800) 467-4490 (outside Salem) and (503) 945-7213 (in Salem)
# # #

Public hearing on classification of forestland in Yamhill County will be held Nov. 15 in McMinnville - 10/27/17

MCMINNVILLE, Ore. -- The Yamhill County Forestland Classification Committee will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, Nov. 15 in the conference room of the McMinnville Fire Department. There will be a brief informational session beginning at 5:30 p.m., followed by the public hearing at 6 p.m.

At the public hearing, landowners will have an opportunity to give written or verbal testimony on the draft results of the forestland classification conducted earlier this year, including the process that the committee used. Draft land classifications will be available at the public hearing and may also be viewed prior to November 15 online at the Yamhill County website (http://www.co.yamhill.or.us/content/forestland-classification-review-committee) or at the Oregon Department of Forestry Office in Forest Grove. Call (503) 357-2191 for additional information.

The pre-hearing informational session will explain the process by which the committee classified land in Yamhill County outside cities as forestland. The committee classified land either as "forestland" or "not forestland" according to:
* fire-risk potential
* vegetation type (fire fuel)
* community structure
* closeness to other forestland

Owners of land designated as forested in Oregon are assessed a fee for forest fire prevention and suppression services. Those services are provided by the Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Protection Division.

Classification changes don't increase ODF's fire budget. Rather, the classification review helps ensure that protection costs are fairly distributed. In most cases, a review results in some lands being removed from forest classification and others being added.
# # #

John Christie describes some of the tools used by foresters to a group of students during the 1965 6th grade forestry tour.
John Christie describes some of the tools used by foresters to a group of students during the 1965 6th grade forestry tour.
6th grade forestry and natural resources tour (Photo) - 10/25/17

News Release
CORRECTED VERSION

Date: October 25, 2017
Contact: Ty Williams, ODF Astoria, 503-338-1398


6th grade forestry and natural resources tour
Students spend a day in the forest learning about trees, water, wildlife, and being a steward of the place we live


Astoria, ORE. -- Nearly 250 6th grade students took a hike at the Bill Lecture Demonstration Forest in Astoria on October 18 and 19. The hike featured 11 educational stations that related science, technology, engineering, arts, and math to forestry and natural resources.

This field day, held annually for over 50 years, provides students an opportunity to learn about the forests that surround us. Topics included social, economic and environmental benefits that forests provide and how human activities affect forests. Other topics included water quality and watersheds, forest wildlife, how people use forests and streams, forest fungi, responsible recreation, forestry tools, wood products, natural resource careers, and fire.

"Clatsop County is 94% Forestland--it is valuable for student to experience the place we live, the forest, and meet the people who call the woods their office," said Valerie Elder, Forestry & Natural Resources, Oregon State University Extension Services.

This year's event was organized by Charley Moyer with the Oregon Department of Forestry and Valerie Elder, Oregon State University Extension Service. The event was held at the Bill Lecture Demonstration Forest for the first time. The Bill Lecture Demonstration Forest is located adjacent to the ODF Astoria District Headquarters near the Clatsop County Fairgrounds.

For nearly two decades the Big Walluski Tree Farm, owned by the Christie Family, hosted the tour. John Christie was a small woodland owner, forestry professor at Clatsop Community College and ODF employee who was instrumental in developing and advocating this educational opportunity for local youth. The Christie Family legacy was carried on this year by a long list of volunteers from public natural resource agencies as well as natural resource private partners including:

Dane Osis, Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation
Jacob Vail, Lois Perdue and Jed Arnold, Hampton Lumber
Erik Nelson, Weyerhaeuser
Jason Mack, GreenWood Resources/Lewis and Clark Timberlands
Kyle D Wilson, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Hatchery Program
Joshua Saranpaa, Wildlife Center of the North Coast
Melyssa Graeper and Joyce Hunt, Necanicum Watershed Council
Susan Rhoads, Lewis and Clark National Park
Ruth Reno, Talks about Trees
Mark Standley, Jr., Mark Standley, Sr., Mike Luttrell, Denise Dethlefs, Big Horn Logging
Tom Scoggins, Tillamook/Clatsop Chapter of the Society of American Foresters
Vince Ferguson, David Bailey, Neal Bond, Skip Cadman, Erik Burgher, Avery Petersen, Oregon Department of Forestry

A special thank you to Clatsop County Fairgrounds for providing a building for lunch and Pape CAT for donating the use of a John Deere 909 Feller-Buncher.

