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State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation meets October 18 and 19 in Portland - 10/09/18

PORTLAND, Ore. – The State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) will meet Oct. 18 and 19 in Portland’s Laurelhurst neighborhood to tour and consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places.

Thursday, Oct. 18: SACHP will depart at 1 p.m. from the Laurelhurst Club, 3721 SE Ankeny St., Portland for a tour of several properties of the proposed nominations. The tour is open to the public and expected to conclude by 4 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 19: SACHP will meet at 9 a.m. at the Laurelhurst Club to consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. The meeting is open to the public.

Friday’s meeting agenda: a presentation by the national register program coordinator, and hearings of the six proposed nominations. Hearings will begin at 10:15 a.m. For specific hearing times, refer to the online agenda: www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/Pages/nrhp_sachphome.aspx

The committee will review six proposed nominations: the Kiernan House, Portland; Charles O. and Carie C. Blakely House, Portland; Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House, Portland; Charles O. Sigglin Flats, Portland; Central Oregon Canal Historic District, Ward Road to Gosney Road in unincorporated Deschutes County; and the Laurelhurst Historic District, Portland.

Nominations recommended by the SACHP go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

The SACHP is a nine-member governor-appointed citizen commission with credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting may be made with at least three days of advance notice by calling (503) 986-0690.

More information about the National Register of Historic Places process is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).

Historic cemetery events in Pendleton October 25 & 26 - 10/09/18

October is historic cemetery month.  Join the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries (OCHC) in Pendleton on October 25 & 26 for a public meeting, presentation and workshop.  All events are free and will take place at Heritage Station Museum, 108 SW Frazer, in Pendleton.

On October 25, the OCHC will kick of the schedule with its quarterly meeting from 2:00 - 4:30 p.m. The agenda includes planning for the next two years, the promotion of historic cemeteries, the historic cemetery permit process, commissioner reports, and future meetings. Interested parties may attend in person or call-in to the meeting. Meetings are accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations and translation may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance of the meeting by calling 503-986-0690.

A presentation will follow the meeting from 5:30– 6:30 p.m. on October 25 that explores events that occur in historic cemeteries to connect people with their local cemeteries. Cemeteries have a purpose for mourning and memorialization. They also hold the continuous history of the community, the cultural trends over decades and preserved natural space. The presentation will include a historic portrayal, descriptions of musical events and other events found in cemeteries in Oregon and beyond.

Finally, on October 26 from 9:30 -11:30 a.m. the commission will offer a workshop on engaging the community in historic cemeteries. Historic cemeteries rely on community support for their preservation. This workshop will cover ways to engage the community and develop a core group of supporters.

OCHC maintains a list of all historic cemeteries in the state. A cemetery must include the burial of at least one person who died before Feb. 14, 1909 to qualify as historic. The seven-member appointed commission helps people and organizations document, preserve and promote designated historic cemeteries statewide.

For more information about the grant program or the OCHC, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.

Historic Assessment Review Committee to meet Oct. 16 in Salem - 10/05/18

The Historic Assessment Review Committee will meet at 9:30 am on October 16 at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street NE, Room 124, Salem.  Agenda items will include overview and highlights of the 2017 Special Assessment Property Tax benefit period, review of policy and procedures, Secretary of Interior Standards, and discussion on the future of the program which sunsets in 2020.  The committee will invite public comments.

State law established the five-member Historic Assessment Review Committee to be the review body for appeals from property owners participating in the Special Assessment Property Tax Program for Historic Properties. 

Requests for information about the meeting and accessibility may be made to coordinator Joy Sears at 503-986-0688 or by e-mail: s@oregon.gov">Joy.Sears@oregon.gov

Attached Media Files: Announcement
Woodburn Receives Three Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. Woodburn was honored with three awards.

The Metropolis Building won the award for Best Building Renovation. This 1891 building was vacant and deteriorating when the City of Woodburn purchased it in 2000 and spend over $850,000 to stabilize it and restore its façade. The City found new owners who created a Mercado style retail space on the ground floor, which includes a coffee shop, an Asian restaurant, a fresh fruit Mexican restaurant, and a churro stand, and an event center on the second floor.

