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Peter Marbach straddles the headwaters of the Columbia River in Canada
Peter Marbach straddles the headwaters of the Columbia River in Canada
Hood River Photographer Peter Marbach Presents Lecture and Slide Show on the Columbia River (Photo) - 02/13/17

Portland, OR -- February 13, 2017 -- Photographer Peter Marbach will share stories and imagery from his current project documenting the landscapes and culture of the entire 1,250 Columbia, from its humble beginnings in Canal Flats, British Columbia, to the two-mile-wide confluence with the Pacific, at a free public lecture and slide show on Wednesday, February 15 at 7pm at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland). At this program, entitled "River of Hope: The Columbia River -- From Source to Sea," Marbach will discuss the importance of the current Columbia River Treaty re-negotiations and its implications that may lead to the eventual return of Pacific Salmon all the way to the headwaters.

The Columbia River flowed for thousands of years in a natural state of astounding beauty and was the place of a miraculous, ancient migration of Pacific Salmon. The era of dams brought great contributions including clean hydropower, flood control, and irrigation that created a rich agricultural bounty for the Northwest. In 1964, the U.S. and Canada enacted a 50 year treaty that focused on these benefits but did not address the restoration of ecosystems and the impact on tribal nations. The Columbia River Treaty is now being re-negotiated. Thanks to persistent efforts lead by First Nations in Canada and numerous tribes in the United States as well as other key stakeholders, we now have a once in a generation opportunity to ensure that language is adopted to include ecosystem restoration and the eventual return of Pacific Salmon into Canada.

Peter Marbach's evocative landscapes reflect time spent working with light at the edges of day. He has produced six photo essay book projects and has had a diverse list of clients, from National Geographic to Travel Oregon. His work is part of a permanent collection at Oregon State University, and a selection of his photography is currently on display in the Oregon Historical Society exhibit The Columbia River: From Source to Sea.

Following the talk, Marbach will moderate a Q&A session featuring Bill Bradbury, Northwest Power and Conservation Council; Tom Shearer, President of Sales and Marketing for Whoosh Innovations; and Stephen Smith, representing Upper Columbia United Tribes. This program is supported by the Upper Columbia United Tribes.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

Willard P. Hawley III is shown, dressed as Dan Cupid, cutting Oregon's birthday cake with 70 candles. Chester A. Moores, as Uncle Sam, is in the middle and on the right is Miss Florence Mae Miles, who represents Miss Oregon, Courtesy Oregon Historical Soc
Willard P. Hawley III is shown, dressed as Dan Cupid, cutting Oregon's birthday cake with 70 candles. Chester A. Moores, as Uncle Sam, is in the middle and on the right is Miss Florence Mae Miles, who represents Miss Oregon, Courtesy Oregon Historical Soc
Celebrate Oregon's 158th Birthday with Free Cake at the Oregon Historical Society! (Photo) - 02/10/17

Portland, OR -- Celebrate Oregon's birthday in style at the Oregon Historical Society! Oregon shares its birthday with Valentine's Day--what could be a better way to celebrate the holiday than by professing your love for Oregon?

The celebration begins on Tuesday, February 14 at noon in the Oregon Historical Society pavilion (1200 SW Park Ave., Portland). Join radio broadcaster Margie Boule in singing "Happy Birthday" to Oregon, and then enjoy a slice of birthday cake served by former Governors Ted Kulongoski and Barbara Roberts. While you feast on cake from Gerry Frank's Konditeri, listen to a musical performance by the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Association.

As a birthday gift for all Oregonians, admission will be free all day (10am -- 5pm) to the Oregon Historical Society's museum! Don't miss the chance to explore our three permanent exhibits on Oregon history, Oregon My Oregon, Oregon Voices, and our newest exhibit for young Oregonians, History Hub!


About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

Newspace Center for Photography and the Oregon Historical Society Announce Selection of The Others for Exposing the Archive Residency & Exhibition Program - 02/08/17

Portland, OR -- Newspace Center for Photography and the Oregon Historical Society's Research Library (OHS) are pleased to announce the selection of The Others, a project by collaborating artists Briana Cerezo, Ross Lee Chappell and Jennifer Rabin, for the 2017 Exposing the Archive Residency & Exhibition Program.

In Fall 2016, Newspace and OHS announced an open call for projects by Oregon artists employing image-based practices that critically examine issues pertinent to Oregon, with a focus on collective histories, identity formation, and the politics of place. The selected project will be developed in residence at Newspace's facilities and the OHS Research Library from January to September 2017 and will receive funds to cover research, production, and artist fees supported by the Oregon Community Foundation's Creative Heights Grant Program. An exhibit and series of public programs will follow in October and November of 2017.

About the Selected Project:
The Others seeks to explore the notion of otherness. Working from materials in the OHS Research Library, the artists will ask questions about how Oregon's collective history has affected the identities of individuals who, for a variety of reasons, may feel that they do not belong. They will ask questions such as: what groups of people have been included in the archives? Who has been left out? Whose history has been recorded and whose has been erased? Through research, travel, photography, and interviews with Oregonians throughout the state, the artists will devote this opportunity to investigating how place and history have affected the way people experience exclusion.

About the Artists:
Briana Cerezo is a photographer who makes portraits as a way to dive deeper into the world she lives in and to understand the nature of the human experience. She strives to create a safe environment for the people she photographs in which barriers can be broken down and truth can be allowed to surface.

Ross Lee Chappell is a creative writer, conceptual artist, and theater artist. His experience with physical disability has encouraged his longstanding explorations into compassion and otherness.

Jennifer Rabin is a writer, an arts writer, an artist, and an arts activist. Her writing has appeared in The Sun, Harvard Review, Visual Art Source, Hyperallergic, Oregon Humanities, Bitch, Willamette Week, and The Rumpus. Her visual art has been shown in Oregon and South Carolina. She is the founder of ArtPassportPDX.


About Newspace Center for Photography
Newspace Center for Photography connects and inspires people by offering an accessible place to create, learn, and engage in the evolution of the image. Newspace's exhibition program explores the image's unique position to reflect, communicate, teach, propose, and challenge the state of our culture and surroundings.

About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

Five Fingers of Unk
Five Fingers of Unk
Lifting As We Climb, a Documentary on Portland Hip Hop, Premieres Friday, February 10 at the Oregon Historical Society (Photo) - 02/06/17

Portland, OR -- Join director Michael T. Agnew and the Oregon Historical Society for the world premiere of the original film Lifting As We Climb, a hip hop documentary that examines the history and social impact of Portland hip hop through archival footage and commentary from the industry's leading emcees, dee jays, producers, and executives. Nationally renowned DJ "Chillest Illest" provides narration; the film was written, directed, and produced by Michael T. Agnew. Join the filmmaker and special guests Cool Nutz, Smurf Luchiano, Myg, Brotha Luv, and Lady Love for the world premiere of this important record of Portland history!

The premiere takes place this Friday, February 10 at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland). Doors open at 6pm; the program begins at 7pm. Light refreshments will be provided. Watch the film's trailer on YouTube (https://youtu.be/elCGCZVX72o).

Just like New York, Philadelphia, DC, and Atlanta, Portland has evolved with hip hop music. Covering different periods of Portland's hip hop scene, this documentary will take viewers to where some believe it all began. Topics include the early days, KBOO, record stores, and the PO Hop festival, as well as discussions about the music industry as a whole and how many individuals contributed in branding Portland hip hop. Violence in clubs and venues has provided challenges for local shows, threatening the income for many in the Portland hip hop industry. Questions include whether Portland hip hop will survive this violence and what can be done to help relations between Portland hip hop, local communities, and police agencies.

When asked why he decided to make this documentary, Agnew said, "This film is based on a college term paper. It made a great impact on the class. While studying to write the article, I went to various libraries around Portland and could not find much about Portland hip hop. I want people to be informed of the hard work, dedication, and sacrifice that many individuals put into Portland hip hop culture. When they were break dancing and rapping in New York in 1977, so was Portland."

No matter what your interest is regarding Portland hip hop, the documentary is a must-see film. Viewers will be educated, stimulated, and captivated from beginning to the end. Director Michael T. Agnew tells a powerful hip hop story. Audiences will get real, behind-the-scenes glimpses into the culture of Portland hip hop told from the people who drive the push to put Portland hip hop on the map.

About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

Attached Media Files: Five Fingers of Unk , GOTM , Mikey Vegaz , Yung Mil
Final Weekend to See Comic City, USA and Democracy's Blueprints, on Exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society - 01/26/17

PRESS IMAGES:
Comic City, USA: http://bit.ly/2aD0vtt
Democracy's Blueprints: http://bit.ly/2arJaFN

Portland, OR -- Add a visit to the Oregon Historical Society to your weekend plans because this is the last weekend to visit blockbuster exhibits Comic City, USA (closing January 31) and Democracy's Blueprints (closing February 1). The Society's museum is open Saturday from 10am to 5pm and Sunday from 12pm to 5pm.

