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News Releases
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2017_cover.JPG
Farm Bureau calendar seeks pics of Oregon agriculture (Photo) - 05/22/17

Oregon agriculture is a big reason why our state is so scenic and beloved. From the breathtaking view of flowering orchards in the Gorge; to a bushel of colorful, just-picked berries; to the majestic site of a cowboy herding cattle across an eastern Oregon range, there is infinite beauty to behold in farming and ranching.

Oregon Farm Bureau invites the public to capture some of these scenes and submit their photos for the 2018 Oregon's Bounty Calendar Contest.

"During the summer, there's a lot of harvest activity on farms and ranches that's visually interesting, and also opportunities for great photos at farm stands, u-pick fields, and county fairs. We're looking for exceptional, 'gaze-worthy' images of all aspects of farming and ranching in Oregon," said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss.

The award-winning Oregon's Bounty Calendar celebrates the diversity of agriculture: the products, people, cultivation, harvest, landscape, anything that depicts the beauty, culture, enjoyment, technology, or tradition of family farming and ranching across all parts of the state.

Horizontal-format, high-resolution images -- both close-ups and panoramic views -- are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons. Subject ideas include fruits, vegetables, flowers, crops in the field, farm animals, planting and harvesting, portraits of farm and ranch families, u-picks, farm stands, and farmland in all seasons.

Selected photographers will receive a photo credit in the calendar, which is distributed to over 66,000 Farm Bureau members, and at least 10 copies of the calendar. Every person who submits photos will receive one complimentary copy of the 2018 calendar, a $15 value.

> The deadline is September 15, 2017.

> Digital images MUST be available in high-resolution, 300 dpi format or higher at size of at least 8.5" x 11", otherwise photos will be too grainy when enlarged.

> Horizontal-format photos work best for the calendar layout.

> Photos of people may require a signed photo release form.

> There is no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

Submit your images in one of three ways:

1. Email photos to: annemarie@oregonfb.org, (Note that OFB's email server has a file size limit of 10mb. Photos may need to be sent individually).

2. Upload photos to OFB's dropbox at https://spaces.hightail.com/uplink/OregonFarmBureau

3. Mail a thumb drive, disc, or printed photos to OFB, attn.: Anne Marie Moss, 1320 Capitol St. NE, Suite 200, Salem, OR 97301.

Find detailed photo specifications, contest rules, and a link to the 2017 Oregon's Bounty Calendar at www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

Photographers do not need to be Farm Bureau members to participate and there is no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

PHOTO CAPTION: The 2017 Oregon's Bounty Calendar cover image was taken by Barb Iverson of Clackamas County Farm Bureau.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

For more information, contact Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701, ext. 313.

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* Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising a variety of vegetables and berries at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.

Attached Media Files: 2017_cover.JPG
Second-generation farmer Angi Bailey with her husband Larry and daughters Abbi (left) and Katie.
Second-generation farmer Angi Bailey with her husband Larry and daughters Abbi (left) and Katie.
Oregon farmer Angi Bailey selected for prestigious national ag advocacy program (Photo) - 05/18/17

Oregon's Angi Bailey, a second-generation nursery owner and board member of Multnomah County Farm Bureau, was one of only 10 farm and ranch leaders selected from across the country to participate in the American Farm Bureau Federation's (AFBF) Partners in Advocacy Leadership (PAL) class.

The PAL curriculum is a high-level, executive training program that prepares participants to represent agriculture in the media, in public speaking, in congressional testimony, and other advocacy arenas. Program graduates emerge with the experience and confidence -- in everything from legislative policymaking and issues management to social media and media relations -- to effectively communicate about important issues impacting farm and ranch families.

"We're very proud that Angi was selected from a national pool of candidates for the prestigious PAL program," said Dave Dillon, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) executive vice president.

"Angi has embraced her role as a grassroots leader in Farm Bureau, which as a general agriculture organization represents the diversity of farming and ranching in Oregon and the 250 commodities raised here. While the public policy issues that directly affect her ornamental tree farm are relatively narrow, Angi has advocated for Oregon families who raise cattle, wheat, timber, dairy cows, and other products with a rare passion, as if the issues that impact her neighbors were challenging her own operation's ability to survive and thrive," said Dillon. "She's a dedicated, effective advocate for all of Oregon's hard-working farm and ranch families."

Bailey grew up on a nursery in Gresham established by her mom Verna Jean Hale. As a young adult she left the farm, but returned in 2005 to take over the family business. In a new role as a farm owner, she was surprised by how much public perception of modern agriculture had changed over the years.

"When I came back to the farm, it was striking to see a very distinct rural-urban divide. That's really what inspired me to become an advocate for agriculture," said Bailey.

"I hear the questions my friends as moms and as consumers ask about food production and agriculture, and then I see the farm and ranch families who are working so hard to raise safe, high-quality food and fiber. Most people don't really understand what it takes to run a farm, manage a successful business, and feed a nation. There's a disconnect there. I want to help close that gap."

In her role as an "agvocate," Bailey has testified before state legislative committees in Salem, met with federal agency reps and Oregon's congressional delegation in Washington D.C., given numerous media interviews, appeared in a national campaign promoting the need for immigration reform, and used social media to share her perspective as a family farmer. She's worked on ag-related issues as diverse as labor, taxes, water, biotechnology, and responsible pesticide use.

