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OMSI to Host Media Preview of Latest Featured Exhibition - ILLUSION: Nothing Is As It Seems - 11/14/17

On Friday, November 17, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is hosting a media preview for the opening of its latest featured exhibition, ILLUSION: Nothing Is As It Seems.

After viewing the exhibition, media guests will have the opportunity to speak with Nancy Stueber, president and CEO of OMSI, and Ian Brunswick, head of programming at Science Gallery Dublin and one of the original curators of the exhibition.

Friday's Timeline:
8:50 -- 9:00: Media arrival
9:00 -- 9:45: Exhibition preview
9:45 -- 10:00: Opening remarks with Nancy Stueber and Ian Brunswick
10:00 -- 10:30: Follow-up interview opportunities:
- Nancy Stueber, president and CEO of OMSI
- Ian Brunswick, head of programming at Science Gallery Dublin
- Anthony Murphy, artist and creator of Counter
- Karina Smigla-Bobinski, artist and creator of Simulacra
- Rox Vasquez, artist and creator of Synesthesia

RSVP to John Farmer via email jfarmer@omsi.edu or call 503.797.4517.

About Science Gallery
Pioneered by Trinity College Dublin, Science Gallery is a new kind of space where art and science collide--a porous membrane between the university and the city. Primarily oriented towards young adults between the ages of 15 and 25 years old, Science Gallery develops an ever-changing program of exhibitions, events and experiences on broad themes linking science, technology and the arts.

Since opening in 2008, Science Gallery Dublin has attracted over 3 million visitors and become one of Ireland's top 5 free cultural attractions. To date, exhibitions have ranged from light to love and from contagion to the future of the human species, and have travelled extensively throughout Europe, Asia and North America.

The diverse and provocative exhibitions encourage people to discover, express and pursue their interests in a friendly, sociable environment. Having received significant international recognition for its approach, Science Gallery is currently developing a Global Science Gallery Network. The Global Science Gallery Network was launched in 2012 with the support of Google and the aim of establishing Science Gallery locations in eight cities around the world by 2020, with the first planned to open at King's College London in 2018. For more information visit www.sciencegallery.com

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation's leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu.

Planetarium Hallway
Planetarium Hallway
OMSI Launches Improved, Diversified Space Science Program (Photo) - 11/08/17

PORTLAND, Ore. (November 8, 2017) -- The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is pleased to announce exciting new updates to its space science program. With the support from a NASA-funded grant focused on sharing the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education with underserved communities and the newly remodeled planetarium opening this weekend, OMSI is poised to deliver stellar space science education to museum visitors.

In 2015, OMSI began upgrades through the NASA-funded Lenses on the Sky project. Lenses on the Sky creates diverse sky-watching experiences for youth across Oregon with a special emphasis on serving underserved Hispanic, African American, Native American and rural communities.

"Lenses on the Sky focuses on how people around the world and throughout time observe and understand the sky," said Kyrie Kellett, senior learning and community engagement specialist at OMSI.

In addition to teaching guests about the tools humans have used to understand the sky in the past, the project highlights the relevance, value and scientific achievements of NASA missions, while inspiring them to learn more about space science, STEM careers and NASA.

"This project was particularly significant for me because of the amazing team that came together to create this beautiful exhibit," said Kellett. "So many people shared their stories, their lives, their insights, their traditions and their time to make this project happen."

The OMSI team collaborated with Portland's Rose City Astronomers, Rosa Parks Elementary School, Libraries of Eastern Oregon (LEO), and ScienceWorks Hands-On Museum to develop educational content and coordinate program delivery.

OMSI and its partners hosted several star-gazing events, called Star Parties, throughout Oregon. The team also created a space science guide aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) for educators and designed several permanent exhibits in the planetarium hallway exposing guests to a multicultural and diverse understanding of the heavens.

OMSI's 25-year-old planetarium received an overhaul from top to bottom: new seats and carpet, dome cleaning, a new laser system, and a new projection system.

"The public's expectations are much higher now with their exposure to multimedia presentations, which is why planetariums like ours are changing to address those expectations," said Jim Todd, the space science director at OMSI. "The new projection system will take us to a new level and allow us to be even more creative in the type and variety of programming we offer."

The fully-renovated planetarium will enable Todd and his team to actively practice OMSI's mission of inspiring curiosity in people of all ages and backgrounds through deeply immersive and engaging space science programming.

"We will continue to develop and deliver shows that we can tie in with current and upcoming events like eclipses, meteor showers, visible planets and more, "said Todd. "The universe will never look the same."

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation's leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu.

After experiencing the permafrost research tunnel, guests can interact with multiple educational areas that teach about climate change, the atmosphere and permafrost.
After experiencing the permafrost research tunnel, guests can interact with multiple educational areas that teach about climate change, the atmosphere and permafrost.
ARCTIC THAW: CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON PERMAFROST - Explore real Ice Age fossils, ancient ice cores, and engineering challenges posed by thawing permafrost at OMSI's newest exhibit (Photo) - 10/26/17

PORTLAND, Ore. (October 26, 2017) -- The newest addition to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's (OMSI) educational repertoire is an exhibit that seeks to educate visitors about permafrost. Now open to the public, Under the Arctic: Digging into Permafrost addresses the subject of climate change as viewed through the lens of a thawing arctic using exciting interactive features such as an Alaskan permafrost tunnel replica, fossil research stations and interactive games.

The exhibit, a collaborative effort between OMSI and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), transports visitors to the Arctic using the sights and smells of the nation's only permafrost research tunnel. Visitors step into the boots of climate science researchers to explore real Ice Age fossils, ancient ice cores, and engineering challenges posed by thawing permafrost.