Republic Services won the award for Best Partnership. The City of Woodburn partnered with Republic Services in an effort to clean-up and revitalize the alleys used for deliveries, business access, and trash service. The project included painting over graffiti, installing motion-sensor lighting and security cameras, dumpster enclosures, and adding color accents.

The Taste of Woodburn Campaign won the award for Best Image Activity. The Campaign developed imagery that represented the cultural diversity of Woodburn and placed the imagery on banners and marketing materials.  A “Taste of Woodburn” event attended by over 2000 people was hosted to promote the Campaign and included the distribution of a passport to tastes that feature the seven culinary regions represented by downtown restaurants and businesses.

Eight other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Oregon City Receives Two Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. Oregon City was honored with two awards.

Black Ink Coffee & White Rabbit Gifts won the award for Best Interior Renovation. Owners Danielle & Rolland Walsh began the project renovation in 2016 to remove the layers of change that had been added over the 100-year lifespan of the building including its most recent use as a tavern. They were able to complete the project using an Oregon Main Street Revitalization grant, a grant program established by the legislature in 2015. 

Carol Pauli of Downtown Oregon City Association won the Leadership Award. Carol Pauli is Downtown Oregon City’s longest running board member providing critical leadership that led it to be the 2018 Great American Main Street award winner – the first in Oregon and the first on the west coast in 10 years. She continues to work on strategies to help DOCA accomplish its downtown revitalization efforts and be a resource for downtown businesses. She has also been a key supporter of Oregon Main Street and has helped neighboring communities with their efforts, in addition to serving on the Oregon City Commission.

Eight other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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St. Helens Receives Award for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. St. Helens Economic Development Corporation’s (SHEDCO) St. Helens Steps Out mobile app won the award for Best Organization Activity.

St. Helens Steps Out was launched by SHEDCO to raise awareness about St. Helens’ deep culture and history as well as drive foot traffic into current businesses along Main Street using a mobile app. SHEDCO partnered with the Columbia County Historical Society and Museum to ensure content accuracy and provide photos. The app platform allows SHEDCO to program self-guided tours and scavenger hunts that include trivia, QR codes, and selfie stops. In the first month, almost 60 participants had uploaded their scores proving they had finished all stops in the hunt.

Eight other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Astoria Receives Three Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. Three Astoria projects were recognized at the event.

Mo’s Chowder, a restaurant in downtown Astoria famous for its clam chowder, won the award for Best Adaptive Reuse. Mo’s Chowder Restaurant filled a large vacancy that was left when Englund Marine relocated out of downtown. The former warehouse now houses a Mo’s Restaurant with seating for 160 people and a chowder production plant creating the base for nearly a million bowls of chowder annually. With an overall project budget of $3 million, the project added over 80 windows to capture the view of the Columbia River and a commercial kitchen with viewing windows so visitors can see how they make the chowder. Mo’s Chowder expansion into Astoria created 30 full-time jobs and 40 part-time jobs.

Good to Go won the award for Best New Business. Owners Heidi and Dan Dlubac rehabilited a long-time downtown bakery into a successful take-out and snack venue with catering capabilities. The Dlubacs noticed a lack of on-the-go options in Downtown Astoria and opened Good to Go to offer residents and visitors quick, health, and delicious food at a reasonable price.

Gimre’s Shoes, the oldest family-owned shoe store west of the Rockies, won the award for Best Retailer of the Year. Gimre’s Shoes was founded in 1892 by the grandfather of Pete Gimre, the current owner. The business focuses on quality and excellent customer service. Pete Gimre is very active in the community and involved with the Astoria Downtown Historic District Association and the Chamber of Commerce and has been recognized for his volunteer service within the community.

Eight other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Two Eastern Oregon Cities Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. Baker City was honored with three awards and La Grande was honored with one award.

The Haskell Building in Baker City won the award for Best Façade Renovation. This project brought back the historic character similar to the building’s original 1895 façade based on a historic photo and cues from similar downtown buildings. The existing business on one side of the façade, Delisioso Restaurant, underwent an interior improvement at the same time with pro bono design assistance. The owner of the restaurant reports increased sales due to both the exterior and interior improvements. And, the long-vacant space on the second bay now has a new business, the Royal Artisan.  