Within Farm Bureau, Bailey has served on the Multnomah County Farm Bureau board of directors, as a state Farm Bureau board member and officer, as an AFBF voting delegate, AFBF conference participant, member and chair of various AFBF commodity/issue advisory committees, and completed the invitation-only AFBF Communications Boot Camp in Washington D.C.

Bailey also works with Oregonians for Food & Shelter as its grassroots coordinator.

AFBF's PAL program begins in June with a training in New York City. In September, the group will travel to Washington D.C. A total of four intensive training sessions will take place over a two-year period.

Bailey is determined to immediately put her newly honed communication skills to use as a spokesperson for Oregon agriculture, and she hopes to share what she's learned with fellow Farm Bureau members.

Said Bailey, "I'm very committed to Oregon's natural resources community. I feel this opportunity will make me a better, stronger advocate for our state's proud farmers, ranchers, and foresters."

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* Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising pumpkins, u-pick produce, and flowering baskets at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.

Oregon Farm Bureau Statement on LandWatch Water Report - 05/15/17

SALEM, OREGON, May 15 2017 -- The following may be attributed to Oregon Farm Bureau:

"On May 11, Central Oregon LandWatch issued a report about water efficiency that compared irrigated agriculture in Deschutes and Jefferson Counties.

"Different crops and animals thrive in different regions of the state and have different water needs. But all of Oregon's 225+ ag commodities, from carrot seed to cattle, are valuable and essential to the strength and diversity of Oregon agriculture. Oregon Farm Bureau opposes water management proposals that seek to pick winners and losers among different commodities or farming methods, or attempt to limit farmers' and ranchers' productive use of farmland.

"Farm Bureau has long supported the proactive work by the Central Oregon irrigation districts to protect local farmers and ranchers, while also emphasizing water conservation and wildlife preservation. We appreciate the districts' collaborative process for tackling tough water management issues by involving and respecting all stakeholders, including families involved in agriculture."

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* Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue is a third-generation farmer raising pumpkins, u-pick produce, and flowering baskets at a nearly century-old farm near Boring, Oregon. He is OFB's 15th president.

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Farm Bureau Marks National Small Business Week with Opening of $145K Rural Entrepreneurship Challenge (Photo) - 05/01/17

Washington, D.C, May 1, 2017 -- The American Farm Bureau Federation is opening online applications for its fourth Rural Entrepreneurship Challenge today, to coincide with National Small Business Week (April 30 -- May 6). Entrepreneurs will compete for $145,000 in startup funds.

The competition provides an opportunity for individuals to showcase ideas and business innovations that benefit rural regions of the United States. It is the first national rural business competition focused exclusively on innovative entrepreneurs working on food and agriculture businesses.

Competitors are invited to submit for-profit business ideas related to food and agriculture online starting May 1 at www.strongruralamerica.com/challenge.

Businesses related to food and agriculture include farms or ranches, value-added food processing, food hubs, community-supported agriculture programs, farm-to-table restaurants, farmers' markets and craft beverage startups. Businesses can also support food and agriculture such as crop scouting, agritourism, ag advertising agencies and ag technology companies.

"Rural entrepreneurs typically face hurdles that make it challenging to develop successful businesses, including lack of capital, business networks and business training," said AFBF President Zippy Duvall. "Through the challenge, we're helping food and agricultural entrepreneurs take their businesses to the next level."

Owners of all types of businesses across the food and agriculture supply chain are encouraged to enter the competition. Applications, which include a business plan, video pitch and photo, must be submitted online by June 30. Judges will review the applications and provide feedback to the participants.

The top 10 teams, to be announced in October, will be offered the opportunity to pitch to multimillion dollar investors, in addition to education about venture capital and expanding their businesses.

New this year, six best-in-show winners will each be awarded $10,000 in startup funds in the categories below.

* Best Farm Startup -- farms, ranches, hydroponics, aquaponics, greenhouse production, forestry, etc.
* Best Agritourism Startup -- farm-to-school programs, pumpkin festivals, farm stays, etc.
* Best Farm-to-Table Startup -- CSAs, food hubs, farmers' markets
* Best Ag Tech & Support Services Startup -- hardware, software and support services (marketing programs, scouting services and other services targeting farmers)
* Best Craft Beverage Startup -- including breweries, wineries, cideries and distilleries
* Best Local Product Startup -- food and non-food products

The final four teams will compete in a live competition at AFBF's 99th Annual Convention in Nashville on Jan. 7 to win:

Farm Bureau Entrepreneur of the Year award and $30,000 (chosen by judges)
People's Choice award and $25,000 (chosen by public vote)
First runner-up prize, $15,000
Second runner-up prize, $15,000

The Entrepreneur of the Year award and the People's Choice award will be awarded to two different teams. The team that wins the Entrepreneur of the Year award will not be eligible for the People's Choice Award. The competition timeline, detailed eligibility guidelines and profiles of past Challenge winners are available at www.strongruralamerica.com/challenge.

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Attached Media Files: ruralchallenge.jpg