"Climate change can be hard to wrap your head around. For a lot of people who don't experience its effects, it feels abstract or distant -- like something in the future," said Allyson Woodard, an exhibit developer with OMSI. "This exhibit is an opportunity to make the impacts of climate change tangible - you can see it, touch it, and even smell it."

Permafrost is soil that has been frozen for at least two years, and it traps an enormous amount of carbon dioxide. As it thaws, carbon is released into the atmosphere, which in turn has drastic repercussions for the planet. This exhibit strives to educate visitors about permafrost's fascinating characteristics and its greater implications.

"We've thought a lot about the emotional journey in this exhibit. We know that climate change can be scary or confusing, so we've taken into consideration how to guide people to a place of hope," said Nancy Stueber, president and CEO of OMSI. "I hope that in the end, people come away with a sense of empowerment and self-advocacy -- the idea that I may not be able to change the world necessarily, but there are small things I can to do to contribute to the greater good."

In order to create a fully immersive environment, OMSI contracted expert exhibit sculptor Jonquil LeMaster to construct the 30-foot-long replica of an Alaskan permafrost research tunnel. LeMaster, whose extensive credits include habitats for the San Diego Zoo and installations for the Sacramento Airport, believes that the tunnel will heighten the visitor experience.

"People are the most moved when something in their world moves them," said LeMaster. "Hopefully this exhibit is powerful enough, beautiful enough, interesting enough, that anyone would look at it and be moved somehow. Is that possible? Aren't we moved by the world around us? I know I certainly am."

About University of Fairbanks Geophysical Institute
The Geophysical Institute is part of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, America's Arctic research university. Scientists at the Geophysical Institute study geophysical processes in action from the center of the Earth to the surface of the sun and beyond. Since its creation by an act of Congress in 1946, the institute has been turning data and observations into information useful for state and national needs. Located in Fairbanks, Alaska, the institute works and maintains facilities from Antarctica to Pacific islands to far northern Alaska. For more information about the Geophysical Institute and UAF, go to gi.alaska.edu.

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation's leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu.

Guests look at Moire Matrix Hybrid Form by Shelley Jame, blown by Liam Reeves
Guests look at Moire Matrix Hybrid Form by Shelley Jame, blown by Liam Reeves
Is Perception Reality? Sensory deception, complex sounds, and optical illusions await guests at OMSI's newest feature exhibit (Photo) - 10/24/17

PORTLAND, Ore (October 24, 2017) -- Should you always believe what you see? Can you trust your senses? Is anything really as it seems? These are justs a few of the questions guests will entertain at ILLUSION: Nothing Is As It Seems, the mind-bending new featured exhibition opening at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) on Saturday, November 18.

"Art and science are very much linked together, and this exhibit is a unique and fascinating way to make both accessible to audiences of all ages and backgrounds," said Nancy Stueber, president and CEO of OMSI. "OMSI is a place where we spark people's curiosity in the hope they will discover new things. I hope this exhibit will inspire future scientists, artists and, maybe, a few illusionists as well."

ILLUSION is designed to make guests question reality and their perceptions of the world through techniques used in magic, neuroscience, biology, physics and technology. It investigates how perception underpins the way we see, feel, think and understand the world and shows how what we perceive is often radically different from the reality of what we observe.

"For centuries artists, scientists and magicians have exploited perceptions and manipulated our brains to create illusions that boggle the mind and the senses," said Michael John Gorman, the founding director of Science Gallery. "Magicians are experts at using cognitive biases to their advantage and more recently scientists are borrowing their techniques and combining them with advances in technology to gain a greater understanding of how the brain works."

Guests will experience more than 40 installations in an exhibition by Science Gallery at Trinity College Dublin that deceive the senses. Uncover the many ways our minds are fooled by sensory deception in displays like:

* Delicate Boundaries. Creates a space where the worlds inside our digital devices move into the physical realm as bugs crawl off the screen and onto your body.
* Columba. "The seated child" creates the illusion of a young girl sitting in a constellation of quartz stars through the manipulation of light and optics.
* Significant Birds. An auditory illusion that explores how a single sine wave can be picked out from recorded speech to sound like chirping birds.
* Cubes. An aluminum sculpture based on a geometric pattern of diamonds that gives the optical illusion of six cubes, when in fact the cube you see only consists of three diamond shapes grouped together.
* The Hurwitz Singularity. Makes the viewer actively engage with the piece's structural composition before the illusion can be revealed.

ILLUSION runs from November 18, 2017 - February 19, 2018. General admission to the museum is $14.50 for adults, $9.75 for youth (ages 3-13), and $11.25 for seniors (ages 63+). Guests can purchase tickets online at omsi.edu, via phone at 503.797.4000 or in person at the museum. U.S. Bank is the major sponsor of ILLUSION at OMSI. For more information, visit www.omsi.edu.

About Science Gallery
Pioneered by Trinity College Dublin, Science Gallery is a new kind of space where art and science collide--a porous membrane between the university and the city. Primarily oriented towards young adults between the ages of 15 and 25 years old, Science Gallery develops an ever-changing program of exhibitions, events and experiences on broad themes linking science, technology and the arts.

Since opening in 2008, Science Gallery Dublin has attracted over 1.5 million visitors and become one of Ireland's top 5 free cultural attractions. To date, exhibitions have ranged from light to love and from contagion to the future of the human species, and have travelled extensively throughout Europe, Asia and North America.

The diverse and provocative exhibitions encourage people to discover, express and pursue their interests in a friendly, sociable environment. Having received significant international recognition for its approach, Science
Gallery is currently developing a Global Science Gallery Network. The Global Science Gallery Network was launched in 2012 with the support of Google and the aim of establishing Science Gallery locations in eight cities around the world by 2020, with the first planned to open at King's College London in 2016. For more information visit www.sciencegallery.com

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation's leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu.