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News Releases
Marine Board Hosts Meeting Looking for Smooth Chetco River Season - 11/14/17

LOCATION CLARIFICATION:

The Oregon State Marine Board will hold an open house at the Southwestern Oregon Community College, 96082 Lone Ranch Pkwy, in Brookings on November 17, beginning at 3 pm in rooms 138 A & B.

This public gathering follows a February 2017 meeting looking for solutions to crowding, user conflict, and competition for productive angling areas. "The Chetco is popular because it is a great fishery with good access," said Randy Henry, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board. "There's competition between boat and bank anglers, motorized and non-motorized boating anglers, and guides and non-guides. Typically, the most problems occur when good water conditions coincide with the big three-day weekends or holidays in January and February."

The Board rejected a petition in 2016 to restrict boat operation because, said Henry, "boats were just one part of the problem and shouldn't bear the entire solution." He said, "I think we can do a better job putting law enforcement on the river during those busy times in addition to improving signage as well. The Marine Board wants to engage the community to find ways to get along without regulating one group or another off the river."

Ideas discussed in February included a mix of restrictions on boating and fishing, changes to fisheries management, and increased law enforcement with a focus on apprehending illegal guides. "You may not know they're there, but the Marine Board will have more law enforcement on the river in 2018," said Henry. "They'll be looking for unlicensed guides, people interfering with angling, or who are menacing or threatening assault. Etiquette is a two-way street. Showing courtesy and patience are essential on crowded waterways. It doesn't take much to cross the line." The Marine Board will have an online fillable form set up for public reporting and will respond to complaints.

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters. No general fund tax dollars are used to support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of law enforcement services (on-the-water enforcement, training and equipment), education/outreach materials and boating access facility grants. The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit program is dedicated funding to pay for border inspection stations, decontamination equipment, inspectors, and signage/outreach materials. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.

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Marine Board Seeks Written Public Comment on Hunt Tag Certification Program Rules - 11/07/17

The Oregon State Marine Board seeks public comment to revert OAR 250-016-0040 to the previous fee schedule. The fee change, previously adopted, requires additional consideration by the Oregon Legislature before it can be enacted. The Hunt Tag Program Certification Fee reverts from $100 to $75 and eliminates the Annual Hunt Unit Certification Fees listed in (7)(a), (b) and (c).

Written comments are being accepted through December 29, 2017 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, 435 Commercial St. NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed changes, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx
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Marine Board Seeks Written Public Comment on Visual Distress Signals for Columbia River - 11/07/17

The Oregon State Marine Board seeks public comment on amending a rule adopted in 2015 for visual distress signals in Oregon's ocean waters. The rule established visual distress signal requirements for boats operating west of the "line of demarcation" at the tips of the jetties for Oregon's coastal bays with one exception; the Columbia River. The rule change proposes removing the Columbia River exemption to be consistent with US Coast Guard designations. The visual distress signal requirement would be for the ocean, west of coastal bays and their associated jetties.

Written comments are being accepted through December 29, 2017 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, 435 Commercial St. NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed changes, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.
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Boat Registration Renewal Options
Boat Registration Renewal Options
Boat Registration Reminders Coming Soon (Photo) - 11/06/17

The Oregon State Marine Board is mailing approximately 75,000 boat registration renewal notices to boaters whose boat registration expires on December 31, 2017. Each renewal notice is unique to the owner and their boat.

Boaters have three options to renew. The fastest option is online using the Marine Board's online store. After completing the transaction, boaters can print out a temporary permit and go boating right away. There is no transaction fee when using a credit or debit card. Other options include mailing the payment coupon to the Marine Board or visiting a local registration agent, who can also issue a temporary permit.

Boaters can also take advantage of other services using the online store:
* Apply for a Boater Education Card or Replacement Card
* Purchase Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Permits for nonmotorized boats
* Apply for the boat's Certificate of Title or a Replacement Title
* Register a new boat
* Register or renew as an Outfitter or Guide
* Apply for a Charter Boat license

The cost to register a boat is $4.50 per foot, rounded to the highest foot, plus a $5 aquatic invasive species fee. The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention fund pays for inspection stations, decontamination equipment, inspectors, signage, and education materials.

The Marine Board is funded entirely by motorized boat registrations, motorboat fuel tax and receives federal funding to support services to boaters. Nearly eighty-six cents of every dollar are returned to boaters in the form of law enforcement services, boat ramps, restrooms (floating and land-based), parking, boarding floats, facilities engineering/design services, boating education and program outreach.