Barley Brown’s Beer in downtown Baker City won the award for Business of the Year. Tyler Brown took over operations from his parents twenty years ago and has transitioned the business to what it is today, Baker City Brewing /Barley Brown's Tap House. Barley Brown's has received more than 80 national and international awards for their beer. Continuing in his parents footsteps, Tyler understood that being located in a vibrant downtown was important to the success of Barley Browns and three generations have served on the board of the Main Street program.

Baker City Little Big Show, a community wide art show, won the award for Best Downtown Retail Event. Participating artists complete 8”x8” original artworks which are randomly placed at galleries in downtown Baker City. Each gallery sells the artwork for $40 with commission to the artists and each gallery selects a unique charity to receive the proceeds. The purpose is to showcase artists’ work at an approachable price and encourage art collectors to come to Baker City. Shoppers then frequent other businesses and frequent downtown restaurants during their shopping excursion.

Mary Ann Meisner of La Grande Main Street Downtown won the award for Volunteer of the Year. Meisner has been involved in La Grande’s Main Street efforts since the 1980’s. She has spent many hours volunteering for La Grande Main Street Downtown’s signature events including the Holiday Parade, Crazy Days and Car Show, and the Eastern Oregon Beer Festival. She has served on the Board as both Secretary and Treasurer and served as volunteer interim staff during staff transition.

Seven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Two South Coast Communities Receive Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. Port Orford received two awards and Bandon received one award at the event.

Bandon’s Bandon By The Sea 4th of July event won the award for Best Downtown Special Event. This event is a collaboration of multiple partners to draw residents and visitors to Bandon for the 4th of July. Events include a parade coordinated by the VFW, a barbeque held by the Lions Club, a wine walk, and apple pie and ice cream feed sponsored by the Greater Bandon Association, and the Cardboard Boat Race Regatta sponsored by the Port of Bandon. Attendance was estimated at over 2000.

Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association’s Property Revitalization project received the Best Placemaking Project. The organization purchased a downtown building to revitalize it and incorporate artistic elements on the building and the surrounding property.

Karen Auborn with the Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association won the award for Main Street Manager of the Year. Auborn is one of the founding members of the Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association. Under Auborn’s leadership, the Association has helped the Main Street transition to an Arts focused community. Activities of the Association include a mural and painted fire hydrant project, holiday activities, streetscape improvements such as benches and planters, and most recently, using an Oregon Main Street Revitalization grant to improve a downtown building.

Seven other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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Albany Receives Two Awards for Downtown Revitalization Efforts - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre. Albany was honored with two awards.

Albany Downtown Association’s Downtown Welcome Brochure won the award for Best Economic Vitality Activity. The brochure is a tool to help guide prospective businesses through the process of selecting a space, working with city departments, and getting the word out to prospective customers. 

Christina Knowles of Albany Downtown Association won the Board Member of the Year Award. Knowles, owner of Varitone Architecture, has had a positive effect on projects in all four concentration areas of the Albany Downtown Association. Projects she has contributed to include grant writing, designing, construction and ongoing maintenance of downtown parklets, designing the Downtown Welcome Brochure for those interested in starting a business in Downtown Albany, and assisting with Mixology Madness, an ADA fundraiser.

Eight other cities in Oregon were honored with awards. “The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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State Recognizes Eighteen Individuals & Projects for Excellence in Downtown Revitalization - 10/03/18

SALEM — Oregon Main Street announced its 2018 “Excellence in Downtown Revitalization” award winners at its Excellence in Downtown Revitalization Awards event earlier today in Albany at the award winning Pix Theatre.

The eighteen projects, businesses, & individuals honored are:

Best Façade Over $7500 - The Metropolis Building, Woodburn
Best Building Restoration - Haskell Building, Baker City
Best Interior Renovation -  Black Ink Coffee & White Rabbit Gifts, Oregon City
Best Placemaking Project - Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association’s Property Revitalization project, Port Orford
Best Adaptive Reuse - Mo’s Chowder Restaurant, Astoria
Best Economic Vitality Activity - Albany Downtown Association’s Downtown Albany Welcome Brochure, Albany
Best New Business - Good to Go, Astoria
Retailer of the Year - Gimre’s Shoes, Astoria
Business of the Year - Barley Brown’s Beer, Baker City
Board Member of the Year - Christina Knowles of Albany Downtown Association, Albany
Volunteer of the Year - Mary Ann Miesner of La Grande Main Street Downtown
Leadership Award - Carol Pauli of Downtown Oregon City Association, Oregon City
Best Organization Activity - St. Helens Economic Development Corporation’s (SHEDCO) St. Helens Steps Out mobile app, St. Helens
Best Partnership - Republic Services, Woodburn
Main Street Manager of the Year - Karen Auborn of Port Orford Main Street Revitalization Association, Port Orford
Best Special Event - Greater Bandon Association’s Bandon By the Sea 4th of July, Bandon
Best Image Activity - City of Woodburn’s Taste of Woodburn Campaign, Woodburn
Best Downtown Retail Event - Baker City Little Big Show, Baker City

