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News Releases
Busshcau - age progression
Busshcau - age progression
FBI offers up to $10,000 reward in fugitive hunt for Barrett Busschau (Photo) - 01/17/18

The FBI is offering a new reward and launching a media campaign in an effort to generate tips in the cold case fugitive hunt for Barrett Preston Busschau. Busschau, now 42 years old, disappeared from Oregon in 1993 after Clackamas County authorities arrested him on multiple sex abuse charges involving children. The FBI is running Facebook ads in both the Portland-metro area and in South Africa, where he may be living. In addition, the FBI Laboratory has produced an age-progressed photo of what Busschau may look like now, and the FBI is profiling Busschau's case on its fugitive website. His "Wanted by the FBI" poster can be found at https://www.fbi.gov/wanted/cac/barrett-preston-busschau.

The reward of up to $10,000 is for information that leads directly to his arrest.

On July 27, 1993, a Clackamas County grand jury indicted Buscchau for the alleged molestation of five girls between the ages of ten and 15. He was 18 years old at the time. The charges include:
· 1st degree sexual penetration with a foreign object
· 1st degree sex abuse
· 3rd degree sodomy
· 3rd degree rape
· 3rd degree sex abuse

Busschau was released pending trial, but he fled before his next court appearance. In February 1994, a Clackamas County grand jury indicted him for failure to appear. That same year, the FBI obtained a federal fugitive warrant charging him with Unlawful Flight to Avoid Prosecution.

Busschau is a native of South Africa, and he had been living in the United States since 1984 as a legal permanent resident. Investigators believe he may have traveled to California and/or Panama following his disappearance, but the last known sighting of him places him in South Africa.

Investigators do believe there may be people still living in the Portland-metro area who have information that could help lead the FBI to Busschau. Anyone with information is asked to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip to https://tips.fbi.gov. Anyone living elsewhere who has information about Busschau should contact the nearest FBI office or U.S. Embassy.

###

TT - Diets
TT - Diets
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Diet Scams (Photo) - 01/16/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against diet scams.

Earlier this month, we talked about setting New Year's resolutions to keep your new tech gadgets safe.

This week, are sharing some advice from our friends at the Federal Trade Commission about a different kind of resolution -- the kind that has you desperate to drop a few pounds.

This time of year you are likely seeing all kinds of ads on social media for the latest new gadget, drug or breakthrough to help you lose weight or get in shape. The before-and-after photos are stunning -- if that person can do it, as the story goes, you can, too! The best part -- you often don't have to diet or work out. Shell out a few dollars, and the new you will be shopping for bathing suits soon.

As the FTC can tell you, though, there are plenty of scams mixed in with legitimate offers -- and if you fall for one, the only thing that will lose weight is your wallet.

The FTC recommends:

* Pass on any patch, pill or gadget that promises you can eat all you want and still lose weight permanently. Losing weight requires sensible food choices, and long-term success will require permanent lifestyle changes.
* Electronic devices that offer to slim and tone your body usually only have temporary effects on muscle strength. Most were made for physical therapy and rehabilitation -- not to give you 6-pack abs. Getting real exercise is your best bet for that.
* Be wary of the photos that allegedly prove what money can buy you. The photos can easily be faked, and even if they aren't -- there's no guarantee that the now-skinny person in the "after" picture didn't actually diet and work out in addition to using whatever the miracle product was.
* Recognize that everybody is different. Even if the item is legitimate and does help some people -- it won't necessarily help you.

Bottom line -- there is no "miracle" drug or product that is going to make your body lighter or stronger for the long run. If you are tempted, make sure you do your homework, talk to your doctor and think before you give online scammers your credit card number.

If you need more detail on diet and device scams, go to FTC.gov or FDA.gov.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

Attached Media Files: TT - Diets - Audio file , TT - Diets
Man Indicted, Returned from Indonesia by FBI to Face Fraud Charges in Oregon - 01/12/18

SAN FRANCISCO -- On Friday, January 12, 2018, Richard Macadangdang Sales, 68, made his initial appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Maria-Elena James in the Northern District of California after FBI agents from the Bend, Oregon Residence Agency escorted him back to the U.S. from Indonesia. In December 2017, a federal grand jury in Eugene, Oregon indicted Sales on four counts of wire fraud and one count of money laundering for an alleged scheme that cheated investors of more than $900,000.

The indictment alleges that between 2011 and 2013, investors were led to believe Sales was using their investments to recover hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of U.S. Treasury Notes located in East Asia and the Pacific. The indictment states that victims believed Sales was building humanitarian housing for victims of natural disasters as part of this recovery process and that they would see returns as high as 100 percent.

Sales had been living outside the U.S. since 2012. Working with the Indonesian National Police and Indonesian Immigration, through the FBI's Legal Attaché office in Jakarta, FBI agents traveled to Indonesia and met Sales as he was deported on January 11, 2018. FBI agents escorted him back to the United States and arrested him after touching down on U.S. soil.