Access the online store directly at www.boatoregon.com/store.
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Attached Media Files: Boat Registration Renewal Options
Marine Board Seeks Written Comments on Public Record Request Rules - 11/02/17

The Oregon State Marine Board seeks written public comment on a proposed rule amendment to
OAR 250-001-0020 Fees for Public Records. This rule will align agency fees and procedures associated with public records requests to statewide policy.

The Oregon Department of Administrative Services Statewide Standardized Fee Process policy is available online from http://www.oregon.gov/das/Policies/107-001-030.pdf.

Written comments are being accepted through December 29, 2017 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, 435 Commercial St. NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed changes, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.
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Marine Board Approves Recruitment Plan, Position for Agency Director - 10/27/17

The Oregon State Marine Board met via teleconference on Thursday, October 26, along with a representative from the Department of Administrative Services (DAS) Human Resources and agency staff.

The Board reviewed and approved a recruitment plan and the position announcement for the State Marine Director vacancy. The recruitment plan includes an opportunity to collect hiring input from agency stakeholders. DAS intends to post the position announcement, through the state recruitment system, on November 1, 2017. A national candidate search will be conducted. The Board anticipates making a hiring decision at its January 10, 2018 Board Meeting.

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Marine Board Chair Val Early and Benton County Deputy Marshall Dean
Marine Board Chair Val Early and Benton County Deputy Marshall Dean
Marine Law Enforcement Recognized for Exceptional Service to Boaters, Life Saving Efforts (Photo) - 10/25/17

The Oregon State Marine Board recognized marine law enforcement officers from Klamath, Malheur, Coos, and Benton County Sheriff's Offices for their marine law enforcement efforts during 2017. The recognition occurred during the Marine Board's annual post-season conference, held in Redmond on October 16, 17. The Marine Board honors sheriff's marine deputies and state police troopers each year with recognition of their life saving efforts and exceptional service awards.

Officer of the Year Award

Klamath County Deputy Ronald McKinney was recognized as the Officer of the Year for his many years of service as both a volunteer with Small Boat Rescue and as an employee of the Marine Division. Deputy McKinney helped solidify the success of the marine unit with his well-rounded skills as boating safety instructor for the general public and county schools; boat operation and equipment maintenance, and volunteer coordination for training, hazard mitigation, buoy maintenance and outreach events. Klamath County Cpl. Daren Krag said, "Without Deputy McKinney's tireless efforts, Klamath County's Marine Division would not be nearly as efficient and effective in serving our community." Nominees for the Officer of the Year award must exhibit exceptional service to Oregon's boaters in the past year, demonstrating selfless commitment and outstanding performance in promoting boating safety, passionate and effective enforcement of boating safety laws, effective involvement in public water safety education, efficient use of available resources, excellent program management, great partnering, committed instruction, and boat operation skills. "Deputy McKinney well deserved this distinguished recognition," said Randy Henry, Marine Board Boating Safety Program manager.

Life Saving Awards

The fall and winter storms created exceptionally dangerous situations for boaters and marine law enforcement who frequently put themselves in the line of danger to save others. There were several rescues conducted by marine law enforcement who deserve recognition for their life saving efforts. Three rescue events were recognized involving five deputies.

On November 6, 2016 in the early morning, two brothers launched their boat to go duck hunting. The victim's brother went to park their vehicle without realizing the boat motor was in reverse gear while the victim tried holding the boat from shore. The victim lost his footing but managed to hang on the side of the boat as it headed into deeper water. The older brother returned to find the boat circling down river with his brother hanging to the outside. He called 9-1-1, who alerted Deputy Wade Holom, Malheur County, of the situation. Deputy Holom's boat was a distance away, so he borrowed a jet boat from someone he knew nearby. Deputy Holom launched the borrowed boat and headed more than ?1/2 mile downstream to find the youth fully dressed in waders, still hanging on the side of the boat. Shaking, cold and within seconds of losing his grip, Deputy Holom boarded and tied up to the boat, turned off the motor for safety and was able to pull the youth aboard. He then had to work quickly to avoid drifting into obstructions immediately downstream. Holom tried starting the victim's boat but the jet pump was plugged. Just as he was dangerously close to an obstruction, Holom was able to get the motor to start. The exercise of starting and stopping the motor every few hundred feet to clean out the jet pump added another element of risk, on top of navigating back to the boat ramp with the hypothermic victim and trying to keep him alert. The two finally reached the shore where an ambulance was waiting. "Thanks to the quick thinking and operator skill of Deputy Holom, a young man is alive and safe," said Henry.