“The award winners reflect some of the highest achievements in downtown revitalization efforts across the state,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “It is gratifying to see the progress being made to revitalize historic downtowns across the state. This is happening because of the dedicated staff and volunteers who share a commitment to their downtowns and a passion to make their communities a better place.”

The wide range of awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. From 2010 to 2017, communities participating in the Performing Main Street and Transforming Downtown levels – the top two tiers – have seen $97,218,322 in private building improvement projects, $99,134,718 in public projects, 1,258 private rehab projects, 647 net new businesses, and 3,367 net new jobs. In addition, over 180,000 hours of volunteer time has been contributed to local main street organizations across the state.

Oregon Main Street is part of Heritage Programs, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. For additional information, visit www.oregonheritage.org.

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ATV Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee meets Oct. 9 in Salem - 10/03/18

SALEM, Ore. - The All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee will meet 1 – 4 p.m. Oct. 9 in room 124A in the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: a committee review of an application to allow ATVs to drive on 1 mile of Spinreel Road near Lakeside Oregon; approval of August meeting minutes; and a discussion of other potential applications. The agenda is also available online.

Members of the public will be given the opportunity during the meeting to comment on the Spinreel Road application.

The ATV Highway Access Routes Advisory Committee was established by the Oregon Legislature in 2017. The committee is tasked with accepting, evaluating and conducting field reviews of proposed ATV highway access routes on portions of state highway right-of-ways. The committee’s seven members include representatives of citizen and user groups, law enforcement, local government and state agencies.

For more information about the meeting or committee, contact Ian Caldwell, ATV Program Lead, at ian.caldwell@oregon.gov or 541-410-5512. Individuals needing special accommodations to attend should contact Caldwell at least three days in advance.

Statewide trails advisory committee seeks to fill vacancies - 10/02/18

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers for two vacant positions on the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee.

Current vacancies:

  • Equestrian representative
  • Water trail representative

The ten-member committee evaluates grant proposals for statewide trail projects. They meet once or twice a year at locations throughout the state. Time commitment varies and includes reviewing and evaluating 30-70 grant applications each annual funding cycle. Three-year terms begin Jan. 1, 2019. Members are eligible to serve a second term.

Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon and will be avid equestrians or paddlers with experience in at least one of the following areas: land management, recreation planning, trail planning, project management, grant management, or volunteerism.

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD grant advisory committee appointment interest form by Friday, Nov. 16. The form is available online: http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/RTP-Committee.aspx

The competitive grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to non-profits and governments for motorized and non-motorized trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and developing or improving trail facilities.

For more information about the advisory committee or application process, contact Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP grant coordinator, at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.

New Ranch and Silver Falls State Park
New Ranch and Silver Falls State Park
New Ranch at Silver Falls State Park now available for reservation through end of 2018 (Photo) - 10/01/18

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting reservations for the New Ranch group-use building at Silver Falls State Park. Reservations are being accepted only for stays during the remainder of 2018. The rate is $200 per night for the first 25 people, and $8 per person after that, to a maximum of 75.


The Old Ranch—a separate facility from the New Ranch—is closed to reservations for the winter season and will reopen May 2019.


The limited time frame for New Ranch reservations accommodates negotiations to transition both the New and Old Ranches to management by a concessionaire. The concessionaire, the Silver Falls Lodge and Conference Center, already manages a facility in the park and will announce 2019 rates for the Ranches if contract negotiations succeed. The updated contract is expected to take effect beginning Jan. 1, 2019. Reservations for dates in 2019 are expected to open to the public Dec. 1, 2018.