Judge James ordered Sales detained pending transfer by the U.S. Marshals Service to the District of Oregon for further court proceedings.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Contact for this press release:

Kevin Sonoff
Unites States Attorney's Office
District of Oregon
kevin.sonoff@usdoj.gov

Tech Tuesday Tips
Tech Tuesday Tips
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Spectre & Meltdown (Photo) - 01/09/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against the latest cyber threat presented by the vulnerabilities in your computers and phones.

In recent days, there have been a number of media reports about two major flaws that are being called "Meltdown" and "Spectre". Almost all desktop computers, laptops, servers and cell phones are affected. These vulnerabilities could potentially allow hackers to access passwords, encryption keys and other sensitive data stored on your devices.

While the technical details of how the flaws can be exploited are complicated, the consumer response should not be. All of the major tech companies -- including Intel, Apple, Google and others -- are recommending that you download updates for the operating systems that are running your devices as well as any browser software that you use. To be clear, you should download those updates as soon as possible. The companies have already released some mitigation patches and will continue to do so in the weeks and months ahead.

As these patches come out, you should continue to remain vigilant about updating your devices and browsers. Now that these flaws are public, you can bet that cyber criminals are racing to write and launch exploits before consumers catch up. Even if you download updates today, the bad guys will continue to look for workarounds as fast as the tech companies can push out the fixes.

If you have any specific questions about your devices or the patches available, check with the manufacturer or service provider for guidance.

Captain Williams, Beaverton Police Dept.
Captain Williams, Beaverton Police Dept.
Beaverton Police Captain Graduates from the FBI National Academy (Photo) - 01/03/18

Captain Jeff Williams, Beaverton Police Department, recently completed one of the toughest challenges available for local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy. Captain Williams and two other Oregon law enforcement officers recently completed a ten-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

There is a highly competitive process that local law enforcement officers must go through before being selected for this honor. That process includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews of the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization.

"Only a few law enforcement officers from Oregon have the chance to attend the National Academy each year," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "The exceptional leaders selected to participate have a great opportunity to share their experiences with peers and to learn best practices from officers from across the country and the world."

Captain Williams started his law enforcement career in 1994 as an officer with Forest Grove Police Department. He would later serve as a detective, sergeant, captain and interim police chief in that agency. The Beaverton Police Department hired him as a lieutenant in 2011 to oversee the Patrol Division. In 2012, Beaverton PD promoted him to captain, and, as such, he leads the Administrative Bureau and Operations Bureau.

Captain Williams also served in the United States Coast Guard Reserve as a Commander and retired in 2016 after 24 years of service. He has also earned a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Political Science and a Master of Arts in Administration of Justice and Security.

"Graduating the FBI National Academy is a major accomplishment," said Beaverton Police Chief Jim Monger. "Captain Williams is the 16th member of the Beaverton Police Department to have graduated the National Academy; the first was in 1976. I am confident that the skills and knowledge Captain Williams learned at the National Academy will be of great benefit to the Beaverton Police Department and our community. Jeff, congratulations on this accomplishment!"

During the ten weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Captain Williams' classes included Emotional Intelligence: Context and Communication; Intelligence Theory and Application for Law Enforcement Managers; Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement; Advanced Spirituality, Wellness and Vitality Issues in Law Enforcement Practices; Fitness in Law Enforcement; and a Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement Seminar. The program allows the participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. In addition to the classroom work, participants have physical training courses and activities.

Each year, the FBI sponsors four sessions of the National Academy. Each session includes about 220 local law enforcement officers from around the United States as well as from around the world. While in the Academy, the officers and deputies live in a dorm-like setting. The FBI does not charge U.S. students for tuition, books, equipment, meals, lodging or travel to and from their home.

Deputy Chief Hamilton, GPDPS
Deputy Chief Hamilton, GPDPS
Grants Pass Department of Public Safety Deputy Chief Graduates from the FBI National Academy (Photo) - 01/02/18

Deputy Chief Jim Hamilton, Grants Pass Department of Public Safety, recently completed one of the toughest challenges available for local law enforcement officers: the FBI National Academy. In mid-December, Deputy Chief Hamilton and two other Oregon law enforcement officers completed a ten-week training session at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

There is a highly competitive process that local law enforcement officers must go through before being selected for this honor. That process includes a nomination by a supervisor; interviews of the candidate and co-workers to determine leadership skills and abilities; a background check; a determination of physical fitness; and the support of former National Academy graduates within the candidate's organization.

"Only a few law enforcement officers from Oregon have the chance to attend the National Academy each year," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "The exceptional leaders selected to participate have a great opportunity to share their experiences with peers and to learn best practices from officers from across the country and the world."

Deputy Chief Hamilton began his Public Safety career in 1987 with Valley Fire Service in Josephine County as a firefighter. He became a Reserve Police Officer with the Grants Pass Department of Public Safety in 1991 and in 1992 left Valley Fire Service and became a full-time officer. As an officer, Deputy Chief Hamilton worked as a Patrol Officer, Police Corporal and Public Safety Sergeant. He has also worked as a DARE officer, Field Training Officer and Bike Team Member. In 1996, he joined the SWAT team and moved through the ranks as an Assistant Team Leader, Team Leader and Team Commander. He has also supervised the first K9 unit for the department.