In Democracy's Blueprints: The Documents that Built America, visitors get to view some of the earliest printings and engravings of our country's bedrock documents, including the Magna Carta, the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the Monroe Doctrine. One extraordinary standout of this exhibition, on loan from the Mark Family Collection, is the 1733 engraving of the Magna Carta. Written in 1215, the Magna Carta was the first document to limit the power of a monarch, and it is regarded as the cornerstone of Western democracy. When the only surviving original copy affixed with the Great Seal of King John was damaged by a fire in 1731, a new copy was commissioned. This illuminated hand-engraved copy includes the original Latin text surrounded by the Coats of Arms of the council of Twenty-Five Barons.

Comic City, USA, on view since August 12, profiles fifteen of the most iconic artists that have made Oregon's comic industry into a global powerhouse. From Oregon's first political cartoonist Homer Davenport to "Stone Soup" creator Jan Eliot to Disney artist Carl Barks to Dark Horse founder Mike Richardson, this exhibit is designed to share an important part of Oregon history, inspire people who wish to communicate through an artistic medium, and fascinate those who already have an appreciation of this continuously evolving art form. In addition to displays on each artist, the exhibition offers interactive experiences, from a sketching table to a station where people can design their own comic book to a fun photo op complete with superhero inspired props.

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.


About the Oregon Historical Society
For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

2016 Dragon Dance and Parade, courtesy Andie Petkus
2016 Dragon Dance and Parade, courtesy Andie Petkus
Oregon Historical Society Recipient of the Northwest China Council 2017 Flying Horse Award (Photo) - 01/23/17

Portland, OR -- January 23, 2017 -- Northwest China Council is pleased to announce that the Oregon Historical Society will be presented with their annual Flying Horse Award at a gala celebration on Thursday, February 16. Northwest China Council has honored 26 individuals and businesses with the Flying Horse Award for their outstanding promotion of a greater understanding of Chinese culture in Oregon and SW Washington. Past recipients include Bruce and Gloria Wong, the Yat Sing Music Club, Mayor Bud Clark, and most recently Professor Jeffrey Barlow and Christine Richardson-Barlow.

In 2016, the Oregon Historical Society hosted two exhibitions on Chinese American history that provided both a local and national perspective on issues of immigration, inclusion, and exclusion for the Chinese American community. OHS both hosted the renowned New-York Historical Society traveling exhibition Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion, as well as worked closely with local community members to develop an original exhibition on Portland's historic Chinatowns entitled Beyond the Gate. In addition to these two exhibits, the Oregon Historical Society developed a Chinese American speakers series that was offered to over 30 libraries and historical societies across the state free of charge.

OHS also worked closely with community members to organize a parade in honor of the Lunar New Year, resurrecting the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association's dragon that had not been danced in a public performance for over ten years. The parade will take place again this year on Sunday, January 29, beginning at 11am on NW Davis and Third Avenue. The parade will run through Downtown Portland, concluding at the Oregon Historical Society for lion dances and festivities. More information on the event can be found on the OHS website.

"While many individuals worked with the Oregon Historical Society to develop Beyond the Gate, we are especially grateful for the Society's efforts to send speakers across the state to share Chinese American history with so many communities in Oregon," said Northwest China Council Executive Director Leslie Atiyeh.

"My staff and I are extremely proud of the quality and success of both Chinese American exhibitions," said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. "It was a privilege to work closely with the Chinese American community on these exhibits and programming, and we are honored that the Northwest China Council has chosen to recognize OHS and our work with the Flying Horse Award."

The awards celebration will begin at 5:30pm at Mandarin Cove Restaurant (111 SW Columbia Street, Portland). General admission tickets to the awards celebration are $80 and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information and to register online, visit www.nwchina.org.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

About the Northwest China Council

Established in 1980, the Northwest China Council is a non-profit, non-partisan, dues based, educational organization, dedicated to promoting greater understanding of current affairs and culture of greater China, and the Chinese diaspora and to be a regional resource, providing educational programs, information services, and foreign trade expertise in Oregon and southwest Washington. To accomplish our mission, the Northwest China Council sponsors lectures, seminars, and workshops; offers Mandarin Chinese language classes; organizes China Business Network events; and has led unique cultural and business tours to China.