Chris Gilliand, Silver Falls park ranger supervisor, says the decision to increase cooperation with the concessionaire was driven by the steady increase in park visits over the last few years.


“Transitioning to a concessionaire, especially one we already work with at Silver Falls, will make more staff time available for managing other areas of the park,” said Gilliand. “We want to ensure the New Ranch is available for the public to enjoy during the holiday season while negotiations are concluding.”


“One of our commitments to Oregonians is to offer affordable and accessible experiences balanced against the cost to repair and improve facilities,” continued Gilliand. “We expect costs to use the Ranches will probably increase, while other group facilities at Silver Falls will continue to rent under the existing lower rates.“


The Ranches are daytime and overnight group facilities inside the park. They were rented by 176 groups in 2017. Silver Falls daytime visits have increased 35% since 2013, to an estimated 1.3 million in 2017.


To reserve the New Ranch for dates in 2018, call (800) 551-6949 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.


More information about Silver Falls State Park, including maps and brochures, is on oregonstateparks.org.   
 

Recreational Trails Program Advisory Committee meets Oct. 16-18 in Springfield - 10/01/18

The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee will meet Oct. 16-18 at the Willamette National Forest Interagency Office, 3016 Pierce Parkway, Suite D, Springfield. The meeting is open to the public.

RTP applicants will present their proposed projects to the committee on Oct. 16 and 17. Agenda items for Oct. 18: small grant review and discussion; final scoring and ranking of the proposed projects; review and discussion of the 2019 grant cycle. 

Meeting times for each day:

  • Oct. 16: 9 a.m. – 4:40 p.m.
  • Oct. 17: 9 a.m. – 4:20 p.m.
  • Oct. 18: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

The committee will evaluate and score all applications. A priority ranking list of projects will be created based on the proposed project scores. The priority ranking list will be forwarded to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Commission for final review and approval.

For specific presentation times, refer to the full agenda: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/docs/RTP/2018%20RTP%20Meeting%20Agenda.pdf

Eligible RTP applicants include cities, counties, park and recreation districts, state agencies, federal land management agencies, Tribal governments and non-profits.

The RTP Advisory Committee consists of 10 volunteer members who represent various user groups and land managers.

RTP is a federal aid assistance program administrated by the United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration. RTP grants are used to expand and improve recreational trails in Oregon.

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals that need special accommodations to attend must contact Nicole Sprecher, Administrative Support Specialist, at 503-986-0968 or echer@oregon.gov">nicole.sprecher@oregon.gov, at least three days in advance.

Annual archaeology lecture series returns to Smith Rock State Park during October - 09/28/18

TERREBONNE, Ore. - Smith Rock State Park will host the annual Oregon Archaeology Celebration (OAC) lecture series during October. Each Friday 7 – 8:30 p.m. a different speaker will present their lecture at the Smith Rock State Park Welcome Center, 10087 NE Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne.

The lectures are free and open to the public. Audience members will have a Q&A opportunity with the speaker after each talk.

Scheduled presentations:

—October 5: Loren G. Davis, Ph.D, professor of anthropology at Oregon State University will present “Forgotten Shores: The Search for Archaeological Evidence of Oregon’s Earliest Coastal Peoples.”

—October 12:  Dr. Patrick O’Grady, staff archaeologist at University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History will present “A Window to the Past: Recent Archaeological and Paleo-environmental  Research at Rimrock Draw Rockshelter.”

—October 19: Jarold Ramsey, author and professor emeritus at University of Rochester, NY and member of Jefferson County Historical Society will present “In Search of Coyote: Examining the Identity of Native America's Most Provocative Culture Hero.”

—October 26:  Dallas Winishut, Ichishkin language instructor with the Culture and Heritage Department at The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, will present “Ancestral Voices: The Ancient Languages of the Warm Springs Reservation.”

Paul Patton, resource specialist with Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), says he is pleased the long-running lecture series is returning to Smith Rock State Park this year.

“Smith Rock is the perfect backdrop,” said Patton. “Exciting advances are being made throughout the field of anthropology and the OAC lecture series is an enjoyable, accessible forum for the public.”

The OAC program was established in 1993 when Gov. Barbara Roberts issued a proclamation that set aside one month each year to celebrate and promote Oregon’s archaeology, cultural heritage and history. Specifically, the OAC lecture series highlights advances in cultural knowledge and scientific techniques being made throughout the field of anthropology.

