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Synaptive BrightMatter™ robotic visualization system. Photo courtesy of www.synaptivemedical.com
Synaptive BrightMatter™ robotic visualization system. Photo courtesy of www.synaptivemedical.com
Legacy Health neurosurgeons acquire advanced technology to chart more precise paths through the brain (Photo) - 04/18/17

PORTLAND, OR (April 18, 2017) -- Legacy Emanuel Medical Center is the first hospital in Oregon to acquire an advanced robotic imaging and navigation system for more precise brain tumor removal and spinal surgeries. The Synaptive BrightMatter(TM) technology integrates pre-operative imaging, surgical planning and robotic visualization to give neurosurgeons the ability to see relevant details in the brain not visible to the human eye, which may allow for much safer surgical intervention.

During the pre-operative phase, neurosurgeons use the system's whole brain tractography technology to create images to plan a safer route to reach a tumor. Having this roadmap ahead of time helps the neurosurgeons consider approaches for navigating around critical structures within the brain to reduce the chance of damaging or interfering with important language, visual and movement pathways. Also, neurosurgeons may be able to reach tumors once deemed inoperable or higher risk.

The technology's robotic visualization system consists of a movable arm with a digital video camera system and a high-powered microscope attached that follows the neurosurgeons sensor-driven tools. The incision area is projected in real-time on a 55-inch monitor screen. The 3-D whole brain tractography image is there as well to guide the neurosurgeon's instruments throughout the surgery. This hands-free optical visualization has an added benefit for neurosurgeons ergonomically ??- typical surgical microscopes require more bending of the head and neck.

Legacy Emanuel President Lori Morgan, MD, says acquiring this technology aligns with Legacy Health's vision to keep pace with innovative solutions to improve the patient experience. "These latest advancements in robotics and visualization put us at the forefront of patient care and furthers our commitment to provide quality care," says Dr. Morgan. "More precise surgeries can result in better outcomes and shorter patient stays. In addition, the ergonomics of this technology requires less movement and can reduce or prevent physical stress and fatigue on our surgeons."

Last year, Legacy Health performed almost 400 craniotomies (brain) and 1,600 spinal surgeries, with the majority at Legacy Emanuel.

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Photo Caption (top): A neurosurgeon performing surgery at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center using the newly acquired Synaptive BrightMatter(TM) technology. This robotic visualization system consists of a movable arm with a digital video camera system and a high-powered microscope that follows the neurosurgeons sensor-driven tools. The incision area is projected in real-time on a 55-inch monitor screen. Photo by: Vicki Guinn.

Photo Caption (bottom): Synaptive BrightMatter(TM) robotic visualization system. Photo courtesy of www.synaptivemedical.com.


About Legacy Health
Legacy Health is Oregon's only locally owned nonprofit health-care organization with nearly 12,000 employees. Legacy includes Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel, Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center, Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center, Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, Legacy Silverton Medical Center, Legacy Laboratory Services, and Legacy Research Institute. Legacy also includes over 100 Legacy Medical Group primary care and specialty care clinics. Visit www.legecyhealth.org for more information.


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David Strasser felt well enough this winter to ride his tractor/snowblower to plow his driveway and to help his neighbors.
David Strasser felt well enough this winter to ride his tractor/snowblower to plow his driveway and to help his neighbors.
Quick action between hospitals saves a grandfather's life Retired Bend resident is grateful to be alive thanks to relationship between two hospitals (Photo) - 04/05/17

Quick action between hospitals saves a grandfather's life
Retired Bend resident is grateful to be alive thanks to relationship between two hospitals

(Portland, Ore. April 5, 2017) Bend resident David Strasser, 70, is grateful to be alive today thanks to physicians at St. Charles Medical Center and a call made to dispatch a life-saving mobile critical care team from a hospital over three hours away. The retired grandfather began his life-saving journey almost a year ago with a trip to the St. Charles ER for breathing problems.

The doctors found that David had such severe pneumonia that they couldn't get enough oxygen in his lungs. "Things were foggy," David says of his time in the ER, "almost like a dream." David had other underlying health issues so a diagnosis of pneumonia was serious. Doctors tried to improve his breathing with no luck.

Fortunately, St. Charles Pulmonologist Dr. Louis D'Avignon
knew about a specialized treatment at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, a level 1 trauma center in Portland, called ECMO that could help David breathe and possibly save his life. "Fortunately, it's a rare occasion when we have to make this call," says Dr. D'Avignon. "Knowing Legacy Emanuel has this life-saving service and can dispatch a mobile team to assess and transport patients back to their medical center is very positive."
ECMO, or Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation, is a sophisticated procedure, similar to the heart-lung bypass machine used in cardiac surgery, which takes over the oxygenation and heart function in patients with serious lung disease, cardiac disease or trauma. When a physician makes this call, patients are on the verge of dying.

Legacy Emanuel's mobile ECMO critical care team of six, including two surgeons, flew immediately to Bend in a medically-equipped jet to pick up David to start ECMO therapy to keep him alive while transporting him to Portland for further care. In addition to the surgeons, a perfusionist, respiratory therapist and two critical care nurses make up the team.

"We have one of the oldest mobile transport teams and the only one in the state," says Dr. Ivonne Daly, MD, F.A.C.S., Legacy Emanuel's director of the ECMO program. "We transport patients from all over Oregon, even Montana and as far north as Alaska. To date, all have survived so it's important for other hospitals and physicians to know that our mobile team of highly-skilled healthcare professionals is ready to be dispatched by ambulance or air; whatever will get us there the quickest to help save a life."
Legacy Emanuel's mobile team is part of Legacy Emanuel's award-winning Gold-level ECMO program. It was the second program on the west coast, established in 1986 after the Mt. Hood climbing disaster when several victims needed cardiopulmonary bypass technology to survive.

A lot of what happened to David was retold to him by Vicki, his wife of 47 years. After David was admitted to the intensive care unit, he was hooked up to a bedside ECMO machine and stayed on it for five days while in a medically-induced coma. His illness caused his kidneys to fail and he needed daily dialysis. Despite the setbacks, David survived and regained consciousness. He remained in Legacy Emanuel for two months, even celebrating his 70th birthday there. "It was a fun way to celebrate," laughs David. "My wife bought a cake for me and all my nurse friends."

After two months, he was released to go home, this time sitting up to ride in a medical transport vehicle. He was anxious to get his strength back to start enjoying retirement again, which included tinkering with his 1936 and 1951 Ford cars and visiting a new grandchild in Colorado.

Today, he says he's doing great. "They saved my life," says David. "I recently traveled to Portland to the yearly ECMO reunion to thank the doctors and to see my nurse friends."

His healing then the winter weather delayed David and Vicki's trip to see the new grandchild. He spent a lot of hours not working on his Fords but riding his tractor to plow snow out of their driveway and his neighbors too. With better weather around the corner, they are planning a trip to celebrate a relative's birthday and to finally see the new grandson. David says he's feeling grateful to be alive. "I'm here because I had a doctor who knew to make the call and because of the people who are a part of this mobile life-saving team."
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Photo captions: David Strasser felt well enough this winter to ride his tractor/snowblower to plow his driveway and to help his neighbors. Bend, Ore. Photo: David Strasser. Dr. Ivonne Daly, MD, F.A.C.S., is Legacy Emanuel's director of the ECMO program.