Local schools participating this year included Astoria Middle School, Jewell School, North Coast Christian Academy, Astoria Classical Conversations, Salmonberry Hill School, and several homeschool students.

The field trip was based on conceptual framework from the Oregon Forest Literacy Plan, Oregon Forest Resources Institute. The annual event is open for all 6th graders in Clatsop and Pacific counties. To be included in next year's event call 503-325-8573.



###

Forestry professionals in eastern Oregon nominated for ODF award for responsible forestry operations - 10/25/17

Date: Oct. 25, 2017

Contact:
Nick Hennemann, ODF Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-945-7248
Greg Wagenblast, ODF Policy Analyst/Civil Penalties Administrator, Salem, 503-945-7382



Salem, ORE. -- The Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee, an advisory group made up of forest landowners and other citizens, plans a Nov. 2 eastern Oregon site visit in eastern Oregon of forest operations nominated for the Oregon Board of Forestry's Operator of the Year Award. These awards recognize excellence and exceptional performance in meeting or exceeding the natural resource protection requirements of Oregon's Forest Practices Act. Requirements include replanting, sound construction and maintenance of forest roads, and protection of stream buffers and habitat for fish and wildlife.

All committee meetings and tours are open to the public, and anyone may attend. The agenda for this site visit and additional information about Regional Forest Practices Committees is available at: https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx. For questions about accessibility or special accommodations, please call 503-945-7502.

Similar tours have already been conducted of sites in western Oregon. Based on recommendations from its Northwest, Southwest, and Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committees, the Board of Forestry will present the Operator of the Year Awards at its March 2018 meeting.

Regional Forest Practices Committees advise the board on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. The committees were created by 1971 amendments to the Forest Practices Act.

Forests are among Oregon's most valued resources, providing a balance of environmental, economic and social benefits.

###

Now is a great time to select and plant trees for fall color in western Oregon - 10/25/17

SALEM, Ore. -- When people think of trees to plant for fall color, they automatically think of maples. They are no doubt influenced by countless calendars whose October page features New England sugar maples and red maples blazing with color. However, the overplanting of maples in Oregon and their susceptibility to a lethal pest are good reasons to pick alternatives. Homeowners who do can enjoy brilliant autumn color while reducing their community's vulnerability to catastrophic tree loss, according to Oregon Department of Forestry officials.

In most Oregon cities and towns, maples are overplanted at levels considered highly risky by urban foresters. For example, Portland's comprehensive street tree inventory completed in 2016 showed that maples dominate the city's streetscapes, accounting for more than one tree in four. That percentage is well above an emerging consensus among urban foresters that communities should avoid having more than 10 percent of their trees belong to a single genus and no more than 20 percent in any one tree family.

The risk, according to ODF Urban and Community Forestry Program Manager Kristin Ramstad, is from introduced pests that find an abundant food supply in streets and yards planted with lots of the same type of tree. For maples, the peril comes from the Asian longhorn beetle.

"There have been a number of accidental importations to the U.S. of this beetle, which attacks and kills maples of all kinds, as well as horse-chestnut, poplar and willow," said Ramstad. "So far the only remedy to stop the beetle is to cut down and chip or burn all maples and other susceptible tree species within a wide quarantine zone."

Ramstad said white ash (Fraxinus americana), with amazing red to reddish-purple fall color, used to be a recommended alternative for maples as well as for elms wiped out by Dutch elm disease. But the rapid spread since 2002 of emerald ash borer, which is universally fatal to ash trees, makes ashes of any kind no longer a wise choice.

Good substitutes she recommends for excellent fall color and that are outside the maple family include:

Stewartia (various species)

Although needing regular summer water to survive and look their best, all species of stewartia reward with gorgeous fall color, a tidy habit, well-behaved roots and few pests or diseases. An added bonus are the camellia-like white flowers that bloom from late spring to early summer. Plant where the trees can be shaded from hot afternoon sun, which can scorch leaves. The height of these slow-growing trees is perfect for today's smaller yards, usually 20 to 40 feet.
* Tall stewartia (Stewartia monadelpha) has vivid red fall color with lovely flaking pink and orange-tan bark. The flowers are the smallest of the genus.
* Japanese stewartia (S. pseudocamellia) glows red, orange, purple and gold in fall, often on the same tree. The exfoliating bark is even more enticing in shades of tan and gray.
* Beaked stewartia (S. rostrata) has orange-russet fall color. Although the bark does not exfoliate, it is among the first stewartias to bloom, usually in May, often with a pink stripe on the flowers.
* Serrated stewartia (S. serrata) has as rich a fall color as any stewartia (often purple-red to orange-red) but remains rare in the plant trade. Non-exfoliating bark.