In another incident on February 9 around 6:30 pm, flood waters overtook a man in a pick up truck who attempted to drive through an area without realizing the water level was as deep as it was. The truck was quickly swept off the road by strong current, pinning the truck against trees and fencing. Emergency responders were called and fire personnel attempted rescue from their vehicles, but were unable to get close enough, safely. By this time, water started to fill the cab of the truck and the victim opened his window to climb on to the bed of the truck. Within minutes, the truck started to bounce up and down in the current. Roughly thirty minutes later, Deputy Doug Strain and Sergeant Will Coleman arrived on the scene using a drift boat, navigating in the dark through the debris-filled river upstream from the victim's location. Upon arrival, the strong current pushed the patrol boat into the trees in front of the truck. Deputies Strain and Coleman secured the bow of the boat using a rope system so the boat could be freed from the trees and belayed down to the truck to retrieve the victim. Using the lines and a lot of muscle, the deputies were able to throw a life jacket to the victim and safely bring him on board the boat. Deputy Strain and Sergeant Coleman have served as marine patrol instructors for the Marine Board, and have extensive knowledge and experience with rigging methods using knots and with whitewater rescue. "The outcome could have been tragic for the victim had it not been for the application, timing and expertise of Deputy Strain and Sergeant Coleman in this situation," said Henry.

On June 24, 2017, Benton County Marine Deputies Marshall Dean and Randall Tugwell happened to be at the right place at the right time on the Willamette River near Willamette Park in Corvallis. A group of college students were floating in innertubes. One of the students was visibly intoxicated and jumped off the tube into the water, which caught the Deputies' attention. Immediately, the victim started having problems staying afloat. Two others in the group tried to help the victim back onto the innertube but were unsuccessful. Deputies Dean and Tugwell saw the group struggling. Deputy Tugwell dropped anchor near shore and Deputy Dean dove in. The victim was unwilling to board the boat, but could not climb the boulder-lined shoreline, either. Through sheer muscle and determination, Deputy Dean was able to lift the victim onto the boat's swim deck. The victim appeared to be in shock so the deputies informed dispatch to have an ambulance meet them at the Crystal Lake Boat Ramp. The victim was met by medical personnel and taken to the hospital. "If the deputies had not been in the area, this incident could have ended tragically," said Henry. Deputy Tugwell and Deputy Dean were recognized for having the presence of mind to check on the innertubers and recognize their need for help. Thanks to their efforts, tragedy was averted.

During the 2017 recreational boating season, the Marine Board changed the focus of enforcement from administrative infractions to risk intervention; stopping boaters after observing behavior that could lead to an accident. The objective of this effort is to have one-on-one conversations with boaters to educate them on marine laws and safe behavior. In some cases, boaters were issued warnings; in others, citations. The life-saving recognition of the above marine law enforcement officers were teachable moments for the people involved. Most injuries and accidents are preventable with proper knowledge, planning and preparation. During the 2017 boating season, citations included unsafe and/or reckless operation, riding on decks, bows, gunwales, operator inattention (improper lookout), and slow-no wake infractions. Boating under the influence of intoxicants and distracted operation are leading causes of recreational boating accidents and fatalities in Oregon. Life jackets are important in preventing common accidents from becoming tragedies.

For more information about the Marine Board and the marine law enforcement program, visit www.boatoregon.com.
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Free "Water Wits" Boating and Water Safety STEM Curriculum Available for Educators - 10/24/17

Oregon is home to a huge diversity of waterways, with 129 boatable lakes, over a dozen coastal bays, 363 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline and 11,619 miles of rivers and streams for water recreation. With the bounty of places to play, the Oregon State Marine Board invites educators water safety and environmentally-minded organizations to take advantage of a free, interactive curriculum on boating, water safety and marine stewardship.

The new "Water Wits" STEM curriculum is interdisciplinary, academically rigorous, interactive and can be student-led. The curriculum includes 12 lesson plans divided into grade units (K-2, 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12th grades). All lessons are aligned to state and national education standards including Next Generation Science and Common Core, across multiple subjects. Additionally, each lesson is designed to complete in one class period, but many lessons offer rich opportunities for expansion and exploration.

This curriculum goes beyond learning water safety and the importance of wearing life jackets. This curriculum delves into safety from the aspect of best practices for smart decision-making in, on and around the water. The stewardship component challenges students to think about how they can reduce their impacts and manage water resources for people and wildlife. Furthermore, the science component questions how physics, engineering, ecology and the social sciences are used to explain and inform people about the best behaviors for personal safety and enhanced stewardship.

Educators are encouraged to visit the Marine Board's Water Wits page and submit the Water Wits Request Form. Agency staff will email the grade unit material within two business days.

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters. No general fund tax dollars are used to support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of law enforcement services (on-the-water enforcement, training and equipment), education/outreach materials and boating access facility grants. The Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit program is dedicated funding to pay for border inspection stations, decontamination equipment, inspectors, and signage/outreach materials.
For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.

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