Smith Rock State Park is located off U.S. 97 three miles north of Redmond and three miles east of Terrebonne. The park has a $5 day-use parking fee. The Welcome Center is ADA accessible.

More information, including a park map, is available at oregonstateparks.org. Call 541-923-7551, ext. 21 for more information about the speakers.

Heritage Commission to meet October 7-8 in Klamath Falls - 09/21/18

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet in Klamath Falls October 7-8. 

On October 7, Commissioners will gather at 1:00 p.m. at the historic Oregon Bank Building (905 Main St.) for a walking tour of the downtown district including Sugarman’s Corner and the IOOF building.

On October 8 a public business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. at the Klamath County Museum located at 1451 Main Street, Klamath Falls 97601. The agenda includes discussion on Oregon Heritage Traditions, reports on Commission programs, and a review of the Commission’s bylaws.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information and accessibility needs, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Oregon Heritage Commission Coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov.

Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency to host annual Salmonberry Coalition meeting Oct. 4 - 09/20/18

Banks, OR — The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will host its annual Salmonberry Coalition meeting from 6-9 pm Oct. 4 at the Banks Fire District, 13430 NW Main St.

The agenda includes a presentation on the recently completed Salmonberry Trail Valley Segment Plan, updates on fundraising and an assessment of the current STIA governing structure.

The Salmonberry Coalition is a stakeholder group consisting of public and private partners focused on making the Salmonberry Trail a reality. The 84-mile Salmonberry Trail corridor will connect the cities of Tillamook and Banks and cross through two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the rugged Oregon Coast Range. The route follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway, which closed in 2007 after experiencing catastrophic storm damage. The STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.More information on the project is at http://salmonberrytrail.org/.

For more information, contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail Project Manager at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov.

Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets Oct. 4 in Bend - 09/20/18

BEND, Ore. – The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m. to noon Oct. 4 in the boardroom at the Best Western Peppertree Inn, 1082 SW Yates Drive, Bend. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: updates on various programs, election of officers for 2019 and selection of locations and dates for 2019 ORTAC meetings.

View the agenda online: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/Trail_Programs_Services/Documents/ORTAC%20Agenda%20Bend%202018.pdf

The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members representing the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission. The council holds quarterly meetings in different locations across the state.

For more information about ORTAC, visit https://www.oregon.gov/OPRD/Trail_Programs_Services/Pages/Advisory-Committees.aspx

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals that need special accommodations to attend should contact Nicole Sprecher, Administrative Support Specialist, at 503-986-0968 or echer@oregon.gov">nicole.sprecher@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.

Rosemary Johnson of Astoria appointed to Oregon Heritage Commission - 09/17/18

Rosemary Johnson of Astoria has been appointed by Governor Kate Brown to a four-year term on the Oregon Heritage Commission.

Johnson was the Planner and Historic Preservation Officer for the City of Astoria until her retirement in September 2014, after 35 years with the City. She staffed the Planning Commission, Historic Landmarks Commission, and Design Review Committee for the City for over 27 years. Johnson currently works as a contract planning consultant for the City of Astoria and serves as a project manager for larger projects such as restoration of the Doughboy Monument and the design and construction of the Scandinavian Heritage Park. Having helped to complete the Astoria Riverfront Vision Plan and implementation of codes for three of the four Riverfront Districts, she is currently working on completing the code implementation for the last Urban Core District. She is also an active volunteer at the Clatsop County Historical Society’s Flavel House Museum.

“I am excited to be part of the Oregon Heritage Commission,” Johnson noted about her appointment. “I have been passionate about history for as long as I can remember. I believe we are a product of our past and we need to preserve the history of our State and Nation to help form our future. Preservation is not just preserving structures. It is about people, our cultural history and the built environment.”

“Johnson has engaged with many of the Commission’s programs through her work and brings a wealth of preservation experience to the group,” said Beth Dehn, Heritage Commission Coordinator. “We are pleased to have her on the Heritage Commission.” 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations.

The mission of the Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, commission coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or eth.Dehn@Oregon.gov">Beth.Dehn@Oregon.gov or visit the Commission’s website at www.oregonheritage.org.