American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana)

Fall color varies on this species from eastern North America from a ho-hum yellow to brilliant orange and red. For reliable reddish or orange fall color, pick one of the new cultivars, such as 'Native Flame', 'Firespire' or 'Palisade' (although 'Palisade' often has some gold, too). Besides the autumn fireworks, homeowners will enjoy improved form, strong wood, few pests or diseases and manageable size (usually 20-30 feet tall).

Chinese pistache (Pistacia chinensis)

Heat and drought tolerant, Chinese pistache takes full sun and poor soils in stride. The tallest pistache can reach 60 feet tall, but the trees are usually closer to 30-40 feet. Their compound leaves turn a respectable gold-orange to scarlet in fall. Female trees have pea-sized nutlets that ripen from red to blue and attract birds. If nutlets aren't wanted, select a male clone, such as 'Keith Davey'.

Persian ironwood (Parrotia persica)

Can't decide on a favorite fall color? Have them all by planting a Persian ironwood. These tough, drought-tolerant trees can sport yellow, orange, red and purple all at once. One color or two colors may dominant in a particular tree, so select in autumn to ensure getting the desired color mix. 'Vanessa' has orange to reddish-orange fall color. Years after planting this strong-wooded tree the flaking cream-and-gray bark becomes an added ornamental feature. Few pests or diseases bother this native of Iran.

Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica)

Once rare in Portland, tupelo trees are gaining popularity as new varieties with improved form and chosen for bright fall color enter the market. If fire-engine red is what you crave in fall, 'Red Rage' tupelo is just the ticket. 'Red Rage' not only turns bright red, it also resists leaf spot, which can mar the leaf appearance on tupelos. It is also narrower (to 20 feet) than the species. Because 'Red Rage' does not produce any fruit, bird lovers may prefer 'Afterburner'. It, too, has bright red fall color but also produces blueberry-sized blue fruits relished by cedar waxwings and other local birds. Native to areas of summer rainfall in the eastern U.S., tupelo trees grow faster and are less stressed if watered in summer. Most cultivars mature at 30 to 40 feet.
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Pictured, l-r: Peter Daugherty, Oregon State Forester, Wylda and Steve Cafferata, and Dianne Guidry, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USFS
Pictured, l-r: Peter Daugherty, Oregon State Forester, Wylda and Steve Cafferata, and Dianne Guidry, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USFS
Oregon Tree Farm System announced 2017 Oregon Outstanding Tree Farmers: Steve and Wylda Cafferata (Photo) - 10/24/17

Release date: Oct. 24, 2017

Contact:
Jim James, Oregon Tree Farm System Administrator, 541-619-4252


Silverton, ORE. --The Oregon Tree Farm System on Saturday announced Steve and Wylda Cafferata of Springfield as Oregon's 2017 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. Their work was celebrated during an awards luncheon at the Oregon Garden in Silverton.

The Cafferatas own a 79-acre forest east of Springfield. Their goals for managing their forest include demonstrating responsible forestry, producing income from timber harvest, providing diverse wildlife habitat, establishing a family gathering spot, and maintaining their own mental and physical fitness. To keep their forest healthy, they strive to eliminate invasive species, restore trees in brushy areas, and thin stands to improve forest health and resilience.

The Cafferatas also value forestry education, demonstrated by their sponsorship of tours for youth groups, college students, other family forest landowners and natural resource professionals. They are leaders in several local and state level community and forestry organizations.

"On behalf of the Oregon Department of Forestry, I congratulate the Cafferatas on receiving the Tree Farmer of the Year award," said State Forester Peter Daugherty, "I also thank them for their diligent work and example of excellent forest management."

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized eight other family forest landowners for exceptional, sustainable forestry management. The other honorees were:
* Bob and Marianne Kahl (Clackamas County)
* Eve Lonnquist (Columbia County)
* Ken and Linda Dollinger (Klamath County)
* Mike Newton (Lincoln County)
* Ivan and Rebecca Wolthuis (Linn County)
* Dave Hibbs and Sarah Karr (Polk/Benton Counties)
* Steve and Lynn Harrel (Washington County)
* Edward and Patricia Zakocs (Yamhill County)

For 51 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management.

The American Tree Farm System and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

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