Deputy Chief Hamilton has an Associate Degree in Criminal Justice and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Managerial Leadership from Northwest Christian University. He also holds several police and fire certifications.

"I'm very proud of Jim and his accomplishments during his time at the FBI National Academy," said Public Safety Director Bill Landis. "His time there along with what he learned will pay dividends in the future for our department."

During the ten weeks of training, local executive-level law enforcement officers spend most of their time in the classroom. Deputy Chief Hamilton's classes included Psychology of Leadership; Psychology of Communication; Emotional Intelligence; Fitness in Law Enforcement; Seminar in Media and Managing the Law Enforcement Image; and Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement. The program allows the participants the opportunity to earn college credits through the University of Virginia for some of those studies. In addition to the classroom work, participants have physical training courses and activities.

Each year, the FBI sponsors four sessions of the National Academy. Each session includes about 220 local law enforcement officers from around the United States as well as from around the world. While in the Academy, the officers and deputies live in a dorm-like setting. The FBI does not charge U.S. students for tuition, books, equipment, meals, lodging or travel to and from their home.

Attached Media Files: Deputy Chief Hamilton, GPDPS
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense with your New Year's Resolutions - 01/02/18

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense with your New Year's resolutions.

Beginning-of-the-year resolutions are hard to make and even harder to keep. So, this week, we want to talk about a few easy-to-do things that you can accomplish -- taking on just a bit at a time. If you are like me, it is easy to forget -- so pull out your calendar and make a note to do one thing a week for the next month.

First, start with your firewall. That is a piece of hardware or software that keeps hackers or other unwelcome guests out. Often in a single computer set-up, that firewall is built into your operating system. For networked computers -- the router that connects them all together can serve as the firewall. Your job this week is to do some research on what you already have and whether you need to add any further protection. Either way, make sure that the firewall you have or get is actually turned on. In many cases, it is possible to disable the firewall -- and doing so could leave you at risk.

In week 2 -- take some time to check your antivirus software. This software keeps malicious code -- viruses and worms and the like -- from taking hold of your computer. Again -- do some research to figure out what you have and whether there are any better options available. Make sure your existing software is updated and consider turning on automatic updates so you can check this one off the list for a while.

In week 3 -- take a look at your anti-spyware applications. Once a bad guy downloads spyware onto your device, he can track where you go and what you do online. His collection of your personal information can lead to everything from targeted and unwanted pop-up ads to unauthorized access of your bank account using the login and passwords you thought you were privately typing. Some operating systems offer free spyware protection, and inexpensive software is readily available for download on the Internet or at your local computer store. Remember, though -- don't click on unsolicited offers for anti-spyware protection because they themselves may be filled with malware. Only shop at trustworthy stores.

Finally -- an easy one to close out this month of techy resolutions: check the operating system that is running your computer. Whether it is Windows or Mac OS or something else -- make sure you have the most current operating system available for your device. Computer manufacturers regularly issue updates to keep up with the available technology and to fix security holes. You can often set this to update automatically as well.

If you need more detail on any of these items, go to FBI.gov and type in the keywords "On the Internet" (https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/on-the-internet.)

If you have been victimized by an online scam, be sure to report it to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Debt Elimination Scams - 12/26/17

Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against debt elimination scams.

Welcome to your day-after-Christmas-oh-my-gosh-how-much-did-I-just spend-hangover. The good news is -- you aren't alone. The bad news is that there is no easy way to get rid of that post-holiday debt... despite what all those folks on your social media feed may say.

So how does this kind of scam work? The bad guys target consumers with significant credit card debt and promise to negotiate on your behalf to reduce the debt or get rid of it all together. They often charge an up-front fee and then fail to do much if anything. And, remember when you thought they were going to help you and you gave them all your personal info -- including your social security number, bank account number and credit card details? Well, now you are also at risk for ID theft.

These scammers promote their alleged "services" on the Internet, via emails or social media posts. Sometimes they even give seminars. They often promote inaccurate information about supposedly secret laws such as the conspiracy theory that says credit card companies and banks cannot loan money legally. Sounds crazy but these bad actors can be very convincing. The variations on these types of scams are endless.

So how can you protect yourself?

* Do your homework on the service or counselor and shop around. Ask questions and get answers in writing. Check them out with the Better Business Bureau.
* Don't give anyone your bank account number or other financial information that could allow him to access your accounts.
* Don't send money to strangers, unsolicited contacts, or people you don't know face-to-face.
* Don't respond to unsolicited emails or click on unsolicited links to application forms or websites.
* Don't trust unsolicited social media posts from "friends" saying a service worked for them without confirming it from your friend directly. Many times those accounts are hacked or spoofed.
* Don't trust anything that seems like an easy way to eliminate debt. You can't eliminate an obligation to pay a debt simply by paying someone a fee.

If you have been victimized by this scam, you can file an online report at the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.